38 results match your criteria Internet Journal of Rheumatology[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Development of a Core Set of Outcome Measures for Large-vessel Vasculitis: Report from OMERACT 2016.

J Rheumatol 2017 Dec 1;44(12):1933-1937. Epub 2017 Sep 1.

From the Division of Rheumatology, and Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, and Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Informatics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Division of Rheumatology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA; Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul University Faculty of Medicine; Division of Rheumatology, Marmara University, School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey; Division of Rheumatology, University of Ottawa; Division of Rheumatology, The Ottawa Hospital; Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Department of Internal Medicine, University Paris Diderot, Paris, France; University of the West of England; University of Bristol; University Hospitals Bristol National Health Service (NHS) Trust, Bristol, UK; Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.

Objective: Among the challenges in conducting clinical trials in large-vessel vasculitis (LVV), including both giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu arteritis (TA), is the lack of standardized and meaningful outcome measures. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Vasculitis Working Group initiated an international effort to develop and validate data-driven outcome tools for clinical investigation in LVV.

Methods: An international Delphi exercise was completed to gather opinions from clinical experts on LVV-related domains considered important to measure in trials. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.161467DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5712274PMC
December 2017
30 Reads

Agreement between Rheumatologist and Patient-reported Adherence to Methotrexate in a US Rheumatoid Arthritis Registry.

J Rheumatol 2016 06 1;43(6):1027-9. Epub 2016 May 1.

From the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama; Consortium of Rheumatology Researchers of North America (CORRONA) LLC, Southborough; University of Massachusetts, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA.J.R. Curtis, MD, MS, MPH, University of Alabama at Birmingham; A. Bharat, MD, MPH, University of Alabama at Birmingham; L. Chen, PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham; J.D. Greenberg, MD, MPH, CORRONA LLC; L. Harrold, MD, MPH, University of Massachusetts; J.M. Kremer, MD, CORRONA LLC; T. Sommers, MS, CORRONA LLC; D. Pappas, MD, MPH, CORRONA LLC.

Objective: Rheumatologists have limited tools to assess medication adherence. The extent to which methotrexate (MTX) adherence is overestimated by rheumatologists is unknown.

Methods: We deployed an Internet survey to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) participating in a US registry. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.151136DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4891269PMC
June 2016
15 Reads

Why Do Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases Discontinue Their Biologics? An Assessment of Patients' Adherence Using a Self-report Questionnaire.

J Rheumatol 2016 Apr 15;43(4):724-30. Epub 2016 Feb 15.

From the Pharmacy Department, University Hospital; Interuniversity Laboratory of Psychology: Personality, Cognition, Social Change (LIP/PC2S), University Grenoble-Alpes; Rheumatology Clinic, and Clinical Research Center, Grenoble University Hospital; University Grenoble-Alpes/Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)/Techniques de l'Ingénierie Médicale et de la Complexité - Informatique, Mathématiques et Applications, Grenoble Unité Mixte de Recherche CNRS #5525 (TIMC-IMAG UMR 5525)/Themas, Grenoble, France.A.L. Betegnie, PharmD, Pharmacy Department, University Hospital; A. Gauchet, MS, PhD, LIP/PC2S, University Grenoble-Alpes; A. Lehmann, PharmD, Pharmacy Department, University Hospital, and the University Grenoble-Alpes/CNRS/TIMC-IMAG UMR 5525/Themas; L. Grange, MD, PhD, Rheumatology Clinic, Grenoble University Hospital; M. Roustit, PharmD, PhD, Clinical Research Center, Grenoble University Hospital; M. Baudrant, PharmD, PhD, Pharmacy Department, University Hospital, and the University Grenoble-Alpes/CNRS/TIMC-IMAG UMR 5525/Themas; P. Bedouch, PharmD, PhD, Pharmacy Department, University Hospital, and the University Grenoble-Alpes/CNRS/TIMC-IMAG UMR 5525/Themas; B. Allenet, PharmD, PhD, Pharmacy Department, University Hospital, and the University Grenoble-Alpes/CNRS/TIMC-IMAG UMR 5525/Themas.

Objective: Concerns have been raised about nonadherence behavior among patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (CIRD) receiving biologics. This nonadherence may be caused by various factors. The main objective was to explain why patients discontinue their biologics of their own accord. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.150414DOI Listing
April 2016
8 Reads

Development of Cardiovascular Quality Indicators for Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results from an International Expert Panel Using a Novel Online Process.

J Rheumatol 2015 Sep 15;42(9):1548-55. Epub 2015 Jul 15.

From the Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, and the Department of Community Health Sciences, Arthur J.E. Child Chair in Rheumatology Research, the Division of Cardiology and the Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, and the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta; Division of Cardiology and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Arthritis Research Centre of Canada, Richmond, British Columbia; The RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California, USA; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.C.E. Barber, MD, FRCPC, PhD Candidate, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine; D.A. Marshall, MHSA, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Community Health Sciences, Arthur J.E. Child Chair in Rheumatology Research; N. Alvarez, MD, FRCPC, BA, Associate Professor, Division of Cardiology, Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, and Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary; G.B. Mancini, MD, FRCPC, Professor, Division of Cardiology; D. Lacaille, MD, FRCPC, MHSc, Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia and Senior Scientist, Arthritis Research Centre of Canada; S. Keeling, MD, FRCPC, MSc, Associate Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta; J.A. Aviña-Zubieta, MD, MSc, PhD, Assistant Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia and Research Scientist, Arthritis Research Centre of Canada; D. Khodyakov, PhD, MA, Social/Behavioral Scientist, The RAND Corporation; C. Barnabe, MD, FRCPC, MSc, Assistant Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary and ARC Research Sci

Objective: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have a high risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). We developed CVD quality indicators (QI) for screening and use in rheumatology clinics.

Methods: A systematic review was conducted of the literature on CVD risk reduction in RA and the general population. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.141603DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4758831PMC
September 2015
26 Reads

An Internet-based Controlled Trial Aimed to Improve Osteoporosis Prevention among Chronic Glucocorticoid Users.

J Rheumatol 2015 Aug 1;42(8):1478-83. Epub 2015 Jul 1.

From the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, and Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, and Department of Biostatistics, and Division of Preventive Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama; Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts; Express Scripts, St. Louis, Missouri; Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, New Jersey; Real Endpoints LLC, Westport, Connecticut, USA.A.H. Warriner, MD, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism; R.C. Outman, MS, Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham; J.J. Allison, MD, MS, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School; J.R. Curtis, MD, MS, MPH, Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham; N.J. Markward, PhD, Express Scripts; D.T. Redden, PhD, Department of Biostatistics; M.M. Safford, MD, Division of Preventive Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham; E.J. Stanek, PharmD, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation; A.R. Steinkellner, PharmD, Express Scripts* and Real Endpoints LLC; K.G. Saag, MD, MSc, Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Objective: To address the low prevention and treatment rates for those at risk of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP), we evaluated the influence of a direct-to-patient, Internet-based educational video intervention using "storytelling" on rates of antiosteoporosis medication use among chronic glucocorticoid users who were members of an online pharmacy refill service.

Methods: We identified members who refilled ≥ 5 mg/day of prednisone (or equivalent) for 90 contiguous days and had no GIOP therapy for ≥ 12 months. Using patient stories, we developed an online video addressing risk factors and treatment options, and delivered it to members refilling a glucocorticoid prescription. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.141238DOI Listing
August 2015
26 Reads

Patient Information about Gout: An International Review of Existing Educational Resources.

J Rheumatol 2015 Jun 1;42(6):975-8. Epub 2015 Apr 1.

From the Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch; Department of Psychology, University of Otago, Dunedin; Department of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Canterbury District Health Board, New Zealand.M.E. Johnston, PhD, Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch; G.J. Treharne, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Otago, Dunedin; P.T. Chapman, MD, FRACP, Department of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Canterbury District Health Board; L.K. Stamp, MB, ChB, FRACP, PhD, Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch.

Objective: Inadequate patient information about gout may contribute to poor disease outcomes. We reviewed existing educational resources for gout to identify strengths and weaknesses and compare resources cross-nationally.

Methods: Content, readability, and dietary recommendations were reviewed using a sample of 30 resources (print and Web-based) from 6 countries. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.jrheum.org/lookup/doi/10.3899/jrheum.141442
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.141442DOI Listing
June 2015
5 Reads

Is a patient questionnaire without a joint examination as undesirable as a joint examination without a patient questionnaire?

J Rheumatol 2014 Apr;41(4):619-21

Division of Rheumatology, NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, New York, USA;

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.140074DOI Listing
April 2014
11 Reads

Toward a generalized framework of core measurement areas in clinical trials: a position paper for OMERACT 11.

J Rheumatol 2014 May 1;41(5):978-85. Epub 2014 Mar 1.

From the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Centre for Global Health Research, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa; University of Bristol, Academic Rheumatology Unit, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, UK; Mobility Program Clinical Research Unit, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada; International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) Research Branch in cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for the Family of International Classifications in Germany; Swiss Paraplegic Research (SPF), Nottwil; Department of Health Sciences and Health Policy, University of Lucerne, Lucerne; and at SPF, Nottwil, Switzerland; Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Maastricht University Medical Center and Caphri Research Institute, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Department of Medical Social Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA; Respiratory Unit, Alder Hey Children's Hospital, Liverpool, UK; Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.

Objective: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) international consensus initiative has successfully developed core sets of outcome measures for trials of many rheumatologic conditions, but its expanding scope called for clarification and updating of its underlying conceptual framework and working process. To develop a core set of what we propose to call outcome measurement instruments, consensus must be reached both on what to measure and how to measure. This article deals with the first part: a framework necessary to ensure comprehensiveness of the domains chosen for measurement. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.131307DOI Listing
May 2014
8 Reads

How to choose core outcome measurement sets for clinical trials: OMERACT 11 approves filter 2.0.

J Rheumatol 2014 May 1;41(5):1025-30. Epub 2014 Mar 1.

From the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; University of Bristol, Academic Rheumatology Unit, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, UK; Université Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC) - Paris 6, GRC-UMPC 08 (EEMOIS), Paris, France; APHP, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, Rhumatologie; University of Leeds and UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds, UK; Department of Rheumatology, APHP, Ambroise Paré Hospital, UPRES EA 2506 Université Versailles-Saint Quentin En Yvelines, Boulogne-Billancourt, France; Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Australian Health Workforce Institute, School of Population Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; Academic Medical Center University of Amsterdam and Atrium Medical Center Heerlen, Heerlen, The Netherlands; Institute of Bone and Joint Research and Sydney Medical School and School of Public Health, University of Sydney, and Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore, St. Leonards, NSW, Australia; SDG LLC, Cambridge, Massachusetts; University of Alabama at Birmingham; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama; Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota; Division of Immunology/Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, and Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) initiative works to develop core sets of outcome measures for trials and observational studies in rheumatology. At the OMERACT 11 meeting, substantial time was devoted to discussing a conceptual framework and a proposal for a more explicit working process to develop what we now propose to term core outcome measurement sets, collectively termed "OMERACT Filter 2.0. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.131314DOI Listing
May 2014
11 Reads

Is tightly controlled disease activity possible with online patient-reported outcomes?

J Rheumatol 2014 Apr 15;41(4):640-7. Epub 2014 Feb 15.

From the Department of Rheumatology and the Department of Biostatistics, University Medical Center; Department of Rheumatology, Maasstad Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; and Department of Biostatistics, KV Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

Objective: To evaluate the performance of patient-reported outcomes (PRO) as primary indices for identification and prediction of a 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28)>3.2 among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Methods: Patients with RA completed monthly online PRO [Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity Index (RADAI), visual analog scale (VAS) fatigue] and were clinically assessed every 3 months using the DAS28. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.130174DOI Listing
April 2014
6 Reads

Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis video project: an update from the GRAPPA 2011 annual meeting.

J Rheumatol 2012 Nov;39(11):2198-200

University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

Numerous physical examination instruments are used to assess and measure severity of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in practice and in clinical trials. The Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) has developed several online training modules used by GRAPPA members and investigators participating in psoriasis and PsA research. At the 2011 GRAPPA meeting, attendees were updated on the ongoing development of the training modules. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.120823DOI Listing
November 2012
20 Reads
1 Citation
3.190 Impact Factor

Development and assessment of users' satisfaction with the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index 2000 responder index-50 website.

J Rheumatol 2013 Jan 1;40(1):34-9. Epub 2012 Nov 1.

Institute of Medical Science, the Lupus Clinic, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: To describe the development of the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 Responder Index-50 (S2K RI-50) Website (www.s2k-ri-50.com) and to assess satisfaction with its training and examination modules among rheumatologists and rheumatology fellows. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.120754DOI Listing
January 2013
51 Reads
4 Citations
3.190 Impact Factor

Health information on the internet.

J Rheumatol 2012 May;39(5):883-4

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.120136DOI Listing
May 2012
3 Reads

YouTube for information on rheumatoid arthritis--a wakeup call?

J Rheumatol 2012 May 1;39(5):899-903. Epub 2012 Apr 1.

Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Objective: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common debilitating autoimmune disease, with unmet need for knowledge among patients and the general population. YouTube is a popular, consumer-generated, video-sharing website, which can be a source of information on RA. We investigated the quality of information on RA on YouTube and analyzed audience interaction. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.111114DOI Listing
May 2012
6 Reads

Patient-reported outcome in psoriatic arthritis: a comparison of Web-based versus paper-completed questionnaires.

J Rheumatol 2011 Dec 1;38(12):2619-24. Epub 2011 Nov 1.

Psoriatic Arthritis Program, University Health Network, Centre for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: Patients followed in observational cohorts often complete patient-reported outcomes on paper questionnaires. With advances in technology, Web-based (WB) formats have been developed. The aims of our study were to determine whether WB and paper-based questionnaires (PB) completed by patients followed in the psoriatic arthritis (PsA) clinic are comparable; whether there is a patient preference for one method or the other; and whether any preference is related to patient characteristics. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.110165DOI Listing
December 2011
3 Reads

Valuing health for clinical and economic decisions: directions relevant for rheumatologists.

J Rheumatol 2011 Aug;38(8):1770-5

Arthritis Research UK Epidemiology Unit, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.

The quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) is a construct that integrates the value or preference for a health state over the period of time in that health state. The main use of QALY is in cost-utility analysis, to help make resource allocation decisions when faced with choices. Although the concept of the QALY is appealing, there is ongoing debate regarding their usefulness and approaches to deriving QALY. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.110404DOI Listing
August 2011
6 Reads

The PROMIS of better outcome assessment: responsiveness, floor and ceiling effects, and Internet administration.

J Rheumatol 2011 Aug;38(8):1759-64

Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA.

Objective: Use of item response theory (IRT) and, subsequently, computerized adaptive testing (CAT), under the umbrella of the NIH-PROMIS initiative (National Institutes of Health-Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System), to bring strong new assets to the development of more sensitive, more widely applicable, and more efficiently administered patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments. We present data on current progress in 3 crucial areas: floor and ceiling effects, responsiveness to change, and interactive computer-based administration over the Internet.

Methods: We examined nearly 1000 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and related diseases in a series of studies including a one-year longitudinal examination of detection of change; compared responsiveness of the Legacy SF-36 and HAQ-DI instruments with IRT-based instruments; performed a randomized head-to-head trial of 4 modes of item administration; and simulated the effect of lack of floor and ceiling items upon statistical power and sample sizes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.110402DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3827974PMC
August 2011
3 Reads

An internet-based self-management program with telephone support for adolescents with arthritis: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

J Rheumatol 2010 Sep 1;37(9):1944-52. Epub 2010 Jul 1.

Child Health Evaluative Sciences, Chronic Pain Program, Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada.

Objective: To determine the feasibility of a 12-week Internet-based self-management program of disease-specific information, self-management strategies, and social support with telephone support for youth with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and their parents, aimed at reducing physical and emotional symptoms and improving health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Methods: A nonblind pilot randomized controlled trial (NCT01011179) was conducted to test the feasibility of the "Teens Taking Charge: Managing Arthritis Online" Internet intervention across 4 tertiary-level centers in Canada. Participants were 46 adolescents with JIA, ages 12 to 18 years, and 1 parent for each participant, who were randomized to the control arm (n = 24) or the Internet intervention (n = 22). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.091327DOI Listing
September 2010
16 Reads

Surfing for juvenile idiopathic arthritis: perspectives on quality and content of information on the Internet.

J Rheumatol 2009 Aug 16;36(8):1755-62. Epub 2009 Jun 16.

Child Health Evaluative Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: To determine the quality and content of English language Internet information about juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) from the perspectives of consumers and healthcare professionals.

Methods: Key words relevant to JIA were searched across 10 search engines. Quality of information was appraised independently by 2 health professionals, 1 young adult with JIA, and a parent using the DISCERN tool. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.081010DOI Listing
August 2009
13 Reads

The challenges of developing online learning.

Authors:
Alfred Cividino

J Rheumatol 2009 Mar;36(3):470-1

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.090007DOI Listing
March 2009
2 Reads

Evaluation of a web-based teaching module on examination of the hand.

J Rheumatol 2009 Mar 4;36(3):623-7. Epub 2009 Feb 4.

Queens University, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of an online module in the development of medical students' clinical hand examination skills.

Methods: We developed a Web-based module to teach examination of the hand to first-year medical students (n = 99) to address the core skills expected in undergraduate medical training in Canada. The module was compared to the standard recommended text and tutor-led teaching using a validated objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) and a written knowledge test. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.080761DOI Listing
March 2009
6 Reads

Facebook medicine.

J Rheumatol 2009 Jan;36(1):211

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.080750DOI Listing
January 2009
4 Reads

Patient-oriented methotrexate information sites on the Internet: a review of completeness, accuracy, format, reliability, credibility, and readability.

J Rheumatol 2009 Jan;36(1):41-9

Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, Rheumatology Centre, St. Joseph's Health Care, 268 Grosvenor Street, PO Box 5777, London, ON, Canada, N6A 4V2.

Objective: With continuing use of the Internet, rheumatologists are referring patients to various websites to gain information about medications and diseases. Our goal was to develop and evaluate a Medication Website Assessment Tool (MWAT) for use by health professionals, and to explore the overall quality of methotrexate information presented on common English-language websites.

Methods: Identification of websites was performed using a search strategy on the search engine Google. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.jrheum.com/subscribers/08/13/1118.html
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.080430DOI Listing
January 2009
9 Reads

Evaluation of the presentation of systemic onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: data from the Pennsylvania Systemic Onset Juvenile Arthritis Registry (PASOJAR).

J Rheumatol 2008 Feb 15;35(2):343-8. Epub 2007 Dec 15.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Rheumatology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4318, USA.

Objective: To characterize the initial clinical and laboratory features of patients with systemic onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (soJRA) through a Web-based registry.

Methods: Patients diagnosed with soJRA in the last 15 years at 3 medical centers in Pennsylvania were identified. Data were collected retrospectively using a Web-based interface in compliance with patient privacy standards. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2008
7 Reads

The clinical spectrum of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome in the absence and presence of lupus.

J Rheumatol 2007 Feb;34(2):346-52

Interfaith Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA.

Objective: To compare the clinical spectrum of patients with primary catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (P-CAPS) to those with systemic lupus erythematosus-associated CAPS (SLE-CAPS).

Methods: We used the Internet-based CAPS Registry to compare the demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics of 127 P-CAPS patients to 103 SLE-CAPS patients. In a logistic regression analysis, we also determined the poor prognostic factors for mortality. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2007
4 Reads

Recent diuretic use and the risk of recurrent gout attacks: the online case-crossover gout study.

J Rheumatol 2006 Jul 1;33(7):1341-5. Epub 2006 Jun 1.

Boston University Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Arthritis Center, the Department of Medicine at Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA.

Objective: To assess several putative risk factors, including thiazide and loop diuretics use, thought to trigger recurrent gout attacks.

Methods: We conducted an internet-based case-crossover study involving subjects who had a gout attack within the past year. Patients were recruited online and asked to provide access to medical records. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2006
3 Reads

Medication errors with the use of allopurinol and colchicine: a retrospective study of a national, anonymous Internet-accessible error reporting system.

J Rheumatol 2006 Mar 15;33(3):562-6. Epub 2006 Feb 15.

Department of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, USA.

Objective: To more closely assess medication errors in gout care, we examined data from a national, Internet-accessible error reporting program over a 5-year reporting period.

Methods: We examined data from the MEDMARX database, covering the period from January 1, 1999 through December 31, 2003. For allopurinol and colchicine, we examined error severity, source, type, contributing factors, and healthcare personnel involved in errors, and we detailed errors resulting in patient harm. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2006
4 Reads

Frequency and predictors of inappropriate management of recurrent gout attacks in a longitudinal study.

J Rheumatol 2006 Jan 1;33(1):104-9. Epub 2005 Nov 1.

Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118, USA.

Objective: To evaluate the patterns and determinants of medication use during recurrent gout attacks.

Methods: We followed participants with documented gout in an online prospective case-crossover study. During an attack, subjects were asked if they had consulted a physician for the attack and what medications they were using. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2006
4 Reads

Assessment of disease severity (in terms of function) using the internet.

J Rheumatol 2004 Sep;31(9):1819-22

Clinical School, Swansea University, Wales.

Objective: To determine whether visual analog scales (VAS) can be used over the Internet to assess the patient with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) accurately or if the use of this different medium will affect the results.

Methods: Patients with AS (n = 50) attending a physiotherapy/educational course completed both an Internet based and a paper based version of the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) that uses VAS. The Internet version was completed twice to assess intrarespondent variation reliability and compared with the paper version to assess interrespondent variation reliability. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2004
4 Reads

A web-compatible instrument for measuring self-reported disease activity in arthritis.

J Rheumatol 2004 Feb;31(2):223-8

Health Services Research and Development, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, Veterans Medical Research Foundation, University of California, San Diego (UCSD), California 92161, USA.

Objective: To describe a Web-based computer health assessment survey for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to evaluate the survey in comparison with current paper versions.

Methods: Utilizing data from a study on RA, we compared results from 43 patients attending a university-based clinic who were each given a paper and a demonstration computer version of a patient self-assessment questionnaire including multiple-choice questions from a multi-dimensional Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ); visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, fatigue, and global disease severity; and a tender and swollen joint count reporting tool. Patients were given optional followup surveys to determine their opinion of the computer program. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2004
3 Reads

Localized polyarteritis nodosa with periostitis.

J Rheumatol 2001 Dec;28(12):2758-9

Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Purpan, Toulouse, France.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2001
5 Reads

The WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring, its database, and the technical support of the Uppsala Monitoring Center.

J Rheumatol 2001 May;28(5):1180-7

Uppsala Monitoring Center, Sweden.

We describe the development of an international adverse reaction database. The operational responsibility for technical aspects of international drug monitoring are run by the Uppsala Monitoring Center (UMC). The system is based on interchange of adverse reaction information between national drug monitoring centers in 60 countries. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2001
4 Reads

Surfing the Net--information on the World Wide Web for persons with arthritis: patient empowerment or patient deceit?

J Rheumatol 2001 Jan;28(1):185-91

Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Health Services, Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Objective: In the past few years access to the Internet has become readily available. Patients are increasingly seeking and obtaining health information through the Internet, most often the World Wide Web (WWW). We assessed the content, authorship, and scope of the information available on WWW in relation to rheumatoid arthritis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2001
3 Reads

Crawling through the Web: what do our patients find?

Authors:
S M Edworthy

J Rheumatol 2001 Jan;28(1):1-2

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2001
3 Reads

Human neutrophil elastase in temporal (giant cell) arteritis: plasma and immunohistochemical studies.

J Rheumatol 1998 Apr;25(4):710-3

INSERM U353, Hôpital St-Louis, Paris, France.

Objective: Few enzymes are able to attack the internal elastic lamina, which is destroyed in temporal arteritis (TA). Because human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is one of these, its role in the pathogenesis of TA was examined in patients undergoing temporal artery biopsy for suspected TA.

Methods: Over a 6 month period, 33 patients undergoing temporal artery biopsy were prospectively included in the study. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 1998
3 Reads
  • Page 1 of 1