801 results match your criteria Journal for Nurses in Staff Development [Journal]


The impact of education and simulation on pediatric novice nurses' response and recognition to deteriorating.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Nov-Dec;28(6):E5-8

Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pennsylvania, USA.

Adverse patient events related to preventable errors while hospitalized resulted in need for interventions to improve outcomes. One identified error is the lack of symptom recognition during patient deterioration. Pediatric patients' symptoms during deterioration vary from their adult counterparts and often go unrecognized. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e3182732db5DOI Listing
May 2013
30 Reads

Measuring the impact of an educational program on nurses: teaching an evidence-based approach to oral mucositis.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Nov-Dec;28(6):E1-4

Department of Nursing Administration, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Pennsylvania 17033, USA.

Oral mucositis, a cancer therapy side effect, can negatively affect quality of life. This study evaluated the effect of an educational program on nurses' knowledge and perceived need to change oral mucositis management practice. This study revealed that nurses' knowledge and perceived need to change practice were positively affected by the educational program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e3182725a5fDOI Listing
May 2013
16 Reads

The tipping point.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Nov-Dec;28(6):300-1

The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e3182740056DOI Listing
May 2013
18 Reads

Arkansas Children's Hospital: a framework for education and professional development.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Nov-Dec;28(6):297-9

Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e318274003aDOI Listing
May 2013
8 Reads

Electronic classroom: supporting nursing education.

Authors:
Lorene Payne

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Nov-Dec;28(6):292-3

MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e318274b102DOI Listing
May 2013
6 Reads

A pediatric resource nurse program for nonpediatric nurses.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Nov-Dec;28(6):288-91

Mission Children's Hospital, Asheville, North Carolina 28801, USA.

Children receiving care in primarily adult areas, such as emergency or procedural departments, may receive care from nonpediatric nurses. A pediatric resource nurse program offered didactic and hands-on education in pediatric assessment and care. Participants significantly improved self-reported knowledge, skill, and comfort level. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e3182711c4fDOI Listing
May 2013
5 Reads

Online learning: an innovative solution to meeting the challenges of staff education.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Nov-Dec;28(6):285-7

Virtua Home Care, Mount Laurel, New Jersey, USA.

Scheduling traditional continuing education and required classes for homecare staff can be challenging, resulting in low attendance and compliance rates. Innovative, flexible, and accessible educational opportunities are needed to meet clinicians' educational needs. This article describes the affect of implementing online learning at one homecare agency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31827259deDOI Listing
May 2013
5 Reads

Assessing nurses' continuing education preferences in rural community and urban academic settings.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Nov-Dec;28(6):279-84

College of Nursing, University of Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0038, USA.

Continuing education programs that increase nursing knowledge and collaboration are needed across urban and rural settings. A survey was distributed to determine interest in nursing grand rounds and preferred educational modalities at two unaffiliated hospitals. Results revealed that nurses from the urban and rural hospitals were interested in nursing grand rounds as a recorded online offering, thus providing valuable information used to develop a nursing grand rounds program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e318272590cDOI Listing
May 2013
11 Reads

Designing a process for simulation-based annual nurse competency assessment.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Nov-Dec;28(6):274-8

Orlando Health, Florida 32806, USA.

The education council at Orlando Regional Medical Center identified a need to improve the annual nurse competency assessment. A revision process was implemented to improve the method and efficiency of assessing nurse competency. This process included evaluating population-specific competencies using simulation-based scenarios that were developed by a multidisciplinary team. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31827258f8DOI Listing
May 2013
6 Reads

Retention of new graduate nurses: the literature informs staff educators.

Authors:
Roxanne Moran

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Nov-Dec;28(6):270-3

Notre Dame of Maryland University, Baltimore, 21210, USA.

The authors examine the literature on resiliency and relate important concepts to the retention of new graduate nurses. Changes in the support of new graduates are proposed as a means to increase retention in the nursing profession. Developing resilient graduate nurses who can withstand the pressures of the workplace is at the center of retention efforts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e318272584aDOI Listing
May 2013
51 Reads

Use of high-fidelity simulation for staff education/development: a systematic review of the literature.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Nov-Dec;28(6):260-9; quiz E9-10

The Ohio State University, Newark, USA.

Currently, high-fidelity simulations (HFS) are widely used in nursing education and are being introduced into acute care to assist with orientation programs, continuing education, certification courses, and staff development. In a review of the literature, many articles were found that describe HFS and its advantages and how to use the technology. But, there are few research studies to support the use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31827259c7DOI Listing
May 2013
12 Reads

Engaging nurses in research utilization.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):E1-5

Wilmington Center for Rehabilitation, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware, USA.

Research skills education is needed for nurses at all levels: novice, intermediate, and advanced. Nurse educators can help novice nurse researchers develop skills such as performing literature searches and critiquing research articles, which are necessary to develop and update clinical practice guidelines and implement evidence-based practice. The purpose of this article is to describe an innovative approach to encourage nurses to perform literature searches and critique research articles as a means to eventually engage in evidence-based practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31826a008cDOI Listing
January 2013
8 Reads

Storytelling…A tool for education, leadership, and team building.

Authors:

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):255-6

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31826ad5f5DOI Listing
January 2013
19 Reads

Nursing professional development: stories, tips, and techniques.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):250-2

Ohio Northern University, Ada, Ohio, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31826a9ef9DOI Listing
January 2013
9 Reads

The transition from student to new registered nurse in professional practice.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):243-9

School of Nursing, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana, USA.

This qualitative study presents the transition experience of new registered nurses during the first year of professional practice. Four themes emerged: feelings of frustration and being overwhelmed, preceptors, fear, and the orientation process. The orientation process, quality, competent preceptors, and reducing lateral violence are key strategies to successfully retain new nurses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31826a009cDOI Listing
January 2013
5 Reads

The midlife learner.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):238-42

Bronson Methodist Hospital, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA.

The author reviews the literature regarding midlife adult learners to determine the best educational methods to positively affect retention. Developing hospital-based educational programs will meet the needs of the midlife learner and help retain nurses. Strategies reviewed include intergenerational mentoring, adapting to physiological age-related changes, linking new and prior learning, allowing time to acquire new skills, and deliberate planning for the future. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e318269fec7DOI Listing
January 2013
6 Reads

A mentoring model for evidence-based practice in a community hospital.

Authors:
Lois A Morgan

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):233-7

Methodist Hospital, Henderson, Kentucky, USA.

Significant emphasis has been placed on reducing barriers to implementing evidence-based practice and improving patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a mentor-led evidence-based practice quality improvement project would reduce professional nurses' perceptions of barriers to using best practice research findings in their practice to influence patient outcomes related to pressure ulcer prevalence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e318269fe0fDOI Listing
January 2013
6 Reads

Direct care nurses' knowledge in acute myocardial infarction treatment.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):229-32

Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware, USA.

An acronym, a button, a script card, and a lot of fun are all an educator needs to turn dreaded education into a great learning experience for nurses as well as the patients. A multidisciplinary team pilot tested a new learning approach on a cardiac step-down unit. The goal was to educate both nurses and patients about the American Heart Association's Get-With-the-Guidelines Program for Coronary Artery Disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31826a0c5eDOI Listing
January 2013
8 Reads

Designing a needs assessment survey for clinical nurse educators.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):225-8

Seton Family of Hospitals, Austin, Texas, USA.

Clinical nurse educators frequently have a wide range of job responsibilities. In the changing healthcare environment, the identification of education needs must be specific, measurable, and applicable to their assigned responsibilities. A literature search into academic and industry professional development helped the authors develop a needs assessment survey for clinical nurse educators. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31826a0c73DOI Listing
January 2013
4 Reads

Nursing department education needs assessment: implementation and outcome.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):222-4

Nursing Professional Development Department, Mary Greeley Medical Center, Ames, Iowa, USA.

The Education Council was interested in identifying learning needs. Previous needs assessments identified topics but did not assist in prioritizing education. A survey was developed with topics selected from quality and process initiatives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e318269fdfeDOI Listing
January 2013
32 Reads

A group orientation model for new graduate nurses.

Authors:
Julie Woodworth

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):219-21

Niagara County Community College, Sanborn, New York, USA.

A local hospital implemented a unique, fiscally resourceful orientation strategy constructed by a nursing faculty professor designed to accommodate the needs of the graduate nurse (GN) in making the transition from academia to practice. The nurse faculty provided a reliable "hands-on" small group orientation to four new graduates simultaneously. This group orientation strategy provided these GNs with a preceptor, mentor, and role model to assist in their transition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e318269fc8dDOI Listing
January 2013
10 Reads

Overcoming nursing faculty shortages and bridging the gap between education and practice.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):216-8

Cone Health, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA.

The nurse faculty shortage and new requirements for teaching have led to thousands of qualified applicants being turned away from prelicensure nursing programs. In response, the Chief Nursing Officer in one organization created nursing faculty consultant positions to collaborate with faculty, teach prelicensure students in clinical practice, ensure the consistency of care by students in the hospital system, and enhance the relationships between schools of nursing and the organization. In the past 4 years the nursing faculty consultants have been employed they have taught over 500 nursing students from six different nursing programs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e318269fc6cDOI Listing
January 2013
34 Reads

The meaning of being a primary nurse preceptor for newly graduated nurses.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Sep-Oct;28(5):208-13; quiz 214-5

Renown Regional Medical Center, Reno, Nevada, USA.

Understanding the meaning of being the primary preceptor for newly graduated nurses during their transition into clinical practice has implications for hospital administrators, nurse leaders, and staff development nurses. This qualitative study explores the meaning of this experience through interviews with six preceptors. Findings suggest that nursing leaders need to clarify other roles that preceptors are expected to fill while precepting, implement a systematic approach to match preceptors with preceptees, and provide support for development of the preceptor role and daily preceptor practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e318269fde8DOI Listing
January 2013
15 Reads

Enhancing the effectiveness of nurse preceptors.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Jul;28(4):E1-7; quiz E8-9

School of Nursing, Graceland University, 1401 W. Truman Road, Independence, MO 64050, USA.

More than half of new graduate nurses start their careers in the hospital setting. Once there, they need an orientation that will help them make the transition from student to novice professional. It is just as important for experienced nurses transferring into another unit or hospital to be inculturated into the new work environment. Read More

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http://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:land
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825dfb90DOI Listing
July 2012
49 Reads

Translating research into practice.

Authors:
Mary Krugman

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Jul;28(4):205-6

Professional Resources, University of Colorado Hospital, Denver, Colorado, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825f8f15DOI Listing
July 2012
10 Reads

The power of "thank you": appreciation as a management strategy.

Authors:
Joyce A Johnson

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Jul;28(4):203-4

Kaiser Permanente, Pasadena, California, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825f8f3eDOI Listing
July 2012
8 Reads

Nursing professional development: stories, tips, and techniques.

Authors:
Michele L Deck

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Jul;28(4):198-200

GAMES/Tool Thyme for Trainers, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825f8eb9DOI Listing
July 2012
21 Reads

Observed and self-perceived teamwork in a rapid response team.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Jul;28(4):191-7

Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose, California 95128, USA.

Teamwork and communication between healthcare workers are vital for patient safety in the high-risk environment of health care. The purpose of this descriptive study was to measure the teamwork among members of the rapid response team (RRT) to design teamwork communication training for team members. Data were collected via live observation of RRT events and from RRT team member ratings of teamwork during events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825e63d7DOI Listing
July 2012
10 Reads

Blended versus lecture learning: outcomes for staff development.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Jul;28(4):186-90

Nursing Practice, Education and Research, Mission Hospital, Asheville, North Carolina 28801, USA.

Critical care pharmacology education is crucial to safe patient care for nurses orienting to specialized areas. Although traditionally taught as a classroom lecture, it is important to consider effectiveness of alternative methods for education. This study provided experimentally derived evidence regarding effectiveness of blended versus traditional lecture for critical care pharmacology education. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825dfb71DOI Listing
July 2012
8 Reads

Nurses' barriers to learning: an integrative review.

Authors:
Marion C Santos

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Jul;28(4):182-5

Clinical Resource and Simulation Center, School of Nursing, Science and Health Professions, Regis College, Weston, Massachusetts 02493, USA.

This integrative review of the literature describes nurses' barriers to learning. Five major themes emerged: time constraints, financial constraints, workplace culture, access/relevance, and competency in accessing electronic evidence-based practice literature. The nurse educator must address these barriers for the staff to achieve learning and competency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825dfb60DOI Listing
July 2012
5 Reads

Mentoring for evidence-based practice: a collaborative approach.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Jul;28(4):177-81

Saginaw Valley State University, 7400 Bay Road, University Center, Michigan 58710, USA.

This article describes a collaborative project between clinical staff development professionals and a university associate professor of nursing to increase implementation of evidence-based practice in a clinical setting. The faculty member served as a mentor, helping nurses at the point of care who often lack the knowledge and skills to integrate evidence into practice. Outcomes of this project of benefit to staff development included education of the nurses on evidence-based practice, integration of evidence into policies, and development of a sustainable process to increase evidence-based practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825dfb2aDOI Listing
July 2012
18 Reads

Educating nurses about veno-thrombolytic events (VTE).

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Jul;28(4):173-6

Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA.

This study determined the effect of a computer-based educational program in preparing nurses to complete an assessment for veno-thrombotic risk on all patients admitted to a community hospital. The educational program included information on appropriate prophylaxis for patients at risk for veno-thrombolytic events (VTEs). Nurses were encouraged to work with physicians and pharmacists to obtain the appropriate VTE prophylaxis for all patients based on risk. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825dfb17DOI Listing
July 2012
9 Reads

Generational differences and learning style preferences in nurses from a large metropolitan medical center.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Jul;28(4):166-72

Bon Secours Charity Health System, New York, USA.

Nursing educators face the challenge of presenting educational programs to meet the learning needs of four diverse generational groups of nurses. This cross-sectional survey examined if there is a relationship between staff nurses' generation and their learning styles. Results show that a combination of years in practice, time lapsed since last educational program ended, current school enrollment, degree earned, and generation influences preferred learning style. Read More

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http://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:land
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825dfae5DOI Listing
July 2012
15 Reads

Overcoming barriers to research utilization and evidence-based practice among staff nurses.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Jul;28(4):163-5

Hospice of the Bluegrass, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA.

Several barriers exist to research utilization among staff nurses. Two barriers that appear in the research are lack of knowledge about research utilization and perceived lack of organizational support. The goal of this article is to present recommendations to overcome these barriers so that staff development educators can promote research utilization and evidence-based practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825dfaffDOI Listing
July 2012
5 Reads

Evaluating the impact of a nurse residency program for newly graduated registered nurses.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Jul;28(4):156-62

Memorial Medical Center, Springfield, Illinois 62781, USA.

Nurse residency programs are designed to support graduate nurses as they assume the professional role. Evaluation of these programs has been inconsistent. The purpose of this descriptive research study was to evaluate a year-long nurse residency program using a nonexperimental, repeated measures design with qualitative questions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825dfb4cDOI Listing
July 2012
103 Reads

Preceptors and new graduate nurse orientees: implications of psychological type compatibility.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 May-Jun;28(3):E9-E15

Saint Xavier University, 3700 W 103rd Street, Chicago, IL 60655, USA.

The relationship between preceptor and new graduate nurse (NGN) orientee can be a critical factor in NGNs' satisfaction with choice of profession and place of employment. A research study was conducted with NGN orientees (n = 218) and preceptors (n = 159) to investigate characteristics of psychological type as determined by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Preliminary descriptive data regarding participants' Myers-Briggs Type Indicator characteristics is presented, and suggestions are offered for working with orientees during orientation in both classroom sessions and clinical units. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825515ecDOI Listing
September 2012
13 Reads

Assessment and planning for a dedicated education unit.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 May-Jun;28(3):E1-6; quiz E7-8

St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618, USA.

This pilot project describes the use of the Revised Professional Practice Environment scale to identify inpatient acute care units suitable for implementation of dedicated education units. Staff development professionals may use the suggested model to assess and plan phases of a dedicated education unit. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825515daDOI Listing
September 2012
5 Reads

Promoting your very best self.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 May-Jun;28(3):152-3

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https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00124645-201205000-000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e3182556c52DOI Listing
September 2012
10 Reads

Nursing professional development: stories, tips, and techniques.

Authors:
Michele L Deck

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 May-Jun;28(3):143-9

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e3182553665DOI Listing
September 2012
13 Reads

Research priorities for nursing professional development: a modified e-Delphi study.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 May-Jun;28(3):137-42

Western Governors University, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

In 2010, the National Nursing Staff Development Organization Research Committee identified the need to delineate research priorities for nursing professional development (NPD). A Delphi study with 13 experts in NPD resulted in the identification of 24 priorities for the next 5 years. These priorities provide the future direction for NPD research and funding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e3182551543DOI Listing
September 2012
8 Reads

Assessing confidence in triage decision making: evaluation of an inventory in a sample of navy and civilian nurses.

Authors:
Anita J Smith

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 May-Jun;28(3):132-6

College of Nursing, University of South Alabama, S721 USA Drive N. Mobile, AL 36688, USA.

Triage decision making and prioritizing nursing care are essential nursing skills in all clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Triage Decision Making Inventory in a sample of Navy and civilian nurses with diverse clinical specialties and years of clinical experience. Establishing reliability and validity allows staff development educators to evaluate training strategies that promote confidence in decision making among nurses of all specialty practices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e3182551531DOI Listing
September 2012
5 Reads

A student evaluation workshop with rural nursing preceptors.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 May-Jun;28(3):125-31

University of Alberta, Level 3, Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 11405 87 Avenue, Edmonton Alberta, Canada T6G 1C9.

Increasingly, clinicians and faculty members are motivated to provide students quality preceptorship placements in rural areas, particularly in light of the potential for recruitment of new graduates to underserved areas. Invariably, student performance evaluation is an onerous task for many preceptors and one in which they often feel ill-prepared. Rural preceptors may face additional challenges given the lesser availability of educational resources and professional development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e318255151cDOI Listing
September 2012
6 Reads

Improving code blue response through the use of simulation.

Authors:
Kelley F Huseman

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 May-Jun;28(3):120-4

Ephrata Community Hospital, 169 Martin Avenue, Ephrata, PA 17522, USA.

In this research project, the response times to chest compressions, first defibrillation, and first dose of epinephrine in cardiac arrest were measured over a 3-month period through retrospective chart reviews. All nursing staff then participated in random, unannounced mock code blue drills using a high-fidelity patient simulator. After 3 months of code blue drills, the variables were again measured in patient code blue situations and compared with the response times before training. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e3182551506DOI Listing
September 2012
27 Reads

Predictors of new graduate nurses' organizational commitment during a nurse residency program.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 May-Jun;28(3):108-19

Marquette University, 530 N. 16th Street, Clark Hall, Milwaukee, WI 53233, USA.

Retaining newly graduated nurses is critical for organizations because of the significant cost of turnover. Since commitment to an organization is associated with decreased turnover intent, understanding factors that influence new graduates' organizational commitment is important. In a sample of nurse residency program participants, predictors of organizational commitment over time were explored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825515c4DOI Listing
September 2012
6 Reads

Succeeding in the first year of practice: heed the wisdom of novice nurses.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 May-Jun;28(3):103-7

University of Massachusetts Amherst, 122 Skinner Hall, 651 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01054, USA.

The transition from student to nurse has been described as traumatic, confusing, and shocking. The difficulties encountered by the graduates have led to the premature termination of their first position, and sometimes they leave nursing altogether. To coach new nurses in preparation for their first year of practice using an appreciative inquiry framework, this study focused on the new graduates' perspective of the processes that enabled them to successfully integrate into their new role. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825514eeDOI Listing
September 2012
7 Reads

Orientation without walls: opening an acute care hospital.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 May-Jun;28(3):99-102

Seton Healthcare Family, Austin, Texas, USA.

Providing holistic orientation for all hospital personnel of a newly constructed acute care facility without patient presence proved challenging and rewarding to staff development educators. Early planning, multidisciplinary involvement of key stakeholders for hospital-wide and nursing orientation, and on-boarding of unit nursing educators shortly after unit nursing managers promoted success. Using an interdisciplinary approach to address hospital policies, procedures, and education ensured a quality healthcare facility in the community. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825514d2DOI Listing
September 2012
23 Reads

The development of an educational intervention to address workplace bullying: a pilot study.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 May-Jun;28(3):94-8

Division of Nursing Quality and Translational Research, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

A growing body of research on workplace bullying which addresses the detrimental consequences of bullying in nursing has emerged. This quasi-experimental pilot study was aimed at examining the effect of an educational program provided to nursing staff on workplace bullying. The development of an educational program and use of a registered nurse educator in a group setting is an effective method for addressing workplace bullying. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31825514bbDOI Listing
September 2012
7 Reads

What have you done for yourself lately?

Authors:
Belinda E Puetz

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 May-Jun;28(3):93

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e3182556bc9DOI Listing
September 2012
11 Reads

Evaluation of basic arrhythmia knowledge retention and clinical application by registered nurses.

J Nurses Staff Dev 2012 Mar-Apr;28(2):E5-9

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

The purpose of this descriptive study was to evaluate knowledge retention over time and clinical application of basic arrhythmia knowledge following exposure to an orientation program. Data showed significant differences in knowledge retention at 4 weeks and clinical application in rhythm identification using simulation at 3 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NND.0b013e31824b41e1DOI Listing
July 2012
6 Reads