2 results match your criteria Indian Journal of Clinical Practice [Journal]

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Can ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers be detrimental in CKD patients?

Nephron Clin Pract 2011 7;118(4):c407-19. Epub 2011 Mar 7.

College of Medicine, Mayo Health System Practice-Based Research Network, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Current epidemiological data from the USA, Europe, Asia and the Indian subcontinent, Africa, the Far East, South America, the Middle East and Eastern Europe all point to the increasing incidence of renal failure encompassing acute kidney injury (AKI), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While the explanations for these worldwide epidemics remain speculative, it must be acknowledged that these increases in AKI, CKD and ESRD, happening worldwide, have occurred despite the universal application of strategies of renoprotection over the last 2 decades, more especially the widespread use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). We note that many of the published large renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade randomized controlled trials, upon which current evidence-based practice for the increasing use of ACEIs and ARBs for renoprotection derived from, have strong deficiencies that have been highlighted over the years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000324164DOI Listing
May 2012
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Assessing suitability for renal donation: can equations predicting glomerular filtration rate substitute for a reference method in the Indian population?

Nephron Clin Pract 2005 5;101(3):c128-33. Epub 2005 Jul 5.

Department of Nephrology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences Ansari Nagar, New Delhi, India.

Background: Accurate measurement of donor renal function has important long-term implications for both the donor and recipient. As the use of recommended filtration markers is limited by cumbersome and costly techniques, renal function is typically estimated using 24-hour urinary creatinine clearance (urine-CrCl). Prediction equations used for rapid bedside estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) are simple and overcome the inaccuracies of urinary collection and, if validated, can expedite the donor workup besides reducing the cost. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000086683DOI Listing
May 2006
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