677 results match your criteria Implantable Hearing Devices


Rehabilitation for unilateral deafness - Narrative review comparing a novel bone conduction solution with existing options.

Am J Otolaryngol 2021 Apr 18;42(6):103060. Epub 2021 Apr 18.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery University of Michigan Ann Arbor Michigan, United States of America. Electronic address:

Patients with single sided deafness (SSD) struggle with sound localization and speech in noise. Existing treatment options include contralateral routing of signal (CROS) systems, percutaneous bone conduction hearing devices (BCHDs), passive transcutaneous BCHDs, active BCHDs, and cochlear implants. Implanted devices provide benefits in speech in noise compared to CROS devices. Read More

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A New Type of Wireless Transmission Based on Digital Direct Modulation for Use in Partially Implantable Hearing Aids.

Sensors (Basel) 2021 Apr 16;21(8). Epub 2021 Apr 16.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, 680 Gukchaebosang-ro, Jung-gu, Daegu 41944, Korea.

In this study, we developed a new type of wireless transmission system for use in partially implantable hearing aids. This system was designed for miniaturization and low distortion, and features direct digital modulation. The sigma-delta output, which has a high SNR due to oversampling and noise shaping technology, is used as the data signal and is transmitted using a wireless transmission system to the implant unit through OOK without restoration as an audio signal, thus eliminating the need for additional circuits (i. Read More

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Prediction models for clinical outcome after cochlear implantation: a systematic review: Systematic review of prediction models in cochlear implantation.

J Clin Epidemiol 2021 Apr 20. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; University Medical Center Utrecht Brain Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; Department of Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.; Epidemiology and Data Science, Amsterdam University Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.. Electronic address:

Objective: Cochlear implants (CIs) are implantable hearing devices with a wide variation in clinical outcome between patients. We aim to provide an overview of the literature on prediction models and their performance for clinical outcome after cochlear implantation in bilateral hearing loss or deafness.

Study Design And Setting: In this systematic review, studies describing the development or external validation of a multivariable model for predicting clinical CI outcome were eligible for selection. Read More

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Wireless battery free fully implantable multimodal recording and neuromodulation tools for songbirds.

Nat Commun 2021 03 30;12(1):1968. Epub 2021 Mar 30.

Departments of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.

Wireless battery free and fully implantable tools for the interrogation of the central and peripheral nervous system have quantitatively expanded the capabilities to study mechanistic and circuit level behavior in freely moving rodents. The light weight and small footprint of such devices enables full subdermal implantation that results in the capability to perform studies with minimal impact on subject behavior and yields broad application in a range of experimental paradigms. While these advantages have been successfully proven in rodents that move predominantly in 2D, the full potential of a wireless and battery free device can be harnessed with flying species, where interrogation with tethered devices is very difficult or impossible. Read More

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The design of a lumped parameter model considering the stimulus path of round window.

Technol Health Care 2021 ;29(S1):49-56

Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.

Background: Sound normally enters the ear canal, passes through the middle ear, and stimulates the cochlea through the oval window. Alternatively, the cochlea can be stimulated in a reverse manner, namely round window stimulation. The reverse stimulation is not well understood, partly because in classic lumped-parameter models the path of reverse drive during the round window stimulation is usually not considered. Read More

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January 2021

Adverse events associated with Bonebridge and Osia bone conduction implant devices.

Am J Otolaryngol 2021 Feb 26;42(4):102968. Epub 2021 Feb 26.

Department of Otolaryngology, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, United States of America.

Purpose: Active transcutaneous Bone Conduction Implants (BCIs) are relatively new to the market and may offer improved outcomes while reducing skin-related complications associated with previous models. The purpose of this study is to examine medical device reports (MDRs) submitted to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Manufacturer and User Device Facility Experience (MAUDE) database to identify adverse events with the active, transcutaneous BCIs, Bonebridge and Osia.

Methods: A search of the FDA MAUDE database was conducted using product code "PFO" (for Active Implantable Bone Conduction Hearing System), brand names "Bonebridge" and "Osia. Read More

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February 2021

Planning tools and indications for "virtual surgery" for the Bonebridge bone conduction system.

HNO 2021 Mar 2. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, University Medicine Halle (Saale), Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120, Halle (Saale), Germany.

Background: Implantation of the Bonebridge (MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria), an active semi-implantable transcutaneous bone conduction hearing system, involves the risk of impression or a lesion in intracranial structures, such as the dura or sigmoid sinus. Therefore, determining the optimal implant position requires careful preoperative radiological planning.

Objective: The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the possibilities for preoperative radiological planning for the Bonebridge implantation and to evaluate their indications and feasibility. Read More

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Cervicofacial surgery and implantable hearing device extrusion: management of challenging cases.

J Laryngol Otol 2021 Mar 1;135(3):212-216. Epub 2021 Mar 1.

Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Department, Son Espases University Hospital, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Objective: To describe our management of implantable hearing device extrusion in cases of previous cervicofacial surgery.

Methods: A review was conducted of a retrospectively acquired database of surgical procedures for implantable hearing devices performed at our department between January 2011 and December 2019. Cases of device extrusion and previous cervicofacial surgery are included. Read More

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Posture, Gait, Quality of Life, and Hearing with a Vestibular Implant.

N Engl J Med 2021 02;384(6):521-532

From the Departments of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (M.R.C., A.I.A., D.P.S., Y.G., K.E.L., B.J.M., P.J.B., S.P.B., B.K.W., D.Q.S., C.T.G., M.C.S., J.P.C., C.C.D.S.) and Biomedical Engineering (M.R.C., A.I.A., B.J.M., P.J.B., C.C.D.S.), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Labyrinth Devices (M.A.R., N.S.V., C.C.D.S.) - both in Baltimore.

Background: Bilateral vestibular hypofunction is associated with chronic disequilibrium, postural instability, and unsteady gait owing to failure of vestibular reflexes that stabilize the eyes, head, and body. A vestibular implant may be effective in alleviating symptoms.

Methods: Persons who had had ototoxic (7 participants) or idiopathic (1 participant) bilateral vestibular hypofunction for 2 to 23 years underwent unilateral implantation of a prosthesis that electrically stimulates the three semicircular canal branches of the vestibular nerve. Read More

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February 2021

Effects of different electrodes used in bone-guided extracochlear implants on electrical stimulation of auditory nerves in guinea pigs.

Tzu Chi Med J 2021 Jan-Mar;33(1):42-48. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Department of Otolaryngology, Hualian Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, Hualien, Taiwan.

Objective: Conventional cochlear implants provide patients who are deaf with hearing via electrical intracochlear stimulations. Stimulation electrodes are inserted into the cochlea through a cochleostomy or round window membrane (RWM) approach. However, these methods might induce cochlear ossificans and loss of residual hearing by damaging inner ear structures. Read More

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[Planning tools and indications for "virtual surgery" for the Bonebridge bone conduction system. German version].

HNO 2021 Jan 18. Epub 2021 Jan 18.

Universitätsklinik und Poliklinik für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Universitätsklinikum Halle (Saale), Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120, Halle (Saale), Deutschland.

Background: Implantation of the Bonebridge (MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria), an active semi-implantable transcutaneous bone conduction hearing system, involves the risk of impression or a lesion in intracranial structures, such as the dura or sigmoid sinus. Therefore, determining the optimal implant position requires careful preoperative radiological planning.

Objective: The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the possibilities for preoperative radiological planning for the Bonebridge implantation and to evaluate their indications and feasibility. Read More

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January 2021

Non-implantable bone conduction device for hearing loss: a systematic review.

J Biol Regul Homeost Agents 2020 Sep-Oct;34(5 Suppl. 3):97-110. Technology in Medicine

Unit of Integrated Therapies in Otolaryngology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome, Italy.

There are different treatment options that employ a bone conduction transmission of the sound, for different types of hearing loss, as well as hearing aids, medical intervention via prostheses and surgically implanted medical devices. A middle ear disease causes a decline in the conductive mechanism of hearing. The current possibilities of compensating Conductive Hearing Loss (CHL) solutions include both surgical and no surgical Bone Conduction Devices (BCDs). Read More

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February 2021

Implantable Hearing Aids: Where are we in 2020?

Laryngoscope Investig Otolaryngol 2020 Dec 6;5(6):1184-1191. Epub 2020 Nov 6.

Department of Otolaryngology University of Colorado School of Medicine Aurora Colorado USA.

Beginning in the late 20th century, implantable hearing aids were developed and used as an alternative for individuals who were unable to tolerate conventional hearing aids. Since that time, several devices have been developed, with four currently remaining on the international market (Med-el Vibrant Soundbridge, Envoy Esteem, Ototronix MAXUM, and Cochlear Carina). This review will briefly examine the history of middle ear implant development, describe current available devices, evaluate the benefits and limits of the technology, and consider the future directions of research in the field of implantable hearing aids. Read More

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December 2020

Surgical and functional outcomes of two types of transcutaneous bone conduction implants.

J Laryngol Otol 2020 Dec 18;134(12):1065-1068. Epub 2020 Dec 18.

Regional Department of Neurotology, Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, UK.

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate surgical and functional outcomes, in a tertiary referral centre, of two different types of semi-implantable transcutaneous bone conduction devices.

Method: This study involved prospective data collection and review of patients implanted between November 2014 and December 2016. Glasgow Hearing Aid Inventory (Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile or Glasgow Hearing Aid Difference Profile) and Client Oriented Scale of Improvement were completed where appropriate. Read More

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December 2020

Long-Term Stability and Safety of the Soundbridge Coupled to the Round Window.

Laryngoscope 2021 05 19;131(5):E1434-E1442. Epub 2020 Nov 19.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, University Clinic St. Poelten, St. Poelten, Austria.

Objective: The objective of the study was to demonstrate the long-term outcomes of patients implanted with the active middle ear implant (AMEI) Vibrant Soundbridge (VSB) through coupling the floating mass transducer (FMT) to the round window (RW).

Methods: This retrospective study evaluated the short- and long-term clinical performance (audiological outcomes) and safety (revisions/explantations) of the VSB coupled to the RW between 2013 and 2019 at the St. Pölten University Hospital, Austria. Read More

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Mastoid Obliteration with S53P4 Bioactive Glass Can Make Bonebridge Implantation Feasible: A Case Report.

Am J Case Rep 2020 Nov 10;21:e925914. Epub 2020 Nov 10.

World Hearing Center, Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Warsaw/Kajetany, Poland.

BACKGROUND Obliteration of the mastoid cavity with S53P4 bioactive glass is becoming a popular method of treatment, allowing most of the problems with the postoperative cavity to be eliminated. In the case of a hearing aid, reconstruction of the posterior wall of the auditory canal is an extremely beneficial procedure and, in the case of the Bonebridge implant, is necessary. After reconstruction, the FMT transducer is covered by bone and bioactive glass and has no contact with the postoperative cavity. Read More

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November 2020

Device profile of the Bonebridge bone conduction implant system in hearing loss: an overview of its safety and efficacy.

Expert Rev Med Devices 2020 Oct 2;17(10):983-992. Epub 2020 Nov 2.

Department of Otolaryngology, Ninewells Hospital & Medical School , Dundee, UK.

Introduction: The Bonebridge is an active transcutaneous semi-implantable bone conduction hearing device suitable for several types of hearing loss. It has unique benefits over some more established technologies. It consists of an internal active implant and an external sound processor. Read More

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October 2020

Audiological benefit and subjective satisfaction with the ADHEAR hearing system in children with unilateral conductive hearing loss.

Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2020 Sep 19. Epub 2020 Sep 19.

Klinik für Hals-Nasen-Ohrenheilkunde, Abteilung für Phoniatrie Und Pädaudiologie, Universitätsklinikum Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany.

Objective: The ADHEAR system (MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria) is a new adhesive bone conduction hearing aid. This study evaluates the audiological benefit and subjective satisfaction as well as the manageability in everyday life in children with unilateral conductive hearing loss.

Methods: Ten children with unilateral hearing loss of different origin were included in the study. Read More

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September 2020

American Neurotology Society, American Otological Society, and American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Foundation Guide to Enhance Otologic and Neurotologic Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Otol Neurotol 2020 10;41(9):1163-1174

Department of Otolaryngology, Harvard Medical School.

: This combined American Neurotology Society, American Otological Society, and American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Foundation document aims to provide guidance during the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) on 1) "priority" of care for otologic and neurotologic patients in the office and operating room, and 2) optimal utilization of personal protective equipment. Given the paucity of evidence to inform otologic and neurotologic best practices during COVID-19, the recommendations herein are based on relevant peer-reviewed articles, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention COVID-19 guidelines, United States and international hospital policies, and expert opinion. The suggestions presented here are not meant to be definitive, and best practices will undoubtedly change with increasing knowledge and high-quality data related to COVID-19. Read More

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October 2020

Binaural hearing restoration with a bilateral fully implantable middle ear implant.

Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2020 Aug 24. Epub 2020 Aug 24.

ENT Audiology and Phoniatric Unit, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.

Aim: The fully implantable middle ear implant (C-FI-MEI) is designed for patients with moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss or those with mixed hearing loss. To analyze the audiological post-operative results of subjects bilaterally implanted with C-FI-MEI.

Materials And Methods: Retrospective study: 14 patients with bilateral, moderate-to-severe, sensorineural or mixed hearing loss were treated. Read More

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Longitudinal study of use of the pressure free, adhesive bone conducting hearing system in children at a tertiary centre.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2020 Nov 8;138:110307. Epub 2020 Aug 8.

Birmingham Children's Hospital, Steelhouse Ln, Birmingham, B4 6NH, UK. Electronic address:

Objectives: To assess the long-term compliance and usability of the non-implantable, adhesive bone conduction hearing aid system in children. Review of patient demographics, compliance and continued use. Identification of factors that impact on future patient selection. Read More

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November 2020

Evolving Criteria for Adult and Pediatric Cochlear Implantation.

Ear Nose Throat J 2021 Jan 17;100(1):31-37. Epub 2020 Aug 17.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 2647The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.

The indications for cochlear implantation have gradually expanded as advancements in technology have evolved, resulting in improved audiologic outcomes for both adult and children. There remains a significant underutilization of cochlear implant technology in the United States, and recognition of the potential benefits of cochlear implantation for non-traditional indications is critical for encouraging the evolution of candidacy criteria. Adult cochlear implantation candidacy has progressed from patients with bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) to include patients with greater degrees of residual hearing, single-sided deafness and asymmetric hearing, and atypical etiologies of hearing loss (eg, vestibular schwannoma, Ménière's disease, and otosclerosis). Read More

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January 2021

In-situ sensitivity of a totally-implantable microphone.

Hear Res 2020 09 8;395:108018. Epub 2020 Jul 8.

KU Leuven, University of Leuven, Department of Neurosciences, Research Group ExpORL, Leuven, Belgium; University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address:

One of the key components of fully-implantable hearing devices is the implantable microphone. A crucial parameter when characterizing implantable microphones is the acoustic sensitivity, as it is one of the input parameters for the fitting algorithm and influences the achievable gain. The aim of our study was to investigate the sensitivity of an implanted subcutaneous microphone over time to answer two research questions: (1) How does the sensitivity change once the microphone is implanted under the skin (pre-op versus in-situ)? and (2) How does the sensitivity change from short-term to mid-term? We have measured the in-situ microphone sensitivity in three subjects implanted with a fully-implantable active middle ear implant from 2 weeks up to 20 weeks after implantation with a research software. Read More

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September 2020

Fully Implantable Active Middle Ear Implants After Subtotal Petrosectomy With Fat Obliteration: Preliminary Clinical Results.

Otol Neurotol 2020 08;41(7):e912-e920

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Saxony, Germany.

Objectives: In patients with chronic middle ear disease, especially after revision surgery for ventilation problems and mixed hearing loss, active middle ear implants may provide an alternative treatment option. The fully implantable active middle-ear implant (FI-AMEI) is designed for implantation in a ventilated mastoid with an intact posterior canal wall. Until now, there have been no reports on audiometric results after implantation of a FI-AMEI in a fat-obliterated cavity after subtotal petrosectomy (SPE). Read More

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A Quantitative Approach for the Objective Assessment of Coupling Efficiency for an Active Middle Ear Implant by Recording Auditory Steady-state Responses.

Otol Neurotol 2020 08;41(7):e906-e911

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, University Medicine Halle (Saale), Germany.

Objective: The coupling efficiency of a semi-implantable active middle ear implant with an electromagnetically driven floating mass transducer coupled to a middle ear ossicle or the round window can only be quantified postoperatively in cooperative patients by measuring behavioral vibroplasty in situ thresholds in comparison with bone conduction thresholds. The objective of the study was to develop a method to objectively determine the vibroplasty in situ thresholds by determining calibration factors from the relation between the objective and behavioral vibroplasty in situ thresholds.

Study Design: Prospective experimental study. Read More

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Bioinspired Multiresonant Acoustic Devices Based on Electrospun Piezoelectric Polymeric Nanofibers.

ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2020 Aug 23;12(31):34643-34657. Epub 2020 Jul 23.

UCL Centre for Biomaterials in Surgical Reconstruction and Regeneration, Division of Surgery & Interventional Science, University College London, London NW3 2PF, United Kingdom.

Cochlear hair cells are critical for the conversion of acoustic into electrical signals and their dysfunction is a primary cause of acquired hearing impairments, which worsen with aging. Piezoelectric materials can reproduce the acoustic-electrical transduction properties of the cochlea and represent promising candidates for future cochlear prostheses. The majority of piezoelectric hearing devices so far developed are based on thin films, which have not managed to simultaneously provide the desired flexibility, high sensitivity, wide frequency selectivity, and biocompatibility. Read More

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A 3D-Printed Modular Microreservoir for Drug Delivery.

Micromachines (Basel) 2020 Jun 30;11(7). Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Microsystems Engineering, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623, USA.

Reservoir-based drug delivery microsystems have enabled novel and effective drug delivery concepts in recent decades. These systems typically comprise integrated storing and pumping components. Here we present a stand-alone, modular, thin, scalable, and refillable microreservoir platform as a storing component of these microsystems for implantable and transdermal drug delivery. Read More

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Device profile of the MED-EL cochlear implant system for hearing loss: overview of its safety and efficacy.

Expert Rev Med Devices 2020 Jul 3;17(7):599-614. Epub 2020 Jul 3.

Audiological Acoustics, ENT Department, University Hospital Frankfurt , Frankfurt Am Main, Germany.

Introduction: Patients suffering from severe to profound hearing loss or even deafness can achieve a hearing improvement with a cochlear implant (CI) treatment that is significantly higher than the results achieved with conventional hearing aids. The CI system consists of an implantable stimulator, which is inserted retro-auricularly into the mastoid, and an externally worn processor unit, which provides the pickup of sound and processing of acoustic information as well as the power supply for the stimulator and internal current sources. The stimulator has an electrode array that is inserted into the cochlea. Read More

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Adults' cochlear implant journeys through care: a qualitative study.

BMC Health Serv Res 2020 May 24;20(1):457. Epub 2020 May 24.

Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Macquarie University, Macquarie Park, NSW, Australia.

Background: Cochlear implants (CIs) can provide a sound sensation for those with severe sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), benefitting speech understanding and quality of life. Nevertheless, rates of implantation remain low, and limited research investigates journeys from traditional hearing aids to implantable devices.

Method: Fifty-five adults (≥ 50 years), hearing aid users and/or CI users, General Practitioners, and Australian and United Kingdom audiologists took part in a multi-methods study. Read More

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Speech Perception Gap Is Predictive of an Active Middle Ear Implant Advantage.

Otol Neurotol 2020 06;41(5):663-668

Shohet Ear Associates, Orange County, California.

Objective: Evaluate whether the difference between word recognition score (WRS) obtained unaided under earphone and with a hearing aid (HA), the speech perception gap (SPgap), is predictive of performance with a totally implantable active middle ear implant (AMEI).

Study Design: Retrospective review of systematically collected data.

Setting: Private otologic practice. Read More

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