2,346 results match your criteria Injury Prevention [Journal]


We need more randomised controlled trials in injury prevention.

Inj Prev 2019 Apr 16. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

School of Rural Medicine, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia

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http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/injurypre
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2019-043253DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Building capacity for injury prevention: a process evaluation of a replication of the Cardiff Violence Prevention Programme in the Southeastern USA.

Inj Prev 2019 Apr 16. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

School of Dentistry, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.

Objectives: Violence is a major public health problem in the USA. In 2016, more than 1.6 million assault-related injuries were treated in US emergency departments (EDs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043127DOI Listing

Public interest in gun control in the USA.

Inj Prev 2019 Apr 16. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Crozer-Keystone Health System, Upland, Pennsylvania, USA

To characterise public interest in gun control in the USA using internet search queries, we undertook a cross-sectional study of the relative popularity Google Trends searchers for 'Gun Control', 'Second Amendment', 'National Rifle Association' and 'Mass Shooting' from May 2015 to December 2018. 740 weeks of data were queried. Graphed data revealed nine major inflection points. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2019-043183DOI Listing

Typhoon track change-based emergency shelter location-allocation model: a case study of Wenchang in Hainan province, China.

Inj Prev 2019 Apr 11. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Key Laboratory of Environmental Change and Natural Disaster of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China.

Background: Determining the locations of disaster emergency shelters and the allocation of impacted residents are key components in shelter planning and emergency management. Various models have been developed to solve this location-allocation problem, but gaps remain regarding the processes of hazards. This study attempts to develop a model based on the change of typhoon track that addresses the location-allocation problem for typhoon emergency shelters. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043081DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Recent trends in child and youth emergency department visits because of pedestrian motor vehicle collisions by socioeconomic status in Ontario, Canada.

Inj Prev 2019 Apr 11. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Children in lower-income households have higher injury rates. Trends in emergency department (ED) visits by children 0-19 years because of pedestrian motor vehicle collisions (PMVCs) in Ontario, Canada (2008-2015) by socioeconomic status were examined.

Methods: PMVC ED data were obtained from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences for children age 0-19 years over the period 2008-2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043090DOI Listing

Drug overdose deaths at work, 2011-2016.

Inj Prev 2019 Apr 10. Epub 2019 Apr 10.

Division of Safety Research, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC/NIOSH), Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.

Drug overdose fatalities have risen sharply and the impact on US workplaces has not been described. This paper describes US workplace overdose deaths between 2011 and 2016. Drug overdose deaths were identified from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries and fatality rates calculated using denominators from the Current Population Survey. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043104DOI Listing

Paediatric window falls and interannual temperature variability in the Seattle metro area.

Inj Prev 2019 Apr 4. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Center for Health and the Global Environment, Departments of Global Health and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

We explore whether the timing and burden of paediatric window fall injuries in the Seattle area have changed with higher temperatures and increased air conditioning (AC) prevalence. Using hospital trauma registry records from 2005 to 2017, along with population estimates from the National Center for Health Statistics, we calculate trauma incidence rates from paediatric window falls. Using local temperature data, we explore the relationship between temperature increases over time and the seasonality and rate of incidents. Read More

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http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/injurypre
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043110DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Spatial distribution of roadway environment features related to child pedestrian safety by census tract income in Toronto, Canada.

Inj Prev 2019 Apr 1. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Child Health Evaluative Sciences, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Investments in traffic calming infrastructure and other street design features can enhance pedestrian safety as well as contribute to the 'walkability' of neighbourhoods. Pedestrian-motor vehicle collisions (PMVCs) in urban areas, however, remain common and occur more frequently in lower income neighbourhoods. While risk and protective features of roadways related to PMVC have been identified, little research exists examining the distribution of roadway environment features. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043125DOI Listing
April 2019
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Age-specific incidence of injury-related hospital contact after release from prison: a prospective data-linkage study.

Inj Prev 2019 Mar 30. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

Justice Health Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

Background: In population studies, the risk of injury declines after early adulthood. It is unclear if a similar age difference in the risk of injury exists among people released from prison.

Methods: Prerelease survey data collected between 1 August 2008 and 31 July 2010, from a representative cohort of sentenced adults (≥18 years) in Queensland, Australia, were linked prospectively and retrospectively to person-level emergency department, inpatient hospital and correctional records. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043092DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Effect of a cognitive test at license renewal for older drivers on their crash risk in Japan.

Inj Prev 2019 Mar 30. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Objective: To evaluate the effect of adding a cognitive test to a license renewal procedure for drivers aged 75 years or older in reducing their motor vehicle collisions (MVCs). The test has been obligatory since June 2009.

Methods: Using monthly police-reported national data on MVCs from January 2005 through December 2016, we calculated the rates of MVCs per licensed driver-year by sex and age group (70-74, 75-79, 80-84 and 85 years or older) for each month together with the ratios of MVC rates of drivers in the three oldest age groups (which are subject to the test) to those of the 70-74 years group (not subject to the test) to control for extraneous factors affecting MVCs over the study period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043117DOI Listing

Comparison of revised Functional Capacity Index scores with Abbreviated Injury Scale 2008 scores in predicting 12-month severe trauma outcomes.

Inj Prev 2019 Mar 30. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Introduction: Anatomical injury as measured by the AIS often accounts for only a small proportion of variability in outcomes after injury. The predictive Functional Capacity Index (FCI) appended to the 2008 AIS claims to provide a widely available method of predicting 12-month function following injury.

Objectives: To determine the extent to which AIS-based and FCI-based scoring is able to add to a simple predictive model of 12-month function following severe injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043085DOI Listing

Firearm assault injuries by residence and injury occurrence location.

Inj Prev 2019 Mar 30. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Research on spatial injury patterns is limited by a lack of precise injury occurrence location data. Using linked hospital and death records, we examined residence and injury locations for firearm assaults and homicides in or among residents of King County, Washington, USA from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2014. In total, 670 injuries were identified, 586 with geocoded residence and injury locations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043129DOI Listing

Developing drowning prevention strategies for rivers through the use of a modified Delphi process.

Inj Prev 2019 Mar 30. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia.

Introduction: Internationally, rivers are a leading drowning location, yet little evidence exists evaluating river drowning prevention strategies. This study aims to use expert opinion to identify strategies more likely to be effective.

Methods: Using a modified Delphi process, a virtual panel of 30 experts from 12 countries considered, grouped and prioritised strategies for river drowning prevention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2019-043156DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Unintentional injury deaths among American Indian residents of the Fort Apache Indian Reservation, 2006-2012.

Inj Prev 2019 Mar 30. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

International Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

This study aims to describe the epidemiology of unintentional injury deaths among American Indian residents of the Fort Apache Indian Reservation between 2006 and 2012. Unintentional injury death data were obtained from the Arizona Department of Health Services and death rates were calculated per 100 000 people per year and age adjusted using data obtained from Indian Health Service and the age distribution of the 2010 US Census. Rate ratios were calculated using the comparison data obtained through CDC's Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043082DOI Listing

Road safety risk factors for non-motorised vehicle users in a Chinese city: an observational study.

Inj Prev 2019 Mar 29. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Objective: The objective of this study is to describe and analyse the prevalence of speeding, helmet use and red-light running among riders of non-motorised vehicles (NMVs) in Shanghai, China, with a focus on electric bikes (ebikes).

Methods: Observational studies were conducted in eight randomly selected locations in Shanghai. Descriptive statistics and a Cox proportional hazard (PH) model were used in the analyses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043071DOI Listing

Forging the future: is the injury prevention community a learning organisation?

Inj Prev 2019 Apr;25(2):75

School of Rural Medicine, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2019-043199DOI Listing

Road user behaviour, attitudes and crashes: a survey of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia.

Inj Prev 2019 Mar 5. Epub 2019 Mar 5.

School of Public Health and Community Medicine, UNSW, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Objective: This study aimed to describe road user behaviour, attitudes and crashes in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in four urban, regional and remote communities located in New South Wales (NSW) and South Australia (SA).

Methods: Face-to-face surveys were administered to clients (n=625) in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS). All Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients attending the ACCHS for any reason were approached to participate over a 2-week period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043011DOI Listing

Impacts of helmet law on the changes in potential years of life lost due to traffic injury: a multiple-province evaluation in Vietnam.

Inj Prev 2019 Mar 5. Epub 2019 Mar 5.

Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.

Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the helmet law on the changes in potential years of life lost (PYLL) due to traffic mortality and to examine modification effects of socioeconomic factors on the impacts in Vietnam.

Methods: We applied an interrupted time series design using the Bayesian framework to estimate the impact of the law at the provincial level. Then, we used random effects meta-analysis to estimate the impact of the law at the country level and to examine the modification effects of socioeconomic factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043088DOI Listing

Identifying sociodemographic risk factors associated with residential fire fatalities: a matched case control study.

Inj Prev 2019 Mar 4. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Department of Economics, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.

Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the association between sociodemographic factors and residential fire fatalities in Sweden. A majority of fatal fires occur in housing. An understanding of risk factors and risk groups is a must for well-founded decisions regarding targeted prevention efforts. Read More

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http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/injurypre
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043062DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Using street imagery and crowdsourcing internet marketplaces to measure motorcycle helmet use in Bangkok, Thailand.

Inj Prev 2019 Mar 4. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Introduction: The majority of Thailand's road traffic deaths occur on motorised two-wheeled or three-wheeled vehicles. Accurately measuring helmet use is important for the evaluation of new legislation and enforcement. Current methods for estimating helmet use involve roadside observation or surveillance of police and hospital records, both of which are time-consuming and costly. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043061DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Current health status and history of traumatic brain injury among Ohio adults.

Inj Prev 2019 Feb 25. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA.

Introduction: Lifetime history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) with loss of consciousness (LOC) is prevalent in 21% of adult, non-institutionalised residents of Ohio. Prior history has been associated with lower incomes, inability to work and disability. The current study sought to evaluate the relationship between lifetime history and adverse health conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043056DOI Listing
February 2019

Incidence of medically attended paediatric burns across the UK.

Inj Prev 2019 Feb 21. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

Division of Population Medicine, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK

Objective: Childhood burns represent a burden on health services, yet the full extent of the problem is difficult to quantify. We estimated the annual UK incidence from primary care (PC), emergency attendances (EA), hospital admissions (HA) and deaths.

Methods: The population was children (0-15 years), across England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland (NI), with medically attended burns 2013-2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042881DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads
1.941 Impact Factor

Income inequality and firearm homicide in the US: a county-level cohort study.

Inj Prev 2019 Feb 19. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Objective: Income inequality has been rising in the US and thought to be associated with violence especially homicide. About 75% of homicides involve firearms. We quantified the association between county-level income inequality and all-race/ethnicity and race/ethnicity-specific firearm homicide rates among individuals aged 14-39 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043080DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

Feasibility of Safe-Tea: a parent-targeted intervention to prevent hot drink scalds in preschool children.

Inj Prev 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Division of Population Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.

Objective: Despite the high prevalence of preventable hot drink scalds in preschool children, there is a paucity of research on effective prevention interventions and a serious need to improve parents' knowledge of first aid. This study investigates the feasibility of 'Safe-Tea', an innovative multifaceted community-based intervention delivered by early-years practitioners.

Methods: 'Safe-Tea' was implemented at Childcare, Stay&Play and Home Visit settings in areas of deprivation in Cardiff, UK. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042921DOI Listing
February 2019

Crash characteristics of on-road single-bicycle crashes: an under-recognised problem.

Inj Prev 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Compared with crashes with motor vehicles, single-bicycle crashes are an under-recognised contributor to cycling injury and the aetiology is poorly understood. Using an in-depth crash investigation technique, this study describes the crash characteristics and patient outcomes of a sample of cyclists admitted to hospital following on-road bicycle crashes. Enrolled cyclists completed a structured interview, and injury details and patient outcomes were extracted from trauma registries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043014DOI Listing
February 2019

Indicators for estimating trends in alcohol-related assault: evaluation using police data from Queensland, Australia.

Inj Prev 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

School of Psychology, Deakin University, Geelong Waterfront Campus, Geelong, Victoria, Australia.

Monitoring levels of alcohol-related harm in populations requires indicators that are robust to extraneous influence. We investigated the validity of an indicator for police-attributed alcohol-related assault. We summarized offence records from Queensland Police, investigated patterns of missing data, and considered the utility of a surrogate for alcohol-related assault. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042985DOI Listing
January 2019

The annual cannabis holiday and fatal traffic crashes.

Inj Prev 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Epidemiology, Biostatistics & Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Background: Cannabis use has been linked to impaired driving and fatal accidents. Prior evidence suggests the potential for population-wide effects of the annual cannabis celebration on April 20th ('4/20'), but evidence to date is limited.

Methods: We used data from the Fatal Analysis Reporting System for the years 1975-2016 to estimate the impact of '4/20' on drivers involved in fatal traffic crashes occurring between 16:20 and 23:59 hours in the USA. Read More

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http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/injurypre
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043068DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Safety seat and seat belt use among child motor vehicle occupants, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

Inj Prev 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Department of Public Health, College of Political, Administrative and Communication Sciences, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

Background: Use of seat belts and car seats for children are among the most effective interventions to reduce injury severity when a crash occurs. The use should be enforced in order to have an increase in wearing these restraints. Romania has the lowest rate of using seatbelts in the backseat, 16%. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042989DOI Listing
January 2019

Violence prevalence and prevention status in China.

Inj Prev 2019 02;25(1):67-73

Division of Injury Prevention, National Center for Chronic and Non-communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China

Objectives: To describe the prevalence status of violence and its prevention in China, and to provide reference for the development of strategies regarding violence prevention.

Methods: Violence mortality data between 2006 and 2015 were obtained from the national disease/death surveillance data set in 2006-2015. Data on violence-related medical cases were collected from the 2015 National Injury Surveillance System. Read More

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http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/injurypre
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2017-042593DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Incidence, risk factors and economic burden of fall-related injuries in older Chinese people: a systematic review.

Inj Prev 2019 02;25(1):4-12

The George Institute for Global Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Objective: China's population is ageing and fall-related injury in older Chinese people is a growing public health concern. This review aims to synthesise existing evidence on the incidence, risk factors and economic burden of fall-related injury among older Chinese people to inform health service planning.

Methods: A systematic search of literature on falls and injury among older people living in China was performed in six electronic databases including both English and Chinese databases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042982DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

Introductory remarks.

Inj Prev 2019 02;25(1)

National Center for Chronic and Noncommunicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043106DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

Advancing injury prevention in China.

Inj Prev 2019 02;25(1):1-2

Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital. The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042948DOI Listing
February 2019

Lowering the speed limit from 30 mph to 25 mph in Boston: effects on vehicle speeds.

Inj Prev 2019 Jan 13. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Introduction: Effective 9 January 2017, the default speed limit on Boston streets was reduced from 30 mph to 25 mph. This study evaluated the effects of the speed limit reduction on speeds in Boston.

Method: Vehicle speeds were collected at sites in Boston where the speed limit was lowered, and at control sites in Providence, Rhode Island, where the speed limit remained unchanged, before and after the speed limit change in Boston. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043025DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Trends of drowning mortality in Vietnam: evidence from the national injury mortality surveillance system.

Inj Prev 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

The George Institute for Global Health, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Objective: To describe the trends of drowning mortality in Vietnam over time and to identify socioeconomic characteristics associated with higher drowning mortality at the provincial level.

Methods: We analysed data from the Ministry of Health injury mortality surveillance system from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2013. The surveillance covers more than 11 000 commune health centres in all provinces of Vietnam. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043030DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Gun ownership among US women.

Inj Prev 2018 Dec 19. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard Injury Control Research Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Introduction: Little is known about female gun owners in the USA. We describe the number and type of firearms owned, and reasons for owning, by sex.

Methods: An online survey conducted in 2015 of 3949 US adults; cross-tabulations using survey weights generated nationally representative estimates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042991DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Injury-related mortality among children younger than 5 years in China during 2009-2016: an analysis from national surveillance system.

Inj Prev 2019 02 19;25(1):60-66. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

National Office for Maternal and Child Health Surveillance of China, West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China

Background: Epidemiology in injury-related mortality among children younger than 5 years was unreported in China recently.

Methods: Data were obtained from China's Under 5 Child Mortality Surveillance System (U5CMSS) in 2009-2016. Injury-related mortality rates were calculated by residence, age-group, gender and major injury type (drowning, traffic injuries, suffocation, poisoning, falls). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042853DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6388909PMC
February 2019
13 Reads

Insufficient sleep and fitness to drive in shift workers: a systematic literature review protocol.

Inj Prev 2018 Dec 15. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

Faculty of Health Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.

Background: The majority of shift workers experience insufficient sleep as a result of their employment. Insufficient sleep is associated with impaired neurocognitive functioning, affecting key skills required for driving, resulting in shift workers experiencing a disproportionate burden of RTC injuries and fatalities. Yet, to our knowledge, no systematic literature review (SLR) exists to critically appraise and synthesise evidence on the determinants of fitness to drive (assessed on-road) and driving performance (assessed in a driving simulator) in shift workers with insufficient sleep. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042972DOI Listing
December 2018
13 Reads

Work absence due to compensable RTCs in Victoria, Australia.

Inj Prev 2018 Dec 15. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Introduction: RTC burden is commonly measured using fatality or hospitalisation statistics. However, non-fatal and less severe injuries contribute substantial economic and human costs, including work absence. In Victoria, Australia, two major compensation systems provide income support to employed people injured in RTCs; workers' compensation (if RTC occurred during work) and an RTC-specific compensation system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043019DOI Listing
December 2018
13 Reads

Estimating drowning mortality in Tanzania: a systematic review and meta-analysis of existing data sources.

Inj Prev 2018 Dec 4. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Centre for Maternal Adolescent Reproductive and Child Health (MARCH), London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

Background: The WHO advocates a 7-step process to enable countries to develop and implement drowning prevention strategies. We sought to assess, using existing data sources, the drowning situation in Tanzania as a first step in this process.

Methods: We searched for data on causes of death in Tanzania by reviewing existing literature and global datasets and by in-country networking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042939DOI Listing
December 2018
4 Reads

Fatal drowning in the Western Cape, South Africa: a 7-year retrospective, epidemiological study.

Inj Prev 2018 Nov 24. Epub 2018 Nov 24.

Violence, Injury and Peace Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council-University of South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa.

Introduction: Drowning is a neglected public health threat in low-income and middle-income countries where the greatest drowning burden is observed. There is a paucity of drowning surveillance data from low-resource settings, particularly in Africa. Understanding local epidemiological factors will enable the development of context-specific drowning prevention initiatives and the appropriate allocation of resources. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042945DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

Sampling design and methodology of the Violence Against Children and Youth Surveys.

Inj Prev 2018 Nov 24. Epub 2018 Nov 24.

Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Introduction: Globally 1 billion children are exposed to violence every year. The Violence Against Children Surveys (VACS) are nationally representative surveys of males and females ages 13-24 that are intended to measure the burden of sexual, physical and emotional violence experienced in childhood, adolescence and young adulthood. It is important to document the methodological approach and design of the VACS to better understand the national estimates that are produced in each country, which are used to drive violence prevention efforts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042916DOI Listing
November 2018
25 Reads

Motorcycle taxi programme increases safe riding behaviours among its drivers in Kampala, Uganda.

Inj Prev 2018 Nov 24. Epub 2018 Nov 24.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Background: is a motorcycle taxi company that provides road safety training and helmets to its drivers in Kampala, Uganda. We sought to determine whether drivers are more likely to engage in safe riding behaviours than regular drivers (motorcycle taxi drivers not part of ). METHODS : We measured riding behaviours in and regular drivers through: (1) computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI), where 400 drivers were asked about their riding behaviours (eg, helmet and mobile phone use) and (2) roadside observation, where riding behaviours were observed in 3000 boda-boda drivers and their passengers along major roads in Kampala. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043008DOI Listing
November 2018
12 Reads

In review.

Inj Prev 2018 12;24(6):395

School of Rural Medicine, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-043038DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Effect of seawalls on tsunami evacuation departure in the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake.

Inj Prev 2018 Nov 17. Epub 2018 Nov 17.

Graduate School of Public Health, St. Luke's International University, Tokyo, Japan.

Objective: To quantitatively evaluate the effect of seawalls on tsunami evacuation departure.

Methods: A mixed-effect Cox proportional-hazards regression model was applied to evacuation behavioural data obtained from a probability survey of survivors of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami in Iwate and Miyagi prefectures.

Findings: Presence of a seawall higher than the forecast tsunami height at any given time reduces the likelihood of prompt evacuation by 30%. Read More

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http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/injurypre
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042954DOI Listing
November 2018
11 Reads

Shuffle methodological deck chairs or abandon theoretical ship? The complexity turn in injury prevention.

Authors:
Sheree Bekker

Inj Prev 2019 Apr 16;25(2):80-82. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

Department for Health, University of Bath, Bath, UK

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042905DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Vanishing racial disparities in drowning in Florida.

Inj Prev 2018 Oct 23. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

Department of Sociology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

Objectives: To examine the change in the racial disparity in drowning in Florida from 1970 to 2015 and to analyse the contextual factors associated with white, black and Hispanic drowning rates in Florida from 2007 to 2015.

Methods: Our outcome variable is county-level annual drowning rates by race, ethnicity, sex and age group. We computed county-level contextual data, including emergency weather events, temperature, extreme weather, number of pools, quality of pools, coastline, swimming participation rates and prominent black competitive swim teams. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042872DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Non-fatal self-inflicted versus undetermined intent injuries: patient characteristics and incidence of subsequent self-inflicted injuries.

Inj Prev 2018 Oct 23. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Background: Non-fatal self-inflicted (SI) injuries may be underidentified in administrative medical data sources.

Objective: Compare patients with SI versus undetermined intent (UI) injuries according to patient characteristics, incidence of subsequent SI injury and risk factors for subsequent SI injury.

Methods: Truven Health MarketScan was used to identify patients' (aged 10-64) first SI or UI injury in 2015 (index injury). Read More

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http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/injurypre
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042933DOI Listing
October 2018
14 Reads

Cost-effectiveness of raising alcohol excise taxes to reduce the injury burden of road traffic crashes.

Inj Prev 2018 Oct 18. Epub 2018 Oct 18.

Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand.

Background: Alcohol is an important risk factor for road transport injuries. We aimed to determine if raising alcohol taxes would be a cost-effective intervention strategy for reducing this burden.

Methods: We modelled the effect of a one-off increase in alcohol excise tax (NZ$0. Read More

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Source
http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/injurypre
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042914DOI Listing
October 2018
8 Reads