252 results match your criteria Journal of Biology [Journal]


The water flea Daphnia--a 'new' model system for ecology and evolution?

J Biol 2010 13;9(2):21. Epub 2010 Jan 13.

Queen Mary, University of London, School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, UK.

Daphnia pulex is the first crustacean to have its genome sequenced. Availability of the genome sequence will have implications for research in aquatic ecology and evolution in particular, as addressed by a series of papers published recently in BMC Evolutionary Biology and BMC Genomics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol212DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871515PMC
February 2011
6 Reads

Endothelial adherens junctions and the actin cytoskeleton: an 'infinity net'?

J Biol 2010 8;9(3):16. Epub 2010 Apr 8.

IFOM, FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology, via Adamello, 16-20139 Milan, Italy.

A recent paper in BMC Biology reports that actin stress fibers in adjacent cultured endothelial cells are linked through adherens junctions. This organization might provide a super-cellular network that could enable coordinated signaling and structural responses in endothelia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol232DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871513PMC
August 2010
3 Reads

Robust and specific inhibition of microRNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

J Biol 2010 1;9(3):20. Epub 2010 Apr 1.

Department of Molecular, Cellular and Development Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of numerous target genes. Yet, while hundreds of miRNAs have been identified, little is known about their functions. In a recent report published in Silence, Zheng and colleagues demonstrate a technique for robust and specific knockdown of miRNA expression in Caenorhabditis elegans using modified antisense oligonucleotides, which could be utilized as a powerful tool for the study of regulation and function of miRNAs in vivo. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol230DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871512PMC
August 2010
6 Reads

Genome of a songbird unveiled.

Authors:
Raphael Pinaud

J Biol 2010 1;9(3):19. Epub 2010 Apr 1.

Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, 117 Meliora Hall, River Campus, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA.

An international collaborative effort has recently uncovered the genome of the zebra finch, a songbird model that has provided unique insights into an array of biological phenomena. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol222DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871510PMC
August 2010
2 Reads

The mathematics of sexual attraction.

Authors:
José A Feijó

J Biol 2010 29;9(3):18. Epub 2010 Mar 29.

Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, P-2780-156 Oeiras, Portugal and Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, Depto, Biologia Vegetal, Campo Grande C2, P-1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal.

Pollen tubes follow attractants secreted by the ovules. In a recent paper in BMC Plant Biology, Stewman and colleagues have quantified the parameters of this attraction and used them to calibrate a mathematical model that reproduces the process and enables predictions on the nature of the female attractant and the mechanisms of the male response. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol233DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871514PMC
August 2010
3 Reads

Scale-eating cichlids: from hand(ed) to mouth.

Authors:
A Richard Palmer

J Biol 2010 24;9(2):11. Epub 2010 Feb 24.

Systematics and Evolution Group, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G2E9, Canada.

Two recent studies in BMC Biology and Evolution raise important questions about a textbook case of frequency-dependent selection in scale-eating cichlid fishes. They also suggest a fascinating new line of research testing the effects of handed behavior on morphological asymmetry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol218DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871516PMC
February 2011
2 Reads

Top dogs: wolf domestication and wealth.

J Biol 2010 24;9(2):10. Epub 2010 Feb 24.

Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, The Recanati-Kaplan Centre, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Tubney House, Abingdon Road, Tubney, Abingdon OX135QL, UK.

A phylogeographic analysis of gene sequences important in determining body size in dogs, recently published in BMC Biology, traces the appearance of small body size to the Neolithic Middle East. This finding strengthens the association of this event with the development of sedentary societies, and perhaps even has implications for the inception of human social inequality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol226DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871521PMC
February 2011
3 Reads

No better time to FRET: shedding light on host pathogen interactions.

J Biol 2010 18;9(2):12. Epub 2010 Feb 18.

Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology, University College London and Birkbeck, University of London, Gower Street, London WC1E6BT, UK.

Understanding the spatio-temporal subversion of host cell signaling by bacterial virulence factors is key to combating infectious diseases. Following a recent study by Buntru and co-workers published in BMC Biology, we review how fluorescence (Forster) resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been applied to studying host-pathogen interactions and consider the prospects for its future application. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol225DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871520PMC
February 2011
3 Reads

Making progress in genetic kin recognition among vertebrates.

J Biol 2010 17;9(2):13. Epub 2010 Feb 17.

Mammalian Behaviour and Evolution Group, School of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Leahurst Campus, Neston CH647TE, UK.

A recent study in BMC Evolutionary Biology has shown that genetically similar individual ring-tailed lemurs are also more similar in their scent composition, suggesting a possible mechanism of kin recognition. Theoretical and experimental studies reveal challenges ahead in achieving a true systems-level understanding of this process and its outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol221DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871517PMC
February 2011
4 Reads

Regeneration review reprise.

J Biol 2010 16;9(2):15. Epub 2010 Feb 16.

Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, NRB 360, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

There have been notable advances in the scientific understanding of regeneration within the past year alone, including two recently published in BMC Biology. Increasingly, progress in the regeneration field is being inspired by comparisons with stem cell biology and enabled by newly developed techniques that allow simultaneous examination of thousands of genes and proteins. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol224DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871519PMC
February 2011
3 Reads

Acoel and platyhelminth models for stem-cell research.

J Biol 2010 16;9(2):14. Epub 2010 Feb 16.

Biology Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA.

Acoel and platyhelminth worms are particularly attractive invertebrate models for stem-cell research because their bodies are continually renewed from large pools of somatic stem cells. Several recent studies, including one in BMC Developmental Biology, are beginning to reveal the cellular dynamics and molecular basis of stem-cell function in these animals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol223DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871518PMC
February 2011
4 Reads

Evolution underground: shedding light on the diversification of subterranean insects.

J Biol 2010 11;9(3):17. Epub 2010 Mar 11.

Department de Biologia, Universitat de les Illes Balears, 07122 Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

A recent study in BMC Evolutionary Biology has reconstructed the molecular phylogeny of a large Mediterranean cave-dwelling beetle clade, revealing an ancient origin and strong geographic structuring. It seems likely that diversification of this clade in the Oligocene was seeded by an ancestor already adapted to subterranean life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol227DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871511PMC
August 2010
3 Reads

The THO complex as a key mRNP biogenesis factor in development and cell differentiation.

J Biol 2010 28;9(1). Epub 2010 Jan 28.

Centro Andaluz de Biología Molecular y Medicina Regenerativa, Av. Américo Vespucio s/n, 41092 Sevilla, Spain.

The THO complex is a key component in the co-transcriptional formation of messenger ribonucleoparticles that are competent to be exported from the nucleus, yet its precise function is unknown. A recent study in BMC Biology on the role of the THOC5 subunit in cell physiology and mouse development provides new clues to the role of the THO complex in cell differentiation. Read More

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http://jbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/jbiol217
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol217DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871528PMC
August 2010
3 Reads

Bunched and Madm: a novel growth-regulatory complex?

Authors:
Kieran F Harvey

J Biol 2010 11;9(1). Epub 2010 Feb 11.

Cell Growth and Proliferation Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, 7 St Andrews Place, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002, Australia.

By combining Drosophila genetics and proteomics Gluderer et al. report in this issue of Journal of Biology the isolation of a novel growth-regulatory complex consisting of Bunched and Madm. Future study of this complex will address the precise mechanism of growth control, regulation of complex activity, the interface with other growth pathways and a potential role in human cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol219DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871529PMC
August 2010
2 Reads

Regulation of metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans longevity.

J Biol 2010 10;9(1). Epub 2010 Feb 10.

Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, 263-2185 East Mall, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T1Z4, Canada.

The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a favorite model for the study of aging. A wealth of genetic and genomic studies show that metabolic regulation is a hallmark of life-span modulation. A recent study in BMC Biology identifying metabolic signatures for longevity suggests that amino-acid pools may be important in longevity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol215DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871526PMC
August 2010
4 Reads

Reprogramming of the non-coding transcriptome during brain development.

J Biol 2010 5;9(1). Epub 2010 Feb 5.

Center for RNA Molecular Biology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.

A recent global analysis of gene expression during the differentiation of neuronal stem cells to neurons and oligodendrocytes indicates a complex pattern of changes in the expression of both protein-coding transcripts and long non-protein-coding RNAs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol197DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871522PMC
August 2010
2 Reads

Madm (Mlf1 adapter molecule) cooperates with Bunched A to promote growth in Drosophila.

J Biol 2010 11;9(1). Epub 2010 Feb 11.

Institute of Molecular Systems Biology, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 16, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland.

Background: The TSC-22 domain family (TSC22DF) consists of putative transcription factors harboring a DNA-binding TSC-box and an adjacent leucine zipper at their carboxyl termini. Both short and long TSC22DF isoforms are conserved from flies to humans. Whereas the short isoforms include the tumor suppressor TSC-22 (Transforming growth factor-beta1 stimulated clone-22), the long isoforms are largely uncharacterized. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol216DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871527PMC
August 2010
4 Reads

SnoPatrol: how many snoRNA genes are there?

J Biol 2010 25;9(1). Epub 2010 Jan 25.

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB101SA, UK.

Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are among the most evolutionarily ancient classes of small RNA. Two experimental screens published in BMC Genomics expand the eukaryotic snoRNA catalog, but many more snoRNAs remain to be found. Read More

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http://jbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/jbiol211
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol211DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871523PMC
August 2010
5 Reads

Sometimes one just isn't enough: do vertebrates contain an H2A.Z hyper-variant?

J Biol 2010 21;9(1). Epub 2010 Jan 21.

Department of Cell Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY 10461, USA.

How much functional specialization can one component histone confer on a single nucleosome? The histone variant H2A.Z seems to be an extreme example. Genome-wide distribution maps show non-random (and evolutionarily conserved) patterns, with localized enrichment or depletion giving a tantalizing suggestion of function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol214DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871525PMC
August 2010
2 Reads

Apical polarity in three-dimensional culture systems: where to now?

J Biol 2010 21;9(1). Epub 2010 Jan 21.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Division of Life Sciences, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.

Delineation of the mechanisms that establish and maintain the polarity of epithelial tissues is essential to understanding morphogenesis, tissue specificity and cancer. Three-dimensional culture assays provide a useful platform for dissecting these processes but, as discussed in a recent study in BMC Biology on the culture of mammary gland epithelial cells, multiple parameters that influence the model must be taken into account. Read More

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http://jbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/jbiol213
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol213DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871524PMC
August 2010
4 Reads

Fishing for the signals that pattern the face.

J Biol 2009 22;8(11):101. Epub 2009 Dec 22.

Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, 4462 Natural Sciences II, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-2300, USA.

Zebrafish are a powerful system for studying the early embryonic events that form the skull and face, as a model for human craniofacial birth defects such as cleft palate. Signaling pathways that pattern the pharyngeal arches (which contain skeletal precursors of the palate, as well as jaws and gills) are discussed in light of a recent paper in BMC Developmental Biology on requirements for Hedgehog signaling in craniofacial development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol205DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2804286PMC
September 2013
2 Reads

Chromatin 'programming' by sequence--is there more to the nucleosome code than %GC?

J Biol 2009 23;8(11):96. Epub 2009 Dec 23.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street No, 903, Worcester, MA 01605, USA.

The role of genomic sequence in directing the packaging of eukaryotic genomes into chromatin has been the subject of considerable recent debate. A new paper from Tillo and Hughes shows that the intrinsic thermodynamic preference of a given sequence in the yeast genome for the histone octamer can largely be captured with a simple model, and in fact is mostly explained by %GC. Thus, the rules for predicting nucleosome occupancy from genomic sequence are much less complicated than has been claimed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol207DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2804288PMC
March 2011
2 Reads

The transcriptome of human monocyte subsets begins to emerge.

J Biol 2009 23;8(11):99. Epub 2009 Dec 23.

Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3RE, UK.

Human monocytes can be divided into subsets according to their expression or lack of the cell-surface antigen CD16. In papers published recently in the Journal of Proteome Research and in BMC Genomics, two groups publish independent transcriptome analyses of CD16(+) and CD16(-) monocytes, with revealing results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol206DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2804287PMC
September 2013
3 Reads

Mapping the protistan 'rare biosphere'.

J Biol 2009 ;8(12):105

Department of Microbiology, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA.

The use of cultivation-independent approaches to map microbial diversity, including recent work published in BMC Biology, has now shown that protists, like bacteria/archaea, are much more diverse than had been realized. Uncovering eukaryotic diversity may now be limited not by access to samples or cost but rather by the availability of full-length reference sequence data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol201DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2804278PMC
April 2010
3 Reads

Scribble at the crossroads.

J Biol 2009 29;8(12):104. Epub 2009 Dec 29.

Institut Pasteur, Cell Polarity and Migration Group and CNRS URA 2582, 25 rue du Dr Roux, 75724 Paris cedex 15, France.

Although proteins involved in determining apical-basal cell polarity have been directly linked to tumorigenesis, their precise roles in this process remain unclear. A recent report in BMC Biology clarifies the signaling pathways that control cell polarity, proliferation and apoptosis downstream of the tumor suppressor and apical-basal polarity determinant Scribble. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol190DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2804276PMC
April 2010
7 Reads

The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes: an emerging model in prokaryotic transcriptomics.

J Biol 2009 30;8(12):107. Epub 2009 Dec 30.

Institut Pasteur, Unité des Interactions Bactéries Cellules, Paris F-75015, France.

A major challenge in bacterial pathogenesis is understanding the molecular basis of the switch from saprophytism to virulence. Following a recent whole-genome transcriptomic analysis using tiling arrays, an article published in BMC Genomics reports the first use of RNA-seq in Listeria monocytogenes in order to identify genes controlled by sigma B, a transcriptional regulator with a critical role in virulence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol202DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2804279PMC
April 2010
2 Reads

Forward genetics in Tribolium castaneum: opening new avenues of research in arthropod biology.

Authors:
Andrew D Peel

J Biol 2009 30;8(12):106. Epub 2009 Dec 30.

Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FoRTH), Nikolaou Plastira 100, GR-70013 Iraklio, Crete, Greece.

A recent paper in BMC Biology reports the first large-scale insertional mutagenesis screen in a non-drosophilid insect, the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. This screen marks the beginning of a non-biased, 'forward genetics' approach to the study of genetic mechanisms operating in Tribolium. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol208DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2804280PMC
April 2010
2 Reads

Promoter architecture and the evolvability of gene expression.

J Biol 2009 14;8(11):95. Epub 2009 Dec 14.

Department of Molecular Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, 76100, Israel.

Evolutionary changes in gene expression are a main driver of phenotypic evolution. In yeast, genes that have rapidly diverged in expression are associated with particular promoter features, including the presence of a TATA box, a nucleosome-covered promoter and unstable tracts of tandem repeats. Here, we discuss how these promoter properties may confer an inherent capacity for flexibility of expression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol204DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2804285PMC
March 2011
7 Reads

Coordinated gene expression by post-transcriptional regulons in African trypanosomes.

J Biol 2009 14;8(11):100. Epub 2009 Dec 14.

Centre de Recherche en Infectiologie and Département de Microbiologie-Infectiologie et Immunologie, Université Laval, Québec, G1V 4G2, Canada.

The regulation of gene expression in trypanosomes is unique. In the absence of transcriptional control at the level of initiation, a subset of Trypanosoma brucei genes form post-transcriptional regulons in which mRNAs are co-regulated in response to differentiation signals. See research articles http://www. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol203DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2804284PMC
March 2011
3 Reads

Adaptations of proteins to cellular and subcellular pH.

J Biol 2009 2;8(11):98. Epub 2009 Dec 2.

Department of Biophysics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.

Bioinformatics-based searches for correlations between subcellular localization and pI or charge distribution of proteins have failed to detect meaningful correlations. Recent work published in BMC Biology finds that a physicochemical metric of charge distribution correlates better with subcellular pH than does pI. See research article http://www. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol199DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2804283PMC
March 2011
4 Reads

TBP2 is a general transcription factor specialized for female germ cells.

J Biol 2009 30;8(11):97. Epub 2009 Nov 30.

Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.

The complexity of the core promoter transcription machinery has emerged as an additional level of transcription regulation that is used during vertebrate development. Recent studies, including one published in BMC Biology, provide mechanistic insights into how the TATA binding protein (TBP) and its vertebrate-specific paralog TBP2 (TRF3) switch function during the transition from the oocyte to the embryo. See research article http://www. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol196DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2804282PMC
March 2011
2 Reads

Life and death as a T lymphocyte: from immune protection to HIV pathogenesis.

J Biol 2009 ;8(10):91

Lymphocyte Biology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Dr MSC-1892, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Detailed analysis of T cell dynamics in humans is challenging and mouse models can be important tools for characterizing T cell dynamic processes. In a paper just published in Journal of Biology, Marques et al. suggest that a mouse model with its activated CD4(+) T cells are deleted has relevance for HIV infection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol198DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2790836PMC
February 2010
2 Reads

Generalized immune activation as a direct result of activated CD4+ T cell killing.

J Biol 2009 ;8(10):93

Division of Immunoregulation, MRC National Institute for Medical Research, The Ridgeway, London NW7 1AA, UK.

Background: In addition to progressive CD4(+) T cell immune deficiency, HIV infection is characterized by generalized immune activation, thought to arise from increased microbial exposure resulting from diminishing immunity.

Results: Here we report that, in a virus-free mouse model, conditional ablation of activated CD4(+) T cells, the targets of immunodeficiency viruses, accelerates their turnover and produces CD4(+) T cell immune deficiency. More importantly, activated CD4(+) T cell killing also results in generalized immune activation, which is attributable to regulatory CD4(+) T cell insufficiency and preventable by regulatory CD4(+) T cell reconstitution. Read More

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http://jbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/jbiol194
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol194DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2790834PMC
February 2010
5 Reads

The gene complement of the ancestral bilaterian - was Urbilateria a monster?

J Biol 2009 ;8(10):89

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and Comparative Genomics Centre, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia.

Expressed sequence tag analyses of the annelid Pomatoceros lamarckii, recently published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, are consistent with less extensive gene loss in the Lophotrochozoa than in the Ecdysozoa, but it would be premature to generalize about patterns of gene loss on the basis of the limited data available. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol192DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2790832PMC
February 2010
17 Reads

The nature of cell-cycle checkpoints: facts and fallacies.

J Biol 2009 ;8(10):88

Wadsworth Center, Albany, NY 12201-0509, USA.

The concept of checkpoint controls revolutionized our understanding of the cell cycle. Here we revisit the defining features of checkpoints and argue that failure to properly appreciate the concept is leading to misinterpretation of experimental results. We illustrate, using the mitotic checkpoint, problems that can arise from a failure to respect strict definitions and precise terminology. Read More

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http://jbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/jbiol195
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol195DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2790835PMC
February 2010
27 Reads

An expanded evolutionary role for flower symmetry genes.

J Biol 2009 ;8(10):90

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045, USA.

CYCLOIDEA (CYC)-like TCP genes are critical for flower developmental patterning. Exciting recent breakthroughs, including a study by Song et al. published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, demonstrate that CYC-like genes have also had an important role in the evolution of flower form. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol193DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2790833PMC
February 2010
5 Reads

Mechanisms of ubiquitin transfer by the anaphase-promoting complex.

J Biol 2009 ;8(10):92

Department of Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.

The anaphase-promoting complex (APC) is a ubiquitin-protein ligase required for the completion of mitosis in all eukaryotes. Recent mechanistic studies reveal how this remarkable enzyme combines specificity in substrate binding with flexibility in ubiquitin transfer, thereby allowing the modification of multiple lysines on the substrate as well as specific lysines on ubiquitin itself. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol184DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2790831PMC
February 2010
5 Reads

TEs or not TEs? That is the evolutionary question.

J Biol 2009 Oct 23;8(9):83. Epub 2009 Oct 23.

Department of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69987, Israel.

Transposable elements (TEs) have contributed a wide range of functional sequences to their host genomes. A recent paper in BMC Molecular Biology discusses the creation of new transcripts by transposable element insertion upstream of retrocopies and the involvement of such insertions in tissue-specific post-transcriptional regulation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol188DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2776909PMC
October 2009
3 Reads

Targeting TNF-alpha for cancer therapy.

J Biol 2009 Oct 23;8(9):85. Epub 2009 Oct 23.

Montefiore Medical Center, Medical Arts Pavilion, 3400 Bainbridge Avenue, MMC-MAP, Bronx, NY 10467, USA.

As the tumor vasculature is a key element of the tumor stroma, angiogenesis is the target of many cancer therapies. Recent work published in BMC Cell Biology describes a fusion protein that combines a peptide previously shown to home in on the gastric cancer vasculature with the anti-tumor cytokine TNF-alpha, and assesses its potential for gastric cancer therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol189DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2776910PMC
October 2009
5 Reads

Molecular machines or pleiomorphic ensembles: signaling complexes revisited.

J Biol 2009 Oct 16;8(9):81. Epub 2009 Oct 16.

Richard D Berlin Center for Cell Analysis and Modeling, University of Connecticut Health Center, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT 06030-3301, USA.

Signaling complexes typically consist of highly dynamic molecular ensembles that are challenging to study and to describe accurately. Conventional mechanical descriptions misrepresent this reality and can be actively counterproductive by misdirecting us away from investigating critical issues. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol185DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2776906PMC
October 2009
4 Reads

What are pharmacological chaperones and why are they interesting?

J Biol 2009 Oct 13;8(9):80. Epub 2009 Oct 13.

Departments of Biochemistry and Chemistry and the Rosenstiel Center, Brandeis University, 415 South Street, Waltham, MA 02454, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol186DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2776907PMC
October 2009
4 Reads

Decoding the multifaceted HIV-1 virus-host interactome.

J Biol 2009 Oct 13;8(9):84. Epub 2009 Oct 13.

Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-8070, USA.

Recently in BMC Medical Genomics, Tozeren and colleagues have uncovered virus-host interactions by searching for conserved peptide motifs in HIV and human proteins. Their computational model provides a novel perspective in the interpretation of high-throughput data on the HIV-host interactome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol183DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2776905PMC
October 2009
2 Reads

Adaptation by introgression.

J Biol 2009 Oct 13;8(9):82. Epub 2009 Oct 13.

Department of Genetics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA.

Both selective and random processes can affect the outcome of natural hybridization. A recent analysis in BMC Evolutionary Biology of natural hybridization between an introduced and a native salamander reveals the mosaic nature of introgression, which is probably caused by a combination of selection and demography. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol176DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2776903PMC
October 2009
2 Reads

The effects of lipids on channel function.

Authors:
Anthony G Lee

J Biol 2009 Oct 6;8(9):86. Epub 2009 Oct 6.

School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO16 7PX, UK.

Anionic lipids affect the function of many channels, including connexins, as shown in a recent report in BMC Biology. These effects might follow from direct binding of the anionic lipids to the channels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/jbiol178DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2776904PMC
October 2009
2 Reads