11 results match your criteria Hyperuricosuria and Gouty Diathesis

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Metabolic diagnosis in stone formers in relation to body mass index.

Urol Res 2012 Feb 10;40(1):47-52. Epub 2011 Jun 10.

Instituto de Investigaciones Metabólicas, Universidad del Salvador, Libertad 836 1 piso, 1012 Buenos Aires, Argentina.

It is known that several metabolic abnormalities that favor stone formation have a strong dependence on environmental and nutritional factors. The incidence and prevalence of kidney stone is increasing while there has been a parallel growth in the overweight/obesity rate, and epidemiologic studies have shown a significant association between overweight/obesity and increased nephrolithiasis risk. The aim of this study was to assess if metabolic abnormalities observed in stone patients differ in relation to their BMI. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s00240-011-0392
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00240-011-0392-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00240-011-0392-8DOI Listing
February 2012
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5 Citations
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Metabolic abnormalities associated with calyceal diverticular stones.

BJU Int 2006 May;97(5):1053-6

Department of Urology, Naval Medical Center, San Diego, CA, USA.

Objective: To review the metabolic analyses of patients with calyceal diverticular stones who had surgical treatment of their calculi and to examine the effect of selective medical therapy on stone recurrence, as recent reports suggest that metabolic abnormalities contribute to stone development.

Patients And Methods: In all, 37 patients who had endoscopic treatment of symptomatic calyceal diverticular calculi were retrospectively reviewed. Stone composition and initial 24-h urine collections (24-h urinary volumes, pH, calcium, sodium, uric acid, oxalate, citrate, and the number of abnormalities/patient per collection) were compared with 20 randomly selected stone-forming patients (controls) with no known anatomical abnormalities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-410X.2006.06134.xDOI Listing
May 2006
3 Reads

Ethnic background has minimal impact on the etiology of nephrolithiasis.

J Urol 2005 Jun;173(6):2001-4

Comprehensive Kidney Stone Center, Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

Purpose: Nephrolithiasis disproportionately affects white patients. However, recent studies propose an increase in the incidence of stone disease in nonwhite populations. We compared the metabolic risk factors of ethnically disparate stone formers from the same geographic region. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.ju.0000159076.70638.1eDOI Listing
June 2005
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Medical management of urinary stone disease.

Authors:
Charles Y C Pak

Nephron Clin Pract 2004 ;98(2):c49-53

Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Tex 75390-8571, USA.

A variety of dietary and metabolic factors may contribute or cause stone formation in idiopathic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Dietary factors include a high intake of animal proteins, oxalate and sodium, and a low intake of fluids and potassium-containing citrus products. Some of the metabolic causes of stones are hypercalciuria, hypocitraturia, gouty diathesis, hyperoxaluria, and hyperuricosuria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000080252DOI Listing
May 2006
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Metabolic risk factors and the impact of medical therapy on the management of nephrolithiasis in obese patients.

J Urol 2004 Jul;172(1):159-63

Comprehensive Kidney Stone Center, The Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA.

Purpose: Previous studies have demonstrated that obesity can increase the risk of stone formation as well as recurrence rates of stone disease. Yet appropriate medical management can significantly decrease the risk of recurrent stone disease. Therefore, we analyzed our obese patient population, assessing the risk factors for stone formation and the impact of selective medical therapy on recurrent stone formation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.ju.0000128574.50588.97DOI Listing
July 2004
4 Reads

Metabolic abnormalities associated with renal calculi in patients with horseshoe kidneys.

J Endourol 2004 Mar;18(2):157-61

Division of Urology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.

Background And Purpose: Horseshoe kidneys are a complex anatomic variant of fused kidneys, with a 20% reported incidence of associated calculi. Anatomic causes such as high insertion of the ureter on the renal pelvis and obstruction of the ureteropelvic junction are thought to contribute to stone formation via impaired drainage, with urinary stasis, and an increased incidence of infection. In this multi-institutional study, we evaluated whether metabolic factors contributed to stone development in patients with horseshoe kidneys. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/089277904322959798DOI Listing
March 2004
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Predictive value of kidney stone composition in the detection of metabolic abnormalities.

Am J Med 2003 Jul;115(1):26-32

Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390-8885, USA.

Purpose: To determine if kidney stone composition can predict the underlying medical diagnosis, and vice versa.

Methods: We studied 1392 patients with kidney stones who underwent a complete ambulatory evaluation and who submitted one or more stones for analysis. We ascertained the associations between medical diagnosis and stone composition. Read More

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July 2003
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Pathophysiology of uric acid nephrolithiasis.

Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am 2002 Dec;31(4):895-914

Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research, Center of Human Nutrition, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.

Humans although a predominantly ureotylic organism, has preserved the ability to excrete nitrogen as uric acid and ammonia. An imbalance between these two secondary modes of nitrogen excretion has resulted in uric acid precipitation in human urine. Uric acid nephrolithiasis can arise from diverse etiologies all with distinct underlying defects converging to one or more of three defects of hyperuricosuria, acidic urine pH, and low urinary volume, originating from secondary, genetic or heretofore undefined (idiopathic) causes. Read More

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December 2002
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Biochemical distinction between hyperuricosuric calcium urolithiasis and gouty diathesis.

Urology 2002 Nov;60(5):789-94

Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390-8885, USA.

Objectives: To determine whether the biochemical presentation and urinary physicochemical environment of patients with hyperuricosuria presenting with calcium stones (hyperuricosuric calcium urolithiasis [HUCU]) differs from those of patients with gouty diathesis (GD) or idiopathic uric acid urolithiasis.

Methods: A total of 122 patients with HUCU and 68 patients with GD were identified from our "stone registry" of patients who underwent a full ambulatory evaluation. All patients with HUCU had urinary uric acid greater than 800 mg/day in men and greater than 750 mg/day in women and presented with calcium stones. Read More

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November 2002
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[Metabolic changes in 2612 patients with nephrolithiasis].

Medicina (B Aires) 1999 ;59(5 Pt 1):417-22

Instituto de Investigaciones Metabólicas, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Nephrolithiasis is one of the most frequent pathologies of the urinary tract. Its prevalence in the city of Buenos Aires is 4%. Different biochemical and physiological disturbances may create an environment conductive to renal stone formation. Read More

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March 2000
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Ambulatory evaluation of nephrolithiasis: an update of a 1980 protocol.

Am J Med 1995 Jan;98(1):50-9

Department of Internal Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.

Evaluations of 1,270 patients with recurrent nephrolithiasis in an outpatient setting were analyzed for the purpose of updating the classification of nephrolithiasis. All but 4% had abnormal urinary biochemistry that placed them into one or more of 20 etiologic categories. A single diagnosis was documented in 41. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0002-9343(99)80080-1DOI Listing
January 1995
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