1,354 results match your criteria Immunotherapy [Journal]


Recent advances in localized immunotherapy of skin cancers.

Immunotherapy 2019 Apr;11(5):443-456

Unit of Dermatology, University of Padua, Via Gallucci 4, Padova 35128, Italy.

Skin cancer is the most frequent malignancy in humans. The immune system has long been known to have an important role in defeating cancer. Immunotherapy, which includes various strategies to enhance tumor immunity, currently represents an exciting option for the treatment of skin cancers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0139DOI Listing

Nivolumab-associated digital small-vessel vasculitis in a patient with an advanced renal cell carcinoma.

Immunotherapy 2019 Apr;11(5):379-384

Department of Medical oncology, Puerta de Hierro University Hospital, Majadahonda, Spain.

The immunotherapy (IO) agents in the renal cell carcinoma represent the best option in the second line of treatment. However, these drugs can be associated with different types of toxicities. The vascular toxicity related with IO is very uncommon. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0082DOI Listing

Silencing PD-1 and PD-L1: the potential of PolyPurine Reverse Hoogsteen hairpins for the elimination of tumor cells.

Immunotherapy 2019 Apr;11(5):369-372

Department of Biochemistry & Physiology School of Pharmacy & Food Sciences & Institute of Nanoscience & Nanotechnology IN2UB University of Barcelona 08028 Barcelona, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0215DOI Listing

Optimal primary end point in Phase II trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors for advanced solid cancers: an evolving issue.

Immunotherapy 2019 Apr;11(5):365-368

Department of Medical, Surgery & Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Piazza Ospitale 1, 34129 Trieste, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0204DOI Listing

Concomitant use of blinatumomab and donor lymphocyte infusion for mixed-phenotype acute leukemia: a case report with literature review.

Immunotherapy 2019 Apr;11(5):373-378

Department of Hematology, Taussig Cancer Center, Medical Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.

Blinatumomab and donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) combination is a promising cancer therapy, whereby blinatumomab might achieve an initial reduction in leukemic-cell burden using T cells, and after tumor clearance, DLI can potentially stimulate the donor immune system to achieve longer lasting remission. Here, we present a 51-year-old female with mixed phenotype acute leukemia who had a hematologic relapse 3 months after she received total body irradiation-based myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an unrelated human leukocyte antigen matched (10/10) donor and achieved complete remission with minimal residual disease negativity by multi-parameter flow cytometry using the combination of blinatumomab and DLI. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the use of blinatumomab and DLI combination therapy in the treatment of B/myeloid mixed phenotype acute leukemia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0104DOI Listing

Delayed IL-21 treatment preferentially expands peptide-specific CD8 T cells by reducing bystander activation of T cells.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Biomedicine Production Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang, 10408 Korea.

Aim: We previously reported a simple and practical procedure to generate peptide-specific CD8 T cells using peptide and IL-2, which is applied to produce human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-specific CD8+ T cells for clinical use. We have modified the procedure to enhance the amplification of peptide-specific CD8 T cells adding IL-21.

Materials & Methods: Using human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201-restricted cytomegalovirus/pp65-specific CD8 T cells of healthy volunteers, we optimized the culture conditions by adjusting the dose and timing of IL-21 treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0095DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Heat-shock proteins in diagnosis and treatment: an overview of different biochemical and immunological functions.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(3):215-239

Department of Hepatitis & AIDS, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran.

Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) have been involved in different functions including chaperone activity, protein folding, apoptosis, autophagy and immunity. The HSP families have powerful effects on the stimulation of innate immune responses through Toll-like receptors and scavenger receptors. Moreover, HSP-mediated phagocytosis directly enhances the processing and presentation of internalized antigens via the endocytic pathway in adaptive immune system. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/imt-2018-0105
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0105DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Early fatal hemoptysis after first-dose, first-line pembrolizumab in a central lung cancer: did tumor shrinkage matter?

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(3):161-166

Medical Oncology Unit, Department of General and Specialistic Medicine, University Hospital of Parma, 43126 Parma, Italy.

A patient diagnosed with centrally located advanced lung adenocarcinoma with signs of large vessels infiltration, strongly expressing PD-L1, was candidate to first-line pembrolizumab. He had not complained of any bleeding manifestation before immunotherapy. 5 days after the first dose of pembrolizumab, the patient experienced massive, fatal hemoptysis. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/imt-2018-0136
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0136DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Hyperprogressive disease in hepatocellular carcinoma with immune checkpoint inhibitor use: a case series.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(3):167-175

Department of Oncologic Imaging, National Cancer Centre, Singapore, 169610, Singapore.

Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) have demonstrated promising results in a variety of advanced cancer types. The phenomenon of hyperprogressive disease (HPD) has only been documented in recent years, however, there have been no reports of HPD in hepatocellular carcinoma. We present a case series of six patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma treated with ICIs who demonstrated rapid radiological progression, this was confirmed by comparing tumor growth rates before and during treatment with HPD defined as tumor growth rate ≥2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0126DOI Listing
February 2019

Enhancing tumor T cell infiltration to enable cancer immunotherapy.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(3):201-213

Center of Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPS-M) & Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Klinikum der Universität München, Lindwurmstrasse 2a, 80337 Munich, Germany, Member of the German Center of Lung Research.

Cancer immunotherapy has changed the treatment landscape for cancer patients, especially for those with metastatic spread. While the immunotherapeutic armamentarium is constantly growing, as exemplified by approved compounds, clinical outcome remains variable both within and across entities. A sufficient infiltration into the tumor microenvironment and successful activation of effector T lymphocytes against tumor cells have been identified as predictors for responses to T cell-based immunotherapies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0111DOI Listing
February 2019

Predictors for clinical benefit of immune checkpoint inhibitors in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(3):189-199

Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston, TX, USA.

Aim: In this meta-analysis, we evaluated several predictors of benefit to single-agent immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) in metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Patients & Methods: Using the random-effect model, we assessed the comparative efficacy of ICIs over chemotherapy according to age, gender, smoking history, PD-L1 status and CNS involvement.

Results: Eight randomized trials were selected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0086DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Pros and cons of the immunogenicity of monoclonal antibodies in cancer treatment: a lesson from autoimmune diseases.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(3):241-254

Department of Oncology & Onco-Hematology, University of Milan, 20162, Milan, Italy.

The aim of this review is to report the current evidence on immunogenicity of monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) used in cancer compared with autoimmune diseases, focusing on local microenvironment. English abstracts were identified in Medline and www.clinicaltrials. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/imt-2018-0081
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0081DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

Fast up-dosing with a birch allergoid is safe and well tolerated in allergic rhinitis patients with or without asthma.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(3):177-187

Department for Children & Adolescents, Division for Allergology, Pneumology & Cystic Fibrosis, University Hospital Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, 60590, Germany.

Aim: Subcutaneous immunotherapy is effective in treating allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma, but is still inconvenient when heavy schedules are used. A faster dose escalation is desirable.

Materials & Methods: In this open-label, Phase II trial, 130 adults were randomized 1:1 to receive a birch pollen allergoid subcutaneous immunotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0143DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Immune checkpoint inhibitors and non-small-cell lung cancer management: 2018 update.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(3):149-153

Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0167DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read
2.440 Impact Factor

The T-cell-inflamed tumor microenvironment as a paradigm for immunotherapy drug development.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(3):155-159

Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology/Oncology, The University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Ave, MC 2115, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0171DOI Listing
February 2019

Future perspectives of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(2):119-127

Molecular Bioengineering Laboratory, Division of Chemistry for Materials, 1577 Kurima-Machiya-cho, Tsu, Mie 514-8507, Japan.

Attention to therapeutic monoclonal antibodies has been dramatically increasing year by year. Their highly specific targeting of antigens can provide very effective medical treatment, and the advent of molecular-targeting medicine is allowing development of a new generation of therapeutic agents. However, there is one critical obstacle to overcome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0130DOI Listing
February 2019

The role of glial-neuronal metabolic cooperation in modulating progression of multiple sclerosis and neuropathic pain.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(2):129-147

Department of Biology, University of Texas at San Antonio, TX 78249, USA.

While the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unclear, research from the clinic and preclinical models identified the essential role of inflammation and demyelination in the pathogenesis of MS. Current treatments focused on anti-inflammatory processes are effective against acute episodes and relapsing-remitting MS, but patients still move on to develop secondary progressive MS. MS progression is associated with activation of microglia and astrocytes, and importantly, metabolic dysfunction leading to neuronal death. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0153DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6354220PMC
February 2019

Visualizing microbiome-immune system interplay.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(2):63-67

School of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0138DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6354219PMC
February 2019

The evolving clinical landscape for dendritic cell vaccines and cancer immunotherapy.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(2):75-79

Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic Florida, 4500 San Pablo Road S, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0129DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Immunotherapy: a 10-year anniversary issue.

Authors:
Mike Gregg

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(2):61-62

Future Science Group, Unitec House, 2 Albert Place, London N3 1QB, UK.

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/imt-2018-0189
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0189DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Prostate cancer: any room left for immunotherapies?

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(2):69-74

Cancer Immunology & Immunotherapy Center, Saint Savas Cancer Hospital, Athens, Greece.

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/imt-2018-0159
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0159DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Management of cardiac tamponade during nivolumab of lung cancer with intrapericardial bleomycin: case report.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Thoracic Oncology & Respiratory Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer & Infectious Diseases Center, Komagome Hospital, Bunkyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Immuno-checkpoint inhibitor response and immune-related adverse events remain controversial issues. Managing pericardial effusion during programmed cell death 1 inhibitor treatment is challenging. Here, we report a case of successfully managed cardiac tamponade caused by nivolumab-induced pseudoprogression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2019-0003DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Pembrolizumab plus chemotherapy for first-line treatment of metastatic nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer: a network meta-analysis.

Immunotherapy 2019 Apr 4;11(5):407-428. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Thoracic/Head & Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77005, USA.

Aim: A systematic review and network meta-analysis were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of pembrolizumab + pemetrexed + platinum relative to other regimens in metastatic nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSq-NSCLC).

Patients & Methods: Eligible studies evaluated first-line regimens in NSq-NSCLC patients without known targetable mutations. Relative treatment effects were synthesized with random effects proportional hazards Bayesian network meta-analyses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0193DOI Listing

Immune context characterization and heterogeneity in primary tumors and pulmonary metastases from renal cell carcinoma.

Immunotherapy 2019 Jan;11(1):21-35

Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital of Parma, Parma, 43126, Italy.

Aim: The knowledge of the immune context of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is useful to predict benefit from immunotherapy. We retrospectively characterized the immune context of RCC patients underwent primary nephrectomy and pulmonary metastasectomy.

Materials & Methods: Intratumoral infiltrating lymphocytes and peritumoral renal infiltrating lymphocytes, lymphocyte subpopulations (CD4, CD8), PD-1, PD-L1 were explored in paired samples of primary RCC (T) and respective pulmonary metastases (M). Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/imt-2018-0097
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0097DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads
2.440 Impact Factor

The complicated effects of  obesity on cancer and immunotherapy.

Immunotherapy 2019 Jan;11(1):11-14

Department of Dermatology, UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA 95816, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0133DOI Listing
January 2019

Biologics for hidradenitis suppurativa: an update.

Immunotherapy 2019 Jan;11(1):45-59

Department of Dermatology, Venereology & Allergology, Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland.

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, inflammatory dermatosis characterized by an occurrence of nodules, abscesses, sinus tracks and scarring. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial and still not fully understood, therefore, current systemic therapies still remain a serious challenge. Increased levels of several proinflammatory cytokines have been reported in patients suffering from HS, therefore biologics appear as a new approach to therapy for this condition. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/imt-2018-0090
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0090DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Use of chimeric antigen receptor T cells in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Immunotherapy 2019 Jan;11(1):37-44

Department of Hematology, Xinqiao Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China.

The chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells play an antileukemia role, and can be used to treat or prevent relapse by targeting minimal residual disease for patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). However, the infusion of allogeneic CAR-T cells may also cause graft-versus-host disease, which limited their applications during and after allo-HSCT. In this review, we discuss the clinical trials that applying CAR-T cells before allo-HSCT and the use of donor-derived CAR-T cells as conditioning regimen during allo-HSCT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0089DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read
2.440 Impact Factor

Update on the current revolution in cancer immunotherapy.

Immunotherapy 2019 Jan;11(1):15-20

Department of Biochemistry, Cancer Biology, Neuroscience & Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0135DOI Listing
January 2019

The importance of being scientifically cautious when criticizing the administration of vaccines: 'retracted' post truth.

Immunotherapy 2019 Jan;11(1):7-9

Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santa Fe, Argentina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0062DOI Listing
January 2019

Immunotherapy: a 10-year anniversary issue.

Authors:
Mike Gregg

Immunotherapy 2019 Jan;11(1):1-2

Future Science Group, Unitec House, 2 Albert Place, London N31QB, UK.

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/imt-2018-0188
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0188DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Programmed cell death-1/programmed cell death ligand-1 checkpoint inhibitors: differences in mechanism of action.

Immunotherapy 2019 Apr 30;11(5):429-441. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.

Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1)/programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) checkpoint inhibitors are widely used in many types of solid tumors, and are often considered to be in the same immunotherapy subclass. This review explores whether specific agents in these two categories exhibit differences in their mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, and clinical efficacy and safety. Due to the complicated functional pathways in the immune checkpoint system, the epitopes, interfaces and signal pathways between PD-1: PD-L1/PD-L2, PD-L1/CD28/CTLA-4: B7-1 axes often overlap and affect each other. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0110DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Intestinal microbiota predicts lung cancer patients at risk of immune-related diarrhea.

Immunotherapy 2019 Apr 29;11(5):385-396. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Medical Oncology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China, 100853.

Aim: Previous studies showed that some patients after the treatment of anti-programmed cell death protein-1 (anti-PD-1) antibodies experienced immune-related diarrhea. In this study, we aim to explore the association between intestinal microbiota and immune-related diarrhea.

Methods: We obtained the fecal samples of 26 advanced lung cancer patients before the first dose of anti-PD-1 antibodies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0144DOI Listing

Metabolic regulation of CAR T cell function by the hypoxic microenvironment in solid tumors.

Immunotherapy 2019 Mar;11(4):335-345

Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

The field of immunometabolism has attracted growing attention as an area at the heart of immune regulation. Upon activation, T cells undergo significant metabolic changes allowing them to mediate effector responses. The advent of chimeric antigen receptor T cell-adoptive therapy has shown some striking clinical efficacy but fails to induce sufficient antitumor response in many patients. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/imt-2018-0141
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0141DOI Listing
March 2019
7 Reads

Dupilumab utility in difficult-to-treat asthma.

Authors:
Garry M Walsh

Immunotherapy 2019 Mar;11(4):261-264

School of Medicine, Medical Sciences & Nutrition, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen, AB25 2ZD, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0184DOI Listing

First-line checkpoint inhibitors for wild-type advanced non-small-cell cancer: a pair-wise and network meta-analysis.

Immunotherapy 2019 Mar;11(4):311-320

Department of Medical Oncology, Shantou Central Hospital, Shantou, China.

Aim: To estimate efficacy of checkpoint inhibitors and rank treatment effects in non-small-cell lung cancer.

Materials & Methods: Prospective randomized trials were included. p-score was used to rank treatment effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0107DOI Listing

The promising role of monoclonal antibodies for gastric cancer treatment.

Immunotherapy 2019 Mar;11(4):347-364

Research Center for Immunodeficiencies, Children's Medical Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Gastric cancer (GC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death world-wide. Despite improvements in prevention, early detection and various therapeutic options, the prognosis is still poor. GC is often diagnosed at an advanced stage with survivals less than 1 year. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/imt-2018-0093
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0093DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads
2.440 Impact Factor

Do immune-related adverse events correlate with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors?

Immunotherapy 2019 Mar;11(4):257-259

Hematology-Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Saint Joseph University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon.

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/imt-2018-0201
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0201DOI Listing
March 2019
6 Reads

Erratum.

Authors:

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb;11(3):255

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0097e1DOI Listing
February 2019

Tuberculosis, hepatitis B and herpes zoster in tofacitinib-treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Immunotherapy 2019 Mar 11;11(4):321-333. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Department of Rheumatology & Immunology, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing, China, 210008.

There is currently interest in the risk of infections during treatment with new targeted synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), specifically the Janus kinase inhibitor tofacitinib. Tofacitinib has been studied extensively in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and has been shown to be effective and generally safe. East Asian countries have a high background rate of tuberculosis (TB) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and the risk of recurrence or reactivation of infections such as TB, HBV and herpes zoster during DMARD therapy is of particular interest in the region. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0113DOI Listing
March 2019
10 Reads
2.440 Impact Factor

Tolerability of subcutaneous immunoglobulin 20%, Ig20Gly, in pediatric patients with primary immunodeficiencies.

Immunotherapy 2019 Apr 9;11(5):397-406. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Shire, 650 E Kendall St, Cambridge, MA, 02142, USA.

Aim: To assess Ig20Gly tolerability in pediatric patients with primary immunodeficiencies.

Patients & Methods: Infusion parameters and tolerability were analyzed in pediatric patients (aged 2-5 years [n = 6], 6-11 years [n = 22] and 12-17 years [n = 22]) receiving Ig20Gly in two Phase II/III trials.

Results: Of 2624 Ig20Gly infusions, >99% did not require any rate reduction, interruption or discontinuation due to adverse events (AEs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0088DOI Listing

Progressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with TP53 gene mutation treated with chidamide-based chemotherapy.

Immunotherapy 2019 Mar 4;11(4):265-272. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Department of Hematology & Hematology Research Laboratory, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, PR China.

We attempted to explore novel treatment options for progressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with TP53 mutation that has a poor response to rituximab-based immunochemotherapy. Herein, we report the case of a patient with DLBCL having TP53 mutation who showed progression following four cycles of rituximab-based immunochemotherapy but achieved sustained partial remission following chidamide-based chemotherapy. In vitro experiments performed using the DLBCL cell lines OCI-ly1 (LY1; mutant TP53), OCI-ly10 (LY10; wild-type TP53) and OCI-ly19 (LY19, wild-type TP53) demonstrated that chidamide is more potent against cells with mutant TP53 mutant than those with wild-type TP53. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0083DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads
2.440 Impact Factor

Immunotherapy plus surgery/radiosurgery is associated with favorable survival in patients with melanoma brain metastasis.

Immunotherapy 2019 Mar 4;11(4):297-309. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Center for Dermatooncology, Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany.

Aim: Melanoma brain metastases (MBM) are associated with a dismal prognosis. Few clinical trials evaluated the impact of immunotherapy (IT) and targeted therapy (TT) alone or in combination with surgery and radiotherapy in this population.

Patients & Methods: Retrospective analysis of data from 163 patients diagnosed with MBM between January 2014 and December 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0149DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Clinical and economic outcomes associated with treatment sequences in patients with BRAF-mutant advanced melanoma.

Immunotherapy 2019 Mar 19;11(4):283-295. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, DC, 20007, USA.

Aim: The cost-effectiveness of treatment sequences in BRAF-mutant advanced melanoma.

Materials & Methods: A discrete event simulation model was developed to estimate total costs and health outcomes over a patient's lifetime (30 years). Efficacy was based on the CheckMate 067/069 trials and a matching-adjusted-indirect comparison between immuno-oncology and targeted therapies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0168DOI Listing

Clinical value of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio as a predictor of prognosis of RetroNectin-activated cytokine-induced killer cell therapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

Immunotherapy 2019 Mar 14;11(4):273-282. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Department of Immunotherapy, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University & Henan Cancer Hospital, Zhengzhou 450008, PR China.

Aim: To assess the impact of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) on time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) and explore the value of NLR as an indicator in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with RetroNectin-activated cytokine-induced killer (R-CIK) cells.

Patients & Methods: Using data gathered from a single center between January 2010 and June 2015, 201 patients with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC receiving at least four cycles of R-CIK cell therapy were included. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the associations of NLR with TTP and OS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0147DOI Listing
March 2019
2.440 Impact Factor

α-PD-L1 mAb enhances the abscopal effect of hypo-fractionated radiation by attenuating PD-L1 expression and inducing CD8 T-cell infiltration.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb 4;11(2):101-118. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Department of Radiation & Medical Oncology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430071, China.

Aim: We investigated a promising cooperative combination of radiotherapy (RT) and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in both local and abscopal tumors.

Materials & Methods: C57BL/6 mice were randomly grouped and received RT, α-PD-L1 mAb or combination therapy 13 days after implantation of Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry analyses demonstrated CD8 T-cell infiltration and PD-L1 expression in tumor issue. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/imt-2018-0049
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0049DOI Listing
February 2019
14 Reads

A study of the clinical characteristics and prognosis of advanced mucosal and cutaneous melanoma in a Chinese population.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb 4;11(2):91-99. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Department of Biotherapy, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 127 Dong Ming Road, Jinshui District, Zhengzhou, Henan, 450008, PR China.

Aim: To investigate the characteristics and prognosis of melanoma in a Chinese population.

Materials & Methods:  Total of 162 advanced melanoma patients were analyzed retrospectively. Kaplan-Meier method and Log rank test were used for survival analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0030DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Safety and efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin (Flebogamma 10% DIF) in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

Immunotherapy 2019 Feb 30;11(2):81-89. Epub 2018 Nov 30.

Grifols Bioscience Research Group, Grifols, Barcelona, Spain.

Aim: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of 10% intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG; Flebogamma 10% DIF) in individuals with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP).

Patients & Methods: Patients aged 3-70 years, diagnosed with chronic ITP, received 1 g/kg IVIG over two consecutive days.

Results:  64 evaluable patients (51 adults, 13 children) with chronic ITP received IVIG. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0165DOI Listing
February 2019
11 Reads

Immunotherapy Foreword 2018.

Authors:
Mike Gregg

Immunotherapy 2018 Nov;10(16):1339-1341

Future Science Group, Unitec House, 2 Albert Place, London N31QB, UK.

To all of our readers, the Future Medicine editorial office would like to thank you for your continued readership over 2018 and I hope you have a fantastic Christmas and New Year. I would also like to thank our esteemed editorial board, peer reviewers and contributing authors for their continued support. We very much look forward to working with you all in 2019 and seeing the journal continue to progress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0183DOI Listing
November 2018

The behavior of Italian allergists in prescribing allergen immunotherapy for house dust mites allergy.

Immunotherapy 2018 Nov;10(16):1343-1348

Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Genoa, Italy.

The meeting 'Clinical Evidence, Extracts Quality and Biotechnology Innovation in Allergen Immunotherapy' held in Trieste (Italy) on 1 October 2017 concerned the outcomes of a real-world survey conducted on a group of Italian allergists about allergen immunotherapy (AIT) for house dust mites allergy. It pointed out: allergist's confidence that AIT should be prescribed continuously; tablets seem to be well accepted by patients and effective in most subjects with a fast onset of action (3-6 months); combined score for symptom severity and medication use is universally assessed; there is disagreement about the diagnosis of house dust mites allergy, the quote of AIT prescription, the choice for AIT route of administration, assessment of serum IgE and perception of patient's adherence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/imt-2018-0066DOI Listing
November 2018
2.440 Impact Factor