4,389 results match your criteria Internal medicine journal[Journal]


Prevalence of advance care directives in the community: A telephone survey of three Australian States.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb 20. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Australian Centre for Health Law Research, Queensland University of Technology.

Background: The community prevalence of advance care directives (ACDs) is low despite known benefits of advance care planning for patients, families and health professionals.

Aim: To determine the community prevalence of instructional and appointing ACDs in New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland and factors associated with completion of these documents.

Methods: A telephone survey of adults living in New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland (n=1175) about completion of instructional ACDs (making their own decisions about future health care) and appointing ACDs (appointing another to decide). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14261DOI Listing
February 2019

The effects of empagliflozin treatment on cardiac function and structure in patients with type 2 diabetes - a cardiac MR study.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb 19. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute.

Background: The effects of empagliflozin on cardiac structure and function are not known AIMS: To examine the changes in cardiac structure and function following the addition of empagliflozin in patients with Type 2 (T2D) diabetes using cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging.

Methods: 20 patients attending a specialist diabetes service recommended for treatment with empagliflozin, and 8 control patient with T2D on stable glucose lowering therapy were recruited for cardiac imaging. Participants underwent cardiac MR scans at baseline and 6 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14260DOI Listing
February 2019

Decision-making for older patients by Australian and New Zealand doctors with Advance Care Directives: A vignette based study.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb 18. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

MStrokeMgt. Advance Care Planning Department Alfred Health.

Background: Little is known about doctors' decision-making patterns when using Advance Care Directives (ACDs) particularly for older patients in Australia and New Zealand.

Aims: To determine the level of agreement amongst Australian and New Zealand doctors' decisions when using ACDs to guide treatment decisions for older patients. To evaluate factors that may affect decision-making including doctors' demographics, vignette complexity and ACD content. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14263DOI Listing
February 2019

Cognitive function during exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb 18. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Hutt Valley District Health Board, New Zealand.

Purpose Of The Study: To determine the prevalence and time course of cognitive impairment in COPD patients during and after an admission to hospital with an exacerbation of COPD.

Study Design: Patients admitted to hospital with an exacerbation of COPD between October 2013 and November 2014 were administered the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) tool, COPD assessment test (CAT), and modified BORG dyspnoea scale at three points in time: within 24 hours of admission, between 48 and 72 hours after admission and 6 weeks post discharge.

Results: 25 patients agreed to participate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14259DOI Listing
February 2019

Impact of access to novel therapies on the initial management of castrate-resistant prostate cancer: an Australian multicentre study.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb 18. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Department of Medical Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia.

Background: The impact of regulatory approvals of new therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in Australia is unclear.

Aims: To determine if changes in novel therapy access in Australia affected how clinicians initially managed men with newly-diagnosed CRPC.

Methods: Data from patients diagnosed with CRPC from 2013-2016 across three Australian hospitals were retrospectively collected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14262DOI Listing
February 2019

Supporting safe implementation of voluntary assisted dying.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):278-279

Eastern Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14198DOI Listing
February 2019

Royal College of Physicians of London: a 1793 entrant, fabled fellow or member malcontent.

Authors:
Bruce H Short

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):265-268

Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

The adverse fallout following the Royal Australasian College of Physician's (RACP) introduction to computer-based testing that was disrupted in the February 2018 examinations, aroused great sympathy for the candidates and perhaps rekindled worrying memories by the College fellowship. The RACP's entrance procedures have slowly and steadily evolved since 1938 when the first 41of 45 practitioners were admitted to membership. Powerful emotive experiences accompany most applicants' progress to membership, perhaps no greater an ordeal than visited upon a 1793 anonymous entrant to the Royal College of Physicians of London, facing far different but no less stressful predicaments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14206DOI Listing
February 2019

Conflicting purposes: the challenge facing modern professional associations.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):147-148

Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14213DOI Listing
February 2019

Inpatient continuous cardiac monitoring in hyper-acute stroke: a comparison between telemetry by cardiology and stroke unit.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):259-261

Department of Neurosciences, Eastern Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

This retrospective study assessed the pattern of telemetry usage and rates of atrial fibrillation (AF) detection in the 6 months pre- and post-implementation of stroke unit monitored telemetry; 122/154 (79%) of patients had telemetry prior to implementation of stroke unit based telemetry and 164/194 (85%) in the 5 months post (P = 0.31). The use of stroke unit based telemetry was associated with a small increase of telemetry usage and significant increase in telemetry hours per patient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14202DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Sepsis and septic shock: current approaches to management.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):160-170

The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Sepsis, defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated host response to infection, is recognised by the World Health Organization as a global health priority. Each year, 5000 of the 18 000 adults with sepsis treated in Australian intensive care units die, with survivors suffering long-term physical, cognitive and psychological dysfunction, which is poorly recognised and frequently untreated. There are currently no effective pharmacological treatments for sepsis, making early recognition, resuscitation and immediate treatment with appropriate antibiotics the key to reducing the burden of resulting disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14199DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Approaches to palliative oxygen therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a multi-national survey of specialists.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):252-256

Palliative Medicine, Centre for Cancer Research, The University of Melbourne (St Vincent's Hospital), Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

As palliative oxygen therapy (POT) is beneficial only to a minority of patients with chronic breathlessness, it is no longer routinely recommended. This multi-national, online survey of respiratory and palliative medicine specialists, with 440 participants, identified that prescription of POT has decreased over the past decade; however a sizeable proportion of doctors, particularly within palliative care, still support and recommend POT. Further education and research regarding the optimal management of chronic breathlessness are required. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14195DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Lactation ketoacidosis: an easily missed diagnosis.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):256-259

Department of Internal Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Ketoacidosis is uncommon in non-diabetic women, but occurs in the postpartum period as a rare complication of continuing to breastfeed during periods of acute illness. We report a case of a lactating woman who presented with severe symptomatic ketoacidosis in the early postpartum period. We also review the pathophysiology and management of lactation ketoacidosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14207DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Hypothyroidism and renal impairment: an easily missed diagnosis.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):276-278

Department of Renal Medicine, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14203DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Unusual cause of an elevated hemidiaphragm: large right-sided spontaneous diaphragmatic hernia induced by severe chronic cough in an adolescent patient with asthma.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):273-274

Department of Respiratory Medicine and Sleep Disorders, Western Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14196DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Non-invasive ventilation of patients with acute asthma.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):262-264

Internal Medicine, Ballarat Health Services, Ballarat, Victoria, Australia.

A retrospective observational study of 21 patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Frankston Hospital with acute asthma between 2011 and 2014 was undertaken. We report the outcomes for three groups of patients; those that did (n = 7) or did not (n = 6) receive initial therapy with non-invasive ventilation (NIV) together with those that received invasive ventilation (n = 8). Patients successfully managed with NIV alone experienced a shorter ICU and hospital stay versus those who required invasive ventilation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14208DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Interferon-beta in multiple sclerosis causing thrombotic microangiopathy.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):274-276

Department of Neuroscience, Monash Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14204DOI Listing
February 2019

Why is optimisation of antimicrobial use difficult at the end of life?

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):269-271

Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, and The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

The antibiotic optimisation imperative is now ubiquitous, with national policy frameworks in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries incorporating the requirement for antimicrobial stewardship within healthcare services. Yet in practice, the optimisation agenda often raises complex ethical- and practice-based dilemmas. Antibiotic use at the end of life is multidimensional. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14200DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Acute Q-fever infection in a dairy products maker without direct animal contact.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):272-273

Department of Infectious Diseases, Northern Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14197DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Addressing barriers to timely lung cancer diagnosis and treatment in an outer metropolitan Western Australian hospital.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):279-280

Department of Respiratory Medicine, St John of God Health Care, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14205DOI Listing
February 2019

Faecal microbiota transplantation in Australia: bogged down in regulatory uncertainty.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):148-151

Inflammatory Bowel Disease Service, Department of Gastroenterology, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14212DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

A case of persistent fever, cutaneous manifestations and pulmonary and splenic nodules: clinical experience and a literature review.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb;49(2):247-251

Department of Respiratory, Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen, Gangdong, China.

Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare and recurrent ulcerating, non-infectious, inflammatory dermatosis, with occasional concomitant extracutaneous manifestations. The pathogenesis and aetiology of PG are unknown. Moreover, early diagnosis is challenging because there are several visceral manifestations that may occur prior to the skin findings, such that misdiagnosis of PG as an infection is common. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14201DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Driving with Cardiac Devices in Australia. Does a review of recent evidence prompt a change in guidelines?

Intern Med J 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine, Monash University.

Australian Driving Guidelines for patients with pacemakers and implanted cardioverter defibrillators are in line with many around the world, with some minor differences. Some aspects of these guidelines lack contemporary evidence in key decision making areas and make broad recommendations regarding groups with heterogeneous populations. Additionally, more recent studies suggest lower rates of adverse events in some patients with these devices than previously thought. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14243DOI Listing
February 2019

Changing Ethnic and Clinical Trends and Factors Associated with Successful Home Haemodialysis at Auckland District Health Board.

Intern Med J 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Department of Renal Medicine, Auckland District Health Board.

Background: The health and diversity of the population in New Zealand is changing under the influence of many socio-economic factors. This may have shifted the landscape of home haemodialysis (HHD).

Aims: This study examines the demographic and clinical changes, determinants of HHD training and technique outcome, and mortality between 2008 and 2015 at Auckland District Health Board, NZ. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14240DOI Listing
February 2019

Is there a role for proton pump inhibitor prophylaxis in haematology patients?

Intern Med J 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Department of Clinical Haematology, Austin Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria.

While proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely prescribed as prophylaxis in selected haematology inpatient and outpatients , an informal survey of haematology units around Australia found wide variations in the specific indications for their use. This is consistent with a literature review which showed a paucity of robust evidence to support their use, specifically in chemotherapy-induced mucositis, thrombocytopenia or administration of high dose glucocorticosteroids in the absence of additional risk factors. Overuse is relevant both due to cost perspective emerging evidence of adverse events associated with prolonged PPI administration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14241DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Use of a three-tiered clinical decision rule to quantify unnecessary radiological investigation of suspected pulmonary embolism.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan 30. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Consultant General Physician, Royal Adelaide Hospital.

Background: Clinical decision rules for suspected pulmonary embolism are proposed to identify patients suitable for discharge without radiological investigation. Their use varies between institutions.

Aims: To quantify unnecessary radiological investigations for suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) as defined by a newly proposed three-tiered clinical decision rule incorporating the Revised Geneva Score, Pulmonary Embolism Rule-Out Criteria and D-dimer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14234DOI Listing
January 2019
8 Reads

Predictors of acute hospital mortality and length of stay in patients with new onset atrial fibrillation: A first-hand experience from a MET response provider.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Medicine, Monash Medical Centre, Monash Health.

Background: Atrial fibrillation(AF) occurs frequently following cardiothoracic surgery and treatment decisions are informed by evidence-based clinical guidelines. Outside this setting there is little data to guide clinical management. Our aim was to describe the characteristics, management and outcomes of hospitalised adult patients with new-onset AF. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14236DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read
1.699 Impact Factor

Conflicts of interest: new thinking, new processes.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Unversity of Sydney, Sydney, NSW.

Although the concept of "conflict of interest" (COI) arises in many contexts in health care it is often poorly understood, and commonly accepted definitions are often circular, self-contradictory and unable to provide procedural guidance. To overcome such confusion and imprecision we offer a reformulation of COI that carefully defines interests, clarifies their scope and articulates a simple, non-punitive approach to managing them. We define an "interest" as "a commitment, goal, obligation or duty related to a particular social role or practice". Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14233DOI Listing
January 2019

Prevalence and Health Care Usage of Knee Pain in South Australia (SA): A Population Based Study.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

University of Adelaide.

Background: It is known that South Australia (SA) has the highest rate of knee arthroscopy use of any state in Australia, however Level 1 evidence demonstrates that knee arthroscopy in patients with uncomplicated knee osteoarthritis confers no benefit. In SA, which patients are presenting with knee pain and what treatments are they receiving?

Aims: To determine the prevalence, persistence and treatment modalities of knee pain in SA.

Methods: This study analysed data from the North-West Adelaide Health Study (1999-2015), a longitudinal, population based cohort study of people aged 18 years and over (n=4060), initially randomly selected from the north-west region of Adelaide, SA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14237DOI Listing
January 2019

The biggest decision of them all - death and assisted dying: capacity assessments and undue influence screening.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Australian Centre for Health Law Research, Queensland University of Technology.

Arguably, deciding the timing and manner of one's death is the biggest decision of all. With the Victorian Voluntary Assisted Dying Act commencing in 2019, assessing capacity to choose Voluntary Assisted Dying (VAD) becomes a critical issue for clinicians in Victoria, and elsewhere with ongoing efforts to change the law across Australia and in New Zealand. We consider how capacity assessment and undue influence screening can be approached for VAD, the role and risks of supported decision-making, and argue for the importance of training to ensure health care professionals are educated about their role. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14238DOI Listing
January 2019

Patterns of immunotherapy use and management of toxicities in regional and tertiary settings.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Staff Specialist, Central West Cancer Care Centre, Orange.

Background: The introduction of the CTLA-4 and PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitors and their subsequent listing on the PBS for use in metastatic melanomas, renal cell carcinomas and non-small cell lung cancers has resulted in routine use of these agents in oncology practices, including in regional areas. Although immunotherapeutic agents generally have a favourable toxicity profile compared to chemotherapy, they can provoke immune-related adverse effects (irAEs) caused by an unregulated and hyperstimulated immune response. Some of these effects can be serious and life-threatening. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14235DOI Listing
January 2019

Author reply.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):137-138

University of São Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14179DOI Listing
January 2019

Bridging the access gap: Medicare ineligibility in people living with chronic hepatitis B.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):122-125

WHO Collaborating Centre for Viral Hepatitis, The Doherty Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

People living in Australia on temporary student or work visas are excluded from Medicare access and can face barriers to adequate healthcare, even if they are privately insured. This analysis aimed to quantify this issue in relation to people living with chronic hepatitis B, the majority of whom in Australia were born overseas. The data suggest that an estimated 25 000 people living with chronic hepatitis B in Australia are ineligible for Medicare, 10% of the total number affected, with considerable potential impact in access to effective healthcare and prevention of adverse outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14175DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Management of frail older people with acute illness.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):28-33

Centre for Health Services Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Frailty status is intrinsically related to every aspect of older patients' hospital journeys: the way in which they present to hospital, their health status at admission, vulnerability to complications in hospital and rate of recovery after an acute insult. In younger people, hospitalisation is usually the result of a serious illness or injury, such as sepsis or major trauma. Management can be underpinned by evidence-based algorithms relating to the precipitating insult and recovery usually follows a predictable trajectory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14182DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Hamman syndrome: spontaneous postpartum pneumomediastinum.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):130-131

Eastern Health and Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14171DOI Listing
January 2019

Risk versus regulation: an update on the state of e-cigarette control in Australia.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):110-113

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia.

E-cigarettes are increasingly common around the world, particularly among youth. Ingestion of nicotine-containing e-liquid, while relatively rare, is the major toxicological risk associated with their use. Current Australian regulation has nicotine for use in e-cigarettes listed as a dangerous poison in Schedule 7, with its supply or sale illegal in all states and territories, while regulation on the sale of e-cigarettes and accessories varies by state. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14176DOI Listing
January 2019

Gastric anisakiasis: a rare cause of abdominal pain.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):129-130

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14194DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Hope, hype and harms of Big Data.

Authors:
Ian A Scott

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):126-129

Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Big Data are characterised by greater volumes of data from a greater variety of sources which are produced and processed at greater velocity. Huge digitised datasets from electronic medical records, registries, administrative datasets and genomic databanks can now be analysed by advanced computer programs to reveal patterns, trends and associations previously indiscernible using conventional analytic methods. These new insights may have important implications for clinical care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14172DOI Listing
January 2019

Imaging aortitis.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):136-137

Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14132DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Aspirin for primary cardiovascular disease prevention: what we know and what we don't know.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):12-14

School of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14190DOI Listing
January 2019

2018 IMJ Reviewers.

Authors:

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):8-12

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14188DOI Listing
January 2019

Recognising and managing dying patients in the acute hospital setting: can we do better?

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):119-122

Centre for Palliative Care, Victoria, Australia.

Healthcare professionals have limited formal end-of-life care training despite the large proportion of hospital deaths. A retrospective review of 201 acute hospital deaths revealed 166 (82.6%) had documentation to suggest the patient was dying but this was performed late with a median time between documentation and death of 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14177DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Consent in the face of death.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):108-110

Sydney Health Ethics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

While the traditional model of consent is supported by codes and theories of ethics, is enshrined in law, and provides the core of health policy and clinical governance, it is unclear how accurately it reflects clinical practice and in particular how accurately it accounts for edition-making in 'high-risk' situations where patients are critically ill and facing death. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14173DOI Listing
January 2019

The epidemic of compassion fatigue.

Authors:
Nadia Hitchen

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):134-135

General Medicine, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14180DOI Listing
January 2019

The Journal in 2018.

Authors:
Jeff Szer

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):7-8

Clinical Haematology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/imj.14189
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14189DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Vaccine strain varicella zoster virus transmitted within a family from a child with shingles results in varicella meningitis in an immunocompetent adult.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):132-133

Sunshine Coast University Hospital, Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14178DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Aspirin for primary cardiovascular disease prevention: time to re-evaluate guidelines?

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):133-134

Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Western Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14185DOI Listing
January 2019

Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy secondary to hepatitis C virus infection-related T-cell lymphopenia.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):114-118

Department of Allergy, Immunology, Respiratory Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is an uncommon neurological condition known to occur in the setting of T-cell immune suppression. We report a case of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related T-cell lymphopenia manifesting as PML. HCV treatment and transient viral suppression resulted in immunological recovery with clinical stabilisation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14174DOI Listing
January 2019
1.699 Impact Factor

Anaphylaxis presentations to the emergency department: impending Victorian reporting legislation.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan;49(1):135-136

Allergy, Asthma and Clinical Immunology, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14181DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Comparison between Gallium-68 citrate PET-CT and Gallium-67 citrate scintigraphy for infection imaging.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan 22. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Australia.

Background: Preliminary studies have reported promising results for the utility of Ga-68 citrate PET-CT for infection imaging. This technique offers reduced radiation dose to patients, shorter time between injection and imaging and reduced time for image acquisition compared to the 'gold standard' nuclear imaging technique: Ga-67 citrate scintigraphy.

Aims: To compare the two imaging modalities to ascertain whether Ga-68 citrate PET-CT is of equivalent diagnostic efficacy for bone and joint infection or pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) and to assess image quality and reporter confidence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14231DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read
1.699 Impact Factor

Resource Use and Outcomes in Patients with Dialysis Dependent Chronic Kidney Disease Admitted to Intensive Care.

Intern Med J 2019 Jan 22. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Department of Renal Medicine, Alice Springs Hospital, Alice Springs, Northern Territory,, Australia.

Background: Central Australia (CA) has a high prevalence of haemodialysis-dependent-chronic kidney-disease (CKD5D). CKD5D is associated with an increased need for critical care services.

Aims: To describe the demographic features, critical care resource use, and outcomes of patients with CKD5D requiring intensive care admission in CA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imj.14232DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read