3,184 results match your criteria International Journal of Eating Disorders[Journal]


Hospital course of underweight youth with ARFID treated with a meal-based behavioral protocol in an inpatient-partial hospitalization program for eating disorders.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 19. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Objective: Information on nutritional rehabilitation for underweight patients with avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) is scarce. This study characterized hospitalized youth with ARFID treated in an inpatient (IP)-partial hospitalization behavioral eating disorders (EDs) program employing an exclusively meal-based rapid refeeding protocol and compared weight restoration outcomes to those of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN).

Method: Data from retrospective chart review of consecutive underweight admissions (N = 275; age 11-26 years) with ARFID (n = 27) were compared to those with AN (n = 248) on clinical features, reason for discharge, and weight restoration variables. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23049DOI Listing
February 2019

Comparisons of bone density and body composition among adolescents with anorexia nervosa and atypical anorexia nervosa.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 16. Epub 2019 Feb 16.

Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Objective: To compare bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition among adolescents: (a) with atypical anorexia nervosa (AAN) versus anorexia nervosa (AN) and (b) those with and without a prior history of overweight.

Method: Electronic medical records of patients 9-20 years with AN or AAN who underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed.

Results: A total of 286 adolescents with AN or AAN were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23048DOI Listing
February 2019

Emotional feeding as interpersonal emotion regulation: A developmental risk factor for binge-eating behaviors.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

Emotional feeding is an interpersonal emotion regulation strategy wherein people provide food to others as a means of influencing the recipient's emotional response. Parental emotional feeding has been linked to higher levels of emotional eating in children and adolescents using cross-sectional, retrospective, and prospective designs; however, there is little research on emotional feeding as a developmental risk factor for emotional eating and binge-eating behaviors in adolescence and adulthood. This Idea Worth Researching article explores the rationale for studying emotional feeding as a lifespan construct and its potential implications for understanding eating disorder pathology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23044DOI Listing
February 2019

Results of disseminating an online screen for eating disorders across the U.S.: Reach, respondent characteristics, and unmet treatment need.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.

Objective: The treatment gap between those who need and those who receive care for eating disorders is wide. Scaling a validated, online screener that makes individuals aware of the significance of their symptoms/behaviors is a crucial first step for increasing access to care. The objective of the current study was to determine the reach of disseminating an online eating disorder screener in partnership with the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), as well to examine the probable eating disorder diagnostic and risk breakdown of adult respondents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23043DOI Listing
February 2019

Radcliffe ARFID Workgroup: Toward operationalization of research diagnostic criteria and directions for the field.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Objective: Since its introduction to the psychiatric nomenclature in 2013, research on avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) has proliferated highlighting lack of clarity in how ARFID is defined.

Method: In September 2018, a small multi-disciplinary pool of international experts in feeding disorder and eating disorder clinical practice and research convened as the Radcliffe ARFID workgroup to consider operationalization of DSM-5 ARFID diagnostic criteria to guide research in this disorder.

Results: By consensus of the Radcliffe ARFID workgroup, ARFID eating is characterized by food avoidance and/or restriction, involving limited volume and/or variety associated with one or more of the following: weight loss or faltering growth (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23042DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Psychiatric and medical correlates of DSM-5 eating disorders in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan;52(1):42-50

Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Objective: To examine psychiatric and somatic correlates of DSM-5 eating disorders (EDs)-anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge-eating disorder (BED)-in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States.

Method: A national sample of 36,309 adult participants in the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions III (NESARC-III) completed structured diagnostic interviews (AUDADIS-5) to determine psychiatric disorders, including EDs, and reported 12-month diagnosis of chronic somatic conditions. Prevalence of lifetime psychiatric disorders and somatic conditions were calculated across the AN, BN, and BED groups and a fourth group without specific ED; multiple logistic regression models compared the likelihood of psychiatric/somatic conditions with each specific ED relative to the no-specific ED group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23004DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Residential eating disorder outcomes associated with screening positive for substance use disorder and borderline personality disorder.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Objective: We examined whether eating disorder (ED) outcome trajectories during residential treatment differed for patients screening positive for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and/or substance use disorders (SUDs) than those who do not.

Method: We examined data from patients in a residential ED treatment program. Patients completed validated self-report surveys to screen for SUDs and BPD on admission, and the ED Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) on admission and every 2 weeks until discharge (N = 479 females). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23028DOI Listing
February 2019
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Long-term follow-up study of low-weight avoidant restrictive food intake disorder compared with childhood-onset anorexia nervosa: Psychiatric and occupational outcome in 56 patients.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Psychiatry Skane, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Eating Disorders Centre, Lund, Sweden.

Objective: To compare long term outcome between childhood-onset Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and low-weight Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) in regard to psychiatric diagnoses, social and occupational functioning.

Method: A consecutive series of 56 children originally treated for low-weight restrictive eating disorder (ED) were followed up after a mean of 15.9 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23038DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Patients' experiences of brief cognitive behavioral therapy for eating disorders: A qualitative investigation.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Eating Disorders Service, Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.

Objective: Although it is important to analyze the effectiveness of new therapies, it is also necessary to consider how patients experience them. This is particularly important if we are to maximize treatment acceptability and reduce attrition. This study examined patient experiences of a new 10-session cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT-T), using a qualitative approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23039DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Health related quality of life of infants and children with avoidant restrictive food intake disorder.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Emma Children's Hospital, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare health related quality of life (HRQOL) in infants and children with avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) to healthy and chronically ill controls.

Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted in children who meet ARFID criteria at our tertiary care pediatric feeding clinic (September 2014 to July 2016). Before consultation, parents of patients (n = 100) were asked to complete questionnaires to determine HRQOL: the TNO-AZL Preschool Children Quality of Life (0-5 years), and "Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory" (6-7 and 8-10 years). Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23037
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23037DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Disordered eating among Australian adolescents: Prevalence, functioning, and help received.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

Objective: To estimate the prevalence of disordered eating (DE) among Australian adolescents and examine associations with clinical mental health problems, problems with functioning, and help received.

Method: We analyzed data from the Young Minds Matter survey (n = 2,298, 13-17 years). We derived an index of DE severity with four levels: (1) no DE; (2) subclinical DE; (3) suspected eating disorder; and (4) lifetime eating disorder diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23032DOI Listing
February 2019

Identifying and responding to child maltreatment when delivering family-based treatment-A qualitative study.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Offord Center for Child Studies, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Introduction: This study describes practitioner strategies, perceptions, experiences with identifying and responding to child emotional abuse (CEA) and child exposure to intimate partner violence (CEIPV) when providing Family-Based Treatment (FBT) to children and adolescents with eating disorders.

Method: Using qualitative interpretive description, this study recruited a purposeful sample of practitioners (N = 30, 90% female) implementing FBT for adolescent eating disorders. Semi-structured interviews focused on eliciting their perspectives regarding identifying and responding to CEA and CEIPV in practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23036DOI Listing
February 2019

Etiological influences on continuity and co-occurrence of eating disorders symptoms across adolescence and emerging adulthood.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Objective: The role of common and symptom-specific genetic and environmental influences in maintaining eating disorder symptoms across development remains unclear. This study investigates the continuity and change of etiological influences on drive for thinness, bulimia, and body dissatisfaction symptoms and their co-occurrence, across adolescence and emerging adulthood.

Method: In total, 2,629 adolescent twins (mean age = 15. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23040DOI Listing
February 2019

Is bullying and teasing associated with eating disorders? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Regional Department for Eating Disorders, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Objective: Involvement in bullying and teasing has been associated with adverse health outcomes, including eating disorders (EDs). The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to examine the association between bullying/teasing and EDs.

Method: A systematic search was conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23035DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Alliance, technique, both, or more? Clinicians' views on what works in cognitive-behavioral therapy for eating disorders.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.

Objective: This study examined clinicians' views of the roles of two elements of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in explaining treatment outcomes-CBT techniques and the therapeutic alliance.

Method: Ninety-eight clinicians who reported delivering CBT for eating disorders completed measures addressing their beliefs about what is effective in CBT, their use of specific techniques, and their own anxiety levels.

Results: Clinicians substantially overestimated the role of both therapeutic techniques and the alliance in explaining treatment outcomes in CBT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23033DOI Listing
February 2019

Children with avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder and anorexia nervosa in a tertiary care pediatric eating disorder program: A comparative study.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the medical and psychological characteristics of children under the age of 13 years with avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) and anorexia nervosa (AN) from a Canadian tertiary care pediatric eating disorders program.

Method: Participants included 106 children assessed between 2013 and 2017 using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5). Data were collected through clinical interviews, psychometric questionnaires, and chart review. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23027
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23027DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

Menopausal status and disordered eating and body image concerns among middle-aged women.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Objective: Eating disorders are present among middle-aged women, yet most eating disorder knowledge comes from adolescents and young adults. There is arguably a need for research specific to middle-aged women and eating pathology. One biological factor that may contribute to eating disorder symptoms and is unique to middle-aged women is menopause, given the changes in body shape and weight that direct women's bodies away from the young, thin beauty standard. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23030DOI Listing
January 2019

Body image concern and treatment outcomes in adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Eating and Weight Disorders, Villa Garda Hospital, Garda (VR), Italy.

Objective: To ascertain the role of baseline measures of body-image concern (BIC) in changes in body mass index (BMI) centile and psychopathological outcomes associated with intensive enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-E) in adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN).

Method: The BMI centile of 62 adolescent patients with AN was recorded at four time-points over 12 months, and Eating Disorder Examination interview (EDE) and Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) scores, were recorded at admission and discharge from CBT-E. Changes in three BIC components, namely "Preoccupation with shape/weight", "Fear of weight gain" and "Feeling fat", were assessed at admission and discharge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23031DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Is stage of change enough? Confidence as a predictor of outcome in inpatient treatment for eating disorders.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 30. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

St. Paul's Hospital Eating Disorders Program, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Objective: While stage of change has been shown to be a robust predictor of eating disorder treatment outcome, little attention has been paid to the role of confidence. This study sought to better understand the role of confidence and the possible interaction it may have with stage of change in promoting eating disorder symptom change.

Method: Participants were adult women in inpatient treatment for eating disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23026DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

A test of the DSM-5 severity specifier for bulimia nervosa in adolescents: Can we anticipate clinical treatment outcomes?

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 30. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, California.

Objective: This study tested clinical utility of the DSM-5 severity specifier for bulimia nervosa (BN) in predicting treatment response among adolescents (N = 110) within a randomized clinical trial of two psychosocial treatments.

Method: Analyses grouped individuals meeting criteria for BN diagnosis by baseline severity, per DSM-5. Associations among baseline severity classification and BN behavior (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23034DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Examining physical activity and correlates in adults with healthy weight, overweight/obesity, or binge-eating disorder.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 28;52(2):159-165. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Objective: To examine physical activity and correlates among three subgroups of adults: healthy weight without binge eating (HW), overweight/obesity without binge eating (OW/OB), and core features of binge-eating disorder (BED).

Method: Participants (N = 2,384) completed an online survey with established measures of physical activity, eating psychopathology, and health. Most participants were White (82. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23003DOI Listing
February 2019

Approach bias modification training in bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Section of Eating Disorders, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.

Objective: Bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge-eating disorder (BED) are associated with poorly controlled approach behavior toward food resulting in binge eating. Approach bias modification (ABM) may reduce these automatic action tendencies (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23024DOI Listing
January 2019
10 Reads

Why is premorbid BMI consistently elevated in clinical samples, but not in risk factor samples, of individuals with eating disorders?

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 24;52(2):117-120. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Psychology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Body image disturbance is widely viewed as contributing to the development and maintenance of disordered eating. Yet this perspective is not inconsistent with the possibility that elevated premorbid BMIs also increase the risk of developing eating disorders. Research examining whether actual body size may play a role in eating disorder development reveals a curious pattern of findings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23029DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Avoidant restrictive food intake disorder: First do no harm.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 24. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Division of Child and Family Mental Health and Developmental Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina.

Objective: This opinion piece offers some considerations, both medical and psychological, for the use of nasogastric tube (NGT) feedings in the treatment of avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) in children and adolescents.

Method: Although there is empirical support for the use of NGT feedings in the treatment of anorexia nervosa, this evidence base does not exist for the treatment of ARFID. As such, there is need to delineate pragmatic considerations in the use of this procedure. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23021
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23021DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

Preserved white matter microstructure in adolescent patients with atypical anorexia nervosa.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 24;52(2):166-174. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Objective: Patients with atypical anorexia nervosa (AN) are often in the normal-weight range at presentation; however, signs of starvation and medical instability are not rare. White matter (WM) microstructural correlates of atypical AN have not yet been investigated, leaving an important gap in our knowledge regarding the neural pathogenesis of this disorder.

Method: We investigated WM microstructural integrity in 25 drug-naïve adolescent patients with atypical AN and 25 healthy controls, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23012DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Fear of negative evaluation among eating disorders: Examining the association with weight/shape concerns in adolescence.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Centre for Emotional Health, Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.

Objective: Fear of negative evaluation has been proposed as a transdiagnostic factor associated with the development of eating disorders and has been shown to relate to disorders of body image, especially those with weight/shape concerns such as eating disorders and muscle dysmorphia. The current study aimed to investigate whether fear of negative evaluation was a transdiagnostic factor of disorders diagnostically characterized by weight/shape concerns. The study examined whether fear of negative evaluation was associated with higher odds for meeting criteria for an eating disorder and/or muscle dysmorphia, especially those disorders diagnostically characterized by weight/shape concerns. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23018
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23018DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Blunted emotion-modulated startle reflex in anorexia nervosa.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 17. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of General Internal Medicine and Psychosomatics, Center for Psychosocial Medicine, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany.

Objective: Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) often show difficulties in the perception, expression, and regulation of emotions and a strong avoidance of aversive feelings. According to psychobiological models, dietary restraint and accompanying weight loss may serve as a maladaptive mechanism of emotion regulation by attenuating aversive emotional states in AN, thereby contributing to the maintenance of the disorder.

Method: Twenty-seven women with AN and 26 age-matched healthy women were shown short film-clips to elicit fear, sadness, amusement, and neutral emotional states. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23022DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Associations between ovarian hormones and emotional eating across the menstrual cycle: Do ovulatory shifts in hormones matter?

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 15;52(2):195-199. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan.

Objective: Elevated ovarian hormone levels are associated with increased risk for binge eating (BE) and emotional eating (EE) during the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle. However, past studies have not examined whether pronounced hormonal changes that precede the midluteal phase (i.e. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.22985
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.22985DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

Severe and enduring anorexia nervosa: Can risk of persisting illness be identified, and prevented, in young patients?

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 14. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Jane and Terry Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.

Objective: Long-term outcome studies of anorexia nervosa (AN) have demonstrated that up to 20% of cases will follow an unremitting course despite many attempts at symptom-based treatments. The objectives of this study are to identify in a younger age group with AN whether persistent illness can be identified early and prevented.

Methods: An extensive literature review of such studies published in Pubmed was conducted. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23019
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23019DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads

Change in eating disorder symptoms following pediatric obesity treatment.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 14. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California.

Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether children with overweight or obesity participating in an evidence-based treatment, family-based behavioral treatment (FBT) for obesity, or a parent-only variant of FBT (PBT), experience an increase of eating disorder (ED) symptoms during and following treatment.

Method: Children (N = 150) participating in a randomized controlled trial of FBT or PBT completed measures of EDs attitudes and behaviors at baseline, following 6-months of treatment, 6 months, and 18 months after treatment.

Results: Linear-mixed effects models suggest that ED attitudes did not significantly increase. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23015
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23015DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Eating disorders and substance use in adolescents: How substance users differ from nonsubstance users in an outpatient eating disorders treatment clinic.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 14;52(2):175-182. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Division of Child and Youth Psychiatry, Kingston Health Sciences Centre, Hotel Dieu Hospital Site, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: The relationship between eating disorders (EDs) and substance use (SU) has only been briefly described in literature using mainly adult populations. This study examined the prevalence and characteristics of SU among patients of an adolescent ED outpatient treatment program.

Method: A retrospective chart analysis was conducted to determine and subsequently compare medical status, psychosocial factors, treatment course and outcome between patients with and without SU. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23017
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23017DOI Listing
February 2019
8 Reads

Relationship between three factor eating questionnaire-restraint subscale and food intake.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 14. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York.

Objective: Dietary restraint refers to an individual's intention to restrict food intake, measured via self-report questionnaires, whereas dietary restriction refers to actual reduction in caloric intake. The aim of this research was to investigate the association between dietary restraint scales and actual caloric restriction.

Method: Data were collected from six previously published or two ongoing eating behavior studies in which participants (n = 183) completed the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) and Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and participated in a laboratory-based research lunch meal. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23014
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23014DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

An investigation of indirect effects of personality features on anorexia nervosa severity through interoceptive dysfunction in individuals with lifetime anorexia nervosa diagnoses.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 12;52(2):200-205. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida.

Objective: This study examined a hypothesized pathway by which interoceptive dysfunction accounted for associations between personality features (harm avoidance, self-directedness, and perfectionism) and anorexia nervosa (AN) severity (indicated by drive for thinness, eating disorder-related preoccupations and rituals, and body mass index).

Method: The study sample (n = 270, mean age = 28.47, 95. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23008
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23008DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Problematic eating behaviors and attitudes predict long-term incident metabolic syndrome and diabetes: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 12. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Background: Problematic relationship to eating and food (PREF) captures a broad range of unhealthy eating behaviors. We previously reported that higher BMI is associated with PREF and graded by the number of PREF endorsed. In this study, we prospectively examined the association between PREF and metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23020
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23020DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Characteristics of outpatients diagnosed with the selective/neophobic presentation of avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 12. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Child and Adolescent OCD, Tic, Trich, and Anxiety Group (COTTAGe), Perelman School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Objective: Although Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) has existed since the publication of DSM-5 in 2013, research on the descriptive psychopathology of treatment-seeking patients with formal ARFID diagnoses is sparse, and limited to tertiary eating disorder-focused treatment settings where most patients present with weight loss/malnutrition. In these settings, the selective/neophobic symptom presentation is rare compared to other primary eating restrictions. We aimed provide initial descriptive psychopathology of ARFID primary selective/neophobic symptom presentation in an outpatient setting, and to explore the prevalence of the core ARFID symptoms and clinical differences among patients meeting criteria based on weight/nutritional symptoms versus psychosocial impairment only. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23013
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23013DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

Portal hypertension in prolonged anorexia nervosa with laxative abuse: A case report of three patients.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 12;52(2):211-215. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, National Center for Global Health Medicine, Ichikawa City, Chiba, Japan.

Objective: There has been no report on portal hypertension related to anorexia nervosa (AN).

Method: We describe three cases of portal hypertension manifesting with collateral circulation represented by gastroesophageal varices in prolonged AN with laxative abuse and self-vomiting. These women, in their 20s to 50s, were diagnosed as having AN binging and purging type (AN-BP) that included self-induced vomiting and abuse of irritating laxatives (more than 100 tablets daily). Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23007DOI Listing
February 2019
12 Reads

Confident body, confident child: Evaluation of a universal parenting resource promoting healthy body image and eating patterns in early childhood-6- and 12-month outcomes from a randomized controlled trial.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 12;52(2):121-131. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: To evaluate Confident Body, Confident Child (CBCC), a universal parenting resource designed to promote positive body image and healthy eating patterns in children aged 2-6 years, at 6- and 12-months follow-up.

Method: A four-arm randomized controlled trial with 345 parents was conducted. Group (A) received the CBCC resource pack + workshop, (B) received the CBCC resource pack only, (C) received a nutrition booklet and (D) received no interventions until all questionnaires were completed (i. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.22992
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.22992DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Further support for diagnostically meaningful ARFID symptom presentations in an adolescent medicine partial hospitalization program.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Division of Adolescent Medicine and Eating Disorders, Penn State Health Children's Hospital, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania.

Objective: To identify potential presentations of avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) in a pediatric eating disorder partial hospitalization program (PHP) based on the nature of the eating restriction leading to core symptoms of ARFID.

Method: A retrospective chart review of 83 patients ages 8-17 admitted to a PHP and diagnosed with ARFID. Charts were independently reviewed by two coders, with high inter-rater agreement (κ = 0. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23016
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23016DOI Listing
January 2019
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Anorexia nervosa and perfectionism: A meta-analysis.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Objective: Despite the multitude of research surrounding anorexia nervosa (AN) and perfectionism, there is yet to be a thorough investigation comparing perfectionism in those diagnosed with AN and other eating disorders, and other psychiatric diagnoses. The current meta-analysis aimed to explore these comparisons.

Method: Following the Preferred Reporting Items or Systematic Reviews Meta Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we identified empirical studies that compared maladaptive and/or adaptive perfectionism scores in those diagnosed with AN and either a non-clinical comparison group, people diagnosed with a non-AN ED, or people diagnosed with another psychological disorder (i. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23009
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23009DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads

Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder: A diagnosis at the intersection of feeding and eating disorders necessitating subtype differentiation.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Children's Multidisciplinary Feeding Program, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia.

Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) is a diagnosis that sits squarely at the cross roads of feeding disorders and eating disorders. It is historically tied to feeding disorders as a replacement of the DSM-IV diagnosis of feeding disorder of infancy or early childhood. The revision process, however, extended the diagnostic umbrella by removing its predecessor's weight loss requirement and age of onset restriction (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.22987DOI Listing
January 2019
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Metformin abuse: A novel and dangerous purging behavior in anorexia nervosa.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 10. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Department of Medicine, ACUTE, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado.

Objective: To report a case of severe multisystem illness, near death and permanent kidney failure in a woman with a history of anorexia nervosa-binge purge type due to abuse of prescription metformin, an approved oral diabetes medication obtained surreptitiously via the internet.

Method: Psychiatric and medical records were reviewed from the medical care of this patient. A literature search was also performed on prescription medication abuse as a mode of purging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23010DOI Listing
January 2019
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Conceptualizing the role of disgust in avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder: Implications for the etiology and treatment of selective eating.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 9. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA.

Selective eating is a common presenting problem in Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID). Understanding the etiology of selective eating will lead to the creation of more effective treatments for this problem. Recent reports have linked disgust sensitivity to picky eating, and the field has yet to conceptualize the role that disgust might play in ARFID. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23006
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23006DOI Listing
January 2019
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Transactions among thinness expectancies, depression, and binge eating in the prediction of adolescent weight control behaviors.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 9;52(2):142-152. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.

Objective: Binge eating, the transdiagnostic risk associated with depression, and the eating disorder-specific risk associated with expectancies for reinforcement from thinness have been identified as risk factors for the development of weight control behaviors. The purpose of this study was to examine if these risk factors transact to further predict risk in youth.

Method: Binge eating, depressive symptoms, thinness expectancies, and weight control behaviors were assessed in 1,758 adolescents three times during the transitional period between middle school and high school. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23001DOI Listing
February 2019
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I didn't want them to see: Secretive eating among adults with binge-eating disorder.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 9;52(2):153-158. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Objective: Secretive eating is characterized by eating furtively and concealing the act and evidence of eating. Among youth, secretive eating is common and associated with eating-disorder psychopathology. Yet, secretive eating among adults, including adults with eating disorders, is relatively unexplored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6368878PMC
February 2019

Could repetitive negative thinking interfere with corrective learning? The example of anorexia nervosa.

Int J Eat Disord 2018 Dec 31. Epub 2018 Dec 31.

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, California.

Identifying processes that may interfere with corrective learning during treatments for anorexia nervosa (AN) may help to improve the effectiveness of existing interventions. We propose that certain cognitive processes characteristic of the AN temperament may help explain previous findings in AN suggesting difficulty updating previously learned associations and learning from feedback. Specifically, we hypothesize that engagement in repetitive negative thinking (RNT), including worry and rumination, could interfere with corrective learning that is critical to the success of behavioral treatments. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.22997
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.22997DOI Listing
December 2018
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Feeling and body investigators (FBI): ARFID division-An acceptance-based interoceptive exposure treatment for children with ARFID.

Int J Eat Disord 2018 Dec 31. Epub 2018 Dec 31.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina.

Objective: Individuals with Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) experience impairing health consequences from insufficient nutritional variety and/or quantity. Early medical conditions and/or somatic symptoms such as abdominal pain may lead some with ARFID to experience somatic sensations as aversive. As such, food avoidance may be part of a broader behavioral repertoire aimed at suppressing bodily sensations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.22996DOI Listing
December 2018
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Effort expenditure for rewards task modified for food: A novel behavioral measure of willingness to work for food.

Int J Eat Disord 2018 Dec 31. Epub 2018 Dec 31.

Department of Psychology, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada.

Objective: Binge eating and associated eating disorders are characterized by abnormalities in reward processing. One component of reward is willingness to expend effort to obtain a reinforcer. The Effort Expenditure for Rewards Task (EEfRT) is a widely used behavioral measure of willingness to work for money. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.22999
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.22999DOI Listing
December 2018
9 Reads