816 results match your criteria Human Resources for Health [Journal]


Stakeholders' perceptions of policy options to support the integration of community health workers in health systems.

Hum Resour Health 2019 Feb 18;17(1):13. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Department of Internal Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon.

Background: Community health workers (CHWs) are an important component of the health workforce in many countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed a guideline to support the integration of CHWs into health systems. This study assesses stakeholders' valuation of outcomes of interest, acceptability and feasibility of policy options considered for the CHW guideline development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-019-0348-6DOI Listing
February 2019

HRH dimensions of community health workers: a case study of rural Afghanistan.

Hum Resour Health 2019 Feb 6;17(1):12. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.

Introduction: There is ample evidence to indicate that community health workers (CHW) are valuable human resources for health in many countries across the globe, helping to fill the gap created by a chronic health workforce shortage. This shortage is not only in number but also in workforce distribution and skill mix. There remains a lack of evidence, however, concerning the size and distribution of CHWs and their relationship to the professionally regulated and recognized health workforce, such as physicians and nurses, and the unregulated and unrecognized health workforce, such as traditional birth attendants and traditional healers. Read More

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https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-019-0347-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6366045PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

"Doctors ready to be posted are jobless on the street…" the deployment process and shortage of doctors in Tanzania.

Hum Resour Health 2019 Feb 1;17(1):11. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Epidemiology and Global Health, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden, 90185, Umeå, SE, Sweden.

Background: The World Health Organization advocates that health workforce development is a continuum of three stages of entry, available workforce and exit. However, many studies have focused on addressing the shortage of numbers and the retention of doctors in rural and remote areas. The latter has left the contribution of the entry stage in particularly the deployment process on the shortage of health workforce less understood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-019-0346-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6359816PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Capacity building of the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health researcher workforce: a narrative review.

Hum Resour Health 2019 Jan 30;17(1):10. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Melbourne Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, University of Melbourne, 141 Barry Street, Carlton, 3053, Australia.

Background: This paper provides a narrative review that scopes and integrates the literature on the development and strengthening of the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health researcher workforce. The health researcher workforce is a critical, and oft overlooked, element in the health workforce, where the focus is usually on the clinical occupations and capabilities. Support and development of the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health researcher workforce is necessary to realise more effective health policies, a more robust wider health workforce, and evidence-led clinical care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-019-0344-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6354397PMC
January 2019

How do we strengthen the health workforce in a rapidly developing high-income country? A case study of Abu Dhabi's health system in the United Arab Emirates.

Hum Resour Health 2019 Jan 24;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Global Health and Tropical Medicine, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.

Background: The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a rapidly developing high-income country that was formed from the union of seven emirates in 1971. The UAE has experienced unprecedented population growth coupled with increased rates of chronic diseases over the past few decades. Healthcare workers are the core foundation of the health system, especially for chronic care conditions, and the UAE health workforce needs to be fully prepared for the increased rates of chronic diseases in the adult population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-019-0345-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6346501PMC
January 2019

Reviewing reliance on overseas-trained doctors in rural Australia and planning for self-sufficiency: applying 10 years' MABEL evidence.

Hum Resour Health 2019 Jan 22;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Alan Gilbert Building, Parkville, 3010, Australia.

Background: The capacity for high-income countries to supply enough locally trained doctors to minimise their reliance on overseas-trained doctors (OTDs) is important for equitable global workforce distribution. However, the ability to achieve self-sufficiency of individual countries is poorly evaluated. This review draws on a decade of research evidence and applies additional stratified analyses from a unique longitudinal medical workforce research program (the Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life survey (MABEL)) to explore Australia's rural medical workforce self-sufficiency and inform rural workforce planning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0339-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6341566PMC
January 2019

Experiences of foreign medical graduates (FMGs), international medical graduates (IMGs) and overseas trained graduates (OTGs) on entering developing or middle-income countries like South Africa: a scoping review.

Hum Resour Health 2019 Jan 21;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Clinical and Professional Practice, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Room 12, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, Umbilo Road, Durban, 4000, South Africa.

Background: Foreign medical graduates (FMGs) have continued to render effective health care services to underserved communities in many high- and middle-income countries. In rural and disadvantaged areas of South Africa, FMGs have alleviated the critical shortage of doctors. FMGs experience challenges to adjust to new working environments as they have studied and obtained their medical qualifications in a country that differs from the one where they eventually choose to practise. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-019-0343-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6341748PMC
January 2019

Success of a South-South collaboration on Human Resources Information Systems (HRIS) in health: a case of Kenya and Zambia HRIS collaboration.

Hum Resour Health 2019 Jan 15;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Emory University, Atlanta, USA.

Background: Shortage of health workforce in most African countries is a major impediment to achieving health and development goals. Countries are encouraged to develop evidence-based strategies to scale up their health workforce in order to bridge the gap. South-South collaborations have gained popularity due to similarities in the challenges faced in the region. Read More

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https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-019-0342-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6332838PMC
January 2019
5 Reads

The role and scope of practice of midwives in humanitarian settings: a systematic review and content analysis.

Hum Resour Health 2019 Jan 14;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 14.

The Australian Centre for Public and Population Health Research, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Background: Midwives have an essential role to play in preparing for and providing sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services in humanitarian settings due to their unique knowledge and skills, position as frontline providers and geographic and social proximity to the communities they serve. There are considerable gaps in the international guidance that defines the scope of practice of midwives in crises, particularly for the mitigation and preparedness, and recovery phases. We undertook a systematic review to provide further clarification of this scope of practice and insights to optimise midwifery performance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0341-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6333021PMC
January 2019

Forecasting imbalances of human resources for health in the Thailand health service system: application of a health demand method.

Hum Resour Health 2019 Jan 8;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 8.

International Health Policy Program, Ministry of Public Health, Tiwanon road, Muang, Nonthaburi, 11000, Thailand.

Background: For an effective health system, human resources for health (HRH) planning should be aligned with health system needs. To provide evidence-based information to support HRH plan and policy, we should develop strategies to quantify health workforce requirements and supply. The aim of this study is to project HRH requirements for the Thai health service system in 2026. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0336-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325808PMC
January 2019

How are gender inequalities facing India's one million ASHAs being addressed? Policy origins and adaptations for the world's largest all-female community health worker programme.

Hum Resour Health 2019 Jan 8;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 8.

School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape, Robert Sobukwe Rd, Bellville, Cape Town, 7535, South Africa.

Background: India's accredited social health activist (ASHA) programme consists of almost one million female community health workers (CHWs). Launched in 2005, there is now an ASHA in almost every village and across many urban centres who support health system linkages and provide basic health education and care. This paper examines how the programme is seeking to address gender inequalities facing ASHAs, from the programme's policy origins to recent adaptations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0338-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6323796PMC
January 2019

Analysis of strategies to attract and retain rural health workers in Cambodia, China, and Vietnam and context influencing their outcomes.

Hum Resour Health 2019 Jan 7;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 7.

China Centre for Health Development Studies, Peking University, No. 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing, China.

Background: Many Asia-Pacific countries are experiencing rapid changes in socio-economic and health system development. This study aims to describe the strategies supporting rural health worker attraction and retention in Cambodia, China, and Vietnam and explore the context influencing their outcomes.

Methods: This paper is a policy analysis based on key informant interviews with stakeholders about a rural province of Cambodia, China, and Vietnam, coupled with a broad review of the literature. Read More

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https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0340-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322300PMC
January 2019
13 Reads

Job preferences of undergraduate nursing students in eastern China: a discrete choice experiment.

Hum Resour Health 2019 Jan 3;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 3.

College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University, Adelaide, 5042, Australia.

Background: Shortage and mal-distribution of nursing human resources is an intractable problem in China. There is an urgent need to explore the job preferences of undergraduate nursing students. The main aim of this study is to investigate the stated preferences of nursing students when choosing a job. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0335-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6318922PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

The benefits of international volunteering in a low-resource setting: development of a core outcome set.

Hum Resour Health 2018 12 20;16(1):69. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Background: Qualitative narrative analysis and case studies form the majority of the current peer-reviewed literature about the benefits of professional volunteering or international placements for healthcare professionals. These often describe generalised outcomes that are difficult to define or have multiple meanings (such as 'communication skills' or 'leadership') and are therefore difficult to measure. However, there is an interest from employers, professional groups and individual volunteers in generating metrics for monitoring personal and professional development of volunteers and comparing different volunteering experiences in terms of their impact on the volunteers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0333-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6300912PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Application of machine learning models in predicting length of stay among healthcare workers in underserved communities in South Africa.

Hum Resour Health 2018 12 13;16(1):68. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

The Best Health Solutions, 107 Louis Botha Avenue, Orange Grove, Norwood, P.O. Box 92666, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Background: Human resource planning in healthcare can employ machine learning to effectively predict length of stay of recruited health workers who are stationed in rural areas. While prior studies have identified a number of demographic factors related to general health practitioners' decision to stay in public health practice, recruitment agencies have no validated methods to predict how long these health workers will commit to their placement. We aim to use machine learning methods to predict health professional's length of practice in the rural public healthcare sector based on their demographic information. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0329-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6293620PMC
December 2018

A labor requirements function for sizing the health workforce.

Hum Resour Health 2018 12 4;16(1):67. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

INESC TEC and Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.

Background: Ensuring healthcare delivery is dependent both on the prediction of the future demand for healthcare services and on the estimation and planning for the Health Human Resources needed to properly deliver these services. Although the Health Human Resources planning is a fascinating and widely researched topic, and despite the number of methodologies that have been used, no consensus on the best way of planning the future workforce requirements has been reported in the literature. This paper aims to contribute to the extension and diversity of the range of available methods to forecast the demand for Health Human Resources and assist in tackling the challenge of translating healthcare services to workforce requirements. Read More

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https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0334-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6278005PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Understanding HRH recruitment in post-conflict settings: an analysis of central-level policies and processes in Timor-Leste (1999-2018).

Hum Resour Health 2018 11 29;16(1):66. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

ReBUILD Consortium & Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Background: Although human resources for health (HRH) represent a critical element for health systems, many countries still face acute HRH challenges. These challenges are compounded in conflict-affected settings where health needs are exacerbated and the health workforce is often decimated. A body of research has explored the issues of recruitment of health workers, but the literature is still scarce, in particular with reference to conflict-affected states. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0325-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6263550PMC
November 2018

Assessing Ghana's eHealth workforce: implications for planning and training.

Hum Resour Health 2018 11 27;16(1):65. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of Pittsburgh, 5607 Baum Boulevard, Pittsburgh, PA, 15206, United States of America.

Background: eHealth-the proficient application of information and communication technology to support healthcare delivery-has been touted as one of the best solutions to address quality and accessibility challenges in healthcare. Although eHealth could be of more value to health systems in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where resources are limited, identification of a competent workforce which can develop and maintain eHealth systems is a key barrier to adoption. Very little is known about the actual or optimal states of the eHealth workforce needs of LMICs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0330-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6260724PMC
November 2018

Functioning and time utilisation by female multi-purpose health workers in South India: a time and motion study.

Hum Resour Health 2018 11 26;16(1):64. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

UNICEF Hyderabad Field Office, Hyderabad, India.

Background: Auxillary nurse midwives (ANMs) are the most important frontline multi-purpose workers in rural India. This study was conducted to assess the spectrum of service delivery, time utilisation, work planning, and factors affecting functioning of ANMs in South India.

Methods: We conducted a time and motion study in three districts across two states in South India. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0327-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6258406PMC
November 2018

International approaches to rural generalist medicine: a scoping review.

Hum Resour Health 2018 11 21;16(1):62. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

Rocketship Pacific Ltd, Geneva, Switzerland.

Background: Contemporary approaches to rural generalist medicine training and models of care are developing internationally as part of an integrated response to common challenges faced by rural and remote health services and policymakers (addressing health inequities, workforce shortages, service sustainability concerns). The aim of this study was to review the literature relevant to rural generalist medicine.

Methods: A scoping review was undertaken to answer the broad question 'What is documented on rural generalist medicine?' Literature from January 1988 to April 2017 was searched and, after final eligibility filtering (according to established inclusion and exclusion criteria), 102 articles in English language were included for final analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0332-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6249972PMC
November 2018
7 Reads

Factors enabling community health workers and volunteers to overcome socio-cultural barriers to behaviour change: meta-synthesis using the concept of social capital.

Hum Resour Health 2018 11 21;16(1):63. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

Child and Adolescent Health Service, Health Department, Government of Western Australia, 189 Royal Street, East Perth, WA, 6004, Australia.

Background: Community-based health workers and volunteers are not just low-level health workforce; their effectiveness is also due to their unique relationship with the community and is often attributed to social capital, an area not well studied or acknowledged in the literature.

Methods: A qualitative meta-synthesis was conducted using the SPIDER framework and based on critical interpretive synthesis. The protocol was registered with PROSPERO, ID = CRD42018084130. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0331-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6249815PMC
November 2018
11 Reads

Comparing time and motion methods to study personnel time in the context of a family planning supply chain intervention in Senegal.

Hum Resour Health 2018 11 19;16(1):60. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

Background: A family planning (FP) supply chain intervention was introduced in Senegal in 2012 to reduce contraceptive stock-outs. Labour is the highest cost in low- and middle-income country supply chains. In this paper, we (1) understand time use of personnel working in the FP supply chain at health facilities in Senegal, (2) estimate the validity of self-administered timesheets (STs) relative to continuous observations (COs), and (3) describe the cost of data collection for each method. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0328-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6245801PMC
November 2018
12 Reads

Extent and nature of dual practice engagement among Iran medical specialists.

Hum Resour Health 2018 11 20;16(1):61. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Department of Health Management and Economics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Poursina St, 16 Azar St, Bolvar Keshavarz, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.

Background: Dual practice (DP) by medical specialists is a widespread issue across health systems. This study aims to determine the level of DP engagement among Iran's specialists.

Methods: A pre-structured form was developed to collect the data about medical specialists worked in all 925 Iran hospitals in 2016. Read More

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https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0326-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6245857PMC
November 2018
9 Reads

Four-year review of presenteeism data among employees of a large United States health care system: a retrospective prevalence study.

Hum Resour Health 2018 11 9;16(1):59. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

Research Support, A.T. Still University, Kirksville, MO, USA.

Background: Historically, in an effort to evaluate and manage the rising cost of healthcare employers assess the direct cost burden via medical health claims and measures that yield clear data. Health related indirect costs are harder to measure and are often left out of the comprehensive overview of health expenses to an employer. Presenteeism, which is commonly referred to as an employee at work who has impaired productivity due to health considerations, has been identified as an indirect but relevant factor influencing productivity and human capitol. Read More

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https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0321-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6234777PMC
November 2018
16 Reads

Institutional effects on nurses' working conditions: a multi-group comparison of public and private non-profit and for-profit healthcare employers in Switzerland.

Hum Resour Health 2018 11 9;16(1):58. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland (HES-SO), Geneva, Switzerland.

Background: In response to the need for competitive recruitment of nurses resulting from the worldwide nursing shortage, employers need to attract and retain nurses by promoting their competitive strengths in their working conditions (WCS) and by addressing their competitive weaknesses. This study investigated workplace differences between public hospitals (PuHs), private for-profit hospitals (PrHs), socio-medical institutions (SOMEDs), home care services (HCs), private medical offices (PrOs) and non-profit organisations (NPOs), helping to provide a foundation for competition-oriented institutional employer branding and to increase transparency in the labour market for nurses.

Methods: Data from the Swiss Nurses at Work study of the career paths of 11 232 nurses who worked in Switzerland between 1970 and 2014 were subjected to secondary analysis, assessing the effect of institutional characteristics on self-reported determinants of job satisfaction (such as WCS) using multivariate linear regression and post hoc tests with Bonferroni-adjusted significance levels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0324-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6230274PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Factors contributing to motivation of volunteer community health workers in Ethiopia: the case of four woredas (districts) in Oromia and Tigray regions.

Hum Resour Health 2018 11 8;16(1):57. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America.

Background: The use of community health workers (CHWs) has been considered as one of the strategies to address the growing shortage of health workers, predominantly in low-income countries. They are playing a pivotal role in lessening health disparities through improving health outcomes for underserved populations. Yet, little is known about what factors motivate and drive them to continue working as CHWs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0319-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6225677PMC
November 2018
17 Reads

Rural training pathways: the return rate of doctors to work in the same region as their basic medical training.

Hum Resour Health 2018 10 22;16(1):56. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Flinders University, Northern Territory, PO Box 41326, Casuarina, NT, 0815, Australia.

Background: Limited evidence exists about the extent to which doctors are returning to rural region(s) where they had previously trained. This study aims to investigate the rate at which medical students who have trained for 12 months or more in a rural region return to practice in that same region in their early medical career. A secondary aim is to investigate whether there is an independent or additional association with the effect of longer duration of rural exposure in a region (18-24 months) and for those completing both schooling and training in the same rural region. Read More

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https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0323-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6198494PMC
October 2018
6 Reads

Performance-based financing kick-starts motivational "feedback loop": findings from a process evaluation in Mozambique.

Hum Resour Health 2018 10 19;16(1):55. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

, Nairobi, Kenya.

Background: Performance-based financing (PBF) reforms aim to directly influence health worker behavior through changes to institutional arrangements, accountability structures, and financial incentives based on performance. While there is still some debate about whether PBF influences extrinsic or intrinsic motivators, recent research finds that PBF affects both. Against this backdrop, our study presents findings from a process evaluation of a PBF program in Mozambique, exploring the perceived changes to both internal and external drivers of health worker motivation associated with PBF. Read More

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https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0320-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6194661PMC
October 2018
2 Reads

Healthcare workers' industrial action in Nigeria: a cross-sectional survey of Nigerian physicians.

Hum Resour Health 2018 10 17;16(1):54. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Hepatology Unit, Imperial College London St Mary's Hospital Campus, 10th Floor, QEQM Building, South Wharf Road, London, W2 1NY, United Kingdom.

Background: The Nigerian health system has been plagued with numerous healthcare worker strikes (industrial action) at all levels. The purpose of this study is to document physicians' views on healthcare worker-initiated strike action in Nigeria and represent a follow-on to a previous study where poor leadership and management were cited as the most common cause of strike action by healthcare workers.

Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was executed between April and June 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0322-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6192190PMC
October 2018
4 Reads

Realities and experiences of community health volunteers as agents for behaviour change: evidence from an informal urban settlement in Kisumu, Kenya.

Hum Resour Health 2018 10 4;16(1):53. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Department of Disease Control, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom.

Background: Community health workers play an important role in health service delivery and are increasingly involved in behaviour change interventions, including for hygiene-related behaviour change. However, their role and capacity to deliver behaviour change interventions, particularly in high-density urban settlements, remain under-researched. This study examines the behaviour change-related activities of community health volunteers (CHVs)-community health workers affiliated with the Kenyan Ministry of Health-in a peri-urban settlement in Kenya, in order to assess their capabilities, opportunities to work effectively, and sources of motivation. Read More

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https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0318-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6172748PMC
October 2018
1 Read

Assessment of health professional education across five Asian countries-a protocol.

Hum Resour Health 2018 10 3;16(1):52. Epub 2018 Oct 3.

Research, Training and Management (RTM) International, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Background: There is an increasing consensus globally that the education of health professionals is failing to keep pace with scientific, social, and economic changes transforming the healthcare environment. This catalyzed a movement in reforming education of health professionals across Bangladesh, China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam who jointly volunteered to implement and conduct cooperative, comparative, and suitable health professional education assessments with respect to the nation's socio-economic and cultural status, as well as domestic health service system.

Methods: The 5C network undertook a multi-country health professional educational study to provide its countries with evidence for HRH policymaking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0316-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6171128PMC
October 2018
19 Reads

Conceptualising production, productivity and technology in pharmacy practice: a novel framework for policy, education and research.

Hum Resour Health 2018 10 3;16(1):51. Epub 2018 Oct 3.

University of Arizona, Colleges of Pharmacy and Public Health, Phoenix Biomedical Campus, 650 East Van Buren Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85004-2222, United States of America.

Context And Background: People and health systems worldwide face serious challenges due to shifting disease demographics, rising population demands and weaknesses in healthcare provision, including capacity shortages and lack of impact of healthcare services. These multiple challenges, linked with the global push to achieve universal health coverage, have made apparent the importance of investing in workforce development to improve population health and economic well-being. In relation to medicines, health systems face challenges in terms of access to needed medicines, optimising medicines use and reducing risk. Read More

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https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0317-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6171192PMC
October 2018
8 Reads

"If I had known, I would have applied": poor communication, job dissatisfaction, and attrition of rural health workers in Sierra Leone.

Hum Resour Health 2018 09 24;16(1):50. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, United States of America.

Background: Sierra Leone's health outcomes rank among the worst in the world. A major challenge is the shortage of primary healthcare workers (HCWs) in rural areas due to especially high rates of attrition. This study was undertaken to determine the drivers of job dissatisfaction and poor retention among Sierra Leone's rural HCWs. Read More

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https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0311-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6154815PMC
September 2018
5 Reads

The use of low-cost Android tablets to train community health workers in Mukono, Uganda, in the recognition, treatment and prevention of pneumonia in children under five: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

Hum Resour Health 2018 09 19;16(1):49. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

Division of Research, Omni Med, Mukono, Uganda.

Background: Since 2012, The World Health Organization and UNICEF have advocated for community health workers (CHWs) to be trained in Integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) of common childhood illnesses, such as pneumonia. Despite the effectiveness of iCCM, CHWs face many barriers to accessing training. This pilot study compares traditional training with using locally made videos loaded onto low-cost Android tablets to train CHWs on the pneumonia component of iCCM. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0315-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6146528PMC
September 2018

Review and analysis of Chilean dental undergraduate education: curriculum composition and profiles of first year dental students.

Hum Resour Health 2018 09 17;16(1):48. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, 1-19 Torrington Place, London, WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom.

Background: In Chile, dentistry has become a very popular career choice for students, which has resulted in a substantial increase in both, the number of dental graduates and dental schools. Nonetheless, there is a need for change in the way dental schools select and educate their students to keep pace with the rapidly changing nature of societal needs and to tackle the marked health inequalities that exist in the country. The aim of this study was to review and critique dental undergraduate education in Chile, with a particular focus on the curriculum composition and profiles of students admitted to dental schools from 2010 to 2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0314-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6142632PMC
September 2018
1 Read

How to keep registered nurses working in New Zealand even as economic conditions improve.

Hum Resour Health 2018 09 10;16(1):45. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Business School, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Background: Many registered nurses (RNs) increased their participation in the New Zealand health workforce during the Global Financial Crisis (GFC), resulting in low vacancy rates. However, based on the documented impact of improving economies, a mean RN age of about 50, and just-agreed substantive increases in RN pay rates, it is likely that many will soon leave or reduce the hours they work. This study aims to investigate whether improved financial security will encourage RNs to leave or reduce their work commitment and to identify the factors that influence such intentions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0312-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6131770PMC
September 2018
5 Reads

"They do not see us as one of them": a qualitative exploration of mentor mothers' working relationships with healthcare workers in rural North-Central Nigeria.

Hum Resour Health 2018 09 10;16(1):47. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

School of Social Work and College of Public Health, University of Georgia Athens, 279 Williams St, Athens, GA, 30602, United States of America.

Background: In HIV programs, mentor mothers (MMs) are women living with HIV who provide peer support for other women to navigate HIV care, especially in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). Nigeria has significant PMTCT program gaps, and in this resource-constrained setting, lay health workers such as MMs serve as task shifting resources for formal healthcare workers and facility-community liaisons for their clients. However, challenging work conditions including tenuous working relationships with healthcare workers can reduce MMs' impact on PMTCT outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0313-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6131877PMC
September 2018
7 Reads

Community boundary spanners as an addition to the health workforce to reach marginalised people: a scoping review of the literature.

Hum Resour Health 2018 09 10;16(1):46. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia.

Background: Health services in high-income countries increasingly recognise the challenge of effectively serving and engaging with marginalised people. Effective engagement with marginalised people is essential to reduce health disparities these populations face. One solution is by tapping into the phenomenon of boundary-spanning people in the community-those who facilitate the flow of ideas, information, activities and relationships across organisation and socio-cultural boundaries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0310-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6131945PMC
September 2018

The role of eLearning in health management and leadership capacity building in health system: a systematic review.

Hum Resour Health 2018 09 3;16(1):44. Epub 2018 Sep 3.

Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Harvard, Boston, MA, 02115, United States of America.

Background: Health leadership and management are essential for ensuring resilient health systems. Relevant training opportunities are often scarce, and the use of digital education could help address this gap. Our aim was to assess the effectiveness of eLearning for healthcare leadership and management capacity building. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0305-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6122658PMC
September 2018

Factors associated with retention intentions among Isibindi child and youth care workers in South Africa: results from a national survey.

Hum Resour Health 2018 08 29;16(1):43. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

Discipline of Public Health Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, 236 George Campbell Building, Howard College Campus, King George V Avenue, Durban, 4041, South Africa.

Background: Child and youth care workers (CYCWs) are a crucial and growing component of South Africa's national response to HIV and AIDS and other issues affecting children and families. CYCWs use the community-centred Isibindi model of care to reach the most vulnerable with key services including psychosocial, health, economic and education support. Like others in similar professions, they may be at risk for occupational challenges affecting retention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0307-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6114490PMC
August 2018
2 Reads

The design of an estimation norm to assess nurses required for educational and non-educational hospitals using workload indicators of staffing need in Iran.

Hum Resour Health 2018 08 23;16(1):42. Epub 2018 Aug 23.

Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Background: One of the effective strategies in the fair distribution of human resources is the use of estimation norm of human workforce. A norm is a coefficient or an indicator for estimating the required human resources in an organization. Due to the changes in the available working hours of nurses in recent years and to use of a standard method, the Iranian Ministry of Health decided to update nursing estimation norm in hospitals in 2014-2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0309-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6107950PMC

China's private institutions for the education of health professionals: a time-series analysis from 1998 to 2012.

Hum Resour Health 2018 08 22;16(1):40. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.

Background: Public institutions have been the major provider of education for health professionals in China for most of the twentieth century. In the 1990s, the Chinese government began to encourage the establishment of private education institutions, which have been steadily increasing in numbers over the past decade. However, there is a lack of authoritative data on these institutions and little has been published in international journals on the current status of private education of health professionals in China. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0308-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6103866PMC
August 2018
1 Read

Reflecting strategic and conforming gendered experiences of community health workers using photovoice in rural Wakiso district, Uganda.

Hum Resour Health 2018 08 22;16(1):41. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa.

Background: Community health workers (CHWs) are an important human resource in Uganda as they are the first contact of the population with the health system. Understanding gendered roles of CHWs is important in establishing how they influence their performance and relationships in communities. This paper explores the differential roles of male and female CHWs in rural Wakiso district, Uganda, using photovoice, an innovative community-based participatory research approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0306-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6104020PMC
August 2018
2 Reads

What do we know about community-based health worker programs? A systematic review of existing reviews on community health workers.

Hum Resour Health 2018 08 16;16(1):39. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, 21205, United States of America.

Objective: To synthesize current understanding of how community-based health worker (CHW) programs can best be designed and operated in health systems.

Methods: We searched 11 databases for review articles published between 1 January 2005 and 15 June 2017. Review articles on CHWs, defined as non-professional paid or volunteer health workers based in communities, with less than 2 years of training, were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0304-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6097220PMC
August 2018
5 Reads

Advancing the science behind human resources for health: highlights from the Health Policy and Systems Research Reader on Human Resources for Health.

Hum Resour Health 2018 08 14;16(1):35. Epub 2018 Aug 14.

The Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research, 20 Avenue Appia, 1211, Geneva, Switzerland.

Health workers are central to people-centred health systems, resilient economies and sustainable development. Given the rising importance of the health workforce, changing human resource for health (HRH) policy and practice and recent health policy and systems research (HPSR) advances, it is critical to reassess and reinvigorate the science behind HRH as part of health systems strengthening and social development more broadly. Building on the recently published Health Policy and Systems Research Reader on Human Resources for Health (the Reader), this commentary reflects on the added value of HPSR underpinning HRH. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0302-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6090660PMC

Funding models and medical dominance in interdisciplinary primary care teams: qualitative evidence from three Canadian provinces.

Hum Resour Health 2018 08 13;16(1):38. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

Faculty of Management, Dalhousie University, 6100 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 4R2, Canada.

Background: Primary care in Canada is the first point of entry for patients needing specialized services, the fundamental source of care for those living with chronic illness, and the main supplier of preventive services. Increased pressures on the system lead to changes such as an increased reliance on interdisciplinary teams, which are advocated to have numerous advantages. The functioning of teams largely depends on inter-professional relationships that can be supported or strained by the financial arrangements within teams. Read More

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https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0299-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6090795PMC
August 2018
11 Reads

'We are planning to leave, all of us'-a realist study of mechanisms explaining healthcare employee turnover in rural Ethiopia.

Hum Resour Health 2018 08 13;16(1):37. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

Department of Management, College of Business and Economics, Samara University, Semera, Ethiopia.

Background: We study healthcare employees' turnover intentions in the Afar National Regional State of Ethiopia. This rural region is experiencing the globally felt crisis in human resources, which is inhibiting its ability to meet health-related sustainable development goals.

Methods: Realist case study which combines literature study and qualitative analysis of interview and focus group discussion data, following a realist case study protocol. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0301-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6090584PMC
August 2018
12 Reads

Willingness to migrate-a potential effect of burnout? A survey of Hungarian physicians.

Hum Resour Health 2018 08 10;16(1):36. Epub 2018 Aug 10.

Health Services Management Training Centre, Semmelweis University, Kútvölgyi st 2, Budapest, H-1125, Hungary.

Background: Burnout worldwide and migration of caregivers are among the most important challenges of the twenty-first century health care.

Methods: Quantitative, online survey of Hungarian physicians (n = 4 784) was performed in 2013. A link to an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire was sent to all potential participants, namely to the registered members of the Hungarian Medical Chamber with a valid e-mail address. Read More

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https://human-resources-health.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0303-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6086050PMC
August 2018
2 Reads

The effect of human resource management on performance in hospitals in Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic literature review.

Hum Resour Health 2018 08 2;16(1):34. Epub 2018 Aug 2.

Erasmus School of Health Policy & Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam, PO Box 1738, 3000 DR, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Hospitals in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) face major workforce challenges while having to deal with extraordinary high burdens of disease. The effectiveness of human resource management (HRM) is therefore of particular interest for these SSA hospitals. While, in general, the relationship between HRM and hospital performance is extensively investigated, most of the underlying empirical evidence is from western countries and may have limited validity in SSA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0298-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6090989PMC
August 2018
4 Reads

Gender differences in the measurement of pharmacists' job satisfaction.

Hum Resour Health 2018 07 31;16(1):33. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

College of Medicine, Nova Southeastern University, 3200 South University Drive, Fort Lauderdale, FL, 33328-2018, United States of America.

Background: Men and women choose different levels of commitment in their careers and at home. Compared to men, women value the significance of tasks performed and social relations more and earnings less. The objective of this study was to explore whether male and female pharmacists show the same levels of satisfaction overall and with key facets of their job, whether overall satisfaction is associated with satisfaction with 12 key facets of pharmacists' jobs, and whether this association is similar for men and women. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12960-018-0297-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6069841PMC
July 2018
7 Reads