822 results match your criteria Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America[Journal]


Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders.

Authors:
Lisa J Kobrynski

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2019 Feb 1;39(1):xi-xii. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Section, Allergy/Immunology, Emory University, 2015 Uppergate Dr, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.09.001DOI Listing
February 2019

Diagnosis and Management of Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders: The Pieces of the Puzzle Are Starting to Fit Together.

Authors:
Stephen A Tilles

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2019 Feb;39(1):ix-x

ASTHMA Inc Clinical Research Center, Northwest Asthma and Allergy Center, University of Washington, 9725 3rd Avenue Northeast, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98115, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.09.002DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Personalized Therapy: Immunoglobulin Replacement for Antibody Deficiency.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2019 Feb;39(1):95-111

Allergy Partners of North Texas, 7777 Forest Lane, Suite B-332, Dallas, TX 75230, USA. Electronic address:

Immunoglobulin replacement therapy is the cornerstone of management for most primary immunodeficiency disease patients. The selection of a particular product, dose, and route of administration requires an understanding of the features of therapeutic immunoglobulin as well as patient-specific risk factors in order to maximize efficacy and tolerability and minimize risk. Individualizing therapy, taking into consideration the burdens of care, is necessary in order to optimize patient outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.08.001DOI Listing
February 2019
14 Reads

Gastrointestinal Manifestations and Complications of Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2019 Feb;39(1):81-94

Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology after the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1089, New York, NY 10029, USA.

Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can be the presenting disease manifestation in patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs). Infections and noninfectious diarrhea are frequent manifestations; however, malignancy and inflammatory and autoimmune-related GI diseases are also described. GI symptoms and disease seen in association with PIDs can mimic other diseases but are often resistant to conventional treatments owing to alternate disease mechanisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.08.006DOI Listing
February 2019
11 Reads

Early-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2019 Feb;39(1):63-79

Division of Allergy Immunology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 3615 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address:

The epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease has changed over the past 4 decades. The incidence is rising dramatically and the age of onset has become younger. This changing landscape of inflammatory bowel disease reflects the new recognition that the youngest children with inflammatory bowel disease are enriched in cases with underlying primary immunodeficiency and monogenic causes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.08.008DOI Listing
February 2019
10 Reads

An Update on Syndromes with a Hyper-IgE Phenotype.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2019 Feb;39(1):49-61

Laboratory of Clinical Immunology and Microbiology, National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), 10 Center Drive, Building 10, Room 12C103, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address:

Improvement in genetic testing has allowed specific delineation of several distinct clinical causes characterized by the hyperimmunoglobulin E (IgE) phenotype of eczema, recurrent infections, and elevated serum IgE. Mutations in STAT3, DOCK8, PGM3, ERBIN, IL6ST, and CARD11 cause clinical phenotypes that can present in this manner. This article focuses on loss of function STAT3 mutations causing autosomal-dominant hyper-IgE syndrome and dedicator of cytokinesis 8 deficiency, with discussion of other more recently described diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.08.007DOI Listing
February 2019
15 Reads

Secondary Hypogammaglobulinemia: An Increasingly Recognized Complication of Treatment with Immunomodulators and After Solid Organ Transplantation.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2019 Feb;39(1):31-47

Division of Allergy and Immunology, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Steven and Alexandra Cohen Medical Center of New York, 865 Northern Boulevard, Suite 101, Great Neck, NY 11021, USA.

Secondary hypogammaglobulinemia is a common development in patients treated with immunomodulatory agents for autoimmune, connective tissue, and malignant diseases. It has been observed in the medical management of patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplantation. Some patients have preexisting immunodeficiency associated with these illnesses; immunosuppressive treatment magnifies their immune defect. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.08.005DOI Listing
February 2019
14 Reads

Hereditary Autoinflammatory Disorders: Recognition and Treatment.

Authors:
Lori Broderick

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2019 Feb 1;39(1):13-29. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive MC 0760, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. Electronic address:

The autoinflammatory diseases encompass approximately 30 monogenic disorders in which inborn errors in the innate immune system lead to episodic systemic inflammation. Largely mediated by dysregulation of myeloid cells, interleukin (IL)-1β, type I interferon, and NF-κB, these disorders have rapidly expanded over the past several years, and increasing numbers of patients identified. Crossover disorders, bridging autoinflammation and immunodeficiency, have recently been described. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.08.004DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

Genetic Testing to Diagnose Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders and to Identify Targeted Therapy.

Authors:
Jennifer Heimall

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2019 Feb;39(1):129-140

Allergy/Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 3401 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address:

Since the first genes associated with primary immunodeficiency were described in the early 1990s, there has been an exponential increase the number of genes found to have pathologic variants in patients with symptoms of primary immunodeficiency. Genetic testing currently used clinically includes chromosomal microarray, Sanger sequencing, and next-generation sequencing techniques, including whole exome testing. With the knowledge of the underlying molecular pathways, biologic therapies have been used for treatment and efforts are underway to broaden the availability of gene therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.08.009DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Update on Advances in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2019 Feb 1;39(1):113-128. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Division of Bone Marrow Transplant, Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University School of Medicine, 2015 Uppergate Drive, ECC Room 418, Atlanta, GA 30030, USA. Electronic address:

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDDs) is being increasingly used as a curative option. Understanding the critical components, such as disease's nature and activity and pre-HSCT and post-HSCT patient care is key to a successful outcome. HSCT should be tailored to the underlying PIDD, as different PIDDs, such as severe combined immune deficiency, Treg dysfunction, and phagocytic disorders, have different transplant approaches. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.08.003DOI Listing
February 2019
13 Reads
2.216 Impact Factor

Newborn Screening for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency in the United States: Lessons Learned.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2019 Feb 1;39(1):1-11. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco, Box 3118, 555 Mission Bay Boulevard South, Rm SC-252K, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.

In the United States, significant improvement in diagnosis and outcomes for children affected with severe combined immunodeficiency has followed institution of newborn screening using an assay to measure T-cell receptor excision circles in newborn dried blood spot specimens. Key to this outcome is the avoidance of infectious complications in infants with severe combined immunodeficiency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.08.002DOI Listing
February 2019
8 Reads

Biomarkers in Allergy and Asthma.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 11;38(4):xiii-xiv

Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, 1400 Jackson Street, Denver, CO 80206, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.07.001DOI Listing
November 2018

Biomarkers in Allergic Diseases and Asthma: Essential Tools for Diagnosis and Treatment.

Authors:
Stephen A Tilles

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 11 10;38(4):xi-xii. Epub 2018 Aug 10.

ASTHMA Inc. Clinical Research Center, Northwest Asthma and Allergy Center, University of Washington, 9725 3rd Avenue Northeast, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98115, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.07.002DOI Listing
November 2018

Biomarkers in Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 11 21;38(4):679-692. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Division of Rhinology, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 3900 Woodland Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Monell Chemical Senses Center, 3500 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address:

Chronic rhinosinusitis is a complex disease that exists along the inflammatory spectrum between types 1 and 2 inflammation. The classic phenotypic differentiation of chronic rhinosinusitis based on the presence or absence of inflammatory polyps remains one of the best differentiators of response to therapy. Development of biologics for the treatment of atopic disease and asthma and topical therapies for sinusitis have placed renewed emphasis on understanding the pathophysiology of polyp disease. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898561183006
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.06.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6201304PMC
November 2018
10 Reads

Exhaled Breath Condensate: An Update.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 11 21;38(4):667-678. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

VCU Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Box 980401, Richmond, VA 23298-0401, USA.

Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a promising source of biomarkers of lung disease. EBC research and utility has increased substantially over the past 2 decades. This review summarizes many of the factors regarding the composition of EBC, its collection, and analysis for the utility of both clinicians and researchers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.06.002DOI Listing
November 2018

Molecular Endotypes Contribute to the Heterogeneity of Asthma.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 11 21;38(4):655-665. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Division of Cell Biology, Department of Pediatrics, National Jewish Health, 1400 Jackson Street, Denver, CO 80206, USA. Electronic address:

Diagnosis and management of asthma is commonly implemented based on clinical assessment. Although these nonmolecular biomarkers have been useful, limited resolution of the heterogeneity among asthmatic patients and little information regarding the underlying pathobiology of disease in individuals have been provided. Molecular endotying using global transcriptome expression profiling associated with clinical features of asthma has improved our understanding of disease mechanisms, risk assessment of asthma exacerbations, and treatment responses, especially in patients with type 2 inflammation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.06.008DOI Listing
November 2018
7 Reads

Airway Eosinophilopoietic and Autoimmune Mechanisms of Eosinophilia in Severe Asthma.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 11 21;38(4):639-654. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Division of Respirology, Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health, St Joseph's Healthcare, McMaster University, 50 Charlton Avenue East, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6, Canada. Electronic address:

Eosinophils are critical in asthma biology, contributing to symptoms, airflow obstruction, airway hyperresponsiveness, and remodeling. In severe asthma, in addition to local maturation in bone marrow, in situ eosinophilopoiesis plays a key role in the persistence of airway eosinophilia. Local milieu of structural, epithelial and inflammatory cells contribute by generating eosinophilopoietic cytokines in response to epithelial-derived alarmins. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.06.003DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

The Role of Neutrophils in Asthma.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 11 18;38(4):629-638. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Department of Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers Institute for Translational Medicine and Science, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 89 French Street, Suite 4211, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA. Electronic address:

Although asthma defines a syndrome associated with airway inflammation, heterogeneity exists concerning the type of inflammation that modulates airway hyperresponsiveness. Compelling evidence suggests that common triggers of asthma exacerbations are preferentially mediated by neutrophilic airway inflammation. Currently, there exists no therapeutic approach that uniquely targets neutrophils in asthma. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898561183005
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.06.005DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

Periostin and Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4: Potential Biomarkers of Interleukin 13 Pathway Activation in Asthma and Allergy.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 11 18;38(4):611-628. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

MedImmune, One MedImmune Way, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, USA.

Periostin and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) are proteins induced by type 2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 and show increased expression in asthma and diseases with type 2 inflammation, including atopic dermatitis and chronic rhinosinusitis. Both proteins can also be induced by other stimuli, such as profibrotic factors, which may confound their specificity as biomarkers of IL-13 pathway activation and type 2-driven disease. DPP-4 is important in glucose metabolism; therefore, serum concentrations may be confounded by the presence of concomitant metabolic disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.06.004DOI Listing
November 2018

Urinary Leukotriene E as a Biomarker of Exposure, Susceptibility, and Risk in Asthma: An Update.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 11 21;38(4):599-610. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy and Immunology, National Jewish Health, 1400 Jackson Street, Denver, CO 80206, USA. Electronic address:

Measurement of urinary leukotriene E (uLTE) is a sensitive and noninvasive method of assaying total body cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT) production and changes in CysLT production. Recent studies have reported on novel LTE4 receptor interactions and genetic polymorphisms causing CysLT variability. The applications of uLTE as a biomarker continue to expand, including evaluation of environmental exposures, asthma severity risk, aspirin sensitivity, predicting atopy in preschool age children, obstructive sleep apnea, and predicting susceptibility to leukotriene receptor antagonists. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.06.011DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Immunoglobulin E as a Biomarker in Asthma.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 11 31;38(4):587-597. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Allergy/Immunology, University of Missouri Kansas City School of Medicine, 2411 Holmes Street, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA. Electronic address:

Asthma is a chronic disease that affects children and adults with significant morbidity and mortality. It is multifactorial, with genetic and environmental factors affecting the overall course of the disease. Both specific and total immunoglobulin (Ig)E can be used in specific phenotypes such as allergic asthma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.06.007DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

Exhaled Nitric Oxide: An Update.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 11 21;38(4):573-585. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Division of Allergy and Immunology, National Jewish Health, 1400 Jackson Street, Denver, CO 80206, USA.

Fractional concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is a biomarker used to identify allergic airway inflammation. Because it is noninvasive and easy to obtain, its utility has been studied in the diagnosis and management of several respiratory diseases. Much of the research has been done in asthma, and many studies support the use of FENO in aiding diagnosing asthma, predicting steroid responsiveness, and preventing exacerbations by guiding medication dosage and assessing adherence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.06.001DOI Listing
November 2018

Bronchoprovocation Testing in Asthma: An Update.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 11;38(4):545-571

National Jewish Health, 1400 Jackson Street (J321), Denver, CO 80206, USA. Electronic address:

Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) is defined as a heightened bronchoconstrictive response to airway stimuli. It complements the cardinal features in asthma, such as variable or reversible airflow limitation and airway inflammation. Although BHR is considered a pathophysiologic hallmark of asthma, it should be acknowledged that this property of the airway is dynamic, because its severity and even presence can vary over time with disease activity, triggers or specific exposure, and with treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.06.010DOI Listing
November 2018
11 Reads

Mastocytosis: Moving the Field to Precision and Personalized Medicine.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08 9;38(3):xv-xvii. Epub 2018 Jun 9.

Drug Hypersensitivity and Desensitization Center, Mastoctytosis Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 60 Fenwood Road, Room 5002, Boston, MA 02115, USA; 850 Boylston Street, Brookline, MA 02445, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.05.001DOI Listing
August 2018
6 Reads

The Many Faces of Mast Cell Disorders.

Authors:
Stephen A Tilles

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08 26;38(3):xiii. Epub 2018 May 26.

ASTHMA Inc. Clinical Research Center, Northwest Asthma and Allergy Center, University of Washington, 9725 3rd Avenue Northeast, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98115, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.05.002DOI Listing
August 2018
2 Reads

Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition in Mastocytosis: KIT and Beyond KIT.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08;38(3):527-543

Cellular and Molecular Oncology, LBPA CNRS UMR8113, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris Saclay, 61, Avenue du Président Wilson, Cachan Cedex 94235, France; Laboratory of Hematology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, 83, Boulevard de l'Hôpital, Paris 75013, France. Electronic address:

Mastocytosis is a group of rare disorders characterized by abnormal accumulation of mast cells in one or several organs. Mastocytosis can be seen at any age; but, in adults, the disease is usually systemic and chronic. Patients with indolent systemic mastocytosis (SM) are usually treated symptomatically, but cytoreductive treatments are needed in more advanced SM. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.04.007DOI Listing
August 2018
125 Reads

Patient Perceptions in Mast Cell Disorders.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08;38(3):505-525

Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy, Mastocytosis Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 60 Fenwood Road, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Understanding experiences, perceptions, and perspectives of patients with a mast cell disorder (MCD), including cutaneous mastocytosis, systemic mastocytosis, mast cell activation syndromes, and hereditary α-tryptasemia, is an important aspect of successful care, treatment, and informed development of novel therapies. This article reviews existing studies and presents new data on MCD patient perceptions regarding medical care, symptoms, allergies/sensitivities, triggers, future health/disease progression, treatment, impact on daily living, quality of life, support needs, and concerns regarding possible familial disease. Discussion includes aspects affecting the MCD community that require further consideration and development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.04.006DOI Listing
August 2018
25 Reads

Association of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome with Mast Cell Activation Disorders.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08 9;38(3):497-504. Epub 2018 Jun 9.

Clinical Immunology and Allergy Division, University of São Paulo, Av. Dr. Arnaldo, 455, Cerqueira César, São Paulo, São Paulo CEP 01246-903, Brazil; Faculdade Israelita de Ciências da Saúde Albert Einstein, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Mast cell activation disorders (MCADs) consist of episodic systemic symptoms due to mast cell mediator release. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation and determination of high levels of tryptase or histamine. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) frequently coexist. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.04.004DOI Listing
August 2018
12 Reads

Hereditary Alpha Tryptasemia: Genotyping and Associated Clinical Features.

Authors:
Jonathan J Lyons

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08 9;38(3):483-495. Epub 2018 Jun 9.

Laboratory of Allergic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 11N240 MSC 1889, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address:

Hereditary alpha tryptasemia is an autosomal dominant genetic trait caused by increased germline copies of TPSAB1 encoding alpha-tryptase. Individuals with this trait have elevated basal serum tryptase, and may present with associated multisystem complaints. Both basal serum tryptase levels and severity of clinical symptoms display a gene-dose relationship with TPSAB1, whereby higher tryptase levels and greater symptom severity are correlated with increasing numbers of alpha-encoding TPSAB1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.04.003DOI Listing
August 2018
1 Read

Nonclonal Mast Cell Activation Syndrome: A Growing Body of Evidence.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08 9;38(3):469-481. Epub 2018 Jun 9.

Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Endoscopy, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

Patients who present with typical features of mast cell activation with laboratory confirmation and without evidence of a clonal mast cell disorder or other medical condition should be initiated on medical treatment to block mast cells and their mediators. If a major response is achieved, a diagnosis of nonclonal mast cell activation syndrome (NC-MCAS) is likely and treatment should be optimized, including management of any associated conditions. In this review, the latest evidence with regard to the diagnosis and treatment of NC-MCAS is presented. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.04.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6049091PMC
August 2018
2 Reads

Hymenoptera Anaphylaxis as a Clonal Mast Cell Disorder.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08 9;38(3):455-468. Epub 2018 Jun 9.

Multidisciplinary Outpatients Clinic for Mastocytosis (GISM), Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata di Verona, Piazzale Stefani 1, Verona 37126, Italy; Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata di Verona, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, Verona 37134, Italy.

Up to 7% of adult patients with Hymenoptera venom allergy may suffer from a clonal mast cell disease. Patients with clonal mast cell disease and Hymenoptera venom anaphylaxis are commonly males, without skin lesions, and anaphylaxis is characterized by hypotension and syncope in the absence of urticaria and angioedema. A normal value of tryptase does not exclude a mastocytosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.04.010DOI Listing
August 2018
5 Reads

Bone Disease in Mastocytosis.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08;38(3):443-454

Hematology Unit, University of Verona, Verona, Italy.

Systemic mastocytosis can give very different bone pictures: from osteosclerosis to osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is one of the most frequent manifestations particularly in adults and the most clinical relevant. It is often complicated by a high recurrence of mainly vertebral fragility fractures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.04.013DOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads

Gastrointestinal Involvement in Mast Cell Activation Disorders.

Authors:
Fred H Hsieh

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08;38(3):429-441

Allergy and Immunology, Respiratory Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, A90, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA. Electronic address:

Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are commonly reported in patients with mast cell disease. GI involvement in systemic mastocytosis is heterogeneous and symptoms may be caused by infiltration of abnormal mast cells in the GI tract and/or by the downstream effect of mast cell mediators on GI tissues. GI symptoms described the monoclonal mast cell activation syndrome are best characterized in the context of acute anaphylaxis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.04.008DOI Listing
August 2018
7 Reads

Kit Mutations: New Insights and Diagnostic Value.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08 9;38(3):411-428. Epub 2018 Jun 9.

Leukemia Department, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 428, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

Mastocytosis is a World Health Organization-defined clonal mast cell disorder characterized by significant clinicopathologic heterogeneity. Despite this diversity, a mutation of the KIT gene, most commonly D816V, is found in almost all cases and believed a driver lesion. Peripheral blood allele-specific oligonucleotide polymerase chain reaction can reliably detect KIT D816V and is used for the initial screening of adults with suspected systemic mastocytosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.04.005DOI Listing
August 2018
13 Reads

Mast Cell Mediators of Significance in Clinical Practice in Mastocytosis.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08 9;38(3):397-410. Epub 2018 Jun 9.

Division of Allergic Diseases, Mayo Clinic, 200 Southwest 1st Street, Rochester, MN 55902, USA.

Mast cells leave evidence, a "fingerprint," of their participation in acute and chronic clinical events. That fingerprint is an elevation, either chronic or acute, in levels of their secreted mediators or their metabolites. Of these, only serum tryptase is currently one of the diagnostic criteria for systemic mastocytosis or mast cell activation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.04.011DOI Listing
August 2018
12 Reads

Bone Marrow Expression of Mast Cell Disorders.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08;38(3):379-395

Instituto de Estudios de Mastocitosis de Castilla La Mancha, Hospital Virgen del Valle, Ctra. Cobisa s/n, Toledo 45071, Spain; Spanish Network on Mastocytosis (REMA), Toledo, Spain.

Mast cell disorders comprise a heterogeneous group of rare diseases, the diagnosis of which still remains a challenge. Bone marrow analysis constitutes the most appropriate site for screening systemic involvement in mastocytosis. Morphologic, immunohistochemical, flow cytometric immunophenotyping, and molecular studies should be routinely performed for diagnostic/prognostic purposes in experienced reference centers during the diagnostic workup in suspected systemic mastocytosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.04.012DOI Listing
August 2018
24 Reads

Pediatric Expression of Mast Cell Activation Disorders.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08 21;38(3):365-377. Epub 2018 May 21.

Mastocytosis Centre Odense University Hospital (MastOUH), Søndre Boulevard 29, 5000 Odense C, Denmark; Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Kløvervænget 23C, 5000 Odense C, Denmark.

Mast cell activation disorders is a term proposed to cover diseases and conditions related to activation of mast cells and effects of mast cell mediators. In its broadest sense, the term encompasses a wide range of diseases from allergic asthma to rhinoconjunctivitis, urticaria, food allergy, anaphylaxis, mastocytosis, and other conditions where MC activation is contributing to the pathogenesis. This article focuses on clinical presentations, challenges, and controversies in pediatric mastocytosis and gives an overview of current knowledge and areas in need of further research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.04.009DOI Listing
August 2018
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Cutaneous Mastocytosis in Adults and Children: New Classification and Prognostic Factors.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08 17;38(3):351-363. Epub 2018 May 17.

Instituto de Estudios de Mastocitosis de Castilla La Mancha (CLMast), Hospital Virgen del Valle, Ctra. Cobisa s/n, Toledo 45071, Spain. Electronic address:

The skin is one of the most frequent tissues affected in patients with mastocytosis, but cutaneous lesions are highly heterogeneous in shape, size, color, number, localization, and distribution. The World Health Organization recognizes 3 subtypes of cutaneous mastocytosis (CM): maculopapular CM (MPCM), diffuse CM, and mastocytoma of skin. An international task force of experts in mastocytosis has recently proposed subdividing MPCM into monomorphic and polymorphic, which could predict the duration of the disease in children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.04.001DOI Listing
August 2018
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New Insights into Clonal Mast Cell Disorders Including Mastocytosis.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 08 9;38(3):341-350. Epub 2018 Jun 9.

Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, 24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive, PO Box 442, Suite H-2100, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-0442, USA. Electronic address:

Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that involve the clonal expansion of mast cells into one or more organ systems, which typically involves the skin and hematopoietic systems. Systemic mastocytosis consists of a multifocal infiltration of mast cells into various noncutaneous tissue sites, especially the bone marrow. Diagnosis requires tissue confirmation, and algorithms have been developed to assist clinicians in this process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.04.014DOI Listing
August 2018
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Exercise and the Total Airway: A Call to Action.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 05 19;38(2):xv-xix. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Royal Brompton Hospital, Imperial College, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Royal Brompton Hospital, Fulham Road, London SW3 6HP, UK. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.02.001DOI Listing
May 2018
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Exercise-Induced Airway Dysfunction in Athletes.

Authors:
Stephen A Tilles

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 05 14;38(2):xiii-xiv. Epub 2018 Feb 14.

ASTHMA Inc. Clinical Research Center, Northwest Asthma and Allergy Center, University of Washington, 9725 3rd Avenue Northeast, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98115, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.02.002DOI Listing
May 2018
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Food Allergy Point of Care Pearls.

Authors:
J Andrew Bird

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 05 23;38(2):e1-e8. Epub 2018 Feb 23.

Departments of Pediatrics and Internal Medicine, Division of Allergy and Immunology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-9063, USA. Electronic address:

Food allergy should be suspected in individuals with a history of immediate reactivity following ingestion (ie, typically within 20 minutes and almost always within 2 hours) with typical symptoms of immunoglobulin E-mediated reactivity (eg, urticaria, angioedema, coughing, wheezing, vomiting). Testing for food allergy should focus on the most likely allergen to provoke the reaction based on the patient's history. Safe introduction of peanut-containing foods into the diet of an infant at high risk of developing peanut allergy at 4 to 6 months is likely to reduce the risk of peanut allergy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2017.10.003DOI Listing
May 2018
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The Future of Exertional Respiratory Problems: What Do We Know About the Total Airway Approach and What Do We Need to Know?

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 05 12;38(2):333-339. Epub 2018 Mar 12.

Department of Respiratory Medicine, Royal Brompton Hospital, Fulham Road, SW3 6HP, London, UK.

Exercise is increasingly viewed as a preventative and therapeutic modality for medical and behavioral health disorders. Therefore, it is imperative that the medical and scientific communities minimize barriers that discourage exercise. This issue of Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America details a "total airway approach" to the evaluation of exertional respiratory problems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.01.013DOI Listing
May 2018
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Exertional Dyspnea and Excessive Dynamic Airway Collapse.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 05 19;38(2):325-332. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Pulmonary/Critical Care Service (MCHE-ZMD-P), Department of Medicine, San Antonio Military Medical Center, 3551 Roger Brooke Drive, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA.

Excessive dynamic airway collapse is a relatively new diagnosis separate from tracheobronchomalacia that is manifested by functional collapse of the large airways. Most commonly described in patients with underlying obstructive lung disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma, it may contribute to increased dyspnea, cough, or exacerbations. There are few data published on the role of excessive dynamic airway collapse as related specifically to exercise. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.01.006DOI Listing
May 2018
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Surgical Intervention for Exercise-Induced Laryngeal Obstruction.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 05 2;38(2):317-324. Epub 2018 Mar 2.

Department of Surgical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology, and Head and Neck Surgery, Uppsala University, Akademiska sjukhuset ing 78-79, Uppsala 75185, Sweden.

Respiratory distress during exercise can be caused by exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO). The obstruction may appear at the level of the laryngeal inlet (supraglottic), similar to supraglottic collapse observed in infants with congenital laryngomalacia (CLM). This observation has encouraged surgeons to treat supraglottic EILO with procedures proven efficient for severe CLM. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.01.005DOI Listing
May 2018
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Exercise-Induced Laryngeal Obstruction and Performance Psychology: Using the Mind as a Diagnostic and Therapeutic Target.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 05 23;38(2):303-315. Epub 2018 Feb 23.

Erika Westhoff Performance, Pleasanton, CA, USA.

Exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction causes severe shortness of breath during exercise. Episodes are associated with severe distress. These patients and those with inducible laryngeal obstruction triggered by other factors have been noted to demonstrate mental health disorders, personality features that may be associated with symptoms, and dysfunctional stress responses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.01.004DOI Listing
May 2018
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Speech-Language Pathology as a Primary Treatment for Exercise-Induced Laryngeal Obstruction.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 05 2;38(2):293-302. Epub 2018 Mar 2.

Department of Respiratory Medicine, North West Lung Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester University National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southmoor Road, Manchester, M23 9LT, UK.

Exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction is a condition that restricts respiration during exercise via inappropriate glottic or supraglottic obstruction. The literature supports behavioral treatment provided by a speech-language pathologist as an effective means of treating exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction. Treatment includes educating the patient, training on relaxation, instruction on paced exercise, and use of various breathing techniques to optimize laryngeal aperture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.01.003DOI Listing
May 2018
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Working Towards a Common Transatlantic Approach for Evaluation of Exercise-Induced Laryngeal Obstruction.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 05 19;38(2):281-292. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Department of Paediatrics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Science, Section for Paediatrics, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

Exertional dyspnea can be a manifestation of dysfunction in a variety of organ systems. Exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO), a condition previously known as vocal cord dysfunction and paradoxic vocal fold motion, is defined as inappropriate, reversible narrowing of the larynx during vigorous exercise. EILO is usually characterized by typical symptoms, which nevertheless frequently are confused with those of other conditions, including asthma. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898561183000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.01.002DOI Listing
May 2018
8 Reads
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Exercise-Induced Laryngeal Obstruction-An Overview.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 05 19;38(2):271-280. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Respiratory Research Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Bispebjerg University Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, Copenhagen DK-2400, Denmark; Respiratory Department, Royal Brompton Hospital, Dovehouse Street, SW3 6JY, London, UK. Electronic address:

Exertional dyspnea is common in health and disease. Despite having known for centuries that breathlessness can arise from the larynx, exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction is a more prevalent condition than previously assumed. This article provides a brief overview of the history, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.01.001DOI Listing
May 2018
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Exercise and Sinonasal Disease.

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2018 05 2;38(2):259-269. Epub 2018 Mar 2.

Laboratory of Clinical Immunology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, Box 811, Leuven 3000, Belgium. Electronic address:

Physical exercise requires proper function of the upper and lower airways in order to meet exertional ventilatory requirements. Athletes performing frequent intensive exercise experience more sino-nasal symptoms and demonstrate objective decreases in sino-nasal function when compared with the general population. Sino-nasal dysfunction is known to interfere with sport performance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2018.01.014DOI Listing
May 2018
3 Reads