3,216 results match your criteria International Journal of Eating Disorders[Journal]


Long-term outcome of inpatients with bulimia nervosa-Results from the Christina Barz Study.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 19. Epub 2019 Apr 19.

Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Munich (LMU), Munich, Germany.

Objective: To assess the long-term outcome and identify outcome predictors in a very large sample of inpatients treated for bulimia nervosa (BN).

Method: Out of a total of 2,033 patients admitted consecutively to specialized treatment, 1,351 patients (mean age at treatment 25.94) were assessed for follow-up on average 11 (SD 6) years after admission. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/eat.23084
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23084DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Genetic risk, body mass index, and weight control behaviors: Unlocking the triad.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 17. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

Background: The relationship between genetic risk for body mass index (BMI) and weight control behaviors remains unknown. The objectives of this study were to determine the association between genetic risk for BMI and weight control behaviors in young adults, and to examine actual measured BMI as a potential mediator variable.

Method: We analyzed data from three data collection waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/eat.23083
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23083DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Kindness begins with yourself: The role of self-compassion in adolescent body satisfaction and eating pathology.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 12. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.

Objective: A wealth of evidence indicates that self-compassion is linked with positive psychological outcomes; however, little is known about the process through which self-compassion exerts its effect. The primary purpose of this research was to investigate the direct and indirect impact of self-compassion on body satisfaction and eating pathology in adolescents.

Method: Two hundred and thirty-eight students were recruited from three local high schools (M  = 16. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23081DOI Listing

Disaggregating the predictive effects of impaired psychosocial functioning on future DSM-5 eating disorder onset in high-risk female adolescents.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 12. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Oregon Research Institute, Eugene, Oregon.

Objective: Impaired psychosocial functioning previously emerged as the only risk factor to predict future onset of each of the four Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder (5th ed.) (DSM-5) eating disorders. The goal of this follow-up report was to refine understanding of this newly identified risk factor. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23082DOI Listing

DSM-5 eating disorder symptoms in adolescents with and without attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A population-based study.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 4. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Faculty of Health, Deakin Child Study Centre, School of Psychology, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria, Australia.

Objective: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with increased eating disorder symptoms, yet little research examining this association has taken a diagnostic approach using a population-based sample. This cross-sectional study examined differences in DSM-5 eating disorder symptoms and partial-syndrome diagnoses at 14-15 years of age in adolescents with and without ADHD in a population-based sample.

Method: This study uses data from waves 1, 5 and 6 of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (N = 2,672). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23080DOI Listing
April 2019
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Differences in risk factors for binge eating by socioeconomic status in a community-based sample of adolescents: Findings from Project EAT.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 2. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Objective: Binge eating is prevalent across socioeconomic status (SES) groups, but it is unclear whether risk factors for binge eating vary by SES. This study examined the prevalence of several risk factors for binge eating by SES and SES as a potential moderator of these risk factors.

Method: Participants included 2,179 individuals involved in Project EAT during early/middle adolescence (EAT-I) and 5 years later during late adolescence/emerging adulthood (EAT-II). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23079DOI Listing
April 2019
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3.126 Impact Factor

A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of vortioxetine in the treatment of binge-eating disorder.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 2. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge; Cambridge and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust (CPFT), UK.

Background: Binge-eating disorder (BED) is associated with impaired quality of life and has a number of untoward public health associations. There are few established pharmacological treatments for BED, and available options are not suitable for all individuals. Vortioxetine is a recently developed pharmacological agent with effects on the serotonergic but also other neurochemical systems, which has yet to be evaluated in this context. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23078DOI Listing

Perceptions of a large amount of food based on binge-eating disorder diagnosis.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 30. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Objective: This study examined what adults with binge-eating disorder (BED) and obesity perceived as the threshold for a large amount of food and how their evaluations compared to ratings by participants with obesity but without BED.

Method: This was a cross-sectional study of 150 participants with obesity. BED was assessed using the Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns and confirmed via interview. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23076DOI Listing

Feasibility of conducting a randomized clinical trial using family-based treatment for avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 29. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California.

Treatments for avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) lack strong empirical support. There is a critical need to conduct adequately powered studies to identify effective treatments for ARFID. As a first step, the primary aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of conducting a randomized clinical trial (RCT) comparing Family-based Treatment for ARFID (FBT-ARFID) to usual care (UC). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23077DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Food insecurity and bulimia nervosa in the United States.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 28. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.

Background: Food insecurity occurs when access to food is limited by financial hardship. Yet, paradoxically, food insecurity is associated with overeating, with emerging evidence that it may be related to disordered eating. A recent report found that food insecurity was associated with binge-eating disorder (BED), but it is not yet known whether food insecurity is also associated with bulimia nervosa (BN). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23074DOI Listing
March 2019
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Increased lipid and lipoprotein concentrations in anorexia nervosa: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 28. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Eating Disorder Unit, Mental Health Center Ballerup, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Objective: Alterations in blood lipid concentrations in anorexia nervosa (AN) has been reported; however, the extent, mechanism, and normalization with weight restoration remain unknown. We conducted a systematic review and a meta-analysis to evaluate changes in lipid concentrations in acutely-ill AN patients compared with healthy controls (HC) and to examine the effect of partial weight restoration.

Method: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis (PROSPERO: CRD42017078014) were conducted for original peer-reviewed articles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23051DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Confirmatory factor analysis and measurement invariance of the eating disorders examination-questionnaire across four male samples in Argentina.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 26. Epub 2019 Mar 26.

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, California.

Objective: The eating disorder examination-questionnaire (EDE-Q) is among the most widely used instruments in eating disorder research and clinical practice. However, the underlying structure remains a source of confusion, and contradictory results have emerged in studies among male populations. In the current study, we examined previously proposed models of EDE-Q structure in four community samples of Argentinian men. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23075DOI Listing

Same, same but different: Attention bias for food cues in adults and adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 26. Epub 2019 Mar 26.

Section of Eating Disorders, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.

Objective: Attention processing for food may be biased in people with Anorexia Nervosa (AN). However, previous studies have had inconsistent results. This is likely to be due to indirect assessment of attention, which does not inform on the underlying attention processes, and/or the heterogeneity of participants across studies, testing either adults or adolescents with AN, that is, people at very different developmental and illness stages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23064DOI Listing
March 2019
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3.126 Impact Factor

Bridging eating disorder symptoms and trait anxiety in patients with eating disorders: A network approach.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 22. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Department of Psychology, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio.

Objective: Anxiety is thought to influence the development and maintenance of eating disorders (EDs). However, little is known about how, specifically, anxiety influences ED symptoms and vice versa. Network analysis identifies how symptoms within and across disorders are interconnected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23070DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Prenatal and perinatal risk factors for eating disorders in women: A population cohort study.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 20. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Objective: The fetal programming model hypothesizes that developmental programming in utero and in early life induces adaptations that predetermine the adult phenotype. This study investigated whether prenatal/perinatal complications are associated with lifetime eating disorders in women.

Method: Participants included 46,373 adult women enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (den norske Mor & barn-undersøkelsen [MoBa]). Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/eat.23073
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23073DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

The classification of eating disorders in China: A categorical model or a dimensional model.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 18. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

Objective: According to the ICD-10 and DSM-5, eating disorders (EDs) are classified using a categorical model that assumes the subtypes are qualitatively different from one another. However, it is still intensely debated that a dimensional model is more suitable. The aim of this study is to examine whether EDs have a categorical or dimensional latent structure using a sample of Chinese ED patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23069DOI Listing
March 2019
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3.126 Impact Factor

The relationship between body mass index, body dissatisfaction, and eating pathology in sexual minority women.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 18. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

Objective: Eating pathology is more prevalent among women compared to men, but prevalence and correlates associated with eating pathology likely vary among subgroups of women. This study examines prevalence and correlates of restrictive and weight control-related eating pathology in sexual minority women.

Method: Data were collected from the Pittsburgh Girls Study (PGS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23072DOI Listing

Navigating the university transition among women who self-report an eating disorder: A qualitative study.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 15. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, Magee-Womens Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Objective: Although developmental milestones have been observed to alter eating disorder (ED) symptom burden, it remains unknown how the transition to university affects symptomatology. To address this gap, we designed a qualitative study to elucidate how students with an ED perceive their general university experience and to describe how the university environment shapes their ED.

Method: Undergraduate students who self-reported an ED were recruited through fliers, an undergraduate advocacy organization, and local treatment centers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23071DOI Listing

Interview-based assessment of avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID): A pilot study evaluating an ARFID module for the Eating Disorder Examination.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 7;52(4):388-397. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

Integrated Research and Treatment Center AdiposityDiseases, Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Leipzig University Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany.

Objective: Although avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) has been included as a new diagnostic entity of childhood feeding and eating disorders, there is a lack of measures to reliably and validly assess ARFID. In addition, virtually nothing is known about clinical characteristics of ARFID in nonclinical samples.

Method: The present study presents the development and validation of an ARFID module for the child and parent version of the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) in a nonclinical sample of N = 39 children between 8 and 13 years with underweight and/or restrictive eating behaviors. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23063
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23063DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Treating bulimia nervosa in the context of gender dysphoria using 10-session cognitive behavior therapy.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 7. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

College of Education, Psychology and Social Work, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Objective: This case report describes the psychological treatment for bulimia nervosa of a 16-year old with co-occurring gender dysphoria. He reported restricting his food intake and purging for approximately 1 year prior to therapy commencing.

Method: Ten sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy for eating disorders (CBT-T) were conducted with accommodations for gender-specific body dissatisfaction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23068DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Optimizing treatment outcomes in adolescents with eating disorders: The potential role of cognitive behavioral therapy.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 4. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.

Objective: While family-based treatment (FBT) is the leading psychological therapy for adolescents with eating disorders, it is not universally effective or suitable. This study considered the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy for eating disorders (CBT-ED) in adolescent cases where FBT was not fully effective or where it was not applicable to the individual case.

Method: A transdiagnostic case series of 54 adolescents with eating disorders (52% with anorexia nervosa; 31% with atypical anorexia nervosa) were offered CBT-ED following previous treatment using FBT or following FBT being judged inappropriate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23067DOI Listing
March 2019
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Visual scanning during emotion recognition in long-term recovered anorexia nervosa: An eye-tracking study.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 4. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Objective: To examine Facial Emotion Recognition (FER) and visual scanning behavior (eye-tracking) during FER in women long-term recovered from teenage-onset anorexia nervosa (recAN) with and without autism spectrum disorder (±ASD) and age-matched comparison women (COMP), using a sensitive design with facial emotion expressions at varying intensities in order to approximate real social contexts.

Method: Fifty-seven 38-47-year-old women (26 recAN of whom six with ASD, 31 COMP) participated in the study. They completed a non-verbal FER task, consisting of matching basic emotions at different levels of expression intensity with full emotional expressions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23066DOI Listing
March 2019
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Assessment of eating attitudes and dieting behaviors in healthy children: Confirmatory factor analysis of the Children's Eating Attitudes Test.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 2. Epub 2019 Mar 2.

Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Objective: The Children's Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT) is a self-report questionnaire that is conventionally summarized with a single score to identify "problematic" eating attitudes, masking informative variability in different eating attitude domains. This study evaluated the empirical support for single- versus multifactor models of the ChEAT. For validation, we compared how well the single- versus multifactor-based scores predicted body mass index (BMI). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23062DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Course, risk factors, and adverse outcomes of disordered eating in pregnancy.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 1. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Department of Psychology, The National University of Singapore, Singapore City, Singapore.

Objective: Although eating disorders in pregnancy have been studied extensively, little research attention has been given to disordered eating. The objectives of the present study were to determine the prevalence and levels of disordered eating in the perinatal period, and to identify risk factors and adverse outcomes of disordered eating during pregnancy.

Method: A prospective longitudinal design with a quantitative approach was adopted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23065DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

The role of peer victimization, sexual identity, and gender on unhealthy weight control behaviors in a representative sample of Texas youth.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 25. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Population Research Center, Human Development and Family Sciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas.

Objective: The aim of the study is to examine the association between victimization and unhealthy weight control behaviors (UWCB), accounting for other key correlates of UWCB while considering the moderating role of sexual identity and gender.

Method: This study used data from the 2017 Texas Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), a representative sample of students in grades 9-12 in the U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23055DOI Listing
February 2019

A new cognitive behavior therapy for adolescents with avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder in a day treatment setting: A clinical case series.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 25;52(4):447-458. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Objective: Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) is a new diagnosis in the DSM-5 Feeding and Eating Disorders section, for which very limited treatment research has been carried out, yet. A new, 4-week exposure based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) day treatment, which integrated the inhibitory learning principles, was developed for adolescents with ARFID, and tested in the current study.

Method: A nonconcurrent multiple baseline design was used in a clinical case series of eleven 10- to 18-year-old patients. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23053
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23053DOI Listing
April 2019
8 Reads

Test of the modified dual pathway model of eating disorders in individuals with type 1 diabetes.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 25. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Department of Pediatrics, University of South Florida Diabetes Center, Tampa, Florida.

Objective: Adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) demonstrate high rates of disordered eating behaviors (DEBs) and may experience physiological and psychological vulnerabilities not currently included in established risk models of DEBs. This study examined associations among constructs included in the recently proposed T1D-specific modified dual pathway model and examined age as a moderator of these associations.

Method: Participants included adolescents (n = 307; age M = 15. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23054DOI Listing
February 2019

Transcranial direct current stimulation modulates implicit attitudes towards food in eating disorders.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 23. Epub 2019 Feb 23.

Department of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy.

Objective: Neuromodulation of regions involved in food processing is increasingly used in studies on eating behaviors, but results are controversial. We assessed the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (a-tDCS) on food and body implicit preferences in patients with eating disorders (EDs).

Method: Thirty-six ED patients and 36 healthy females completed three sessions with a-tDCS applied to the medial-prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the right extrastriate body area (rEBA) or in sham mode. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23046DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

The central role of disgust in disorders of food avoidance.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 25. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

Background: Individuals with extreme food avoidance such as Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) experience impairing physical and mental health consequences from nutrition of insufficient variety or/and quantity. Identifying mechanisms contributing to food avoidance is essential to develop effective interventions. Anxiety figures prominently in theoretical models of food avoidance; however, there is limited evidence that repeated exposures to foods increases approach behavior in ARFID. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23047DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Applying the disgust conditioning model of food avoidance: A case study of acceptance-based interoceptive exposure.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 22;52(4):473-477. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Eating and Weight Disorders Program, Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.

Objective: The current case report details the treatment of a 16-year-old adolescent with anorexia nervosa utilizing a novel adjunct, acceptance-based interoceptive exposure, prior to family-based treatment (FBT) for eating disorders.

Method: The exposure-based module focused particularly on the tolerance of disgust. For six sessions, the clinician taught the client skills that could be used to tolerate distress to visceral sensations associated with disgust. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23045DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

Introduction to a special issue on child and adolescent feeding and eating disorders and avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 22;52(4):327-330. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Objective: We are very pleased to introduce a special issue of the International Journal of Eating Disorders on child and adolescent feeding and eating disorders and avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID).

Method: Contributions focused on five main themes: (1) the definition and assessment of ARFID; (2) the clinical phenomenology of ARFID; (3) similarities and differences between ARFID and anorexia nervosa (AN); (4) novel treatments for ARFID; and (5) new ideas for improving treatment outcomes in AN.

Results: These papers highlight the importance of clear operationalization and measurement of the ARFID diagnostic criteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23052DOI Listing
April 2019
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Education, dissemination, and the science of eating disorders: Reflections on the 2019 International Conference on Eating Disorders: Editorial to accompany IJED Virtual Issue in honor of the 2019 International Conference on Eating Disorders.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 20. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Objective: This virtual issue of the International Journal of Eating Disorders highlights recently published research that aligns with the broad themes of the 2019 International Conference on Eating Disorders (ICED), held in New York, NY, USA.

Methods And Results: We selected articles that were published between 2017 and 2019 that complement the content of the keynote and plenary sessions. We also curated additional articles from early career scholars, given that an important component of the annual ICED is to foster the development and training of the next generation of eating-disorder clinicians and researchers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23050DOI Listing
February 2019

Hospital course of underweight youth with ARFID treated with a meal-based behavioral protocol in an inpatient-partial hospitalization program for eating disorders.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 19;52(4):428-434. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Objective: Information on nutritional rehabilitation for underweight patients with avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) is scarce. This study characterized hospitalized youth with ARFID treated in an inpatient (IP)-partial hospitalization behavioral eating disorders (EDs) program employing an exclusively meal-based rapid refeeding protocol and compared weight restoration outcomes to those of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN).

Method: Data from retrospective chart review of consecutive underweight admissions (N = 275; age 11-26 years) with ARFID (n = 27) were compared to those with AN (n = 248) on clinical features, reason for discharge, and weight restoration variables. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23049
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23049DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Comparisons of bone density and body composition among adolescents with anorexia nervosa and atypical anorexia nervosa.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 16. Epub 2019 Feb 16.

Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Objective: To compare bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition among adolescents: (a) with atypical anorexia nervosa (AAN) versus anorexia nervosa (AN) and (b) those with and without a prior history of overweight.

Method: Electronic medical records of patients 9-20 years with AN or AAN who underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed.

Results: A total of 286 adolescents with AN or AAN were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23048DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

Emotional feeding as interpersonal emotion regulation: A developmental risk factor for binge-eating behaviors.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

Emotional feeding is an interpersonal emotion regulation strategy wherein people provide food to others as a means of influencing the recipient's emotional response. Parental emotional feeding has been linked to higher levels of emotional eating in children and adolescents using cross-sectional, retrospective, and prospective designs; however, there is little research on emotional feeding as a developmental risk factor for emotional eating and binge-eating behaviors in adolescence and adulthood. This Idea Worth Researching article explores the rationale for studying emotional feeding as a lifespan construct and its potential implications for understanding eating disorder pathology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23044DOI Listing
February 2019

Results of disseminating an online screen for eating disorders across the U.S.: Reach, respondent characteristics, and unmet treatment need.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.

Objective: The treatment gap between those who need and those who receive care for eating disorders is wide. Scaling a validated, online screener that makes individuals aware of the significance of their symptoms/behaviors is a crucial first step for increasing access to care. The objective of the current study was to determine the reach of disseminating an online eating disorder screener in partnership with the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), as well to examine the probable eating disorder diagnostic and risk breakdown of adult respondents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23043DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Radcliffe ARFID Workgroup: Toward operationalization of research diagnostic criteria and directions for the field.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 13;52(4):361-366. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Objective: Since its introduction to the psychiatric nomenclature in 2013, research on avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) has proliferated highlighting lack of clarity in how ARFID is defined.

Method: In September 2018, a small multi-disciplinary pool of international experts in feeding disorder and eating disorder clinical practice and research convened as the Radcliffe ARFID workgroup to consider operationalization of DSM-5 ARFID diagnostic criteria to guide research in this disorder.

Results: By consensus of the Radcliffe ARFID workgroup, ARFID eating is characterized by food avoidance and/or restriction, involving limited volume and/or variety associated with one or more of the following: weight loss or faltering growth (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23042DOI Listing
April 2019
9 Reads

Psychiatric and medical correlates of DSM-5 eating disorders in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan;52(1):42-50

Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Objective: To examine psychiatric and somatic correlates of DSM-5 eating disorders (EDs)-anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge-eating disorder (BED)-in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States.

Method: A national sample of 36,309 adult participants in the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions III (NESARC-III) completed structured diagnostic interviews (AUDADIS-5) to determine psychiatric disorders, including EDs, and reported 12-month diagnosis of chronic somatic conditions. Prevalence of lifetime psychiatric disorders and somatic conditions were calculated across the AN, BN, and BED groups and a fourth group without specific ED; multiple logistic regression models compared the likelihood of psychiatric/somatic conditions with each specific ED relative to the no-specific ED group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23004DOI Listing
January 2019
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Residential eating disorder outcomes associated with screening positive for substance use disorder and borderline personality disorder.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 11;52(3):309-313. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Objective: We examined whether eating disorder (ED) outcome trajectories during residential treatment differed for patients screening positive for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and/or substance use disorders (SUDs) than those who do not.

Method: We examined data from patients in a residential ED treatment program. Patients completed validated self-report surveys to screen for SUDs and BPD on admission, and the ED Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) on admission and every 2 weeks until discharge (N = 479 females). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23028DOI Listing
March 2019
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Long-term follow-up study of low-weight avoidant restrictive food intake disorder compared with childhood-onset anorexia nervosa: Psychiatric and occupational outcome in 56 patients.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 11;52(4):435-438. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Psychiatry Skane, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Eating Disorders Centre, Lund, Sweden.

Objective: To compare long term outcome between childhood-onset Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and low-weight Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) in regard to psychiatric diagnoses, social and occupational functioning.

Method: A consecutive series of 56 children originally treated for low-weight restrictive eating disorder (ED) were followed up after a mean of 15.9 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23038DOI Listing
April 2019
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Patients' experiences of brief cognitive behavioral therapy for eating disorders: A qualitative investigation.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Eating Disorders Service, Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.

Objective: Although it is important to analyze the effectiveness of new therapies, it is also necessary to consider how patients experience them. This is particularly important if we are to maximize treatment acceptability and reduce attrition. This study examined patient experiences of a new 10-session cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT-T), using a qualitative approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23039DOI Listing
February 2019
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Health related quality of life of infants and children with avoidant restrictive food intake disorder.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Apr 7;52(4):410-418. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Emma Children's Hospital, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare health related quality of life (HRQOL) in infants and children with avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) to healthy and chronically ill controls.

Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted in children who meet ARFID criteria at our tertiary care pediatric feeding clinic (September 2014 to July 2016). Before consultation, parents of patients (n = 100) were asked to complete questionnaires to determine HRQOL: the TNO-AZL Preschool Children Quality of Life (0-5 years), and "Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory" (6-7 and 8-10 years). Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23037
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23037DOI Listing
April 2019
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Disordered eating among Australian adolescents: Prevalence, functioning, and help received.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 7;52(3):246-254. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

Objective: To estimate the prevalence of disordered eating (DE) among Australian adolescents and examine associations with clinical mental health problems, problems with functioning, and help received.

Method: We analyzed data from the Young Minds Matter survey (n = 2,298, 13-17 years). We derived an index of DE severity with four levels: (1) no DE; (2) subclinical DE; (3) suspected eating disorder; and (4) lifetime eating disorder diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23032DOI Listing

Identifying and responding to child maltreatment when delivering family-based treatment-A qualitative study.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 6;52(3):292-298. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Offord Center for Child Studies, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Introduction: This study describes practitioner strategies, perceptions, experiences with identifying and responding to child emotional abuse (CEA) and child exposure to intimate partner violence (CEIPV) when providing Family-Based Treatment (FBT) to children and adolescents with eating disorders.

Method: Using qualitative interpretive description, this study recruited a purposeful sample of practitioners (N = 30, 90% female) implementing FBT for adolescent eating disorders. Semi-structured interviews focused on eliciting their perspectives regarding identifying and responding to CEA and CEIPV in practice. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/eat.23036
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23036DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Etiological influences on continuity and co-occurrence of eating disorders symptoms across adolescence and emerging adulthood.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Objective: The role of common and symptom-specific genetic and environmental influences in maintaining eating disorder symptoms across development remains unclear. This study investigates the continuity and change of etiological influences on drive for thinness, bulimia, and body dissatisfaction symptoms and their co-occurrence, across adolescence and emerging adulthood.

Method: In total, 2,629 adolescent twins (mean age = 15. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23040DOI Listing
February 2019
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Is bullying and teasing associated with eating disorders? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Regional Department for Eating Disorders, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Objective: Involvement in bullying and teasing has been associated with adverse health outcomes, including eating disorders (EDs). The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to examine the association between bullying/teasing and EDs.

Method: A systematic search was conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23035DOI Listing
February 2019
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Alliance, technique, both, or more? Clinicians' views on what works in cognitive-behavioral therapy for eating disorders.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 1;52(3):278-282. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.

Objective: This study examined clinicians' views of the roles of two elements of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in explaining treatment outcomes-CBT techniques and the therapeutic alliance.

Method: Ninety-eight clinicians who reported delivering CBT for eating disorders completed measures addressing their beliefs about what is effective in CBT, their use of specific techniques, and their own anxiety levels.

Results: Clinicians substantially overestimated the role of both therapeutic techniques and the alliance in explaining treatment outcomes in CBT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23033DOI Listing
March 2019
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Children with avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder and anorexia nervosa in a tertiary care pediatric eating disorder program: A comparative study.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 1;52(3):239-245. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the medical and psychological characteristics of children under the age of 13 years with avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) and anorexia nervosa (AN) from a Canadian tertiary care pediatric eating disorders program.

Method: Participants included 106 children assessed between 2013 and 2017 using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5). Data were collected through clinical interviews, psychometric questionnaires, and chart review. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23027
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23027DOI Listing
March 2019
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Menopausal status and disordered eating and body image concerns among middle-aged women.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Mar 31;52(3):314-318. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Objective: Eating disorders are present among middle-aged women, yet most eating disorder knowledge comes from adolescents and young adults. There is arguably a need for research specific to middle-aged women and eating pathology. One biological factor that may contribute to eating disorder symptoms and is unique to middle-aged women is menopause, given the changes in body shape and weight that direct women's bodies away from the young, thin beauty standard. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23030DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read