10 results match your criteria International Journal of Forensic Mental Health[Journal]

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Response to "The Use of Meta-Analysis to Compare and Select Offender Risk Instruments".

Authors:
Seena Fazel

Int J Forensic Ment Health 2017 12;16(1):16-17. Epub 2017 Jan 12.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14999013.2016.1261965DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5460748PMC
January 2017
5 Reads

Success in School for Justice-Involved Girls: Do Specific Aspects of Developmental Immaturity Matter?

Int J Forensic Ment Health 2016 17;15(1):65-80. Epub 2016 Mar 17.

Department of Psychology, Wheaton College.

Developmental immaturity (DI) may help explain some of the variability in aspects of academic achievement among girls in the juvenile justice system, a population with high rates of truancy, dropout, and school failure. This study examined the relationships among the decision making and independent functioning components of DI, verbal intelligence, and academic achievement within this population. Using data from 60 girls in residential juvenile justice facilities, multiple regression analyses indicated that verbal IQ moderated the relationship between the DI construct of decision making and academic achievement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14999013.2015.1134724DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5222545PMC
March 2016
6 Reads

Commentary: Risk Assessment in the Age of Evidence-Based Practice and Policy.

Int J Forensic Ment Health 2017 31;16(1):18-22. Epub 2017 Jan 31.

North Carolina State University.

Risk assessment has come to be recognized as a key component of evidence-based practice and policy in psychiatric and correctional agencies. At the same time, however, there is significant debate in scientific, policy, and public arenas regarding the role of risk assessment instruments in mental health and criminal justice decision-making, and questions regarding the level of evidence supporting their usefulness. It is in light of these conflicting realities that the current commentary considers Williams, Wormith, Bonta and Sitarenios' (2017) re-examination of the Singh, Grann, and Fazel (2011) meta-analysis and recommendations made in "The Use of Meta-Analysis to Compare and Select Offender Risk Instruments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14999013.2016.1266422DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6089527PMC
January 2017
3 Reads

Research Priorities in Mental Health, Justice, and Safety: A Multidisciplinary Stakeholder Report.

Int J Forensic Ment Health 2015 Jul 6;14(3):205-217. Epub 2015 Oct 6.

Department of Psychology, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières Québec, Canada; Philippe-Pinel Institute, Research Center , Montreal , Quebec , Canada.

This paper is based on the report following the National Research Agenda Meeting on Mental Health, Justice, and Safety held in Montreal on November 19, 2014, which convened academics; health, social, and legal professionals; and people with lived experience of mental illness from across Canada. The goal was to identify research priorities addressing relevant knowledge gaps and research strategies that can translate into public policy action and improvements in evidence-based services. Participants identified key challenges: (1) inadequate identification and response to needs by civil mental health services and frontline law enforcement, (2) limited specialized resources in forensic and correctional settings, (3) fragmented care and gaps between systems, (4) limited resources for adequate community reintegration, and (5) poor knowledge transfer strategies as obstacles to evidence-based policies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14999013.2015.1073197DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4673591PMC
July 2015
7 Reads

Transitioning into the Community: Outcomes of a Pilot Housing Program for Forensic Patients.

Int J Forensic Ment Health 2014 Jan;13(1):62-74

John Howard Society of Waterloo-Wellington, Kitchener, Canada.

The Transitional Rehabilitation Housing Pilot (TRHP) was designed to transition hospitalized forensic patients to the community. Twenty clients and their clinicians in two Ontario cities completed measures on functioning, substance use, recovery, social support, and quality of life at admission to the program and then every 6 months until 18 months post-admission. Clients also responded to open-ended questions on the impact of the program and living in the community on their recovery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14999013.2014.885472DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3962049PMC
January 2014
8 Reads

Predictors of Criminal Justice Outcomes Among Mental Health Courts Participants: The Role of Perceived Coercion and Subjective Mental Health Recovery.

Int J Forensic Ment Health 2013 Apr;12(2):116-125

Center to Study Recovery in Social Contexts, Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, 140 Old Orangeburg Road, Orangeburg, NY 10962.

Internationally, one effort to reduce the number of people with serious mental illness (SMI) in jails and prisons is the development of Mental Health Courts (MHC). Research on MHCs to date has been disproportionately focused on the study of recidivism and re-incarceration over the potential of these problem-solving courts to facilitate mental health recovery and affect the slope or gradient of opportunity for recovery. Despite the strong conceptual links between the MHC approach and the recovery-orientation in mental health, the capacity for MHCs to facilitate recovery has not been explored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14999013.2013.791351DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3770483PMC
April 2013
8 Reads

Taking Stock and Taking Steps: The Case for an Adolescent Version of the Short-Assessment of Risk and Treatability.

Int J Forensic Ment Health 2012 6;11(3):135-149. Epub 2012 Nov 6.

Simon Fraser University.

The field of violence risk assessment has matured considerably, possibly advancing beyond its own adolescence. At this point in the field's evolution, it is more important than ever for the development of any new device to be accompanied by a strong rationale and the capacity to provide a unique contribution. With this issue in mind, we first take stock of the field of adolescent risk assessment in order to describe the rapid progress that this field has made, as well as the gaps that led us to adapt the Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability (START; Webster, Martin, Brink, Nicholls, & Desmarais, 2009) for use with adolescents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14999013.2012.737406DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3578698PMC
November 2012
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The Errors of Karen Franklin's Pretextuality.

Authors:
James M Cantor

Int J Forensic Ment Health 2012 Jan 11;11(1):59-62. Epub 2012 Apr 11.

Law & Mental Health Program, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

In her recent article, Hebephilia: Quintessence of Diagnostic Pretextuality (published in Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 2010), Karen Franklin expands on her previous argument that psychologists and psychiatrists should not diagnose as abnormal hebephilia, the sexual preference for early pubescent children. She supports her argument with a series of claims about the contents of the empirical literature and the scientists who produced it. The present document provides fact-checking of those claims, revealing that Franklin's conclusions are based largely on demonstrable falsehoods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14999013.2012.672945DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3382737PMC
January 2012
8 Reads
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