806 results match your criteria International Journal of Health Geographics [Journal]


Urban environment as an independent predictor of insulin resistance in a South Asian population.

Int J Health Geogr 2019 Feb 12;18(1). Epub 2019 Feb 12.

PURSE-HIS Study Center, Sri Ramachandra University, Chennai, India.

Background: Developing countries, such as India, are experiencing rapid urbanization, which may have a major impact on the environment: including worsening air and water quality, noise and the problems of waste disposal. We used health data from an ongoing cohort study based in southern India to examine the relationship between the urban environment and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR).

Methods: We utilized three metrics of urbanization: distance from urban center; population density in the India Census; and satellite-based land cover. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-019-0169-9DOI Listing
February 2019

Household income, active travel, and their interacting impact on body mass index in a sample of urban Canadians: a Bayesian spatial analysis.

Int J Health Geogr 2019 Feb 6;18(1). Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Canada Research Chair in Population Physical Activity, School of Human Kinetics and Recreation, Physical Education Building, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NF, A1C 5S7, Canada.

Background: Active travel for utilitarian purposes contributes to total physical activity and may help counter the obesity epidemic. However, the evidence linking active travel and individual-level body weight is equivocal. Statistical modeling that accounts for spatial autocorrelation and unmeasured spatial predictors has not yet used to explore whether the health benefits of active travel are shared equally across socioeconomic groups. Read More

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https://ij-healthgeographics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-019-0168-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6366056PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

The association between population density and blood lipid levels in Dutch blood donors.

Int J Health Geogr 2019 Feb 4;18(1). Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, de Boelelaan 1089A, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: In low and middle-income countries (LMIC), the total and LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels of residents of urban areas are reported to be higher than those of rural areas. This may be due to differences in lifestyle behaviors between residents of urban areas and rural areas in LMIC. In this study, our aims were to (1) examine whether or not LDL cholesterol, total/HDL ratios and triglyceride levels of individuals in densely populated areas are higher than those of individuals living in less-densely populated areas in a high-income country (HIC) and (2) investigate the potential mediating roles of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-019-0167-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6360723PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Associations between spatial access to physical activity facilities and frequency of physical activity; how do home and workplace neighbourhoods in West Central Scotland compare?

Authors:
Laura Macdonald

Int J Health Geogr 2019 Jan 29;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 29.

MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, 200 Renfield Street, Glasgow, G2 3AX, Scotland, UK.

Background: Over a third of the Scottish population do not meet physical activity (PA) recommendations, with a greater proportion of those from disadvantaged areas not meeting recommended levels. There is a great need for detailed understanding of why some people are active while others are not. It has been established that features within home neighbourhoods are important for promoting PA, and although around 60% of time spent in exercise daily is undertaken outside the residential environment, relatively little research includes both home and workplace neighbourhood contexts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-019-0166-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6352429PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Geographic and area-level socioeconomic variation in cardiometabolic risk factor distribution: a systematic review of the literature.

Int J Health Geogr 2019 Jan 8;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 8.

School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia.

Introduction: A growing number of publications report variation in the distribution of cardiometabolic risk factors (CMRFs) at different geographic scales. A review of these variations may help inform policy and health service organisation.

Aim: To review studies reporting variation in the geographic distribution of CMRFs and its association with various proxy measures of area-level socioeconomic disadvantage (ASED) among the adult ( ≥ 18 years) population across the world. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0165-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6323718PMC
January 2019

The use of open source GIS algorithms, big geographic data, and cluster computing techniques to compile a geospatial database that can be used to evaluate upstream bathing and sanitation behaviours on downstream health outcomes in Indonesia, 2000-2008.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 12 14;17(1):44. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Department of Geography and Geosciences, Salisbury University, Salisbury, MD, 21801, USA.

Background: Waterborne diseases are one of the leading causes of mortality in developing countries, and diarrhea alone is responsible for over 1.5 million deaths annually. Such waterborne illnesses most often affect those in impoverished rural communities who rely on rivers for their supply of drinking water. Read More

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https://ij-healthgeographics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0164-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6295057PMC
December 2018
6 Reads

A framework for the identification and classification of homogeneous socioeconomic areas in the analysis of health care variation.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 12 4;17(1):42. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Translational Health Research Institute, Western Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Background: Detecting the variation of health indicators across similar areas or peer geographies is often useful if the spatial units are socially and economically meaningful, so that there is a degree of homogeneity in each unit. Indices are frequently constructed to generate summaries of socioeconomic status or other measures in geographic small areas. Larger areas may be built to be homogenous using regionalization algorithms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0162-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6278138PMC
December 2018

Residential green space and pathways to term birth weight in the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 12 4;17(1):43. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, 2520 SW Campus Way, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA.

Background: A growing number of studies observe associations between the amount of green space around a mother's home and positive birth outcomes; however, the robustness of this association and potential pathways of action remain unclear.

Objectives: To examine associations between mother's residential green space and term birth weight within the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) study and examine specific hypothesized pathways.

Methods: We examined 2510 births located in Vancouver, Edmonton, Winnipeg, and Toronto Canada. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0160-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6280529PMC
December 2018

An updated meta-analysis of the distribution and prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. in ticks in Europe.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 12 4;17(1):41. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Department of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

Background: The bacteria of the group Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. are the etiological agents of Lyme borreliosis in humans, transmitted by bites of ticks. Read More

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https://ij-healthgeographics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0163-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6319795PMC
December 2018
10 Reads

Capturing fine-scale travel behaviors: a comparative analysis between personal activity location measurement system (PALMS) and travel diary.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 12 3;17(1):40. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Research Institute, University of Washington, 2001 Eighth Avenue, Suite 400, Seattle, WA, 98121, USA.

Background: Device-collected data from GPS and accelerometers for identifying active travel behaviors have dramatically changed research methods in transportation planning and public health. Automated algorithms have helped researchers to process large datasets with likely fewer errors than found in other collection methods (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0161-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6278002PMC
December 2018

Continuities and changes in spatial patterns of under-five mortality at the district level in India (1991-2011).

Int J Health Geogr 2018 11 15;17(1):39. Epub 2018 Nov 15.

Centre de recherche en démographie, Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.

Background: India has the largest number of under-five deaths globally, and large variations in under-five mortality persist between states and districts. Relationships between under-five mortality and numerous socioeconomic, development and environmental health factors have been explored at the national and state levels, but the possible spatial heterogeneity in these relationships has seldom been investigated at the district level. This study seeks to unravel local variation in key determinants of under-five mortality based on the 1991 and 2011 censuses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0159-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6238274PMC
November 2018

A systematic review of spatial decision support systems in public health informatics supporting the identification of high risk areas for zoonotic disease outbreaks.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 10 30;17(1):38. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

College of Health Solutions, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA.

Background: Zoonotic diseases account for a substantial portion of infectious disease outbreaks and burden on public health programs to maintain surveillance and preventative measures. Taking advantage of new modeling approaches and data sources have become necessary in an interconnected global community. To facilitate data collection, analysis, and decision-making, the number of spatial decision support systems reported in the last 10 years has increased. Read More

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https://ij-healthgeographics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0157-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6208014PMC
October 2018
1 Read

Developing a representative community health survey sampling frame using open-source remote satellite imagery in Mozambique.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 10 29;17(1):37. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Department of Global Health, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA.

Background: Lack of accurate data on the distribution of sub-national populations in low- and middle-income countries impairs planning, monitoring, and evaluation of interventions. Novel, low-cost methods to develop unbiased survey sampling frames at sub-national, sub-provincial, and even sub-district levels are urgently needed. This article details our experience using remote satellite imagery to develop a provincial-level representative community survey sampling frame to evaluate the effects of a 7-year health system intervention in Sofala Province, Mozambique. Read More

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https://ij-healthgeographics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0158-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6206736PMC
October 2018
7 Reads

Cross-border spatial accessibility of health care in the North-East Department of Haiti.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 10 25;17(1):36. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Département d'études urbaines et touristiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, Case postale 8888, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec, H3C 3P8, Canada.

Background: The geographical accessibility of health services is an important issue especially in developing countries and even more for those sharing a border as for Haiti and the Dominican Republic. During the last 2 decades, numerous studies have explored the potential spatial access to health services within a whole country or metropolitan area. However, the impacts of the border on the access to health resources between two countries have been less explored. Read More

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https://ij-healthgeographics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0156-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6203203PMC
October 2018
6 Reads

Evaluating the risk for Usutu virus circulation in Europe: comparison of environmental niche models and epidemiological models.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 10 12;17(1):35. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Department of Biogeography, University of Bayreuth, Universitätsstr. 30, 95447, Bayreuth, Germany.

Background: Usutu virus (USUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus, reported in many countries of Africa and Europe, with an increasing spatial distribution and host range. Recent outbreaks leading to regional declines of European common blackbird (Turdus merula) populations and a rising number of human cases emphasize the need for increased awareness and spatial risk assessment.

Methods: Modelling approaches in ecology and epidemiology differ substantially in their algorithms, potentially resulting in diverging model outputs. Read More

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https://ij-healthgeographics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0155-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6186058PMC
October 2018
13 Reads

Spatial analyzes of HLA data in Rio Grande do Sul, south Brazil: genetic structure and possible correlation with autoimmune diseases.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 09 14;17(1):34. Epub 2018 Sep 14.

Instituto Nacional de Genética Médica Populacional (INaGeMP), Porto Alegre, Brazil.

Background: HLA genes are the most polymorphic of the human genome and have distinct allelic frequencies in populations of different geographical regions of the world, serving as genetic markers in ancestry studies. In addition, specific HLA alleles may be associated with various autoimmune and infectious diseases. The bone marrow donor registry in Brazil is the third largest in the world, and it counts with genetic typing of HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0154-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6137739PMC
September 2018
5 Reads

A multi-modal relative spatial access assessment approach to measure spatial accessibility to primary care providers.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 08 23;17(1):33. Epub 2018 Aug 23.

Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, 1 University of New Mexico, MSC 01 1110, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, Mexico.

Two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) methods that account for multiple transportation modes provide more realistic accessibility representation than single-mode methods. However, the use of the impedance coefficient in an impedance function (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0153-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6108155PMC

Analysis of big patient mobility data for identifying medical regions, spatio-temporal characteristics and care demands of patients on the move.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 08 2;17(1):32. Epub 2018 Aug 2.

Informatics Institute, Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: Patient mobility can be defined as a patient's movement or utilization of a health care service located in a place or region other than the patient's place of residence. Mobility provides freedom to patients to obtain health care from providers across regions and even countries. It is essential to monitor patient choices in order to maintain the quality standards and responsiveness of the health system, otherwise, the health system may suffer from geographic disparities in the accessibility to quality and responsive health care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0152-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6071389PMC

Evaluation of geoimputation strategies in a large case study.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 07 31;17(1):30. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability, University of Oklahoma, 100 East Boyd Street, Norman, OK, USA.

Background: Health data usually has missing or incomplete location information, which impacts the quality of research. Geoimputation methods are used by health professionals to increase the spatial resolution of address information for more accurate analyses. The objective of this study was to evaluate geo-imputation methods with respect to the demographic and spatial characteristics of the data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0151-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6069790PMC

Domestic gardens and self-reported health: a national population study.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 07 31;17(1):31. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Public Health GIS Unit, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield, Regent Court, 30 Regent Street, Sheffield, S1 4DA, UK.

Background: There is a growing recognition of the health benefits of the natural environment. Whilst domestic gardens account for a significant proportion of greenspace in urban areas, few studies, and no population level studies, have investigated their potential health benefits. With gardens offering immediate interaction with nature on our doorsteps, we hypothesise that garden size will affect general health-with smaller domestic gardens associated with poorer health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0148-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6069855PMC
July 2018
1 Read

Capturing exposure in environmental health research: challenges and opportunities of different activity space models.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 07 28;17(1):29. Epub 2018 Jul 28.

Department of Built Environment, Aalto University, PO Box 14100, 00076, Aalto, Finland.

Background: The built environment health promotion has attracted notable attention across a wide spectrum of health-related research over the past decade. However, the results about the contextual effects on health and PA are highly heterogeneous. The discrepancies between the results can potentially be partly explained by the diverse use of different spatial units of analysis in assessing individuals' exposure to various environment characteristics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0149-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6064075PMC

Using Google Location History data to quantify fine-scale human mobility.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 07 27;17(1):28. Epub 2018 Jul 27.

WorldPop Project, Geography and Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.

Background: Human mobility is fundamental to understanding global issues in the health and social sciences such as disease spread and displacements from disasters and conflicts. Detailed mobility data across spatial and temporal scales are difficult to collect, however, with movements varying from short, repeated movements to work or school, to rare migratory movements across national borders. While typical sources of mobility data such as travel history surveys and GPS tracker data can inform different typologies of movement, almost no source of readily obtainable data can address all types of movement at once. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0150-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6062973PMC

Capturing the spatial variability of HIV epidemics in South Africa and Tanzania using routine healthcare facility data.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 07 11;17(1):27. Epub 2018 Jul 11.

Africa Health Research Institute, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.

Background: Large geographical variations in the intensity of the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa call for geographically targeted resource allocation where burdens are greatest. However, data available for mapping the geographic variability of HIV prevalence and detecting HIV 'hotspots' is scarce, and population-based surveillance data are not always available. Here, we evaluated the viability of using clinic-based HIV prevalence data to measure the spatial variability of HIV in South Africa and Tanzania. Read More

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https://ij-healthgeographics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0146-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6042209PMC
July 2018
5 Reads

Validity of environmental audits using GigaPan and Google Earth Technology.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 07 6;17(1):26. Epub 2018 Jul 6.

Environment and Policy Lab, School of Kinesiology, University of Michigan, 1402 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2013, USA.

Background: Health behaviors are shaped by the context in which people live. However, documenting environmental context has remained a challenge. More specifically, direct observation techniques require large investments in time and resources and auditing the environment through web-based platforms has limited stability in spatio-temporal imagery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0147-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6035474PMC

Geospatial blockchain: promises, challenges, and scenarios in health and healthcare.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 07 5;17(1):25. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Nashville, TN, 37204-3951, USA.

A PubMed query run in June 2018 using the keyword 'blockchain' retrieved 40 indexed papers, a reflection of the growing interest in blockchain among the medical and healthcare research and practice communities. Blockchain's foundations of decentralisation, cryptographic security and immutability make it a strong contender in reshaping the healthcare landscape worldwide. Blockchain solutions are currently being explored for: (1) securing patient and provider identities; (2) managing pharmaceutical and medical device supply chains; (3) clinical research and data monetisation; (4) medical fraud detection; (5) public health surveillance; (6) enabling truly public and open geo-tagged data; (7) powering many Internet of Things-connected autonomous devices, wearables, drones and vehicles, via the distributed peer-to-peer apps they run, to deliver the full vision of smart healthy cities and regions; and (8) blockchain-enabled augmented reality in crisis mapping and recovery scenarios, including mechanisms for validating, crediting and rewarding crowdsourced geo-tagged data, among other emerging use cases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0144-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6033217PMC
July 2018
2 Reads

Social and physical environmental correlates of independent mobility in children: a systematic review taking sex/gender differences into account.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 07 3;17(1):24. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

Faculty of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Chemnitz University of Technology, Chemnitz, Germany.

Background: Children's independent mobility (CIM) is an important contributor to physical activity and health in children. However, in the last 20 years CIM has significantly decreased. To develop effective intervention programs to promote CIM, the impact of the environment on CIM must be identified. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0145-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6029402PMC

Quantifying spatial accessibility in public health practice and research: an application to on-premise alcohol outlets, United States, 2013.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 06 27;17(1):23. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 4770 Buford Highway, N.E. Mailstop F-78, Atlanta, GA, 30341, USA.

Objective: To assess spatial accessibility measures to on-premise alcohol outlets at census block, census tract, county, and state levels for the United States.

Methods: Using network analysis in a geographic information system, we computed distance-based measures (Euclidean distance, driving distance, and driving time) to on-premise alcohol outlets for the entire U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0143-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6020393PMC

Distributional ecology of Andes hantavirus: a macroecological approach.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 06 22;17(1):22. Epub 2018 Jun 22.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Biodiversity Institute, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, 66045, USA.

Background: Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is an infection endemic in Chile and Argentina, caused by Andes hantavirus (ANDV). The rodent Oligoryzomys longicaudatus is suggested as the main reservoir, although several other species of Sigmodontinae are known hosts of ANDV. Here, we explore potential ANDV transmission risk to humans in southern South America, based on eco-epidemiological associations among: six rodent host species, seropositive rodents, and human HPS cases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0142-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6013855PMC
June 2018
19 Reads

Use of mobile technology-based participatory mapping approaches to geolocate health facility attendees for disease surveillance in low resource settings.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 06 18;17(1):21. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

MRC Tropical Epidemiology Group, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, WC1E 7HT, UK.

Background: Identifying fine-scale spatial patterns of disease is essential for effective disease control and elimination programmes. In low resource areas without formal addresses, novel strategies are needed to locate residences of individuals attending health facilities in order to efficiently map disease patterns. We aimed to assess the use of Android tablet-based applications containing high resolution maps to geolocate individual residences, whilst comparing the functionality, usability and cost of three software packages designed to collect spatial information. Read More

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https://ij-healthgeographics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0141-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6006992PMC
June 2018
13 Reads

A log-Weibull spatial scan statistic for time to event data.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 06 13;17(1):20. Epub 2018 Jun 13.

Department of Pediatrics, 3-524, Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, University of Alberta, 11405 87 Avenue NW, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1C9, Canada.

Background: Spatial scan statistics have been used for the identification of geographic clusters of elevated numbers of cases of a condition such as disease outbreaks. These statistics accompanied by the appropriate distribution can also identify geographic areas with either longer or shorter time to events. Other authors have proposed the spatial scan statistics based on the exponential and Weibull distributions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0137-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5998574PMC
June 2018
1 Read

Food environments and dietary intakes among adults: does the type of spatial exposure measurement matter? A systematic review.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 06 9;17(1):19. Epub 2018 Jun 9.

School of Population and Global Health, The University of Western Australia, M451, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Perth, WA, 6009, Australia.

Background: The relationships between food environments and dietary intake have been assessed via a range of methodologically diverse measures of spatial exposure to food outlets, resulting in a largely inconclusive body of evidence, limiting informed policy intervention.

Objective: This systematic review aims to evaluate the influence of methodological choice on study outcomes by examining the within-study effect of availability (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0139-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5994245PMC

Ambient air quality and spatio-temporal patterns of cardiovascular emergency department visits.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 06 8;17(1):18. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Department of Geography, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA.

Background: Air pollutants have been associated with various adverse health effects, including increased rates of hospital admissions and emergency room visits. Although numerous time-series studies and case-crossover studies have estimated associations between day-to-day variation in pollutant levels and mortality/morbidity records, studies on geographic variations in emergency department use and the spatial effects in their associations with air pollution exposure are rare.

Methods: We focused on the elderly who visited emergency room for cardiovascular related disease (CVD) in 2011. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0138-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5994043PMC
June 2018
1 Read

Stress experiences in neighborhood and social environments (SENSE): a pilot study to integrate the quantified self with citizen science to improve the built environment and health.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 06 5;17(1):17. Epub 2018 Jun 5.

Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford University, 1070 Arastradero Road, Suite 100, Palo Alto, CA, 94304, USA.

Background: Identifying elements of one's environment-observable and unobservable-that contribute to chronic stress including the perception of comfort and discomfort associated with different settings, presents many methodological and analytical challenges. However, it also presents an opportunity to engage the public in collecting and analyzing their own geospatial and biometric data to increase community member understanding of their local environments and activate potential environmental improvements. In this first-generation project, we developed a methodology to integrate geospatial technology with biometric sensing within a previously developed, evidence-based "citizen science" protocol, called "Our Voice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0140-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5989430PMC

Differences in physical environmental characteristics between adolescents' actual and shortest cycling routes: a study using a Google Street View-based audit.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 05 29;17(1):16. Epub 2018 May 29.

Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Corneel Heymanslaan 10, 9000, Ghent, Belgium.

Background: The objective evaluation of the physical environmental characteristics (e.g. speed limit, cycling infrastructure) along adolescents' actual cycling routes remains understudied, although it may provide important insights into why adolescents prefer one cycling route over another. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0136-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5975511PMC
May 2018
2 Reads

Spatially explicit assessment of heat health risk by using multi-sensor remote sensing images and socioeconomic data in Yangtze River Delta, China.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 05 25;17(1):15. Epub 2018 May 25.

Institute of Island and Coastal Ecosystems, Ocean College, Zhejiang University, Zhoushan, 316021, China.

Background: The increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme heat events, which are potentially associated with climate change in the near future, highlights the importance of heat health risk assessment, a significant reference for heat-related death reduction and intervention. However, a spatiotemporal mismatch exists between gridded heat hazard and human exposure in risk assessment, which hinders the identification of high-risk areas at finer scales.

Methods: A human settlement index integrated by nighttime light images, enhanced vegetation index, and digital elevation model data was utilized to assess the human exposure at high spatial resolution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0135-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5970500PMC
May 2018
3 Reads

A cross-sectional ecological analysis of international and sub-national health inequalities in commercial geospatial resource availability.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 05 23;17(1):14. Epub 2018 May 23.

Geography and Environment, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.

Background: Commercial geospatial data resources are frequently used to understand healthcare utilisation. Although there is widespread evidence of a digital divide for other digital resources and infra-structure, it is unclear how commercial geospatial data resources are distributed relative to health need.

Methods: To examine the distribution of commercial geospatial data resources relative to health needs, we assembled coverage and quality metrics for commercial geocoding, neighbourhood characterisation, and travel time calculation resources for 183 countries. Read More

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https://ij-healthgeographics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0134-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5966850PMC
May 2018
4 Reads

Association between number of institutions with coronary computed tomography angiography and regional mortality ratio of acute myocardial infarction: a nationwide ecological study using a spatial Bayesian model.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 05 21;17(1):13. Epub 2018 May 21.

Department of Biomedical Informatics, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan.

Background: Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) has demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy for detection of coronary artery stenosis, and healthcare providers can detect coronary artery disease in earlier stages before it develops into more serious clinical conditions such as acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We hypothesized that the mortality ratio of AMI in regions with a higher density of coronary CTA is lower than that in regions with a lower density of coronary CTA.

Methods: This ecological and cross-sectional study using secondary data targeted all secondary medical service areas (SMSAs) in Japan (n = 349). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0133-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5963166PMC

Residential scene classification for gridded population sampling in developing countries using deep convolutional neural networks on satellite imagery.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 05 9;17(1):12. Epub 2018 May 9.

Geospatial Science and Technology Program, RTI International, 3040 East Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.

Background: Conducting surveys in low- and middle-income countries is often challenging because many areas lack a complete sampling frame, have outdated census information, or have limited data available for designing and selecting a representative sample. Geosampling is a probability-based, gridded population sampling method that addresses some of these issues by using geographic information system (GIS) tools to create logistically manageable area units for sampling. GIS grid cells are overlaid to partition a country's existing administrative boundaries into area units that vary in size from 50 m × 50 m to 150 m × 150 m. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0132-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5944062PMC

Quantifying multi-dimensional attributes of human activities at various geographic scales based on smartphone tracking.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 05 9;17(1):11. Epub 2018 May 9.

Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843, USA.

Background: Advancement in location-aware technologies, and information and communication technology in the past decades has furthered our knowledge of the interaction between human activities and the built environment. An increasing number of studies have collected data regarding individual activities to better understand how the environment shapes human behavior. Despite this growing interest, some challenges exist in collecting and processing individual's activity data, e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0130-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5941789PMC

Evaluation of threshold selection methods for adaptive kernel density estimation in disease mapping.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 05 8;17(1):10. Epub 2018 May 8.

Department of Educational Psychology, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA.

Background: Maps of disease rates produced without careful consideration of the underlying population distribution may be unreliable due to the well-known small numbers problem. Smoothing methods such as Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) are employed to control the population basis of spatial support used to calculate each disease rate. The degree of smoothing is controlled by a user-defined parameter (bandwidth or threshold) which influences the resolution of the disease map and the reliability of the computed rates. Read More

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https://ij-healthgeographics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0129-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5938815PMC
May 2018
6 Reads

Evaluating neighborhood structures for modeling intercity diffusion of large-scale dengue epidemics.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 05 3;17(1). Epub 2018 May 3.

Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei City, 10617, Taiwan.

Background: Dengue fever is a vector-borne infectious disease that is transmitted by contact between vector mosquitoes and susceptible hosts. The literature has addressed the issue on quantifying the effect of individual mobility on dengue transmission. However, there are methodological concerns in the spatial regression model configuration for examining the effect of intercity-scale human mobility on dengue diffusion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0131-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5934834PMC

Intelligent judgements over health risks in a spatial agent-based model.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 03 20;17(1). Epub 2018 Mar 20.

Department of Governance and Technology for Sustainability (CSTM), Faculty of Behavioral, Management, and Social Sciences (BMS), University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands.

Background: Millions of people worldwide are exposed to deadly infectious diseases on a regular basis. Breaking news of the Zika outbreak for instance, made it to the main media titles internationally. Perceiving disease risks motivate people to adapt their behavior toward a safer and more protective lifestyle. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0128-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5859507PMC
March 2018
2 Reads

Geostatistical modelling of the association between malaria and child growth in Africa.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 02 27;17(1). Epub 2018 Feb 27.

CHICAS Research Group, Lancaster Medical School, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, UK.

Background: Undernutrition among children under 5 years of age continues to be a public health challenge in many low- and middle-income countries and can lead to growth stunting. Infectious diseases may also affect child growth, however their actual impact on the latter can be difficult to quantify. In this paper, we analyse data from 20 Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) conducted in 13 African countries to investigate the relationship between malaria and stunting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0127-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5828493PMC
February 2018
6 Reads

Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the home: Can area characteristics identify at-risk communities in the Republic of Ireland?

Int J Health Geogr 2018 02 20;17(1). Epub 2018 Feb 20.

School of Medicine, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.

Background: Internationally, the majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests where resuscitation is attempted (OHCAs) occur in private residential locations i.e. at home. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0126-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5819205PMC
February 2018
3 Reads

Border analysis for spatial clusters.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 02 17;17(1). Epub 2018 Feb 17.

Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: The spatial scan statistic is widely used by public health professionals in the detection of spatial clusters in inhomogeneous point process. The most popular version of the spatial scan statistic uses a circular-shaped scanning window. Several other variants, using other parametric or non-parametric shapes, are also available. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0124-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5816564PMC
February 2018
3 Reads

Current and future distribution of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 02 14;17(1). Epub 2018 Feb 14.

Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean, World Health Organisation, Cairo, Egypt.

Background: Aedes-borne diseases as dengue, zika, chikungunya and yellow fever are an emerging problem worldwide, being transmitted by Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Lack of up to date information about the distribution of Aedes species hampers surveillance and control. Global databases have been compiled but these did not capture data in the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR), and any models built using these datasets fail to identify highly suitable areas where one or both species may occur. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0125-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5813415PMC
February 2018
46 Reads

Factors related with public open space use among adolescents: a study using GPS and accelerometers.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 01 22;17(1). Epub 2018 Jan 22.

Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.

Background: Low physical activity levels and high levels of sedentary time among adolescents call for population wide interventions. Public open spaces can be important locations for adolescents' physical activity. This study aimed to describe the prevalence, frequency and context of public open space visitation and to gain insight into the individual, social and physical environmental factors associated with public open space use among 12- to 16-year-old Flemish (Belgian) adolescents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0123-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5778634PMC
January 2018
5 Reads

Spatial panorama of malaria prevalence in Africa under climate change and interventions scenarios.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 01 16;17(1). Epub 2018 Jan 16.

Human Health Division, International Center of Insect Physiology and Ecology, P.O. Box 30772-00100, Nairobi, Kenya.

Background: Malaria is highly sensitive to climatic variables and is strongly influenced by the presence of vectors in a region that further contribute to parasite development and sustained disease transmission. Mathematical analysis of malaria transmission through the use and application of the value of the basic reproduction number (R) threshold is an important and useful tool for the understanding of disease patterns.

Methods: Temperature dependence aspect of R obtained from dynamical mathematical network model was used to derive the spatial distribution maps for malaria transmission under different climatic and intervention scenarios. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0122-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5771136PMC
January 2018
15 Reads

Measurement of the potential geographic accessibility from call to definitive care for patient with acute stroke.

Int J Health Geogr 2018 01 12;17(1). Epub 2018 Jan 12.

Univ. Lyon, University Claude Bernard Lyon 1, HESPER EA 7425, 69008, Lyon, France.

Background: The World Health Organization refers to stroke, the second most frequent cause of death in the world, in terms of pandemic. Present treatments are only effective within precise time windows. Only 10% of thrombolysis patients are eligible. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-018-0121-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5767021PMC
January 2018
3 Reads

Spatial smoothing in Bayesian models: a comparison of weights matrix specifications and their impact on inference.

Int J Health Geogr 2017 12 16;16(1):47. Epub 2017 Dec 16.

ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematical and Statistical Frontiers, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD, 4000, Australia.

Background: When analysing spatial data, it is important to account for spatial autocorrelation. In Bayesian statistics, spatial autocorrelation is commonly modelled by the intrinsic conditional autoregressive prior distribution. At the heart of this model is a spatial weights matrix which controls the behaviour and degree of spatial smoothing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12942-017-0120-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5732501PMC
December 2017
10 Reads