17 results match your criteria JPO: Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics [Journal]

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Prosthetic Knee Selection for Individuals with Unilateral Transfemoral Amputation: A Clinical Practice Guideline.

J Prosthet Orthot 2019 Jan 9;31(1):2-8. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

PHILLIP M. STEVENS MEd, CPO, is affiliated with the Hanger Clinic, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Introduction: This guideline was developed to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on prosthetic knee selection for unilateral amputation at the knee disarticulation or transfemoral level.

Methods: The guideline is based upon the best available evidence as it relates to prosthetic knee selection after unilateral knee disarticulation or transfemoral amputation. Recommendations are drawn from systematic review, meta-analysis, and additional published practice guidelines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JPO.0000000000000214DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6314512PMC
January 2019
11 Reads

Prosthetic Foot Selection for Individuals with Lower-Limb Amputation: A Clinical Practice Guideline.

J Prosthet Orthot 2018 Oct 13;30(4):175-180. Epub 2018 Sep 13.

PHILLIP STEVENS, MEd, CPO, JOHN RHEINSTEIN, CP, and SHANE WURDEMAN, PhD, MSPO, CP, are affiliated with Hanger Clinic, Austin, TX.

Introduction: This guideline was developed to present current evidence and to provide associated clinical recommendations on prosthetic foot selection for individuals with lower-limb amputation.

Materials: NA.

Methods: The guideline is based upon the best available evidence as it relates prosthetic foot selection during the provision of definitive lower-limb prostheses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JPO.0000000000000181DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6221375PMC
October 2018
2 Reads

Grip Force Control Using Prosthetic and Anatomical Limbs.

J Prosthet Orthot 2018 Jul;30(3):132-139

Department of Kinesiology, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6190905PMC
July 2018
1 Read

What people want in a prosthetic foot: A focus group study.

J Prosthet Orthot 2016 Oct;28(4):145-151

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle WA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JPO.0000000000000102DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5231923PMC
October 2016
44 Reads

Functional and psychosocial status of Haitians who became users of lower extremity prostheses as a result of the 2010 earthquake.

J Prosthet Orthot 2014 Oct;26(4):177-182

Florida International University, Department of Social Work.

The January 12, 2010 earthquake devastated Port-Au-Prince, the capital of the Republic of Haiti, and its surroundings. Among the 300,000 injured, 1,200 to 1,500 people underwent traumatic /surgical amputations. The purpose of this study was to describe the functional and psychosocial impact of prostheses users who suffered a traumatic lower-limb amputation after the earthquake of 2010 in Haiti. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4278370PMC
October 2014
21 Reads

Training Strategies for Mitigating the Effect of Proportional Control on Classification in Pattern Recognition Based Myoelectric Control.

J Prosthet Orthot 2013 Apr;25(2):76-83

Institute of Biomedical Engineering University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, Canada.

The performance of pattern recognition based myoelectric control has seen significant interest in the research community for many years. Due to a recent surge in the development of dexterous prosthetic devices, determining the clinical viability of multifunction myoelectric control has become paramount. Several factors contribute to differences between offline classification accuracy and clinical usability, but the overriding theme is that the variability of the elicited patterns increases greatly during functional use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JPO.0b013e318289950bDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3719876PMC
April 2013
10 Reads

A Training Strategy for Learning Pattern Recognition Control for Myoelectric Prostheses.

J Prosthet Orthot 2013 Jan;25(1):30-41

Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Pattern recognition-based control of myoelectric prostheses offers amputees a natural, intuitive way of controlling the increasing functionality of modern myoelectric prostheses. While this approach to prosthesis control is certainly attractive, it is a significant departure from existing control methods. The transition from the more traditional methods of direct or proportional control to pattern recognition-based control presents a training challenge that will be unique to each amputee. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JPO.0b013e31827af7c1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3581303PMC
January 2013
5 Reads

Patient training for functional use of pattern recognition-controlled prostheses.

J Prosthet Orthot 2012 Apr;24(2):56-64

Center for Bionic Medicine, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

Pattern recognition control systems have the potential to provide better, more reliable myoelectric prosthesis control for individuals with an upper-limb amputation. However, proper patient training is essential. We begin user training by teaching the concepts of pattern recognition control and progress to teaching how to control, use, and maintain prostheses with one or many degrees of freedom. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JPO.0b013e3182515437DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3339840PMC
April 2012
16 Reads

Virtual reality environment for simulating tasks with a myoelectric prosthesis: an assessment and training tool.

J Prosthet Orthot 2011 Apr;23(2):89-94

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH).

Intuitively and efficiently controlling multiple degrees of freedom is a major hurdle in the field of upper limb prosthetics. A virtual reality myoelectric transhumeral prosthesis simulator has been developed for cost-effectively testing novel control algorithms and devices. The system acquires EMG commands and residual limb kinematics, simulates the prosthesis dynamics, and displays the combined residual limb and prosthesis movements in a virtual reality environment that includes force-based interactions with virtual objects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JPO.0b013e318217a30cDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3589581PMC
April 2011
15 Reads

Ankle-Foot Orthoses: Proprioceptive Inputs and Balance Implications.

J Prosthet Orthot 2010;22(4 Suppl):34-37

Marianjoy Rehabilitation Hospital, Wheaton, Illinois.

Individuals with a loss of sensation in the lower limbs frequently experience postural instability, altered gait patterns, and an increased risk of falling culminating in a decreased quality of life. Previous studies have documented that using ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) help such individuals to maintain their balance. This study was conducted to investigate whether somatosensory cues delivered to the intact tissues of the lower limbs above the ankle joints enhance the control of posture in individuals with peripheral neuropathy. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4357018PMC
January 2010
8 Reads

Comparison of Rectified and Unrectified Sockets for Transtibial Amputees.

J Prosthet Orthot 2008 ;18(1):1-7

Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery, Washington University Medical School, St. Louis, MO.

The current method for fabricating prosthetic sockets is to modify a positive mold to account for the non-homogeneity of the residual limb to tolerate load (i.e., rectified socket). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00008526-200601000-00002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2529461PMC
January 2008
14 Reads

The Effect of Ankle-Foot Orthoses on Balance Impairment: Single-Case Study.

J Prosthet Orthot 1999 ;11(1):15-19

Senior research scientist at the Rehabilitation Foundation, Inc., 26W171 Roosevelt Rd., P.O. Box 675, Wheaton, Illinois 60189. ; FAX: (630) 4624547.

Instability and balance impairment is common in patients with diabetic sensory neuropathy placing them at a higher risk of falling when performing more challenging daily tasks. The report describes the results of a dynamic balance tests of a subject with neuropathy due to the long-standing diabetes. The Computerized Dynamic Posturography was performed with and without ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs). Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380511PMC
January 1999
5 Reads

Effects of Design Variants in Lower-Limb Prostheses on Gait Synergy.

Authors:
Mark R Pitkin

J Prosthet Orthot 1997 ;9(3):113-122

Department of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Tufts University School of Medicine, 75 Kneeland St., Boston, MA 02111; fax (617) 636-5513.

A lower-limb prosthesis is the mechanical device with which an amputee's residual limb interacts with the walking surface. The pressure and shear forces that affect the residuum due to prosthesis use are the sources of pain, residual-limb skin problems and gait deviations. Direct approaches to reducing these problems include improving fit, alignment technique and socket design as well as increasing cushioning with socket liners. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4831900PMC
January 1997
11 Reads
2 Citations

Mechanical Outcomes of a Rolling-Joint Prosthetic Foot and Its Performance in the Dorsiflexion Phase of Transtibial Amputee Gait.

Authors:
Mark R Pitkin

J Prosthet Orthot 1995 ;7(4):114-123

research assistant professor of bioengineering at the Department ofPhysical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111; (617) 636-5038 or fax (617) 636-5513.

To most closely simulate the pe1formance of a biological human foot, a prosthetic foot should function similarly to the biological foot: The shock absorption, propulsion, balance and dorsiflexion functions of the prosthesis should closely mirror those of the biological foot. Most prosthetic feet currently available have good absorption and propulsion abilities, and some also have good balance functions. Howeve1; most prosthetic feet lack proper imitation of the dorsiflexion phase of normal gait. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4831899PMC
January 1995
13 Reads
2 Citations
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