34 results match your criteria JONA: The Journal of Nursing Administration [Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Keeping you up at night.

Authors:
Karen S Hill

J Nurs Adm 2013 Oct;43(10 Suppl):S1

Editor-in-Chief, The Journal of Nursing Administration (JONA); Chief Operating Officer/Chief Nursing Officer, Baptist Health Lexington, Kentucky

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NNA.0000435143.01220.e6DOI Listing
October 2013
49 Reads

Celebrating yesterday, designing tomorrow.

J Nurs Adm 2013 Jun;43(6):321-2

Joan Ellis Beglinger Designing Tomorrow, Cross Plains, Wisconsin, USA.

This is a new department column for JONA. It will be devoted to posing thought-provoking insights about transitions through, to and from, administrative roles in nursing. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NNA.0b013e3182942cbaDOI Listing
June 2013
12 Reads
1.373 Impact Factor

JONA certification supplement.

Authors:
Karen Drenkard

J Nurs Adm 2010 Oct;40(10 Suppl):S1-2

Credentialing Operations, American Nurses Credentialing Center, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NNA.0b013e3181f6269aDOI Listing
October 2010
5 Reads

Nontraditional models of care delivery: have they solved the problems?

J Nurs Adm 2005 Feb;35(2):74-80

School of Nursing, San Diego State University, CA 92182, USA.

Healthcare delivery systems in the United States are changing rapidly in response to socioeconomic forces. In the new competitive healthcare market, work has been redesigned, with hospitals changing their skill mix to include unlicensed assisitive personnel. Having previously described the more traditional models of care delivery, (JONA, June 2004), the authors will now discuss a variety of nontraditional practice models that have been developed to address the changing needs of healthcare. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2005
7 Reads

Managed-care research, Part 2: Researching the domain.

J Nurs Adm 1999 Dec;29(12):10-6

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.

A review of research pertaining to managed care suggests that little information is known about the impact of the components of managed care on care delivery outcomes. Characteristics of managed-care systems rarely are considered, resulting in uncertainty and confusion about which of the domain components of managed care have contributed to the outcomes seen. In part 1 (JONA November 1999) of this two-part series, we described how the shift to managed care has affected healthcare organizations and healthcare providers. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 1999
5 Reads

An organization-wide approach for an effective communication system, Part 1.

J Nurs Adm 1998 Mar;28(3):28-34

Acute and Ambulatory Services, Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, USA.

This two-part series provides a cogent discussion of designing and implementing an effective communication system, with a committee structure based on the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations (JCAHO) functions. Part one includes the development and design using a systems approach. Part two, which will be published in the April 1998 issue of JONA, will address the evaluation of outcomes and implications of this communication system. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 1998
3 Reads

Balancing judicial interests in HIV cases: Part 2, Issues for nurse administrators.

Authors:
M K Zachary

J Nurs Adm 1995 Nov;25(11):9-14

Business Administration, West Georgia College, Carrolton, USA.

Legal issues involving human immunodeficiency virus are consuming an increasing amount of the attention of hospitals and nurse administrators. At times, the legal interests of patients, staff, and administrators conflict, and it is the duty of healthcare administrators to determine which interests should prevail. Recently, two courts have dealt with this problem. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 1995
3 Reads

Identifying the best in nurse executive leadership: Part 2, Interview results.

Authors:
J Dunham-Taylor

J Nurs Adm 1995 Jul-Aug;25(7-8):24-31

College of Nursing, University of Akron, OH, USA.

Interview data from four groups of nurse executives further define transformational leadership. In Part 1 (June 1995 JONA), the group that received the highest staff mean scores were more balanced in their leadership style. The second group, which also received high scores in Part 1, were analytic and enjoyed moving in to "clean up" situations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1995
4 Reads

Ethical dilemmas of nurse executives. Part 2.

Authors:
C Camuñas

J Nurs Adm 1994 Sep;24(9):19-23

Teachers College, Columbia University, New York.

A nationwide survey of nurse executives found that they experience ethical dilemmas about a wide range of topics, that resources used to resolve dilemmas are varied and diverse, and that dilemmas are experienced in many situations. The most important factors influencing decisions that have implications were the superiors of the nurse executives and the politics within the institution. In Part 1 (JONA, July/August 1994), the method, quantitative results, and conflict based on role were discussed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1994
3 Reads

Ethical dilemmas of nurse executives. Part 1.

Authors:
C Camuñas

J Nurs Adm 1994 Jul-Aug;24(7-8):45-51

Teachers College, Columbia University, New York.

Although there is research and much discussion regarding ethical issues related directly to patient care, rarely do we find discussion of ethical issues confronting the nurse executive. Using data from a nationwide survey, the author describes ethical issues nurse executives encounter in their work and identifies the facilitating and inhibiting factors that nurse executives perceive when making decisions that have ethical implications. Part 1 includes the quantitative data and role conflict; Part 2 (JONA September 1994) will present the qualitative data and implications. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1994
3 Reads

Management development: preparing nurse managers for the future. Part 2, program evaluation.

J Nurs Adm 1994 Jul-Aug;24(7-8):24-31

Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD.

In Part 1 of this two-part series (JONA, June 1994), the authors described the factors that influenced the need for a nurse manager development program and the conceptual model used to plan and implement that program at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. In Part, 2 they describe the program evaluation and implications for future work. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1994
4 Reads

A transformational model for the practice of professional nursing. Part 2, Implementation of the model.

J Nurs Adm 1994 May;24(5):38-46

Nursing and Patient Care Service, Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Our healthcare system is undergoing major transformation. Most nurse executives are convinced that change is necessary and inevitable, but they are less certain how to position their departments for future success. The Transformational Model for the Practice of Professional Nursing was developed as a "road map" for that purpose. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1994
4 Reads

A transformational model for the practice of professional nursing. Part 1, The model.

J Nurs Adm 1994 Apr;24(4):51-7

Nursing Service, Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA.

Our healthcare system is undergoing major transformation. Most nurse executives know that change is necessary and inevitable, but are less certain how to position their departments for these changes. The Transformational Model for the Practice of Professional Nursing was developed as a "road map" for that purpose. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 1994
5 Reads

Rural magnet hospitals of excellence. Part 2.

J Nurs Adm 1994 Feb;24(2):35-41

Medical College of Georgia, Augusta.

Although almost half of the hospitals in the United States are rural and small, they often are not seen as leaders in innovation. However, many practices now being adopted by large hospitals have been used in rural hospitals for many years. To understand excellence in rural hospitals, the authors present a study of rural hospitals of excellence, using procedures from the 1982 Magnet Hospitals Study. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 1994
17 Reads

Obtaining services for HIV-positive patients.

J Nurs Adm 1992 Sep;22(9):48-53

Neurology/Neurosurgery Unit, Northside Hospital, Atlanta, GA.

Services needed for HIV-positive persons and the availability of these services were reported in the July/August 1990 issue of JONA. This article includes further information from the original study--an analysis of the factors in each reporting hospital and community that enabled or barred the development of services for HIV-positive persons. This information offers strategies to nurse executives for obtaining services in their own settings. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1992
4 Reads

Strengthening hospital nursing, Part III. Differences among professional groups in the hospital planning process.

J Nurs Adm 1992 Jul-Aug;22(7-8):41-50

School of Nursing, Kent State University, OH.

Interdisciplinary hospital planning processes are examined. Nurses, physicians, hospital administrators, and support and ancillary personnel from 75 hospitals participating in the national Strengthening Hospital Nursing Program indicate their perceptions of the project in relation to the centrality of the program in their hospitals, planning team development, and political issues. Differences and similarities among the professional groups are discussed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1992
3 Reads

Strengthening hospital nursing, Part 2. Characteristics of effective planning processes.

J Nurs Adm 1992 Jun;22(6):36-46

School of Nursing, Kent State University, Ohio.

Characteristics of the planning process for 213 hospitals participating in Phase 1 of the Strengthening Hospital Nursing Program (SHNP) are described. Differences in planning between the Phase 2 implementation sites and those sites not selected for continued funding are explored. Factors associated with positive planning outcomes among participating hospitals are delineated. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 1992
4 Reads

Common-sense ethics in administrative decision making. Part II, Proactive steps.

J Nurs Adm 1991 Nov;21(11):57-61

University of Maryland, School of Nursing, Baltimore.

This article is the second in a two-part study on common-sense ethics. In Part 1 (October 1991 JONA), the authors presented preparatory steps for the nurse administrator to consider in the management of diverse ethical issues. In Part 2, the authors delineate proactive steps to facilitate the resolution of administrative problems with economic, social, and ethical dimensions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 1991
4 Reads

Variance analysis. Part II, The use of computers.

Authors:
S A Finkler

J Nurs Adm 1991 Sep;21(9):9-15

Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, New York University, New York City.

This is the second in a two-part series on variance analysis. In the first article (JONA, July/August 1991), the author discussed flexible budgeting, including the calculation of price, quantity, volume, and acuity variances. In this second article, the author focuses on the use of computers by nurse managers to aid in the process of calculating, understanding, and justifying variances. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1991
3 Reads

Public relations. Part I, A skill for nurses.

J Nurs Adm 1990 Oct;20(10):28-34

Nurse Executive Associates, Washington, DC.

Public relations is a part of marketing. It is concerned with the promotion of a positive image of organizations and individuals. In this two-part series, the authors discuss how nurse administrators, managers, intrapreneurs, and entrepreneurs can use public relations strategies and techniques to advance their careers, organizations, and the profession. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 1990
14 Reads

Case management--a bottom-line care delivery model. Part II: Adaptation of the model.

J Nurs Adm 1989 Dec;19(12):12-7

Public Health Services, Pima County, Tuscon, AZ.

Tuscson Medical Center's service volume management, research based approach to developing an adaptation of several design components of the New England Medical Center's case management model is described. The concept behind this model has been described (JONA 19(11):16-20). TMC's adaptation has been accomplished by operationalizing Rhea's steps to control variation in resource use through the (1) application of qualitative and quantitative research methods, (2) integration of other models, (3) inherent differences between the southwest and northeast settings, and (4) an organizational and participative planning structure and process. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 1989
6 Reads

Redesigning hospital nursing practice: the Professionally Advanced Care Team (ProACT) model, Part 2.

Authors:
M C Tonges

J Nurs Adm 1989 Sep;19(9):19-22

Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

The pressures of the current nursing shortage have created an unparalleled opportunity to restructure hospital nursing practice and care delivery. The potential exists to create new systems which simultaneously advance the goals of the profession and solve the problems of the shortage. Part 1 of this article (JONA, July/August, 1989) examined the similarities and differences among existing models and described the Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital ProACT model. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1989
4 Reads

Patient classification system evaluation: Part 2, System selection and implementation.

Authors:
H A De Groot

J Nurs Adm 1989 Jul-Aug;19(7):24-30

Catalyst Systems, Mill Valley, California.

How can nurse executives assure optimum patient classification system performance? This two-part series advances a framework for patient classification system (PCS) evaluation. Using an expanded definition of a PCS, Part One (JONA, June) presented a discussion of the six system elements considered essential to a fully operational PCS. Part Two offers a description of PCS selection criteria as well as keys to successful system implementation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1989
6 Reads

Decision-making styles: managerial application of the MBTI and type theory.

Authors:
C M Freund

J Nurs Adm 1988 Dec;18(12):5-11

University of North Carolina School of Nursing, Chapel Hill.

Applying type theory is a relatively inexpensive way for managers to increase effectiveness by emphasizing the qualitative issues in organizations. The author describes managerial and organizational uses of C.G. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 1988
7 Reads

Research in service settings: Part I--Consortium project outcomes.

J Nurs Adm 1988 Feb;18(2):32-7

Stanford University Hospital, Palo Alto, California.

As nurse executives in today's cost-conscious environment attempt to meet their professional responsibilities for encouraging and supporting staff involvement in nursing research, they may wish to consider strategies similar to those described here. In this unique 3-year project, a consortium of nine health care agencies shared research expertise and resources, with the overall aim of incorporating nursing research into practice. This article reports the outcomes and the authors' assessment of the experience. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 1988
4 Reads

Magnet hospitals: Part II. Institutions of excellence.

J Nurs Adm 1988 Feb;18(2):11-9

University of Nevada, Reno.

The oft repeated charge today is to "focus on those who are succeeding!" That's what this report does. Using the eight characteristics identified by Peters and Waterman in their book In Search of Excellence, the study analyzes 16 magnet hospitals to ascertain to what extent they possess characteristics similar to the 'best run' companies in the corporate community. The authors suggest that these magnet hospitals may be dealing effectively with the nursing shortage by creating organizational conditions conducive to eliminating internal nurse shortage. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 1988
5 Reads

Improving nursing morale in a climate of cost containment. Part 2. Program planning.

J Nurs Adm 1984 Nov;14(11):10-5

Declining resources in health care frequently translate into work overload and declining opportunities for nursing staff. Faced with increases in absenteeism and lower morale among staff, nursing administrators must develop low-cost approaches to these problems. Building on the assessment process in Part 1 (October 1984 JONA), the authors present elements of program planning, illustrating the process with a low-cost model program to improve morale that addresses workload, learning opportunities, and organizational rewards for staff nurses. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 1984
4 Reads

Improving nursing morale in a climate of cost containment. Part 1. Organizational assessment.

J Nurs Adm 1984 Oct;14(10):8-15

Faced with declining resources for health care and greater pressures to improve productivity of nursing staff, nursing administrators must act now to develop organizational responses to morale problems among nursing staff. As part of a two-part series for JONA, the authors describe low-cost organizational approaches that address nursing morale. Presented in Part 1 is a low-cost diagnostic process for assessing needs of staff and appraising organizational dimensions contributing to morale. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 1984
4 Reads

Minimizing promotion trauma.

J Nurs Adm 1983 Sep;13(9):14-9

In the April 1983 issue of JONA, the authors identified four major causes and the costs of promotion trauma. Nursing administrators can both minimize this trauma and its unnecessary cost by building awareness of the transition process, clarifying roles and expectations, and attending to the promoted employee's needs by developing a systematic program of manager care. Such support and encouragement can help promotees achieve the expected levels of competency in a shorter period of time, with less personal anguish. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1983
4 Reads

A patient classification system based on the Behavioral System Model of Nursing: Part 1.

Authors:
J A Auger V Dee

J Nurs Adm 1983 Apr;13(4):38-43

This article has described the development of a patient classification system based on the Behavioral System Model of Nursing. Although the system was specifically developed for the psychiatric setting, the framework of the model permits application to all clinical settings. A primary advantage of utilizing a model is that it provides an objective framework for organizing observations of patient behavior, thereby increasing consistency and continuity of care provided by all nursing staff. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 1983
3 Reads

Applying management information systems to staffing.

Authors:
R L Hanson

J Nurs Adm 1982 Oct;12(10):5-9

A management information system (MIS) is a tool for managing resources effectively. After reviewing some concepts and principles for effective data management, Hanson clearly applies the concepts to nurse staffing systems, which manage human resources. He defines a seven-step process for establishing an MIS, from defining the management objective to implementing the system. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 1982
4 Reads

Decentralized budgeting: holding the purse strings, part 1.

J Nurs Adm 1982 May;12(5):15-20

A decentralized nursing structure allows the head nurse to become actively involved in the planning and budgeting process. In Nursing Decentralization: The El Camino Experience (published in November 1981 by Nursing Resources) the authors describe the development of a budgeting system that supports autonomy, accountability, and authority at the practitioner level. For JONA readers, we present, in two parts, an abridged version of the chapter "Budgeting: Holding the Purse Strings. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1982
12 Reads

Skilled clinical knowledge: the value of perceptual awareness, part 1.

Authors:
P Benner J Wrubel

J Nurs Adm 1982 May;12(5):11-4

In this two-part article, the authors present strategies for clinical knowledge development, for documenting, conserving and enhancing the unique knowledge of the experienced clinician. In Part 1, they examine differences between practical and theoretical knowledge and discuss the implications for enhancing the practical knowledge nurses gain through clinical experience. Part 2, which will appear in the next issue of JONA, will examine clinical knowledge development as a means for enriching jobs, retaining experienced nurses, and improving patient care. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1982
6 Reads
  • Page 1 of 1