511,774 results match your criteria Joint Commission journal on quality and patient safety / Joint Commission Resources[Journal]


Integration of GWAS and brain eQTL identifies FLOT1 as a risk gene for major depressive disorder.

Neuropsychopharmacology 2019 Feb 16. Epub 2019 Feb 16.

Key Laboratory of Animal Models and Human Disease Mechanisms of the Chinese Academy of Sciences & Yunnan Province, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 650223, Kunming, Yunnan, China.

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the most prevalent mental disorder that affects more than 200 million people worldwide. Recent large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple risk variants that show robust association with MDD. Nevertheless, how the identified risk variants confer risk of MDD remains largely unknown. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41386-019-0345-4DOI Listing
February 2019

Development of a novel frameless skull-mounted ball-joint guide array for use in image-guided neurosurgery.

J Neurosurg 2019 Feb 15:1-10. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

OBJECTIVESuccessful convection-enhanced delivery of therapeutic agents to subcortical brain structures requires accurate cannula placement. Stereotactic guiding devices have been developed to accurately target brain nuclei. However, technologies remain limited by a lack of MRI compatibility, or by devices' size, making them suboptimal for direct gene delivery to brain parenchyma. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2018.10.JNS182169DOI Listing
February 2019

The occipitoatlantal capsular ligaments are the primary stabilizers of the occipitoatlantal joint in the craniocervical junction: a finite element analysis.

J Neurosurg Spine 2019 Feb 15:1-9. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

2Department of Neurosurgery, Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, University of Utah, Primary Children's Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah.

OBJECTIVEThere is contradictory evidence regarding the relative contribution of the key stabilizing ligaments of the occipitoatlantal (OA) joint. Cadaveric studies are limited by the nature and the number of injury scenarios that can be tested to identify OA stabilizing ligaments. Finite element (FE) analysis can overcome these limitations and provide valuable data in this area. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2018.10.SPINE181102DOI Listing
February 2019

Long non-coding RNA activated by transforming growth factor beta alleviates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory injury via regulating microRNA-223 in ATDC5 cells.

Int Immunopharmacol 2019 Feb 13;69:313-320. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Department of Orthopaedics, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130033, Jilin, China. Electronic address:

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a conversant joint disease, which seriously threatens the health of the elderly, and even leads to disability. Long non-coding RNA-activated by transforming growth factor beta (lncRNA-ATB) has been reported in diverse cancers. However, the functions of lncRNA-ATB in OA remain uninvestigated. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2019.01.056DOI Listing
February 2019

Differences between flexion and extension synergy-driven coupling at the elbow, wrist, and fingers of individuals with chronic hemiparetic stroke.

Clin Neurophysiol 2019 Jan 31;130(4):454-468. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address:

Objective: The flexion and extension synergies were quantified at the paretic elbow, forearm, wrist, and finger joints within the same group of participants for the first time. Differences in synergy expression at each of the four joints were examined, as were the ways these differences varied across the joints.

Methods: Twelve post-stroke individuals with chronic moderate-to-severe hemiparesis and six age-matched controls participated. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2019.01.010DOI Listing
January 2019

Prospective Clinical Trial Comparing Trapezial Denervation With Trapeziectomy for the Surgical Treatment of Arthritis at the Base of the Thumb.

J Surg Res 2019 Feb 13;238:144-151. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

The Pulvertaft Hand Surgery Centre, Royal Derby Hospital, Derby, United Kingdom.

Background: Trapeziectomy is considered to be the "gold standard" procedure for first carpometacarpal joint (first CMCJ) osteoarthritis. First CMCJ denervation offers the potential benefit of a shorter procedure with bone and joint preservation and swift postoperative rehabilitation. This trial aimed to compare functional outcomes, patient satisfaction, quality of life, and cost effectiveness following these treatments. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2019.01.011DOI Listing
February 2019

Multivariate copula temporal modeling of intersection crash consequence metrics: A joint estimation of injury severity, crash type, vehicle damage and driver error.

Accid Anal Prev 2019 Feb 13;125:188-197. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Connecticut Transportation Safety Research Center, Connecticut Transportation Institute, University of Connecticut, United States. Electronic address:

This study employs a copula-based multivariate temporal ordered probit model to simultaneously estimate the four common intersection crash consequence metrics - driver error, crash type, vehicle damage and injury severity - by accounting for potential correlations due to common observed and unobserved factors, while also accommodating the temporal instability of model estimates over time. To this end, a comprehensive literature review of relevant studies was conducted; four different copula model specifications including Frank, Clayton, Joe and Gumbel were estimated to identify the dominant factors contributing to each crash consequence indicator; the temporal effects on model estimates were investigated; the elasticity effects of the independent variables with regard to all four crash consequence indicators were measured to express the magnitude of the effects of an independent variable on the probability change for each level of four indicators; and specific countermeasures were recommended for each of the contributing factors to improve the intersection safety. The model goodness-of-fit illustrates that the Joe copula model with the parameterized copula parameters outperforms the other models, which verifies that the injury severity, crash type, vehicle damage and driver error are significantly correlated due to common observed and unobserved factors and, accounting for their correlations, can lead to more accurate model estimation results. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2019.01.036DOI Listing
February 2019

MSC exosomes alleviate temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis by attenuating inflammation and restoring matrix homeostasis.

Biomaterials 2019 Feb 8;200:35-47. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Faculty of Dentistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore; Tissue Engineering Program, Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore. Electronic address:

The efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapies is increasingly attributed to paracrine secretion, particularly exosomes. In this study, we investigated the role of MSC exosomes in the regulation of inflammatory response, nociceptive behaviour, and condylar cartilage and subchondral bone healing in an immunocompetent rat model of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). We observed that exosome-mediated repair of osteoarthritic TMJs was characterized by early suppression of pain and degeneration with reduced inflammation, followed by sustained proliferation and gradual improvements in matrix expression and subchondral bone architecture, leading to overall joint restoration and regeneration. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2019.02.006DOI Listing
February 2019

One-step preparation of gold nanovectors using folate modified polyethylenimine and their use in target-specific gene transfection.

Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces 2019 Feb 6;177:306-312. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

State and Local Joint Engineering Laboratory for Novel Functional Polymeric Materials, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123, PR China.

Gene transfection, as an effective treatment for inherited and acquired life threatening diseases caused by genetic deficiencies and abnormalities, has evolved as a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer and other intractable diseases. Non-target-specific vectors will affect normal cells as well as pathogenic cells, resulting in a relative decrease in transfection efficiency and unnecessary cytotoxicity. In the present work, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with folate (FA)-modified polyethylenimine (PEI-FA) were prepared by a single step method (without additional reducing agent) for targeted gene transfection in tumor cells. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2019.02.011DOI Listing
February 2019

Outcomes of Long-term Interval Rescreening with Low-Dose CT for Lung Cancer in Different Risk Cohorts.

J Thorac Oncol 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Department of Cardiothoracic Imaging, Toronto Joint Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

Hypothesis: We hypothesize that the incidence of screen-detected lung cancer (LC), in participants with previously negative scans, will be highest in the cohort with the highest baseline risk score.

Methods: Individuals with negative baseline screening results from the Princess Margaret International Early Lung Cancer Action Program prior to 2009 underwent low-dose CT rescreening from 2015 to 2018. Individuals were contacted in order of descending risk, as determined by the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial's PLCO 6-year LC risk-prediction model, and then categorized into three risk cohorts according to their baseline risks. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtho.2019.01.031DOI Listing
February 2019

Amelioration of adjuvant induced arthritis in Sprague Dawley rats through modulation of inflammatory mediators by Ribes alpestre Decne.

J Ethnopharmacol 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Prince Abdullah Ben Khaled Celiac Disease Research Chair, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Ethnopharmacological Relevance: Ribes alpestre Decne has been commonly used in the treatment of joint complaints.

Aim Of Study: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the antiarthritic potential of ethanolic extract and fractions of Ribes alpestre and to explore its probable mechanism of action.

Material And Methods: Complete Freunds adjuvant induced arthritis in Sprague Dawley rats was used to assess antiarthritic activity of aqueous ethanol extract, butanol and aqueous fractions at 200mg/kg oral dose for 28 days. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2019.02.025DOI Listing
February 2019

Do theta oscillations explain the somatosensory change detection mechanism?

Biol Psychol 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Intelligent Robotics Institute, School of Mechatronical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, China; Key Laboratory of Biomimetic Robots and Systems, Ministry of Education, Beijing, China.

Recent research has indicated that the mismatch negativity (MMN) is elicited in response to a discernible small change of a somatosensory stimulus applied on the hand. However, the neural mechanism for detecting small change of somatosensory stimulus remains unknown. In the present study, we developed a novel pressure stimulation device using air jet applied on the index finger pad, and determined the just noticeable differences (JNDs) of pressure discrimination for each subject. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.02.001DOI Listing
February 2019

Evaluating the properties of a frailty index and its association with mortality risk among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

Arthritis Rheumatol 2019 Feb 16. Epub 2019 Feb 16.

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine and Department of Pathology, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Center and Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Objective: To evaluate the properties of a frailty index (FI), constructed using data from the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) inception cohort, as a novel health measure in SLE.

Methods: For this secondary analysis, the baseline visit was defined as the first study visit at which both organ damage (SLICC/ACR Damage Index [SDI]) and health-related quality of life (Short-Form 36 [SF-36]) were assessed. The SLICC-FI was constructed using baseline data. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/art.40859
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.40859DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Development and validation of an F-FDG PET/CT-based tool for the evaluation of joint counts and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Arthritis Rheumatol 2019 Feb 16. Epub 2019 Feb 16.

Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Korea.

Objectives: Clinical joint count assessment is important for detecting synovitis but its reliability is controversial. This study assessed the correlation of positron emission tomography (PET)-derived parameters in 68 joints with disease activity and compared the reliability of joint counts between PET/computed tomography (CT) and clinical assessment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Methods: We enrolled 91 patients with active RA who underwent fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and disease activity evaluation at the same time. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.40860DOI Listing
February 2019

New advances in MRI diagnosis of degenerative osteoarthropathy of the peripheral joints.

Radiol Med 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Via Vetoio 1, 67100, L'Aquila, Italy.

Degenerative osteoarthropathy is one of the leading causes of the pain and disability from musculoskeletal disease in the adult population. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows optimal visualization of all tissues involved in degenerative osteoarthritis disease process, mainly the articular cartilage. In addition to qualitative and semiquantitative morphologic assessment, several MRI-based advanced techniques have been developed to allow characterization and quantification of the biochemical cartilage composition. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11547-019-01003-1DOI Listing
February 2019

Arthroscopic anterior shoulder stabilisation in overhead sport athletes: 5-year follow-up.

Ir J Med Sci 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Trauma & Orthopaedic Surgery, Galway University Hospitals, Galway, Ireland.

Introduction: Shoulder instability following traumatic glenohumeral dislocation is a common injury sustained by athletes particularly in contact and collision sports. Overhead contact sports such as gaelic football and hurling pose a unique hazard to the glenohumeral joint, increasing the risk of dislocation.

Aims: To assess return to sport, level of play, recurrence and functional outcomes in gaelic football and hurling athletes in comparison with players of other sports. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11845-019-01986-wDOI Listing
February 2019

The joint impact of smoking plus alcohol drinking on treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Beijing Chest Hospital, Capital Medical University, Machang Road, No. 97, Beijing, 101149, China.

Tuberculosis, smoking, and alcohol drinking are major public health and social issues worldwide. We investigated the joint effect of smoking plus alcohol drinking on TB treatment. Retrospective study was conducted among TB patients in 49 units from eight provinces in China. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10096-019-03489-zDOI Listing
February 2019

Binding identity and orientation in object recognition.

Atten Percept Psychophys 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

School of Psychology, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

We tested whether an object's orientation is inherently bound to its identity in a holistic view-based representation at the early stages of visual identification, or whether identity and orientation are represented separately. Observers saw brief and masked stimulus sequences containing two rotated objects. They had to detect if a previously cued object was present in the sequence and report its orientation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13414-019-01677-9DOI Listing
February 2019

Can feline (Felis catus) flat and long bone morphometry predict sex or skull shape?

Anat Sci Int 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Animal Bone and Joint Research Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Biosciences and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 50100, Thailand.

This study demonstrates sexual dimorphism in feline bones based on morphometric analysis of dried flat bones (scapula and os coxa) and long bones (humerus, radius, ulna, femur, tibia, and fibula) of 92 felines (50 male, 42 female). A total of 58 parameters (flat bones: scapula = 4 and os coxa = 7; long bones: humerus = 8, radius = 9, ulna = 10, femur = 9, tibia = 7, and fibula = 4) were measured using a digital vernier caliper. Twenty-three parameters were found to be significantly different between cats of different sexes and skull shapes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12565-019-00480-8DOI Listing
February 2019

Fluorometric determination of lipopolysaccharides via changes of the graphene oxide-enhanced fluorescence polarization caused by truncated aptamers.

Mikrochim Acta 2019 Feb 15;186(3):173. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, 214122, China.

A broad-spectrum ssDNA aptamer containing 80 nucleotides (LA80) and capable of binding to four different sources of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) was truncated. Two strategies are used to produce truncated aptamers of different length. The results show that LA27, a 27-nt aptamer, retained broad-spectrum capability and has a higher affinity (K = 46. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00604-019-3261-8DOI Listing
February 2019

A process account of the uncontrolled manifold structure of joint space variance in pointing movements.

Biol Cybern 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Institute for Neural Computation, Ruhr-University, Bochum, Germany.

In many situations, the human movement system has more degrees of freedom than needed to achieve a given movement task. Martin et al. (Neural Comput 21(5):1371-1414, 2009) accounted for signatures of such redundancy like self-motion and motor equivalence in a process model in which a neural oscillator generated timed end-effector virtual trajectories that a neural dynamics transformed into joint virtual trajectories while decoupling task-relevant and task-irrelevant combinations of joint angles. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00422-019-00794-wDOI Listing
February 2019

Complete protein assignment from sets of spectra recorded overnight.

J Biomol NMR 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, 40530, Gothenburg, Sweden.

A flexible and scalable approach for protein NMR is introduced that builds on rapid data collection via projection spectroscopy and analysis of the spectral input data via joint decomposition. Input data may originate from various types of spectra, depending on the ultimate goal: these may result from experiments based on triple-resonance pulse sequences, or on TOCSY or NOESY sequences, or mixtures thereof. Flexible refers to the free choice of spectra for the joint decompositions depending on the purpose: assignments, structure, dynamics, interactions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10858-019-00226-8DOI Listing
February 2019

An intact subscapularis tendon and compensatory teres minor hypertrophy yield lower failure rates for non-operative treatment of irreparable, massive rotator cuff tears.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Severance Hospital, Arthroscopy and Joint Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, CPO Box 8044, Seoul, 03722, Republic of Korea.

Purpose: To investigate whether subscapularis integrity and compensatory teres, minor hypertrophy is associated with maintaining relatively good function and tolerable pain levels during non-operative treatment.

Methods: This study included 108 patients with irreparable, massive rotator cuff tears involving at least two tendons and stage III or IV muscle hypotrophy and fatty infiltration on oblique sagittal magnetic resonance imaging, in which even a partial repair does not seem feasible. All supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles were grade IV; if the subscapularis was involved, only stage III or IV was included. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-019-05403-8DOI Listing
February 2019

[Biomechanical modeling and the relevance for total hip arthroplasty].

Orthopade 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Klinik für Orthopädie, Universitätsklinikum Aachen, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074, Aachen, Deutschland.

Background: Providing the hip with an endoprosthesis is one of the most common orthopedic interventions in Germany. The long-term success of such a procedure depends on the consideration of the loads due to muscle and joint forces in the planning and operative care. Patient-specific information of forces acting in vivo is not available to the surgeon in clinical routine today. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00132-019-03695-9DOI Listing
February 2019

The peroneus longus muscle and tendon: a review of its anatomy and pathology.

Skeletal Radiol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego Medical Center, 408 Dickinson Street, San Diego, 92103, CA, USA.

This article will review the anatomy and common pathologies affecting the peroneus longus muscle and tendon. The anatomy of the peroneus longus is complex and its long course can result in symptomatology referable to the lower leg, ankle, hindfoot, and plantar foot. Proximally, the peroneus longus muscle lies within the lateral compartment of the lower leg with its distal myotendinous junction arising just above the level of the ankle. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-019-3168-9DOI Listing
February 2019

CRISPR/Cas9-mediated PINK1 deletion leads to neurodegeneration in rhesus monkeys.

Cell Res 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Guangdong-Hongkong-Macau Institute of CNS Regeneration, Ministry of Education CNS Regeneration Collaborative Joint Laboratory, Jinan University, 510632, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41422-019-0142-yDOI Listing
February 2019

Recessive mutations in muscle-specific isoforms of FXR1 cause congenital multi-minicore myopathy.

Nat Commun 2019 Feb 15;10(1):797. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas "Alberto Sols", CSIC-UAM, 28029, Madrid, Spain.

FXR1 is an alternatively spliced gene that encodes RNA binding proteins (FXR1P) involved in muscle development. In contrast to other tissues, cardiac and skeletal muscle express two FXR1P isoforms that incorporate an additional exon-15. We report that recessive mutations in this particular exon of FXR1 cause congenital multi-minicore myopathy in humans and mice. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-08548-9DOI Listing
February 2019

Parameter estimation in models of biological oscillators: an automated regularised estimation approach.

BMC Bioinformatics 2019 Feb 15;20(1):82. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

(Bio)Process Engineering Group, IIM-CSIC, Eduardo Cabello 6, Vigo, 36208, Spain.

Background: Dynamic modelling is a core element in the systems biology approach to understanding complex biosystems. Here, we consider the problem of parameter estimation in models of biological oscillators described by deterministic nonlinear differential equations. These problems can be extremely challenging due to several common pitfalls: (i) a lack of prior knowledge about parameters (i. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12859-019-2630-yDOI Listing
February 2019

Isolation and functional validation of the CmLOX08 promoter associated with signalling molecule and abiotic stress responses in oriental melon, Cucumis melo var. makuwa Makino.

BMC Plant Biol 2019 Feb 15;19(1):75. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

College of Horticulture, Shenyang Agricultural University, Key Laboratory of Protected Horticulture of Education Ministry and Liaoning Province, National & Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Northern Horticultural Facilities Design & Application Technology (Liaoning), Liaoning Shenyang, 110866, People's Republic of China.

Background: Lipoxygenases (LOXs) play significant roles in abiotic stress responses, and identification of LOX gene promoter function can make an important contribution to elucidating resistance mechanisms. Here, we cloned the CmLOX08 promoter of melon (Cucumis melo) and identified the main promoter regions regulating transcription in response to signalling molecules and abiotic stresses.

Results: The 2054-bp promoter region of CmLOX08 from melon leaves was cloned, and bioinformatic analysis revealed that it harbours numerous cis-regulatory elements associated with signalling molecules and abiotic stress. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12870-019-1678-1DOI Listing
February 2019

Innate immunity and interferons in the pathogenesis of Sjögren's syndrome.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Primary SS (pSS) is a rheumatic disease characterized by an immune-mediated exocrinopathy, resulting in severe dryness of eyes and mouth. Systemic symptoms include fatigue and joint pain and a subset of patients develop more severe disease with multi-organ involvement. Accumulating evidence points to involvement of innate immunity and aberrant activity of the type I IFN system in both the initiation and propagation of this disease. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/key360DOI Listing
February 2019

[Exploration of Medical Equipment Management Development in Public Hospitals].

Zhongguo Yi Liao Qi Xie Za Zhi 2019 Jan;43(1):65-68

Shanghai University of Medicine & Health Sciences, Shanghai, 201318.

With the continuous improvement of the hospital diagnosis and treatment level and the continuous renewal of medical equipment in China, the mismatch between medical equipment management personnel training and the introduction of medical equipment, the development of medical technology and the requirements of modern hospital management is increasingly prominent. This article is based on a current situation survey of medical equipment and management personnel at all levels of hospitals in Shanghai. It discusses joint with professional colleges and universities, and gives suggestions about needs, objectives and practice of personnel training. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3969/j.issn.1671-7104.2019.01.017DOI Listing
January 2019

[Development of Motion Unit of Simulated Intelligent Endotracheal Suctioning Robot].

Zhongguo Yi Liao Qi Xie Za Zhi 2019 Jan;43(1):17-20

Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, 710061.

A motion unit for sucking robot with a stable motion, convenient operation and process simulation is introduced. The key parameters and process data of the sucking operation were obtained from the clinical work, which provided the basis for the design of the sucking robot motion unit. According to the points of sucking action, robotic thumb, forefinger and metacarpophalangeal joints were used to grip the suction tube, and the servo and arm structure were used to simulate the motion of the wrist and elbow to complete the rotation and push of the sputum suction tube. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3969/j.issn.1671-7104.2019.01.0005DOI Listing
January 2019

Intra-surgical Protein Layer on Titanium Arthroplasty Explants: From the Big Twelve To The Implant Proteome.

Proteomics Clin Appl 2019 Feb 15:e1800168. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen, Germany.

Purpose: Aseptic loosening in total joint replacement due to insufficient osteointegration is an unsolved problem in orthopaedics. The purpose of our study was to obtain a picture of the initial protein adsorption layer on femoral endoprosthetic surfaces as the key to the initiation of osseointegration.

Experimental Design: This paper describes the first study of femoral stem explants from patients for proteome analysis of the primary protein layer. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/prca.201800168DOI Listing
February 2019

Rates and outcomes of total knee replacement for rheumatoid arthritis compared to osteoarthritis.

ANZ J Surg 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Background: Total knee replacement (TKR) has been shown to perform differently in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) when compared to osteoarthritis (OA). In this study, we compare the survivorship between these two groups and examine patient and prosthesis factors that impact the revision rate.

Methods: All RA and OA patients undergoing TKR in Australia from 1 September 1999 to 31 December 2016 were included. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ans.15035DOI Listing
February 2019

Healthier Rhythm, Healthier Brain? Integrity of Circadian Melatonin and Temperature Rhythms Relates to the Clinical State of Brain-Injured Patients.

Eur J Neurol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

University of Salzburg, Department of Psychology, Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Hellbrunner Strasse 34, A-5020, Salzburg.

Introduction: Healthy circadian rhythmicity has been suggested to relate to a better state of brain-injured patients and to support the emergence of consciousness in patient groups characterised by a relative instability thereof such as patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC).

Methods: Going beyond earlier studies, we have adopted a systems-level perspective and, using multilevel modelling, assessed the joint predictive value of three indexes of circadian rhythm integrity derived from skin temperature variations, melatoninsulfate (aMT6s) secretion, and physical activity (wrist actigraphy) patterns for DOC patients' (13 unresponsive wakefulness syndrome [UWS]; 7 minimally conscious (exit) state [E/MCS]) behaviourally assessed state (Coma Recovery Scale-Revised [CRS-R] score). Additionally, we have assessed in a subset 16 patients whether patients' behavioural repertoire (CRS-R score) varies with (i) time of day or (ii) offset from the body temperature maximum (BTmax), that is when cognitive performance is expected to peak. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ene.13935DOI Listing
February 2019

The burden of proof: The process of involving young people in research.

Health Expect 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Patient and public involvement in research includes non-academics working with researchers, on activities from consultative tasks, to joint working, and on user-led initiatives. Health and social care funding bodies require involvement in research projects. A current debate focuses on a perceived lack of empirical "proof" to demonstrate the impact of involvement upon the quality of research. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hex.12870DOI Listing
February 2019

Ultrasonographic assessment of the maxillary artery and middle meningeal artery in the infratemporal fossa.

J Clin Ultrasound 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Innovation Centre of the Faculty for Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Serbia.

Purpose: To investigate with Doppler ultrasonography the maxillary and middle meningeal arteries in the infratemporal fossa, and describe their hemodynamic characteristics.

Methods: We included 24 female and 11 male volunteers without vascular diseases, with a median age of 43 years. We used the acoustic window, enlarged by subjects half-opening their mouth, located below the zygomatic arch, in front of temporo-mandibular joint, to reach the maxillary and middle meningeal arteries. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcu.22712DOI Listing
February 2019

Detection of erosions in the sacroiliac joints of patients with axial spondyloarthritis using the magnetic resonance imaging VIBE technique.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany, and the Department of Rheumatology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China. Address correspondence to Assoc. Prof. Dr. X. Baraliakos, Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Ruhr-University Bochum, Claudiusstr. 45, 44649 Herne, Germany.

Objective: The volume-interpolated breathhold examination (VIBE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique can visualize erosive cartilage defects in peripheral joints. We evaluated the ability of VIBE to detect erosions in sacroiliac joints (SIJ) of patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) as compared to the established T1-weighted (T1w)-MRI sequence and computed tomography (CT).

Methods: MRIs (T1w- and VIBE-) and CTs of SIJs of 109 axSpA patients were evaluated by two blinded readers based on SIJ-quadrants (SQ). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181304DOI Listing
February 2019

Radiographic Progression Inhibition with Intravenous Golimumab in Psoriatic Arthritis: Week 24 Results of a Phase III, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From Internal Medicine - Rheumatology, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California; Department of Internal Medicine - Rheumatology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio; Immunology, Janssen Research & Development LLC, Spring House, Pennsylvania; Rheumatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Janssen Research & Development LLC funded this study. Janssen Biotech Inc., part of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, manufactures golimumab. Authors who are employees of the study sponsor were involved in the study design, collecting and analyzing the data, and interpreting the results. Writing support was provided by Janssen Scientific Affairs LLC. Janssen Research & Development LLC approved the content of the article; the authors made the decision to submit for publication. Drs. Harrison and Hsia, and L. Kim, K.H. Lo, and L. Noonan are employees of Janssen Research & Development LLC and own stock or stock options in Johnson & Johnson, of which Janssen Research & Development LLC is a wholly owned subsidiary. A. Kavanaugh, MD, Internal Medicine - Rheumatology, University of California at San Diego; M.E. Husni, MD, MPH, Internal Medicine - Rheumatology, Cleveland Clinic; D.D. Harrison, MD, MPH, Immunology, Janssen Research & Development LLC; L. Kim, PhD, Immunology, Janssen Research & Development LLC; K.H. Lo, PhD, Immunology, Janssen Research & Development LLC; L. Noonan, RT(MR), Immunology, Janssen Research & Development LLC; E.C. Hsia, MD, MSCE, Immunology, Janssen Research & Development LLC, and Rheumatology, University of Pennsylvania. Address correspondence to Dr. E.C. Hsia, Janssen Research & Development LLC, 1400 McKean Road, PO Box 776, Spring House, Pennsylvania 19477, USA. E-mail: Full Release Article. For details see Reprints and Permissions at jrheum.org. Accepted for publication October 18, 2018.

Objective: Evaluate effects of intravenous (IV) golimumab (GOL) on radiographic progression in psoriatic arthritis (PsA).

Methods: This phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (GO-VIBRANT) randomized patients with active PsA to receive IV placebo (n = 239) or IV GOL 2 mg/kg (n = 241) at weeks 0, 4, 12, and 20. Radiographic progression (controlled secondary endpoint) was evaluated as change from baseline at Week 24 in PsA-modified total Sharp/van der Heijde scores (SvdH). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.180681DOI Listing
February 2019

Endorsement of the 66/68 joint count for the measurement of musculoskeletal disease activity: OMERACT 2018 Psoriatic Arthritis workshop report.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, Singapore University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, and University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Musculoskeletal Health and Outcomes Research, St. Michael's Hospital, and Institute for Work and Health, and Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Rehabilitation Sciences Institute and the Institute for Health Policy Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit: The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital & Department of Rheumatology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Department of Medical Humanities, Patient Research Partner, Amsterdam University Medical Centre, , Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Women's College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Pfizer Inc., Montreal, QC, Canada Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital and Conway Institute for Biomolecular Research, University College Dublin, Ireland. Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Patient Research Partner; Division of Rheumatology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC; Kezar Life Sciences, South San Francisco, CA, USA Division of Rheumatology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Medical Centre, Sydney, Australia Patient Research Partner, employed by Amgen Inc, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Centre for Practice-Changing Research, Ottawa, ON, Canada Swedish-Providence-St. John's Health Systems and University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, and School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, ON, Canada Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA St. Vincent's University Hospital and University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases and the University of Bath, Bath, UK. Address correspondence to Alexis Ogdie, MD, University of Pennsylvania, White Building Room 5023, 3400 Spruce St, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, United States. E-mail:

Objective: The psoriatic arthritis (PsA) core domain set for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies (LOS) has recently been updated. The joint counts are central to the measurement of the peripheral arthritis component of the musculoskeletal (MSK) disease activity domain. We report the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 2018 meeting approaches to seek endorsement of the 66/68-swollen and tender joint count (SJC66/TJC68) for inclusion in the PsA Core Outcome Measurement Set. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181089DOI Listing
February 2019

Cyclophosphamide for Systemic Sclerosis-related Interstitial Lung Disease: A Comparison of Scleroderma Lung Study I and II.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the Department of Medicine and Department of Radiology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California; Department of Biomathematics, University of California, Los Angeles, California; Department of Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; Department of Rheumatology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. This work was supported by grants from the US National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/ National Institutes of Health (NIH): R01 HL089758 (DPT) and R01 HL089901 (RME), NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Science, University of California, Los Angeles CTSI Grant Number UL1TR000124 (NL), the Scleroderma Foundation (ERV), and the Rheumatology Research Foundation (ERV). E.R. Volkmann, MD, MS, Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine; D.P. Tashkin, MD, Emeritus Professor, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine; M. Sim, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine; N. Li, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Biomathematics, University of California, Los Angeles; D. Khanna, MD, MS, Department of Medicine, Professor, University of Michigan Medical School; M.D. Roth, MD, Professor, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine; P.J. Clements, MD, MPH, Professor, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine; A.M. Hoffmann-Vold, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Candidate, Department of Rheumatology, Oslo University Hospital; D.E. Furst, MD, Emeritus Professor, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine; G. Kim, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Radiology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine; J. Goldin, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Radiology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine; R.M. Elashoff, PhD, Distinguished Professor, Department of Biomathematics, University of California, Los Angeles. Address correspondence to Dr. E.R. Volkmann, 1000 Veteran Ave., Ste. 32-59, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. E-mail: Accepted for publication October 18, 2018.

Objective: To compare safety and efficacy outcomes between the cyclophosphamide (CYC) arms of Scleroderma Lung Study (SLS) I and II.

Methods: Participants enrolled in the CYC arms of SLS I (n = 79) and II (n = 69) were included. SLS I and II randomized participants to oral CYC for 1 year and followed patients for an additional year off therapy (in SLS II, patients received placebo in Year 2). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.180441DOI Listing
February 2019

Patient Perspectives on DMARD Safety Concerns in Rheumatology Trials: Results from Inflammatory Arthritis Patient Focus Groups and OMERACT Attendees Discussion.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Family Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. Canberra Rheumatology, Canberra, ACT, Australia College of Health and Medicine, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia; Centre for Kidney Research, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Patient Partners, Ingersoll, Canada. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA; Department Social Work Programs, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY USA; Department Social Work Programs, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY USA; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Institute of Bone and Joint Research-Kolling Institute, University of Sydney; Rheumatology Department, Royal North Shore Hospital; Centre for Health Policy, School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Northern Health, Epping Victoria. Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health District, St Leonards, NSW, Australia; Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Reserve Road, St Leonards, NSW, 2065, Australia. Clinical Investigator, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Adjunct Professor, School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, and School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa; Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa; Professor of Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology; Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, The Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital; & Department of Rheumatology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark.Professor, Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Adjunct Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Address correspondence to Dr. Susan J. Bartlett. Email:

Objective: The OMERACT Safety Working Group is identifying core safety domains that matter most to rheumatic disease patients.

Methods: International focus groups were held with 39 inflammatory arthritis patients to identify DMARD experiences and concerns. Themes were identified by pragmatic thematic coding and discussed in small groups by meeting attendees. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181185DOI Listing
February 2019

OMERACT Filter 2.1: Elaboration of the Conceptual Framework for Outcome Measurement in Health Intervention Studies.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit; Department of Medical Humanities, VU University Medical Centre/EMGO+ institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Institute for Work & Health and Institute for Health Policy Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto; Centre for Practice-Changing Research, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute; Cardiovascular Research Methods Centre, University of Ottawa Heart Institute; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, and School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa; Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario; McGill Centre for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; Medicine Service, VA Medical Center; Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Alabama; Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama; SDG LLC, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds and UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds, UK; Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Rheumatology Department, Boulogne-Billancourt; INSERM U1173, Laboratoire d'Excellence INFLAMEX, UFR Simone Veil, Versailles-Saint- Quentin University, Saint-Quentin en Yvelines; Sorbonne Université; Pitié Salpêtrière hospital, AP-HP, Rheumatology Department, Paris, France; Sydney Medical School, Institute of Bone and Joint Research; Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Australia. DEB, COB III, PGC, MAD, MPD, LG, LM, LS, JAS, VS, GAW, and PT are members of the executive of OMERACT, an organization that develops outcome measures in rheumatology and receives arms-length funding from 12 companies. PGC is funded in part by the NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the UK National Health Service, the NIHR, or the Department of Health. JAS is supported by the resources and use of the facilities at the VA Medical Center at Birmingham, Alabama, USA. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the US government. LM is a principal investigator on the Australian Rheumatology Association Database, which has received armslength funding from Pfizer Australia, AbbVie Australia, Eli Lilly Australia, and Janssen Australia. M. Boers, MD, PhD, Professor of Clinical Epidemiology, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam; D.E. Beaton, PhD, Senior Scientist, Institute for Work & Health, and Associate Professor, Institute Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto; B.J. Shea, PhD, Senior Scientist, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Clinical Epidemiology Program, and School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa; L.J. Maxwell, PhD, University of Ottawa and Centre for Practice-Changing Research, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute; S.J. Bartlett, PhD, Professor of Medicine, McGill University, Centre for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; C.O. Bingham III, MD, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; P.G. Conaghan, MBBS, PhD, FRACP, FRCP, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, and NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre; M.A. D'Agostino, MD, PhD, AP-HP, Professor of Rheumatology, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Rheumatology Department, and INSERM U1173, Laboratoire d'Excellence INFLAMEX, UFR Simone Veil, Versailles-Saint-Quentin University; M.P. de Wit, PhD, OMERACT Patient Research Partner, and Amsterdam University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Humanities, Amsterdam Public Health; L. Gossec, MD, PhD, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, and AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Department of Rheumatology; L. March, MBBS, PhD, Liggins Professor of Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology, Sydney Medical School, Institute of Bone and Joint Research, and Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital; J.A. Singh, MBBS, MPH, Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, Department of Medicine at the School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham; L.S. Simon, MD, Co-Managing Director of SDG LLC; V. Strand, MD, Biopharmaceutical Consultant, Portola Valley, California, USA; G.A. Wells, MSc, PhD, Director, Cardiovascular Research Methods Centre, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, and Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa; P. Tugwell, MD, MSc, Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, and School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, and Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. Address correspondence to Dr. M. Boers, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Accepted for publication December 6, 2018.

Objective: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 framework was developed in 2014 to aid core outcome set development by describing the full universe of "measurable aspects of health conditions" from which core domains can be selected. This paper provides elaborations and updated concepts (OMERACT Filter 2. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181096DOI Listing
February 2019

Consensus Building in OMERACT: Recommendations for Use of the Delphi for Core Outcome Set Development.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the University of Ottawa, Departments of Medicine and Innovation in Medical Education; Center for Global Health, University of Ottawa; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa; Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute; Centre for Practice-Changing Research, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute; OMERACT, Ottawa; Institute for Work and Health, Toronto, Ontario; Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; University of Liverpool, Department of Biostatistics, COMET, Liverpool, UK; Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney; Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health; Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Australia; Amsterdam University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Humanities, Amsterdam Public Health, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. S. Humphrey-Murto, Associate Professor of Medicine, MD, MEd, University of Ottawa, Departments of Medicine and Innovation in Medical Education; R. Crew, BSc (Hons), University of Liverpool, Department of Biostatistics, COMET; B. Shea, PhD, Center for Global Health, University of Ottawa; S.J. Bartlett, PhD, Professor, Department of Medicine, McGill University, and Adjunct Professor, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; L. March, MBBS, MSc, PhD, FRACP, FAFPHM, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, and Institute of Bone and Joint Research, Kolling Institute, Northern Sydney Local Health, and Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital; P. Tugwell, MD, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, and Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute; L.J. Maxwell, PhD, Centre for Practice-Changing Research, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, and University of Ottawa; D. Beaton, BscOT, PhD, Senior Scientist, Institute for Work and Health; S. Grosskleg, OMERACT, and University of Ottawa; M. de Wit, PhD, Amsterdam University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Humanities, Amsterdam Public Health. Address correspondence by Dr. S. Humphrey-Murto, The Ottawa Hospital-Riverside Campus, 1967 Riverside Dr., Ottawa, Ontario, K1H 7W9, Canada. E-mail: Accepted for publication December 6, 2018.

Objective: Developing international consensus on outcome measures for clinical trials is challenging. The following paper will review consensus building in Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT), with a focus on the Delphi.

Methods: Based on the literature and feedback from delegates at OMERACT 2018, a set of recommendations is provided in the form of the OMERACT Delphi Consensus Checklist. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181094DOI Listing
February 2019

Advancing stiffness measurement in rheumatic disease: report from the Stiffness Special Interest group at OMERACT 2018.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD USA; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK; Leeds Biomedical Research Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK; McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Rheumatology, Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; Division of Medicine, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia Rheumatology Unit, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, Australia; Horizon Pharma, Inc, Lake Forest, Illinois, USA and Adjunct Professor, College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, USA; Healthy Motivation, Bone and Joint Decade Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health, Santa Barbara, California, USA; Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Horsham, PA, USA; Singapore General Hospital, Duke-NUS Medical School; University of Bristol, Bristol, UK; University of West England - Bristol, Bristol, UK. AMO is a Jerome L. Greene Foundation Scholar and is supported in part by a research grant from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under award number P30-AR070254 (Core B), a Rheumatology Research Foundation Scientist Development award, and a Staurulakis Family Discovery award. Work from the US Cohort was supported by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under award numbers [P30-AR070254 Core B] and [P30-AR053503 Core D] and Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) Pilot Project Award number [IP2-PI000737], and the Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund. All statements in this report including its conclusions are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of PCORI, its board of governors, or its methodology committee, or of NIH or NIAMS. RH is an employee of Horizon Pharma, LLC; CK is an employee of Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC. Address correspondence to Ethan T Craig, 3900 Woodland Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19104. Email:

Objective: To improve measurement of stiffness in rheumatic disease.

Methods: Data presented included: 1) Two qualitative projects; 2) The RA Stiffness patient-reported outcome measure (RAST); 3) three items assessing stiffness severity, duration, and interference. 3) RESULTS: Stiffness is multidimensional and includes aspects of stiffness experience such as duration, severity, and impact. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181074DOI Listing
February 2019

Validity and Responsiveness of Combined Inflammation and Combined Joint Damage Scores Based on the OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring System (RAMRIS).

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital; Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research (COPECARE), Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup; Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen; King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases; University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Regional Health Research, Graasten; Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Århus; Odense University Hospital; Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense; Zealand University Hospital, Køge, Denmark; University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leeds Biomedical Research Centre, Leeds, UK. U. Sundin, MD, Research Fellow, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, and Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo; M. Østergaard, MD, PhD, DMSc, Professor, COPECARE, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet, and the Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen; D. Glinatsi, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, COPECARE, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet; A.B. Aga, MD, PhD, Senior Consultant and Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital Oslo; K. Hørslev-Petersen, MD, DMSc, Professor, Senior Consultant, King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, and the Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark; M.L. Hetland, MD, PhD, DMSc, Professor, COPECARE, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet, and the Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Copenhagen; K. Stengaard-Pedersen, MD, DMSc, Professor Emeritus, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital; P. Junker, MD, DMSc, Professor, Department of Rheumatology, Odense University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark; B.J. Ejbjerg, MD, PhD, Chief Consultant, Zealand University Hospital; P. Bird, BMed (Hons), FRACP, PhD, Grad Dip MRI, Associate Professor, University of New South Wales; P.G. Conaghan, MB, BS, PhD, FRACP, FRCP, Professor of Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, and NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre; S. Lillegraven, MD, MPH, PhD, Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital; E.A. Haavardsholm, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, and Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo. Address correspondence to Dr. U. Sundin, Diakonhjemmet Sykehus, Diakonveien 12, 0370 Oslo, Norway. E-mail: Accepted for publication December 6, 2018.

Objective: The RAMRIS [Outcome Measures in Rheumatology rheumatoid arthritis (RA) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Scoring system] is used in clinical RA trials. We have investigated methods to combine the RAMRIS features into valid and responsive scores for inflammation and joint damage.

Methods: We used data from 3 large randomized early RA trials to assess 5 methods to develop a combined score for inflammation based on RAMRIS bone marrow edema, synovitis, and tenosynovitis scores, and a combined joint damage score based on erosions and joint space narrowing. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181064DOI Listing
February 2019

Development and Validation of an OMERACT MRI Whole-Body Score for Inflammation in Peripheral Joints and Entheses in Inflammatory Arthritis (MRI-WIPE).

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sheba Medical Center, Affiliated to the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; University Pierre et Marie Curie - Paris 6, Sorbonne Universités, GRC-08 (EEMOIS); APHP, Rheumatology Dept., Pitié Salpêtrière University Hospital, Paris, France; Division of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Department of Clinical Immunology & Rheumatology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India; Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada; CaRE Arthritis, Edmonton, Canada; Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada; Department of Rheumatology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique (IREC), Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium; Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Belgium; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds, & NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospital NHS Trust, United Kingdom; Department of Radiology, Arthritis Imaging Research Group, University Hospital Charité, Berlin, Germany; 14Spire Sciences, Inc., Boca Raton, Florida, United States. S.K. received research grants from The Danish Rheumatism Association and Rigshospitalet. Address correspondence to Simon Krabbe, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Valdemar Hansens Vej 17, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark. E-mail:

Objective: To develop a whole-body MRI-scoring system for peripheral arthritis and enthesitis.

Methods: After consensus on definitions/locations of MRI pathologies, four multi-reader exercises were performed. Eighty-three joints were scored 0-3 separately for synovitis and osteitis, thirty-three entheses 0-3 separately for soft tissue inflammation and osteitis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181084DOI Listing
February 2019

Structural Changes over a Short Period Are Associated with Functional Assessments in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, and the Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, and the School of Pharmacy, at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, California; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Program of Advanced Musculoskeletal Imaging (PAMI), Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan. This study was supported by UCB Pharmaceutical Inc. (Xiaojuan Li). T. Shimizu, MD, PhD, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF, and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University; A. Cruz, BS, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, and School of Pharmacy, UCSF; M. Tanaka, BS, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF; K. Mamoto, MD, PhD, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, PAMI, Cleveland Clinic; V. Pedoia, PhD, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF; A.J. Burghardt, BS, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF; U. Heilmeier, MD, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF; T.M. Link, MD, PhD, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF; J. Graf, MD, Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, UCSF; J.B. Imboden, MD, Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, UCSF; X. Li, PhD, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, PAMI, Cleveland Clinic. Address correspondence to Dr. T. Shimizu, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan. E-mail: Accepted for publication October 24, 2018.

Objective: To investigate the correlation between changes in radiological quantitative assessment with changes in clinical and functional assessment from baseline to 3 months in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Methods: Twenty-eight patients with RA [methotrexate (MTX) and anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) group with high disease activity (n = 18); and MTX group with low disease activity (n = 10)] underwent assessments at baseline and 3 months: clinical [28-joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS28)], functional [Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and Michigan Hand Outcome Questionnaire (MHQ)], and imaging-based [3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT)]. MR images were evaluated semiquantitatively [RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS)] and quantitatively for the volume of synovitis and bone marrow edema (BME) lesions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.180496DOI Listing
February 2019

OMERACT 2018 Modified Patient-reported Outcome Domain Core Set in the Life Impact Area for Adult Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the Department of Learning, Informatics and Medical Education, Karolinska Institutet; Function Area Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy, Allied Health Professionals Function, Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Physiotherapy and Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet; Division of Rheumatology, Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Research Center, College of Medicine, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea; Division of Rheumatology, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Institute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch University, Perth; The Notre Dame University Fremantle, Fremantle, Australia; Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Center for Global Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Support for this project comes from a grant from the Korea Health Technology R&D Project through the Korea Health Industry Development Institute, funded by the Ministry of Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (grant number: HI14C1277); The Swedish Rheumatism Association; The Börje Olhagen foundation (supported by grants provided by the Stockholm County Council ALF project); the Diplomat Specialty Infusion Group; Option Care; and Nufactor Inc. M. Regardt, PhD, Occupational Therapist, Department of Learning, Informatics and Medical Education, Karolinska Institutet, and Function Area Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy, Allied Health Professionals Function, Karolinska University Hospital; C.A. Mecoli, MD, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; J.K. Park, MD, PhD, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital; I. de Groot, Patient Research Partner; C. Sarver, Patient Research Partner; M. Needham, MD, Division of Rheumatology, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Institute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch University, and The Notre Dame University; M. de Visser, MD, PhD, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam Neuroscience; B. Shea, MSN, Center for Global Health, University of Ottawa; C.O. Bingham III, MD, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; I.E. Lundberg, MD, PhD, Division of Rheumatology, Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet; Y.W. Song, MD, PhD, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Research Center, College of Medicine, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University; L. Christopher-Stine, MD, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; H. Alexanderson, PhD, Physiotherapist, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Physiotherapy and Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, and Function Area Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy, Allied Health Professionals Function, Karolinska University Hospital. M. Regardt and Dr. C. Mecoli are co-first authors. Address correspondence to M. Regardt, Function Area Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Department of LIME, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. E-mail: Accepted for publication December 21, 2018.

Objective: To present and vote on a myositis modified patient-reported outcome core domain set in the life impact area at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 2018.

Methods: Based on results from international focus groups and Delphi surveys, a draft core set was developed.

Results: Domains muscle symptoms, fatigue, level of physical activity, and pain reached ≥ 70% consensus and were mandatory to assess in all trials. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181065DOI Listing
February 2019

Core Domain Set Selection According to OMERACT Filter 2.1: The OMERACT Methodology.

J Rheumatol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

From the Centre for Practice-Changing Research, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute; Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Clinical Epidemiology Program; School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa; Cardiovascular Research Methods Centre, University of Ottawa Heart Institute; Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, and School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa; Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa; Institute for Work & Health; Institute Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Clinical Epidemiology, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam; Amsterdam University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Humanities, Amsterdam Public Health, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; Medicine and Epidemiology, Department of Medicine at the School of Medicine, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama; SDG LLC, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA; Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds; UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leeds Biomedical Research Centre, Leeds, UK; Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Rheumatology Department, Boulogne-Billancourt; INSERM U1173, Laboratoire d'Excellence INFLAMEX, UFR Simone Veil, Versailles-Saint-Quentin University, Saint-Quentin en Yvelines; Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06; AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Paris, France; Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology, Sydney Medical School, Institute of Bone and Joint Research; Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Australia. PGC is funded in part by the NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the UK National Health Service, the NIHR, or the Department of Health. JAS is supported by the resources and the use of facilities at the VA Medical Center at Birmingham, Alabama. LM is a Principal Investigator on the Australian Rheumatology Association Database, which has received arms-length funding from Pfizer Australia, AbbVie Australia, Eli Lilly Australia, and Janssen Australia. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the US Department of Veterans Affairs or the US government. L.J. Maxwell, PhD, University of Ottawa and Centre for Practice- Changing Research, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute; B.J. Shea, PhD, Clinical Investigator, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Clinical Epidemiology Program, and School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa; D.E. Beaton, PhD, Senior Scientist, Institute for Work & Health, and Associate Professor, Institute Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto; G.A. Wells, MSc, PhD, Director, Cardiovascular Research Methods Centre, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, and Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa; M. Boers, MD, PhD, Professor of Clinical Epidemiology, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam; S. Grosskleg, OMERACT Secretariat, University of Ottawa; C.O. Bingham III, MD, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; P.G. Conaghan, MD, PhD, Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds and NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre; M.A. D'Agostino, MD, PhD, AP-HP, Professor of Rheumatology, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Rheumatology Department, and INSERM U1173, Laboratoire d'Excellence INFLAMEX, UFR Simone Veil, Versailles-Saint-Quentin University; M. de Wit, PhD, OMERACT Patient Research Partner, and Amsterdam University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Humanities, Amsterdam Public Health; L. Gossec, MD, PhD, Professor of Rheumatology, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, and AP-HP, Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, Department of Rheumatology; L. March, MBBS, PhD, Liggins Professor of Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology, Sydney Medical School, Institute of Bone and Joint Research and Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital; J.A. Singh, MBBS, MPH, Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, Department of Medicine at the School of Medicine, University of Alabama; L.S. Simon, MD, Co- Managing Director of SDG LLC; V. Strand, Biopharmaceutical Consultant, Portola Valley, California, USA; P. Tugwell, MD, MSc, Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, and School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, and Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. Address correspondence to L.J. Maxwell, Centre for Practice-Changing Research, Ottawa Hospital General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6, Canada. E-mail: Accepted for publication December 19, 2018.

Objective: To describe the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.1 methodology for core domain set selection.

Methods: The "OMERACT Way for Core Domain Set selection" framework consists of 3 stages: first, generating candidate domains through literature reviews and qualitative work, then a process of consensus to obtain agreement from those involved, and finally formal voting on the OMERACT Onion. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.jrheum.org/lookup/doi/10.3899/jrheum.181097
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181097DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads
  • Page 1 of 10236