116 results match your criteria Infection Genetics and Evolution [Journal]


One stimulus-Two responses: Host and parasite life-history variation in response to environmental stress.

Evolution 2016 11 23;70(11):2640-2646. Epub 2016 Sep 23.

Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, Indiana, 47907.

Climate change stressors will place different selective pressures on both parasites and their hosts, forcing individuals to modify their life-history strategies and altering the distribution and prevalence of disease. Few studies have investigated whether parasites are able to respond to host stress and respond by varying their reproductive schedules. Additionally, multiple environmental stressors can limit the ability of a host to respond adaptively to parasite infection. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/evo.13061
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.13061DOI Listing
November 2016
6 Reads

Within-population covariation between sexual reproduction and susceptibility to local parasites.

Evolution 2016 09 27;70(9):2049-60. Epub 2016 Jul 27.

Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, 47405.

Evolutionary biology has yet to reconcile the ubiquity of sex with its costs relative to asexual reproduction. Here, we test the hypothesis that coevolving parasites maintain sex in their hosts. Specifically, we examined the distributions of sexual reproduction and susceptibility to local parasites within a single population of freshwater snails (Potamopyrgus antipodarum). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.13001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5014691PMC
September 2016
4 Reads

Predicting optimal transmission investment in malaria parasites.

Evolution 2016 07 24;70(7):1542-58. Epub 2016 Jun 24.

Center For Infectious Disease Dynamics, Departments of Entomology and Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802.

In vertebrate hosts, malaria parasites face a tradeoff between replicating and the production of transmission stages that can be passed onto mosquitoes. This tradeoff is analogous to growth-reproduction tradeoffs in multicellular organisms. We use a mathematical model tailored to the life cycle and dynamics of malaria parasites to identify allocation strategies that maximize cumulative transmission potential to mosquitoes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12969DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4991358PMC
July 2016
4 Reads

Persistence of a Wolbachia infection frequency cline in Drosophila melanogaster and the possible role of reproductive dormancy.

Evolution 2016 May 5;70(5):979-97. Epub 2016 May 5.

School of BioSciences, Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, 3010, Australia.

Field populations of arthropods are often polymorphic for Wolbachia but the factors maintaining intermediate Wolbachia frequencies are generally not understood. In Drosophila melanogaster, Wolbachia frequencies are highly variable across the globe. We document the persistence of a Wolbachia infection frequency cline in D. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12923DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4874875PMC
May 2016
28 Reads

The evolution of sexual dimorphism and its potential impact on host-pathogen coevolution.

Evolution 2016 05 6;70(5):959-68. Epub 2016 May 6.

School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, 3800, Australia.

Sex and infection are intimately linked. Many diseases are spread by sexual contact, males are thought to evolve exaggerated sexual signals to demonstrate their immune robustness, and pathogens have been shown to direct the evolution of recombination. In all of these examples, infection is influencing the evolution of male and female fitness, but less is known about how sex differences influence pathogen fitness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12922DOI Listing
May 2016
10 Reads

Parasite diversity drives rapid host dynamics and evolution of resistance in a bacteria-phage system.

Evolution 2016 05 19;70(5):969-78. Epub 2016 Apr 19.

Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3PS, United Kingdom.

Host-parasite evolutionary interactions are typically considered in a pairwise species framework. However, natural infections frequently involve multiple parasites. Altering parasite diversity alters ecological and evolutionary dynamics as parasites compete and hosts resist multiple infection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12909DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4982092PMC
May 2016
3 Reads

Generalized selection to overcome innate immunity selects for host breadth in an RNA virus.

Evolution 2016 02 20;70(2):270-81. Epub 2016 Jan 20.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, 06520.

Virus-host coevolution has selected for generalized host defense against viruses, exemplified by interferon production/signaling and other innate immune function in eukaryotes such as humans. Although cell-surface binding primarily limits virus infection success, generalized adaptation to counteract innate immunity across disparate hosts may contribute to RNA virus emergence potential. We examined this idea using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) populations previously evolved on strictly immune-deficient (HeLa) cells, strictly immune competent (MDCK) cells, or on alternating deficient/competent cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12845DOI Listing
February 2016
4 Reads

Quantifying the coevolutionary potential of multistep immune defenses.

Evolution 2016 Feb 5;70(2):282-95. Epub 2016 Feb 5.

School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, 99164.

Coevolutionary models often assume host infection by parasites depends on a single bout of molecular recognition. As detailed immunological studies accumulate, however, it becomes increasingly apparent that the outcome of host-parasite interactions more generally depends on complex multiple step infection processes. For example, in plant and animal innate immunity, recognition steps are followed by downstream effector steps that kill recognized parasites, with the outcome depending on an escalatory molecular arms race. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12863DOI Listing
February 2016
10 Reads

The Red Queen lives: Epistasis between linked resistance loci.

Evolution 2016 02 3;70(2):480-7. Epub 2016 Feb 3.

Zoological Institute, University of Basel, CH-4051, Basel, Switzerland.

A popular theory explaining the maintenance of genetic recombination (sex) is the Red Queen Theory. This theory revolves around the idea that time-lagged negative frequency-dependent selection by parasites favors rare host genotypes generated through recombination. Although the Red Queen has been studied for decades, one of its key assumptions has remained unsupported. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12854DOI Listing
February 2016
7 Reads

Evolution of Drosophila resistance against different pathogens and infection routes entails no detectable maintenance costs.

Evolution 2015 11 23;69(11):2799-809. Epub 2015 Oct 23.

cE3c: Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, edifício C2, Campo Grande, 1749-016, Lisboa, Portugal.

Pathogens exert a strong selective pressure on hosts, entailing host adaptation to infection. This adaptation often affects negatively other fitness-related traits. Such trade-offs may underlie the maintenance of genetic diversity for pathogen resistance. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/evo.12782
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12782DOI Listing
November 2015
17 Reads

Virulence evolution at the front line of spreading epidemics.

Evolution 2015 Nov 15;69(11):2810-9. Epub 2015 Oct 15.

CEFE - UMR 5175, campus CNRS, 1919 route de Mende, 34293 Montpellier, France.

Understanding and predicting the spatial spread of emerging pathogens is a major challenge for the public health management of infectious diseases. Theoretical epidemiology shows that the speed of an epidemic is governed by the life-history characteristics of the pathogen and its ability to disperse. Rapid evolution of these traits during the invasion may thus affect the speed of epidemics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12781DOI Listing
November 2015
4 Reads

Horizontal transfer of facultative endosymbionts is limited by host relatedness.

Evolution 2015 10 24;69(10):2757-66. Epub 2015 Sep 24.

Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PS, United Kingdom.

Heritable microbial symbionts can have important effects on many aspects of their hosts' biology. Acquisition of a novel symbiont strain can provide fitness benefits to the host, with significant ecological and evolutionary consequences. We measured barriers to horizontal transmission by artificially transferring facultative symbionts from the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae, and five other aphid species into two clonal genotypes of S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12767DOI Listing
October 2015
18 Reads

Conflict of interest and signal interference lead to the breakdown of honest signaling.

Evolution 2015 Sep 8;69(9):2371-83. Epub 2015 Sep 8.

School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, United Kingdom.

Animals use signals to coordinate a wide range of behaviors, from feeding offspring to predator avoidance. This poses an evolutionary problem, because individuals could potentially signal dishonestly to coerce others into behaving in ways that benefit the signaler. Theory suggests that honest signaling is favored when individuals share a common interest and signals carry reliable information. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12751DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4862024PMC
September 2015
16 Reads
6 Citations
4.612 Impact Factor

Clonal reproduction shapes evolution in the lizard malaria parasite Plasmodium floridense.

Evolution 2015 Jun 8;69(6):1584-1596. Epub 2015 Jun 8.

Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics and Division of Invertebrate Zoology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, New York, 10024.

The preponderant clonal evolution hypothesis (PCE) predicts that frequent clonal reproduction (sex between two clones) in many pathogens capable of sexual recombination results in strong linkage disequilibrium and the presence of discrete genetic subdivisions characterized by occasional gene flow. We expand on the PCE and predict that higher rates of clonal reproduction will result in: (1) morphologically cryptic species that exhibit (2) low within-species variation and (3) recent between-species divergence. We tested these predictions in the Caribbean lizard malaria parasite Plasmodium floridense using 63 single-infection samples in lizards collected from across the parasite's range, and sequenced them at two mitochondrial, one apicoplast, and five nuclear genes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12683DOI Listing
June 2015
4 Reads

The jack of all trades is master of none: a pathogen's ability to infect a greater number of host genotypes comes at a cost of delayed reproduction.

Evolution 2014 Sep 15;68(9):2453-66. Epub 2014 Aug 15.

Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, Minnesota, 55108; Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, 22904.

A trade-off between a pathogen's ability to infect many hosts and its reproductive capacity on each host genotype is predicted to limit the evolution of an expanded host range, yet few empirical results provide evidence for the magnitude of such trade-offs. Here, we test the hypothesis for a trade-off between the number of host genotypes that a fungal pathogen can infect (host genotype range) and its reproductive capacity on susceptible plant hosts. We used strains of the oat crown rust fungus that carried widely varying numbers of virulence (avr) alleles known to determine host genotype range. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12461DOI Listing
September 2014
10 Reads

Experimental evolution of an emerging plant virus in host genotypes that differ in their susceptibility to infection.

Evolution 2014 Sep 9;68(9):2467-80. Epub 2014 Jul 9.

Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas (CSIC-UPV), Campus UPV CPI 8E, C/Ingeniero Fausto Elio s/n, 46022, València, Spain.

This study evaluates the extent to which genetic differences among host individuals from the same species condition the evolution of a plant RNA virus. We performed a threefold replicated evolution experiment in which Tobacco etch potyvirus isolate At17b (TEV-At17b), adapted to Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Ler-0, was serially passaged in five genetically heterogeneous ecotypes of A. thaliana. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/evo.12458
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12458DOI Listing
September 2014
5 Reads

Genetic variation in resistance and fecundity tolerance in a natural host-pathogen interaction.

Evolution 2014 Aug 6;68(8):2421-9. Epub 2014 May 6.

Department of Biology, Emory University, O. Wayne Rollins Research Center, Atlanta, Georgia, 30322.

Individuals vary in their ability to defend against pathogens. Determining how natural selection maintains this variation is often difficult, in part because there are multiple ways that organisms defend themselves against pathogens. One important distinction is between mechanisms of resistance that fight off infection, and mechanisms of tolerance that limit the impact of infection on host fitness without influencing pathogen growth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12418DOI Listing
August 2014
6 Reads

How specificity and epidemiology drive the coevolution of static trait diversity in hosts and parasites.

Evolution 2014 Jun 28;68(6):1594-606. Epub 2014 Mar 28.

Biosciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9EZ, United Kingdom.

There is typically considerable variation in the level of infectivity of parasites and the degree of resistance of hosts within populations. This trait variation is critical not only to the evolutionary dynamics but also to the epidemiology, and potentially the control of infectious disease. However, we lack an understanding of the processes that generate and maintain this trait diversity. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/evo.12393
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12393DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4257575PMC
June 2014
6 Reads

Fine-scale genetic structure in a wild bird population: the role of limited dispersal and environmentally based selection as causal factors.

Evolution 2013 Dec 29;67(12):3488-500. Epub 2013 Apr 29.

Edward Grey Institute, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3PS, United Kingdom.

Individuals are typically not randomly distributed in space; consequently ecological and evolutionary theory depends heavily on understanding the spatial structure of populations. The central challenge of landscape genetics is therefore to link spatial heterogeneity of environments to population genetic structure. Here, we employ multivariate spatial analyses to identify environmentally induced genetic structures in a single breeding population of 1174 great tits Parus major genotyped at 4701 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/evo.12121
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12121DOI Listing
December 2013
6 Reads

Cross-species infection trials reveal cryptic parasite varieties and a putative polymorphism shared among host species.

Evolution 2014 Feb 6;68(2):577-86. Epub 2013 Nov 6.

University of Basel, Institute of Zoology, Evolutionsbiologie, Vesalgasse 1, 4051, Basel, Switzerland.

A parasite's host range can have important consequences for ecological and evolutionary processes but can be difficult to infer. Successful infection depends on the outcome of multiple steps and only some steps of the infection process may be critical in determining a parasites host range. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the host range of the bacterium Pasteuria ramosa, a Daphnia parasite, and determined the parasites success in different stages of the infection process. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/evo.12289
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12289DOI Listing
February 2014
8 Reads

Immune evasion and the evolution of molecular mimicry in parasites.

Evolution 2013 Oct 17;67(10):2889-904. Epub 2013 Jun 17.

Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada; Department of Biology, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada; Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

Parasites that are molecular mimics express proteins which resemble host proteins. This resemblance facilitates immune evasion because the immune molecules with the specificity to react with the parasite also cross-react with the host's own proteins, and these lymphocytes are rare. Given this advantage, why are not most parasites molecular mimics? Here we explore potential factors that can select against molecular mimicry in parasites and thereby limit its occurrence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12171DOI Listing
October 2013
5 Reads

Is HIV short-sighted? Insights from a multistrain nested model.

Evolution 2013 Oct 13;67(10):2769-82. Epub 2013 Jun 13.

Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St. Mary's Campus, London, W2 1PG, United Kingdom.

An important component of pathogen evolution at the population level is evolution within hosts. Unless evolution within hosts is very slow compared to the duration of infection, the composition of pathogen genotypes within a host is likely to change during the course of an infection, thus altering the composition of genotypes available for transmission as infection progresses. We develop a nested modeling approach that allows us to follow the evolution of pathogens at the epidemiological level by explicitly considering within-host evolutionary dynamics of multiple competing strains and the timing of transmission. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/evo.12166DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3906838PMC
October 2013
4 Reads

The dynamics of reciprocal selective sweeps of host resistance and a parasite counter-adaptation in Drosophila.

Evolution 2013 Mar 16;67(3):761-73. Epub 2012 Nov 16.

Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EH, United Kingdom.

Host-parasite coevolution can result in consecutive selective sweeps of host resistance alleles and parasite counter-adaptations. To illustrate the dynamics of this important but little studied form of coevolution, we have modeled an ongoing arms race between Drosophila melanogaster and the vertically transmitted sigma virus, using parameters we estimated in the field. We integrate these results with previous work showing that the spread of a resistance allele of the ref(2)P gene in the host was followed by the spread of a virus genotype, which overcomes this resistance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01832.xDOI Listing
March 2013
5 Reads

MHC variation is related to a sexually selected ornament, survival, and parasite resistance in common yellowthroats.

Evolution 2013 Mar 27;67(3):679-87. Epub 2012 Sep 27.

Behavioral and Molecular Ecology Group, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201, USA.

Hamilton and Zuk proposed that females choose mates based on ornaments whose expression is dependent on their genetically based resistance to parasites. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in pathogen recognition and is a good candidate for testing the relationships between immune genes and both ornament expression and parasite resistance. We tested the hypothesis that female common yellowthroats prefer to mate with more ornamented males, because it is a signal of their MHC-based resistance to parasites and likelihood of survival. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01799.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01799.xDOI Listing
March 2013
8 Reads

The origin of specificity by means of natural selection: evolved and nonhost resistance in host-pathogen interactions.

Evolution 2013 Jan 24;67(1):1-9. Epub 2012 Sep 24.

Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, Wallotstrasse 19, 14193 Berlin, Germany.

Most species seem to be completely resistant to most pathogens and parasites. This resistance has been called "nonhost resistance" because it is exhibited by species that are considered not to be part of the normal host range of the pathogen. A conceptual model is presented suggesting that failure of infection on nonhosts may be an incidental by-product of pathogen evolution leading to specialization on their source hosts. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01793.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01793.xDOI Listing
January 2013
11 Reads

The distribution of mutational fitness effects of phage φX174 on different hosts.

Evolution 2012 Nov 31;66(11):3495-507. Epub 2012 May 31.

Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, UMR CNRS 5175, 1919 route de Mende, 34293 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.

Adaptation depends greatly on the distribution of mutation fitness effects (DMFE), but the phenotypic expression of mutations is often environment dependent. The environments faced by multihost pathogens are mostly governed by their hosts and therefore measuring the DMFE on multiple hosts can inform on the likelihood of short-term establishment and longer term adaptation of emerging pathogens. We explored this by measuring the growth rate of 36 mutants of the lytic bacteriophage φX174 on two host backgrounds, Escherichia coli (EcC) and Salmonella typhimurium (StGal). Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01691.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01691.xDOI Listing
November 2012
5 Reads

Influence of viral replication mechanisms on within-host evolutionary dynamics.

Evolution 2012 Nov 14;66(11):3462-71. Epub 2012 Jun 14.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA.

Viruses replicate their genomes using a variety of mechanisms, leading to different distributions of mutations among their progeny. Yet, models of viral evolution often only consider the mean mutation rate. To investigate when and how replication mechanisms impact viral evolution, we analyze the early dynamics of within-host infection for two idealized cases: when all offspring virions from an infected cell carry the same genotype, mutated or not; and when mutations occur independently across offspring virions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01687.xDOI Listing
November 2012
4 Reads

The cellular immune response of Daphnia magna under host-parasite genetic variation and variation in initial dose.

Evolution 2012 Oct 9;66(10):3287-93. Epub 2012 May 9.

School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, USA.

In invertebrate-parasite systems, the likelihood of infection following parasite exposure is often dependent on the specific combination of host and parasite genotypes (termed genetic specificity). Genetic specificity can maintain diversity in host and parasite populations and is a major component of the Red Queen hypothesis. However, invertebrate immune systems are thought to only distinguish between broad classes of parasite. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01671.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01671.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3712491PMC
October 2012
12 Reads

Two-step infection processes can lead to coevolution between functionally independent infection and resistance pathways.

Evolution 2012 Jul 23;66(7):2030-41. Epub 2012 Feb 23.

Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, United Kingdom.

There is growing evidence that successful infection of hosts by pathogens requires a series of independent steps. However, how multistep infection processes affect host-pathogen coevolution is unclear. We present a coevolutionary model, inspired by empirical observations from a range of host-pathogen systems, where the infection process consists of the following two steps: the first is for the pathogen to recognize and locate a suitable host, and the second is to exploit the host while evading immunity. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01578.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01578.xDOI Listing
July 2012
6 Reads

Genetic erosion in wild populations makes resistance to a pathogen more costly.

Evolution 2012 Jun 14;66(6):1942-52. Epub 2012 Feb 14.

CNRS UMR 5023 Ecologie des Hydrosystèmes Naturels et Anthropisés, Université Claude Bernard Lyon1, Université de Lyon, 43 Bd du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex, France.

Populations that have suffered from genetic erosion are expected to exhibit reduced average trait values or decreased variation in adaptive traits when experiencing periodic or emergent stressors such as infectious disease. Genetic erosion may consequentially modify the ability of a potential host population to cope with infectious disease emergence. We experimentally investigate this relationship between genetic variability and host response to exposure to an infectious agent both in terms of susceptibility to infection and indirect parasite-mediated responses that also impact fitness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01570.xDOI Listing
June 2012
5 Reads

Sibling competition arena: selfing and a competition arena can combine to constitute a barrier to gene flow in sympatry.

Evolution 2012 Jun 3;66(6):1917-30. Epub 2012 Mar 3.

Laboratoire Ecologie, Systématique et Evolution, Université Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay, France.

Closely related species coexisting in sympatry provide critical insight into the mechanisms underlying speciation and the maintenance of genetic divergence. Selfing may promote reproductive isolation by facilitating local adaptation, causing reduced hybrid fitness in parental environments. Here, we propose a novel mechanism by which selfing can further impair interspecific gene flow: selfing may act to ensure that nonhybrid progeny systematically co-occur whenever hybrid genotypes are produced. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01563.xDOI Listing
June 2012
4 Reads

Wolbachia infection and dramatic intraspecific mitochondrial DNA divergence in a fig wasp.

Evolution 2012 Jun 2;66(6):1907-16. Epub 2012 Feb 2.

Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.

Mitochondria and Wolbachia are maternally inherited genomes that exhibit strong linkage disequilibrium in many organisms. We surveyed Wolbachia infections in 187 specimens of the fig wasp species, Ceratosolen solmsi, and found an infection prevalence of 89.3%. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01561.xDOI Listing
June 2012
9 Reads

The evolution of conflict resolution between plasmids and their bacterial hosts.

Evolution 2012 May 11;66(5):1662-70. Epub 2012 Jan 11.

Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich, Switzerland.

It has recently been proposed that mobile elements may be a significant driver of cooperation in microorganisms. This may drive a potential conflict, where cooperative genes are transmitted independently of the rest of the genome, resulting in scenarios where horizontally spread cooperative genes are favored, whereas a chromosomal equivalent would not be. This can lead to the whole genome being exploited by surrounding noncooperative individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01549.xDOI Listing
May 2012
4 Reads

Maintenance of a male-killing Wolbachia in Drosophila innubila by male-killing dependent and male-killing independent mechanisms.

Evolution 2012 Mar 11;66(3):678-689. Epub 2011 Nov 11.

1 Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627  2E-mail:

Many maternally inherited endosymbionts manipulate their host's reproduction in various ways to enhance their own fitness. One such mechanism is male killing (MK), in which sons of infected mothers are killed by the endosymbiont during development. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the advantages of MK, including resource reallocation from sons to daughters of infected females, avoidance of inbreeding by infected females, and, if transmission is not purely maternal, the facilitation of horizontal transmission to uninfected females. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01485.xDOI Listing
March 2012
5 Reads

Reverse evolution: selection against costly resistance in disease-free microcosm populations of Paramecium caudatum.

Evolution 2011 Dec 13;65(12):3462-74. Epub 2011 Jul 13.

Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution (ISEM), UMR 5554 (CC065), Université Montpellier 2, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 05, France.

Evolutionary costs of parasite resistance arise if genes conferring resistance reduce fitness in the absence of parasites. Thus, parasite-mediated selection may lead to increased resistance and a correlated decrease in fitness, whereas relaxed parasite-mediated selection may lead to reverse evolution of increased fitness and a correlated decrease in resistance. We tested this idea in experimental populations of the protozoan Paramecium caudatum and the parasitic bacterium Holospora undulata. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01388.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01388.xDOI Listing
December 2011
9 Reads

Bridging scales in the evolution of infectious disease life histories: theory.

Evolution 2011 Dec 19;65(12):3448-61. Epub 2011 Jul 19.

Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Jeffery Hall, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6, Canada.

A significant goal of recent theoretical research on pathogen evolution has been to develop theory that bridges within- and between-host dynamics. The main approach used to date is one that nests within-host models of pathogen replication in models for the between-host spread of infectious diseases. Although this provides an elegant approach, it nevertheless suffers from some practical difficulties. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01394.xDOI Listing
December 2011
5 Reads

A positively selected APOBEC3H haplotype is associated with natural resistance to HIV-1 infection.

Evolution 2011 Nov 28;65(11):3311-22. Epub 2011 Jun 28.

Scientific Institute IRCCS E. Medea, Via don L. Monza 20, Bosisio Parini (LC), Italy.

APOBEC3 genes encode cytidine deaminases endowed with the ability to inhibit retroviruses and retrotransposons. These genes have been targets of natural selection throughout primate evolutionary history. We analyzed their selection pattern in human populations observing that APOBEC3F and 3G are neutrally evolving. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01368.xDOI Listing
November 2011
8 Reads

Bridging scales in the evolution of infectious disease life histories: application.

Evolution 2011 Nov 21;65(11):3298-310. Epub 2011 Jul 21.

Centre for Immunity, Infection, and Evolution, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.

Within- and between-host disease processes occur on the same timescales, therefore changes in the within-host dynamics of parasites, resources, and immunity can interact with changes in the epidemiological dynamics to affect evolutionary outcomes. Consequently, studies of the evolution of disease life histories, that is, infection-age-specific patterns of transmission and virulence, have been constrained by the need for a mechanistic understanding of within-host disease dynamics. In a companion paper (Day et al. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01382.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3937741PMC
November 2011
7 Reads

Collateral damage: rapid exposure-induced evolution of pesticide resistance leads to increased susceptibility to parasites.

Evolution 2011 Sep 19;65(9):2681-91. Epub 2011 May 19.

Laboratory of Aquatic Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Ch. Deberiotstraat 32, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.

Although natural populations may evolve resistance to anthropogenic stressors such as pollutants, this evolved resistance may carry costs. Using an experimental evolution approach, we exposed different Daphnia magna populations in outdoor containers to the carbamate pesticide carbaryl and control conditions, and assessed the resulting populations for both their resistance to carbaryl as well as their susceptibility to infection by the widespread bacterial microparasite Pasteuria ramosa. Our results show that carbaryl selection led to rapid evolution of carbaryl resistance with seemingly no cost when assessed in a benign environment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01331.xDOI Listing
September 2011
6 Reads

Food makes you a target: disentangling genetic, physiological, and behavioral effects determining susceptibility to infection.

Evolution 2011 May 24;65(5):1367-75. Epub 2010 Dec 24.

EAWAG, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland ETH-Zürich, Institute of Integrative Biology, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland.

Genetics, physiology, and behavior are all expected to influence the susceptibility of hosts to parasites. Furthermore, interactions between genetic and other factors are suggested to contribute to the maintenance of genetic polymorphism in resistance when the relative susceptibility of host genotypes is context dependent. We used a maternal sibship design and long- and short-term food deprivation treatments to test the role of family-level genetic variation, body condition, physiological state, and foraging behavior on the susceptibility of Lymnaea stagnalis snails to infection by a trematode parasite that uses chemical cues to locate its hosts. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01205.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01205.xDOI Listing
May 2011
5 Reads

Superinfection drives virulence evolution in experimental populations of bacteria and plasmids.

Authors:
Jeff Smith

Evolution 2011 Mar 20;65(3):831-41. Epub 2010 Nov 20.

Department of Biology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA.

A prominent hypothesis proposes that pathogen virulence evolves in large part due to a trade-off between infectiousness and damage to hosts. Other explanations emphasize how virulence evolves in response to competition among pathogens within hosts. Given the proliferation of theoretical possibilities, what best predicts how virulence evolves in real biological systems? Here, I show that virulence evolution in experimental populations of bacteria and self-transmissible plasmids is best explained by within-host competition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01178.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3057489PMC
March 2011
3 Reads

Divergence of Eurosta solidaginis in response to host plant variation and natural enemies.

Evolution 2011 Mar 10;65(3):802-17. Epub 2010 Nov 10.

Department of Biology, University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota 55812, USA.

We tested the hypothesis that forest and prairie populations of the gall-inducing fly, Eurosta solidaginis, have diverged in response to variation in selection by its host plant Solidago altissima, and its natural enemies. A reciprocal cross infection design experiment demonstrated that fly populations from the prairie and forest biomes had higher survival on local biome plants compared to foreign biome host plants. Flies from each biome also had an oviposition preference for their local plants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01167.xDOI Listing
March 2011
5 Reads

Horizontal gene transfer and the evolution of bacterial cooperation.

Evolution 2011 Jan 6;65(1):21-32. Epub 2010 Oct 6.

Department of Biochemistry, University of Zurich, Building Y27, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland.

Bacteria frequently exhibit cooperative behaviors but cooperative strains are vulnerable to invasion by cheater strains that reap the benefits of cooperation but do not perform the cooperative behavior themselves. Bacterial genomes often contain mobile genetic elements such as plasmids. When a gene for cooperative behavior exists on a plasmid, cheaters can be forced to cooperate by infection with this plasmid, rescuing cooperation in a population in which mutation or migration has allowed cheaters to arise. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01121.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3038327PMC
January 2011
8 Reads

Parallel changes in host resistance to viral infection during 45,000 generations of relaxed selection.

Evolution 2010 Oct 19;64(10):3024-34. Epub 2010 Aug 19.

Program in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology & Behavior, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA.

The dynamics of host susceptibility to parasites are often influenced by trade-offs between the costs and benefits of resistance. We assayed changes in the resistance to three viruses in six lines of Escherichia coli that had been evolving for almost 45,000 generations in their absence. The common ancestor of these lines was completely resistant to T6, partially resistant to T6* (a mutant of T6 with altered host range), and sensitive to λ. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01049.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01049.xDOI Listing
October 2010
48 Reads

A unified model for the coevolution of resistance, tolerance, and virulence.

Evolution 2010 Oct 19;64(10):2988-3009. Epub 2010 Aug 19.

Laboratoire Ecologie & Evolution, CNRS UMR 7625, Université Paris 6, 7 quai Saint-Bernard, Paris Cedex 05, France.

We present a general host-parasite model that unifies previous theory by investigating the coevolution of virulence, resistance, and tolerance, with respect to multiple physiological, epidemiological, and environmental parameters. Four sets of new predictions emerge. First, compared to virulence coevolving with resistance or tolerance, three-trait coevolution promotes more virulence and less tolerance, and broadens conditions under which pure defenses evolve. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01035.xDOI Listing
October 2010
4 Reads

The bitterling-mussel coevolutionary relationship in areas of recent and ancient sympatry.

Evolution 2010 Oct 19;64(10):3047-56. Epub 2010 Aug 19.

School of Biology, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, United Kingdom.

Host-parasite relationships are often characterized by the rapid evolution of parasite adaptations to exploit their host, and counteradaptations in the host to avoid the costs imposed by parasitism. Hence, the current coevolutionary state between a parasite and its hosts is predicted to vary according to the history of sympatry and local abundance of interacting species. We compared a unique reciprocal coevolutionary relationship of a fish, the European bitterling (Rhodeus amarus) and freshwater mussels (Unionidae) between areas of recent (Central Europe) and ancient (Turkey) sympatry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01032.xDOI Listing
October 2010
6 Reads

Do variable compensatory mechanisms explain the polymorphism of the dependence phenotype in the Asobara tabida-wolbachia association?

Evolution 2010 Oct 19;64(10):2969-79. Epub 2010 Aug 19.

Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.

Wolbachia are symbiotic intracellular bacteria, which are classified as reproductive parasites. Although generally facultative, Wolbachia is necessary for Asobara tabida (Hymenoptera), because aposymbiotic females do not produce any offspring. Interestingly, the ovarian phenotype of aposymbiotic females is variable: some females do not produce any eggs, whereas others do produce some eggs, but these are aborted. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01034.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01034.xDOI Listing
October 2010
8 Reads

Host-parasite genetic interactions and virulence-transmission relationships in natural populations of monarch butterflies.

Evolution 2010 Feb 30;64(2):502-14. Epub 2009 Sep 30.

Department of Biology, Emory University, 1510 Clifton Road, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA.

Evolutionary models predict that parasite virulence (parasite-induced host mortality) can evolve as a consequence of natural selection operating on between-host parasite transmission. Two major assumptions are that virulence and transmission are genetically related and that the relative virulence and transmission of parasite genotypes remain similar across host genotypes. We conducted a cross-infection experiment using monarch butterflies and their protozoan parasites from two populations in eastern and western North America. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00845.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00845.xDOI Listing
February 2010
8 Reads

Unexplained split sex ratios in the neotropical plant-ant, Allomerus octoarticulatus var. demerarae (Myrmicinae): a test of hypotheses.

Evolution 2010 Jan 24;64(1):126-41. Epub 2009 Aug 24.

Ecology, Conservation, and Environment Center, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Science, Kunming, Yunnan 65022, China.

We investigated sex allocation in the Neotropical ant Allomerus octoarticulatus var. demerarae. Because Allomerus is a plant symbiont, we could make geographically extensive collections of complete colonies and of foundresses in saplings, allowing us to estimate not only population- and colony-level sex allocation but also colony resource levels and the relatedness of competing ant foundresses. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00824.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00824.xDOI Listing
January 2010
6 Reads

Evolution and manipulation of parasitoid egg load.

Evolution 2009 Nov 16;63(11):2974-84. Epub 2009 Jul 16.

Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, UMR 5175, 34293 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.

In proovigenic parasitoids such as Leptopilina boulardi, the female emerges with a limited egg load and no further eggs are produced during its adult life. A female thus runs the risk of exhausting this limited supply of eggs before the end of her life. Given that the production of an egg is costly, what is the evolutionarily stable egg load at emergence? This question has attracted a lot of attention in the last decade. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00776.xDOI Listing
November 2009
4 Reads