73 results match your criteria Imaging in Ganglioneuroma and Ganglioneuroblastoma


Adrenal masses in children: Imaging, surgical treatment and outcome.

Asian J Surg 2019 Apr 5. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Department of Pediatric Surgery, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Turkey.

Background/objective: This study aims to evaluate the current surgical approach to adrenal masses in the pediatric age group.

Methods: We retrospectively analyzed cases that underwent surgery for adrenal masses between 2007 and 2017. Patients were assessed regarding age, sex, primary diagnosis, image defined risk factors (IDRF), surgical treatment method, complications, duration of hospital stay, and follow-up. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asjsur.2019.03.012DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Multidisciplinary surgical strategy for dumbbell neuroblastoma: A single-center experience of 32 cases.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2019 Mar 4:e27670. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Department of Pediatric Surgery and Urology, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

Introduction: Prognosis of dumbbell neuroblastoma (NBL) is mainly determined by the sequelae induced by the tumor itself and the neurosurgical approach. However, after primary chemotherapy, surgical management of the residual tumor, especially the spinal canal component, remains controversial.

Methods: We conducted a single-center retrospective cohort study over the last 15 years (2002-2017) including patients treated for NBL with spinal canal extension focusing on timing and type of surgery, complications, and functional and oncological follow-up. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/pbc.27670
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.27670DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Quantitative DWI predicts event-free survival in children with neuroblastic tumours: preliminary findings from a retrospective cohort study.

Eur Radiol Exp 2019 Jan 30;3(1). Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Ulm, Albert-Schweitzer-Allee 23, 89081, Ulm, Germany.

Background: Quantitative diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) probes into tissue microstructure in solid tumours. In this retrospective ethically approved study, we investigated DWI as a potential non-invasive predictor of tumour dignity and prognosis in paediatric patients with neuroblastic tumours.

Methods: Nineteen consecutive patients with neuroblastoma (NB, n = 15), ganglioneuroblastoma (GNB, n = 1) and ganglioneuroma (GN, n = 3) underwent 3-T magnetic resonance imaging at first diagnosis and after 3-month follow-up, following a protocol including DWI (b = 50 and 800 s/mm) in addition to standard sequences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41747-019-0087-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6353978PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

High Oct4 expression: implications in the pathogenesis of neuroblastic tumours.

BMC Cancer 2019 Jan 3;19(1). Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Pathology Department, Medical School, University of Valencia-INCLIVA, Av. Blasco Ibáñez, 15, 46010, Valencia, Spain.

Background: Neuroblastic tumours (NBTs) are paediatric solid tumours derived from embryonic neural crest cells which harbour their own cancer stem cells (CSC). There is evidence indicating that CSC may be responsible for tumour progression, chemotherapy resistance and recurrence in NBTs. Oct4 is a transcription factor which plays a key role in mammal embryonic development and stem cell fate regulation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-018-5219-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6318846PMC
January 2019

Peripheral neuroblastic tumor of the kidney: case report and review of literature.

Tumori 2018 Jul 1:300891618788475. Epub 2018 Jul 1.

1 Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.

Introduction: Peripheral neuroblastic tumors (PNTs) account for 8%-10% of all pediatric tumors. Adrenal glands and sympathetic ganglia are the commonest site of tumor growth. In the clinicopathologic spectrum of PNTs, neuroblastoma and ganglioneuroma are the most primitive and the most mature tumor form, while ganglioneuroblastoma represents an intermediate state of maturation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0300891618788475DOI Listing
July 2018
17 Reads

Multifactorial analysis of opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome etiology ("Tumor" vs. "No tumor") in a cohort of 356 US children.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2018 Aug 4;65(8):e27097. Epub 2018 May 4.

National Pediatric Myoclonus Center, National Pediatric Neuroinflammation Organization, Inc., Orlando, Florida, USA.

Background: Pediatric opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) presents a paradox of etiopathogenesis: A neuroblastic tumor (NB) is found in only one half of the cases, the others are ascribed to infections or designated as idiopathic.

Method: From an IRB-approved observational study of 356 US children with OMS, secondary analysis of "etiology" and related factors was performed on a well-characterized cohort. The "Tumor" (n = 173) and "No Tumor" groups (n = 183), as defined radiologically, were compared according to multiple factors considered potentially differentiating. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/pbc.27097
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.27097DOI Listing
August 2018
9 Reads

Usefulness of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for detection of a neuroblastic nodule in a ganglioneuroblastoma: a case report.

J Med Case Rep 2018 May 3;12(1):119. Epub 2018 May 3.

Department of Pediatric Oncology, Fukushima Medical University Hospital, 1 Hikarigaoka, Fukushima City, Fukushima, 960-1295, Japan.

Background: Ganglioneuroblastoma, nodular is defined as a composite tumor of biologically distinct clones. The peripheral neuroblastic tumors in this category are characterized by the presence of grossly visible neuroblastoma nodules coexisting with ganglioneuroblastoma, intermixed, or with ganglioneuroma. Making a correct diagnosis of ganglioneuroblastoma, nodular is often difficult by biopsy or partial tumor resection, because the neuroblastic nodule could be hidden and not sampled for pathological examination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13256-018-1640-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5932788PMC
May 2018
8 Reads

Characteristics and management of ganglioneuroma and ganglioneuroblastoma-intermixed in children and adolescents.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2018 05 25;65(5):e26964. Epub 2018 Jan 25.

Division of Haematology & Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Ganglioneuromas (GNs) usually demonstrate favorable histological and clinical features. Surgery is often performed due to clinical symptoms and/or theoretical concerns that GN may transform into neuroblastoma (NB); however, several studies have identified significant GN-surgical morbidities.

Objectives: We compared the natural history, biological and clinical features of GN and ganglioneuroblastoma-intermixed (GNB-I) managed by surgery or observation to inform management and surveillance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.26964DOI Listing
May 2018
5 Reads

Diagnostic Value of Diffusion-Weighted MRI for Tumor Characterization, Differentiation and Monitoring in Pediatric Patients with Neuroblastic Tumors.

Rofo 2017 Jul 16;189(7):640-650. Epub 2017 May 16.

Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Ulm, Germany.

 We explored the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) for tumor characterization, differentiation and therapy monitoring in pediatric patients with extracranial neuroblastic tumors.  All 29 patients (14 girls, median age: 3 years) with neuroblastoma (NB, n = 19), ganglioneuroblastoma (GNB, n = 4) and ganglioneuroma (GN, n = 6) who had had at least one in-house DWI examination since 2005 were identified and retrospectively analyzed. Two independent blinded readers measured ADC values (unit: 10-3 mm/s) and signal intensity ratios (SIRs) of the primary tumor and, if applicable, of the tumor after chemotherapy, metastases and tumor relapse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0043-108993DOI Listing
July 2017
18 Reads

Role of diffusion-weighted imaging in distinguishing thoracoabdominal neuroblastic tumours of various histological types and differentiation grades.

J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol 2017 Dec 16;61(6):718-724. Epub 2017 May 16.

Department of Pathology, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

Introduction: Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) has demonstrated a great potential to help distinguish benign from malignant tumours in paediatric body. Our purpose is to evaluate whether DWI allow discrimination of thoracoabdominal neuroblastic tumours of various histological types and differentiation grades.

Methods: We retrospectively analysed DWI scans of the thoracoabdominal neuroblastic tumours in 25 children (11 girls, 14 boys). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1754-9485.12615DOI Listing
December 2017
34 Reads

Clinical characteristics of adrenal tumors in children: a retrospective review of a 15-year single-center experience.

Int Urol Nephrol 2017 Mar 17;49(3):381-385. Epub 2016 Dec 17.

Department of Pediatric Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, China.

Objective: Adrenal tumors are rare in children. The aim of this study is to review and analyze clinical data on the diagnosis and management of adrenal tumors in children.

Methods: Between 2001 and 2015, 48 pediatric patients (<14 years old) admitted to our institute with adrenal tumors were reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11255-016-1480-zDOI Listing
March 2017
7 Reads

Diffusion weighted imaging in differentiating malignant and benign neuroblastic tumors.

Jpn J Radiol 2016 Sep 14;34(9):620-4. Epub 2016 Jul 14.

Department of Radiology, Pediatric Radiology Section, Erciyes University School of Medicine, Melikgazi, Kayseri, Turkey.

Purpose: Our aim was to assess diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) of neuroblastic tumors and whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value may have a role in discrimination among neuroblastoma, ganglioneuroblastoma and ganglioneuroma.

Material And Methods: The DWIs (b = 0-800 s/mm(2)) of 24 children (13 girls, 11 boys) who were diagnosed neuroblastic tumors on histopathological examination (neuroblastoma = 15, ganglioneuroblastoma = 5, ganglioneuroma = 4) were evaluated retrospectively. The ADC maps were performed by drawing freehand ROI on PACS (Sectra Workstation IDS7, Linköping, Sweden). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11604-016-0565-zDOI Listing
September 2016
27 Reads

Imaging of Thoracic Neurogenic Tumors.

AJR Am J Roentgenol 2016 Sep 24;207(3):552-61. Epub 2016 Jun 24.

6 Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD.

Objective: Thoracic neurogenic neoplasms may be a diagnostic challenge both clinically and radiologically, ranging from benign, incidentally discovered tumors to aggressive, symptomatic malignancies. These tumors may originate from any nervous structure within the chest and are derived from cells of the nerve sheath, autonomic ganglia, or paraganglia. The nervous anatomy of the thorax is complex, and neurogenic tumors may be found in any mediastinal compartment or in the chest wall. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2214/AJR.16.16018DOI Listing
September 2016
10 Reads

Lumbar Spinal Immature Ganglioneuroma with Conus Medullaris Invasion: Case Report.

Pediatr Neurosurg 2015 14;50(6):330-5. Epub 2015 Oct 14.

Ganglioneuroma (GN) is a benign rare tumor that originates from neural crest cells. It shares a common histogenic family with ganglioneuroblastoma and neuroblastoma and represents the most benign and differentiated form of the group. The most common locations of the GNs are the mediastinum and retroperitoneum. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000438489DOI Listing
September 2016
2 Reads

Long-term follow-up results of the observation program for neuroblastoma detected at 6-month mass screening.

J Pediatr 2014 Oct 3;165(4):855-7.e1. Epub 2014 Aug 3.

Department of Hematology/Oncology, Saitama Children's Medical Center, Saitama, Japan.

We conducted an observation program of neuroblastoma in infants, detected by mass screening at 6 months of age; we followed up with them for 15 years. No recurrence was observed after disappearance of tumors, and persistent tumors showed no malignant transformation or metastasis. Histology of the resected tumors showed age-related differentiation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.06.055DOI Listing
October 2014
7 Reads

Ganglioneuroblastoma of filum terminale: case report.

J Neurosurg Spine 2014 Aug 30;21(2):270-4. Epub 2014 May 30.

Departments of 1 Orthopedic Surgery and.

Object: Neuroblastic tumors can be classified as neuroblastoma, ganglioneuroblastoma (GNB), or ganglioneuroma. Ganglioneuroblastomas consist of small, round, immature neuroblast cells and matured ganglion cells. They are most commonly found in the mediastinum and retroperitoneum; intraspinal GNBs are extremely rare. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2014.4.SPINE121002DOI Listing
August 2014
4 Reads

High ¹²³I-MIBG uptake in neuroblastic tumours indicates unfavourable histopathology.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 2013 Oct 16;40(11):1701-10. Epub 2013 Jul 16.

Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377, Munich, Germany,

Purpose: Scintigraphy using (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) is widely used for the detection of neuroblastic tumours. The aim of this study was to identify a possible correlation between the uptake intensity on (123)I-MIBG SPECT and histopathology of neuroblastic tumours.

Methods: (123)I-MIBG SPECT examinations were performed in 55 paediatric patients with neuroblastic tumour and compared to histopathology after surgical resection or biopsy at a mean of 2 weeks after SPECT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00259-013-2491-yDOI Listing
October 2013
12 Reads
2 Citations
5.383 Impact Factor

The late recurrence of ganglioneuroma 21 years after initial presentation with neuroblastoma.

Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2012 Oct 11;29(7):647-51. Epub 2012 Sep 11.

Department of Neurosurgery and Neuro-Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

A 3-year-old boy presented with tumors in the adrenal gland and the right orbit, and was diagnosed with neuroblastoma. After chemotherapy, the tumors were resected and the pathological diagnoses of ganglioneuroblastoma in the adrenal gland and ganglioneuroma in the orbit were made. The tumor relapsed at the intracranial dura mater 21 years after the initial diagnosis, and was diagnosed as ganglioneuroma from a biopsied sample. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/08880018.2012.721871DOI Listing
October 2012
6 Reads

Laparoscopic adrenalectomy in children.

J Pediatr Urol 2012 Aug 29;8(4):379-85. Epub 2011 Sep 29.

Division of Urology, Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo Medical School, Rua Dr. Enéas de Carvalho Aguiar, 455 - 7 andar, São Paulo, Brazil.

Purpose: Reporting on the laparoscopic technique for adrenal disease in children and adolescents has been limited. We review here our experience with laparoscopic adrenal surgery in children.

Patients And Methods: 19 laparoscopic unilateral adrenalectomies were performed in 10 girls and 7 boys (mean age 3. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpurol.2011.07.012DOI Listing
August 2012
3 Reads

¹²³I-MIBG scintigraphy/SPECT versus ¹⁸F-FDG PET in paediatric neuroblastoma.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 2011 Sep 27;38(9):1648-58. Epub 2011 May 27.

Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Ziemssenstraße 1, 80336 Munich, Germany.

Purpose: To analyse different uptake patterns in (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy/SPECT imaging and (18)F-FDG PET in paediatric neuroblastoma patients.

Methods: We compared 23 (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy scans and 23 (18)F-FDG PET scans (mean interval 10 days) in 19 patients with a suspected neuroblastic tumour (16 neuroblastoma, 1 ganglioneuroblastoma, 1 ganglioneuroma and 1 opsomyoclonus syndrome). SPECT images of the abdomen or other tumour-affected regions were available in all patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00259-011-1843-8DOI Listing
September 2011
19 Reads
11 Citations
5.383 Impact Factor

Excision of ganglioneuroma from skull base to aortic arch.

J Pediatr Surg 2010 Oct;45(10):e29-32

Division of Child Health, University of Liverpool, L12 2AP, United Kingdom.

High retropharyngeal neuroblastic tumors in children have been excised and debulked transorally or cervically, often with a covering tracheostomy. Although we and others have approached high thoracic lesions thoracoscopically, the trapdoor incision (or modification thereof) is generally reserved for cervicothoracic tumors with significant vessel encasement around the thoracic inlet. We report a case of symptomatic ganglioneuroma extending from the nasopharynx, at the level of the skull base, down to the aortic arch: macroscopic clearance was achieved via an extended trapdoor incision and without recourse to tracheostomy, transoral surgery, or transfusion. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S002234681000546
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2010.06.040DOI Listing
October 2010
7 Reads

Diffusion-weighted MRI for differentiation of neuroblastoma and ganglioneuroblastoma/ganglioneuroma.

Eur J Radiol 2011 Sep 13;79(3):443-6. Epub 2010 May 13.

Department of Radiology, Sana Klinikum Lichtenberg, Berlin, Germany.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of neuroblastic tumours and to evaluate if the ADC can enable differentiation of neuroblastoma and ganglioneuroma/ganglioneuroblastoma.

Patients And Methods: 16 histologically classified tumours (10 neuroblastomas and 6 ganglioneuroma/ganglioneuroblastoma) were investigated in 15 children. Diffusion-weighted echo-planar imaging was performed with a b-value of 800s/mm². Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejrad.2010.04.005DOI Listing
September 2011
4 Reads

[Neurogenic tumors of the mediastinum in adults].

Rev Pneumol Clin 2010 Feb 19;66(1):81-94. Epub 2010 Feb 19.

Service de chirurgie thoracique, hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, 20 rue Leblanc, 75015 Paris, France.

In adults, mediastinal neurogenic tumours constitute the third group of mediastinal tumours, after thymomas and lymphomas. If the group of neurogenic tumour is frequent, each type of tumour is relatively unusual in everyday's clinic. Among them, nerve sheath tumours are the more frequent, followed by tumour of the autonomic system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pneumo.2009.12.010DOI Listing
February 2010
4 Reads

Radiological localizing techniques in adrenal tumors.

Authors:
S J Welsh S Khan

Minerva Endocrinol 2009 Jun;34(2):161-9

Nuclear Medicine, Imaging Department, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, London, UK.

The characterisation of adrenal lesions is a common radiological dilemma. Incidental adrenal lesions are commonly detected with computed tomography (CT), and lesion characterisation is critical. The prevalence of incidental adrenal lesions has been reported to be 2. Read More

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June 2009
4 Reads

Tumor with watery diarrhoea, hypokalaemia in a 3-year-old girl.

Eur J Pediatr 2009 Jul 20;168(7):859-62. Epub 2008 Dec 20.

Department of Thoracic Surgery, Beijing Army General Hospital, Beijing, China.

Watery diarrhoea, hypokalaemia and achlorhydria (WDHA) syndrome was caused by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-producing tumour. A 3-year-old Chinese girl with watery diarrhoea, abdominal distension and hypokalaemia due to a thoracic paraspinal VIP-secreting ganglioneuroma is reported. The girl coughed, fevering up to 39 degrees C after a flu-like episode. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-008-0898-4DOI Listing
July 2009
3 Reads

Ganglioneuroma of the mandible resulting from metastasis of neuroblastoma.

Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2009 Feb 18;38(2):196-8. Epub 2008 Nov 18.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, Yorkshire, UK.

Neuroblastoma, ganglioneuroblastoma and ganglioneuroma are neuroblastic tumours derived from primordial neural crest tissue. The authors report a rare presentation of a ganglioneuroma of the mandible arising from a metastasis of an adrenal neuroblastoma. The pathogenesis and behaviour of ganglioneuromas is discussed, together with recommendations for their management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijom.2008.09.009DOI Listing
February 2009
2 Reads

Ganglioneuroma of the adrenal gland: a rare case.

Indian J Pathol Microbiol 2007 Oct;50(4):782-4

Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi.

Ganglioneuromas, which are benign tumors of sympathetic nervous system, are rare to arise in adrenal gland. They are usually clinically silent and detected during work-up for other unrelated conditions. Currently, histopathology is the only tool to diagnose ganglioneuroma and to differentiate it from ganglioneuroblastoma and neuroblastoma. Read More

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October 2007
3 Reads

Uncommon adrenal masses: CT and MRI features with histopathologic correlation.

Eur J Radiol 2007 Jun;62(3):359-70

Department of Radiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China.

Adrenal glands are common sites of diseases. With dramatically increased use of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, more and more uncommon adrenal masses have been detected incidentally at abdominal examinations performed for other purposes. In this article, uncommon adrenal masses are classified as cystic masses (endothelial cysts, epithelial cysts, parasitic cysts, and pseudocysts), solid masses (ganglioneuroma, ganglioneuroblastoma, extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP), neurilemmoma, and lymphoma), fat-containing masses (myelolipoma, teratoma), and infectious masses (tuberculoma), and the imaging features of these uncommon masses are demonstrated. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0720048X0700138
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejrad.2006.12.011DOI Listing
June 2007
5 Reads

1,111 patients with adrenal incidentalomas observed at a single endocrinological center: incidence of chromaffin tumors.

Ann N Y Acad Sci 2006 Aug;1073:38-46

Department of Endocrinology, Centre for Postgraduate Medical Education, Warsaw University of Medicine, and Department of Imaging, MSW&A Hospital, Poland.

A majority of incidentally found adrenal tumors derive from the adrenal cortex. The aim of our study was evaluation of the incidence of chromaffin tumors in a group of 1,111 patients with adrenal incidentalomas. In this group there were 803 women and 308 men, aged 10-87 years. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1196/annals.1353.004
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1196/annals.1353.004DOI Listing
August 2006
5 Reads

[The prognostic significance of P-glycoprotein in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and neuroblastoma].

Authors:
B De Moerloose

Verh K Acad Geneeskd Belg 2005 ;67(1):45-54

UZ Gent, Kliniek voor Kinderziekten C. Hooft, Afdeling pediatrische hematologie/oncologie, Faculteit Geneeskunde en Gezondheidswetenschappen--UGent, De Pintelaan 185--B 9000 Gent.

P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a pump located in the cell membrane, extrudes several clinically important drugs from the cell, and hence causes multidrug resistance (MDR). Reversing MDR is possible by using agents that inhibit the activity of P-gp. In this study, we tried to elucidate the prognostic relevance of P-gp in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and neuroblastoma. Read More

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May 2005
3 Reads

[The VIP-secreting tumor as a differential diagnosis of protracted diarrhea in pediatrics].

Klin Padiatr 2004 Sep-Oct;216(5):264-9

Klinik für Pädiatrie m. S. Onkologie/Hämatologie. Otto Heubner Zentrum für Kinder und Jugendmedizin.

Background: Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) can be produced by mature neurogenic tumors. Pathologically elevated VIP plasma levels cause secretory diarrhea with excessive loss of water and electrolytes. Despite the clinical severity diagnosis of a VIP-secreting tumor is often delayed and subsequently its extirpation as the mainstay of therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2004-44901DOI Listing
November 2004
4 Reads

Is surgery necessary for incidentally discovered adrenal masses in children?

J Pediatr Surg 2004 May;39(5):754-8

Department of Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Background: There are no guidelines that exist to direct the management of incidental adrenal masses (IAM) in children. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a subset of IAMs that could be safely observed.

Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of all adrenal masses that were either resected or biopsied between 1990 and 2002 (n = 91) at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto. Read More

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May 2004
11 Reads

Neurogenic tumors in the abdomen: tumor types and imaging characteristics.

Radiographics 2003 Jan-Feb;23(1):29-43

Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-Ku, Seoul 137-040, South Korea.

There is a broad spectrum of neurogenic tumors that involve the abdomen. These tumors can be classified as those of (a) ganglion cell origin (ganglioneuromas, ganglioneuroblastomas, neuroblastomas), (b) paraganglionic system origin (pheochromocytomas, paragangliomas), and (c) nerve sheath origin (neurilemmomas, neurofibromas, neurofibromatosis, malignant nerve sheath tumors). Abdominal neurogenic tumors are most commonly located in the retroperitoneum, especially in the paraspinal areas and adrenal glands. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/rg.231025050DOI Listing
May 2003
9 Reads

Neuroblastoma, ganglioneuroblastoma, and ganglioneuroma: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

Radiographics 2002 Jul-Aug;22(4):911-34

Department of Radiologic Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, 14th and Alaska Sts, NW, Bldg 54, Rm M-121, Washington, DC 20306-6000, USA.

Neuroblastoma, ganglioneuroblastoma, and ganglioneuroma are tumors of the sympathetic nervous system that arise from primitive sympathogonia and are referred to collectively as neuroblastic tumors. They arise wherever sympathetic tissue exists and may be seen in the neck, posterior mediastinum, adrenal gland, retroperitoneum, and pelvis. The three tumors differ in their degree of cellular and extracellular maturation; immature tumors tend to be aggressive and occur in younger patients (median age, just under 2 years), whereas mature tumors occur in older children (median age, approximately 7 years) and tend to behave in a benign fashion. Read More

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http://pubs.rsna.org/doi/10.1148/radiographics.22.4.g02jl159
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiographics.22.4.g02jl15911DOI Listing
November 2002
6 Reads

Primary pediatric neuroblastic tumors of the neck.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2001 Aug;60(2):155-61

Department of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, La Timone Children's Hospital, Marseille Medical School, Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille cedex 5, France.

Neuroblastic tumors are the third most common cause of solid tumors in early childhood. Cervical tumors account for only 5% of cases. In this report, we describe a series of four pediatric neuroblastic tumors of the neck. Read More

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August 2001
3 Reads

Malignant peripheral nerve-sheath tumor arising in a previously irradiated neuroblastoma: report of 2 cases and a review of the literature.

Pediatr Radiol 2000 Mar;30(3):176-80

Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Only ten cases of the rare occurrence of a malignant peripheral nerve-sheath tumor (MPNST) arising in a ganglioneuroma either de novo or at a site of previous irradiation have been reported.

Patients And Methods: We present two children who at the age of 19 months and 6 months were diagnosed with a cervicothoracic ganglioneuroblastoma and a retroperitoneal neuroblastoma, respectively. They both received radiation therapy as part of the treatment of their disease. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s002470050040
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s002470050040DOI Listing
March 2000
2 Reads

Late-onset central hypoventilation with hypothalamic dysfunction: a distinct clinical syndrome.

Pediatr Pulmonol 2000 Jan;29(1):62-8

Eudowood Division of Pediatric Respiratory Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Idiopathic central hypoventilation has occasionally been reported in previously well children after infancy. The relationship between this late-onset central hypoventilation syndrome (LO-CHS) and congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) has not been established. Both CCHS and LO-CHS have been associated with neural crest tumors, such as ganglioneuroblastoma and ganglioneuroma, and they generally occur in the presence of a histologically normal central nervous system. Read More

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January 2000
2 Reads

[Iodine-123-MIBG scintigraphy in neuroblastoma; relationship between the intensity of uptake and tumor characteristics].

Kaku Igaku 1999 Oct;36(8):827-34

Department of Radiology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine.

Iodine-123-MIBG (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy were performed for 23 patients with neuroblastoma at diagnosis. The intensity of MIBG activity in the primary tumor was evaluated visually (grade 3; intense uptake-grade 0; no definite uptake), and its relationship to the size, degree of tumor spread, urinary catecholamine metabolites (VMA, HVA), and histological types were investigated. The results of 123I-MIBG uptake grade were as follows: grade 3; 44% (10/23), grade 2; 30% (7/23), grade 1; 17% (4/23), grade 0; 9% (2/23). Read More

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October 1999
2 Reads

Fifteen years' review of advanced childhood neuroblastoma from a single institution in Hong Kong.

Authors:
C K Leung

Chin Med J (Engl) 1998 May;111(5):466-9

Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, China.

Objective: To assess the progress in the treatment of advanced childhood neuroblastoma.

Methods: From 1981 to 1996, there were 32 children with neuroblastoma (NB) diagnosed, staged and treated in our institution. There were 4 patients with stage II NB (12%), 5 stage III (16%), 21 stage IV (66%) and 2 stage IV s (6%). Read More

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May 1998
1 Read

Technetium-99m sestamibi imaging in paediatric neuroblastoma and ganglioneuroma and its relation to P-glycoprotein.

Eur J Nucl Med 1999 Apr;26(4):396-403

Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Gent, Belgium.

Imaging with technetium-99m sestamibi offers a non-invasive approach to detect the presence of functional P-glycoprotein (Pgp), one of the major causes of multidrug resistance, in human malignancies. A clinical role for Pgp has been suggested in the subpopulation of primary neuroblastoma without amplification of the proto-oncogene MYCN. We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of 99mTc-sestamibi scintigraphy in the screening of neural crest tumours for the presence of Pgp. Read More

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April 1999
4 Reads

Primary mediastinal tumors: part II. Tumors of the middle and posterior mediastinum.

Chest 1997 Nov;112(5):1344-57

Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, USA.

Lymphoma, mediastinal cysts, and neurogenic neoplasms are the most common primary middle and posterior mediastinal tumors. Lymphoma may involve the anterior, middle and/or posterior mediastinum, frequently as lymphadenopathy or as a discrete mass. Foregut cysts are common congenital mediastinal cysts and frequently arise in the middle mediastinum. Read More

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November 1997
2 Reads

A review of open biopsy for mediastinal masses.

J Paediatr Child Health 1997 Jun;33(3):230-3

Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia.

Objective: To review the recent experience with biopsied mediastinal lesions in children and to assess the impact of recent advances in imaging and surgical techniques on diagnosis.

Methodology: The clinical and radiological features of 55 patients who had mediastinal biopsies at The Royal Alexandra Hospital For Children (RAHC) over 15 years were reviewed.

Results: Fifty-five patients presented to RAHC between 1978 and 1993 with lesions of the mediastinum requiring biopsy of that site. Read More

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June 1997
2 Reads

Indium-111-pentetreotide scintigraphy in children with neuroblast-derived tumors.

J Nucl Med 1996 Jun;37(6):893-6

Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institut Curie, Paris, France.

Unlabelled: The somatostatin analog 111In-pentetreotide was evaluated in 11 children with sympathetic embryonic cell-derived tumors.

Methods: Six neuroblastomas, four ganglioneuroblastomas and one ganglioneuroma (benign) were imaged 4 and 24 hr after injection of 111In-pentetreotide (5 MBq/kg) and 24 hr after administration of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) (3.7 MBq/kg). Read More

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June 1996
4 Reads

Ganglioneuroma: computed tomography and magnetic resonance features.

Br J Radiol 1996 Feb;69(818):114-21

Department of Radiology, Yamanashi Medical College, Japan.

12 patients who had histological proven ganglioneuromas were investigated by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. CT scans (n = 11), conventional spin-echo MR images (n = 10) and dynamic MR images (n = 5) were acquired. All lesions showed a well defined, oval shape. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1259/0007-1285-69-818-114DOI Listing
February 1996
2 Reads

The role of 131 iodine-metaiodobenzylguanidine scanning in the correlative imaging of patients with neuroblastoma.

Pediatrics 1996 Feb;97(2):246-50

Department of Radiology, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010, USA.

Objective: Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scans were studied to determine the impact of the scan results on the clinical treatment of pediatric patients with neural crest tumors.

Methods: Serial scans were reviewed retrospectively for 27 patients with neural crest tumors: 25 with initial diagnoses of neuroblastoma (NB), 1 with ganglioneuroblastoma, and 1 with ganglioneuroma (GN). Results were compared with bone scans and computed tomography scans, as well as surgical pathologic findings. Read More

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February 1996
2 Reads

Magnetic resonance imaging of neuroblastoma, ganglioneuroblastoma, and ganglioneuroma.

Zhonghua Min Guo Xiao Er Ke Yi Xue Hui Za Zhi 1995 Nov-Dec;36(6):420-4

Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, R.O.C.

Eighteen magnetic resonance (MR) examinations were performed in 15 children with neuroblastoma in 6 patients, ganglioneuroblastoma in 4 and ganglioneuroma in 5. The MR images of neuroblastoma and ganglioneuroblastoma presented with ill-defined margins and heterogeneous signal intensity, while ganglioneuroma had well-demarcated outlines and more homogeneous signal intensity in all sequences. The extension of these tumors, invasion to adjacent organs and encasement of vessels could be clearly identified. Read More

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April 1996
3 Reads

Diagnosis and follow-up of neuroblastoma by means of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy and bone scan, and the influence of histology.

Eur J Nucl Med 1995 Apr;22(4):322-9

Institut de Pathologic, Lausanne, Suisse.

The purpose of this work was to compare technetium-99m-diphosphono-propanedicarboxylate (DPD) and iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scans in the diagnosis and follow-up of neuroblastoma, and to study the role of histological differentiation in the uptake of MIBG. The uptake of MIBG and of DPD were studied retrospectively in 27 patients with neuroblastoma (primary, residual and recurrent tumours as well as bone and bone marrow metastases). The findings were related to the histological classification of the tumours as neuroblastoma (N1), differentiating neuroblastoma (N2) or ganglioneuroblastoma (N3). Read More

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April 1995
5 Reads

Bilateral testicular neuroblastoma. Scintigraphic depiction and therapy with I-131 MIBG.

Clin Nucl Med 1992 Aug;17(8):638-42

Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor 48109-0229.

The authors describe a 29-year-old man who had a 16-year history of neuroblastoma and uncommon manifestations. At age 13, he was diagnosed with stage III retroperitoneal ganglioneuroblastoma that was resected. Ten years later, bilateral testicular enlargement and a pelvic mass from infiltration of the neuroblastoma became palpable. Read More

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August 1992
2 Reads

Posterior mediastinal masses in children: ganglioneuroblastoma.

Am Fam Physician 1992 Mar;45(3):1153-6

Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.

Ganglioneuroblastoma, although a rare neoplasm, is one of the most common causes of posterior mediastinal masses in children. This tumor occurs in children from one to 10 years of age. With intrathoracic involvement, the tumor may remain asymptomatic until it is large. Read More

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March 1992
4 Reads