433 results match your criteria History of psychology[Journal]


Mental disorder and mysticism in the late medieval world.

Authors:
Simon Kemp

Hist Psychol 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

University of Canterbury.

During the later Middle Ages, a number of religiously oriented people behaved in ways that we would consider unusual, yet it was unusual for them to be regarded as mentally disordered. This article reviews late medieval thinking and practice with regard to mental disorder and also with regard to the discernment of spirits, that is, how it could be decided whether an experience or impulse to do something was the consequence of God or a good spirit, an evil spirit, or some purely human cause. Many of the criteria for discerning a good spirit were behavioral, for example, consistently showing humility and discretion, and were clearly distinct from those displayed in mental disorder. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000121DOI Listing
February 2019

Promoting the history of the discipline in Brazil: The new book series "Classics of psychology".

Hist Psychol 2019 Feb;22(1):110-112

Federal University of Juiz de Fora.

Most of the psychology programs in Brazil have mandatory courses on the history and foundations of psychology, whatever names such courses may receive. In any case, Brazilian psychology students are supposed to acquire knowledge about the historical development of psychological theories and psychology as a science and profession, which would allow them to adopt a critical perspective toward their own theoretical and practical choices. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000122_dDOI Listing
February 2019

The largest undertaking of translating Piaget into Chinese.

Authors:
Yeh Hsueh

Hist Psychol 2019 Feb;22(1):110

University of Memphis.

As scholars across the world commemorate the 40th anniversary of Piaget's death, in 2020, a 10-volume Collected Works of Jean Piaget will begin to appear in China's bookstores. This translation was edited by Qiwei Li, a prominent psychologist at East China Normal University in Shanghai and an International Associate of Fondation Archives Jean Piaget in Geneva. Li oversees a team of 53 Chinese scholars who are completing the most comprehensive Chinese translation of Piaget's works to date, a project that is financially supported by China's State Publishing Foundation and that will be published by Henan University Press. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000122_cDOI Listing
February 2019

Psychology in National Socialism [Psychologie im Nationalsozialismus] at Sigmund Freud Private University Berlin, July 27-28, 2018.

Authors:
Martin Wieser

Hist Psychol 2019 Feb;22(1):107-109

Sigmund Freud Private University Berlin.

Forty years after the end of World War II, historians and psychologists finally began to thoroughly investigate the involvement of psychological theory and practice with the National-Socialist regime. After this first wave of critical self-reflection, however, very little systematic work has been done to expand our historical knowledge of the darkest chapter in the history of German psychology. As part of a running project on the history of psychology during National Socialism in Austria, the Sigmund Freud Private University (SFU) Berlin hosted a 2-day conference about this topic that was open to the general public. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000122_bDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Developmental psychologies in the Roman world: Change and continuity.

Authors:
Jacob L Mackey

Hist Psychol 2018 Dec 13. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Occidental College.

A common view among ancient historians about Roman attentiveness to children's psychological development needs reconsideration. The view holds that Romans ignored children's cognitive ontogeny, perceiving early childhood as a largely undifferentiated life stage. A separate but related issue is the problematic claim that Roman childhood was entirely a matter of social construction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000105DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Between sacred and profane: Possession, psychopathology, and the Catholic church.

Hist Psychol 2019 Feb 3;22(1):1-16. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, University of Rome La Sapienza.

In Catholic culture, and especially within the Italian Catholic environment, there has recently been a significant revival of the practice of exorcism. This is a fact noted by historians such as Levack (2013) and Young (2016). The article intends to show how this phenomenon is related to a series of important historical turning points, the most important of which is the recent collaboration between exorcists and Catholic psychologists and psychiatrists to establish a differential diagnosis between real possession and mere psychopathology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000106DOI Listing
February 2019

The theory and practice of Thomas Verner Moore's Catholic psychiatry and psychotherapy.

Authors:
Robert Kugelmann

Hist Psychol 2018 Nov 29. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

University of Dallas.

Thomas Verner Moore (1877-1969), a Catholic priest, psychologist, and psychiatrist, developed a Catholic psychiatry in the first half of the 20th century. Following a brief description of Moore's life, this article develops his psychiatric theory, beginning with its grounding in Thomistic philosophical thought. The relationship between reason and faith, the place of the soul in psychological theory, and a central role for Catholic moral teaching were three Thomistic principles vital to Moore's thinking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000117DOI Listing
November 2018

Digital humanities as the historian's Trojan horse: Response to commentary in the special section on digital history.

Authors:
Ivan Flis

Hist Psychol 2018 Nov;21(4):380-383

Descartes Centre.

The commentaries by Baldwin (2018), Green (2018), and Porter (2018) on the 2 articles (Burman, 2018; Flis & Van Eck, 2018) in this special section provide a unique perspective on digital humanities approaches to history of psychology. Each of the commentators approached the topic through their own lens-Melinda Baldwin as a historian of scientific journals, Christopher Green as a pioneer in digital history of psychology, and Ted Porter as a historian of quantification. In my response, I tried to reply to the 3 comments by critically discussing 4 themes the special section has raised: the relationship between digital history and conventional history, the perspective that takes databases as both sources for historians and objects in history, the relationship between "thick descriptions" and "thin" digital ones, and finally, the role of digital history as a type of a "trading creole" between scientists working in quantified disciplines like scientific psychology and less quantified ones like history. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000113DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

Digital history of psychology takes flight.

Hist Psychol 2018 Nov;21(4):374-379

Department of Psychology.

The articles authored by Flis and van Eck (2018) and by Burman (2018) serve as fine examples of the ways in which digital historical methods can illuminate aspects of psychology's past that would probably not be possible otherwise. This success, however, presents no reason to think that digital history is some kind of threat to conventional historiography or that former aims to replace the latter. The two can work complementarily-so closely, in fact, that it sometimes becomes difficult to know which of the two one is practicing at any given moment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000093DOI Listing
November 2018

Digital humanism.

Hist Psychol 2018 Nov;21(4):369-373

Department of History.

Much history of psychology presumes a discordance between its humanistic methods and the focus on rigorous statistical reasoning that is typical of the field it studies. However, the conditions of abundant data typical of digital humanities tend to relax the constraints of tests of significance and to allow greater freedom to try out alternative interpretations within the frame of a single study. At the same time, the elusiveness of rigorous standardization within a very large database, especially if it stretches over wide spaces or many decades, may be seen to demand meticulous source criticism of a sort that has more often been associated with the humanities than with quantitative science. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000107DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

A perspective from the history of scientific journals.

Authors:
Melinda Baldwin

Hist Psychol 2018 Nov;21(4):363-368

American Institute of Physics.

In their articles for this special issue on digital humanities, Jeremy Burman (2018) and Ivan Flis and Nees Jan van Eck (Flis & van Eck, 2018) examine how psychology journals can be used as sources for large-scale data sets that might illuminate the development of psychology as a research discipline. In my commentary, I seek to situate these two articles in a broader history of scientific publishing and offer further thoughts on the possibilities and pitfalls of data-based methods for the history of scientific publishing. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000108DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Digital methods can help you . . . If you're careful, critical, and not historiographically naïve.

Hist Psychol 2018 Nov;21(4):297-301

Department of Theory and History of Psychology.

This special section on the digital history of psychology includes target articles by Ivan Flis and Nees Jan van Eck and Jeremy Trevelyan Burman, with comments by Melinda Baldwin, Ted Porter, and Chris Green. In his introduction to the section, Burman explains his original motivation in turning to tools borrowed from the digital humanities: helping graduate students to identify dissertation topics more easily, and thereby reduce completion times for the doctorate, while at the same time doing "good history." Since then, a new field-digital history of psychology-has blossomed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000112DOI Listing
November 2018

Vittorio Benussi, hypnosuggestive methods, and emotional functional autonomy.

Authors:
Mauro Antonelli

Hist Psychol 2019 Feb 25;22(1):40-62. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Department of Psychology.

This article reconstructs Vittorio Benussi's (1878-1927) research on autonomia funzionale emotiva [emotional functional autonomy], carried out in Padua between 1920 and 1927. Its aim is to demonstrate that Benussi believed-against the intellectualist mainstream of the psychology of his time and even against the Brentanian-Meinongian tradition in which he was educated-in the fundamental independence of emotions from the cognitive functions that usually accompany them. To study this autonomy, Benussi used hypnosis as an experimental tool designed to disassemble the phenomena of mental life from their global functional unity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000110DOI Listing
February 2019

Descartes on emotions, reason, and the adaptive unconscious: The pioneer behind the caricature.

Authors:
Geir Kirkebøen

Hist Psychol 2019 Feb 22;22(1):17-39. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

University of Oslo.

The 17th-century philosopher René Descartes's radical new understanding of psychological phenomena is usually presented very inaccurately in psychological literature. Two extreme examples are Damasio's (1994) Descartes' Error and Wilson's (2002) Strangers to Ourselves. These two much-cited books contrast the "great" philosopher's naive mistakes with recent research on, respectively, the relation among emotions, reason, and the brain (Damasio) and the adaptive functions of unconscious processes (Wilson). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000109DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Theoretical psychology at the University of Alberta as social science during the Cold War.

Hist Psychol 2019 Feb 27;22(1):87-106. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

Department of Psychology.

We examine the University of Alberta's Center for Advanced Study in Theoretical Psychology (1965-1990) in the context of social science conducted during the Cold War. We begin by considering the center with respect to three important properties of social science at this time: an emphasis on interdisciplinarity, a focus on theory, and a preference for quantitative methods. Our analysis suggests that center activities also exhibited these characteristics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000104DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Australian fantasy revisited.

Authors:
Patrick Drumm

Hist Psychol 2018 Aug;21(3):295-296

Ohio University Lancaster.

Australia's Aborigines possessed a rich cultural heritage dating back more than 55,000 years by the time British colonization began in the late 1700s (Davis, 2009). The British invaders could not comprehend the worldview of the Aborigines, whose hunter-gatherer culture emphasized preservation of the varied environments they occupied across the continent. Native traditions of walking, singing, and, most importantly, dreaming both created and maintained the world's existence since the first dawn. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000099DOI Listing
August 2018
1 Read

Magic and loss: Hidden sources in the history of human sciences.

Authors:
Renato Foschi

Hist Psychol 2018 Aug;21(3):291-294

Sapienza Università di Roma.

This article summarizes the book "The Myth of Disenchantment: Magic, Modernity, and the Birth of the Human Sciences" by Jason A. Josephson-Storm (University of Chicago Press, 2017) is a volume that attempts to stimulate discussion on domains considered different: esotericism, spiritism, occultism, idealism, and positivism. (PsycINFO Database Record Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000096DOI Listing
August 2018
1 Read

Joint meeting in Brazil: SBHP and EFHEP.

Authors:
Shayna Fox Lee

Hist Psychol 2018 Aug;21(3):290-291

The Brazilian Society for the History of Psychology (SBHP) was founded in 2013 to promote the History of Psychology in the country. The goal of our joint meeting is to discuss how the history of psychology can help foster critical understandings of some basic problems on the definition of psychology, its projects as a science and some issues related to the delimitation of its subject matter and methods. (PsycINFO Database Record Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000098DOI Listing
August 2018
1 Read

Sexuality, therapeutic culture, and family ties in the United States after 1973.

Hist Psychol 2018 Aug;21(3):273-289

Brown University.

In 1973, the American Psychiatric Association voted to remove homosexuality from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (2nd ed.; DSM-II; American Psychiatric Association, 1968). Clinicians subsequently began conducting psychotherapy with gays and lesbians not in order to change their sexuality but to address the psychological effects of homophobia and associated problems. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/hop0000043
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000043DOI Listing
August 2018
17 Reads

Psychology and psychoanalysis in Argentina: Politics, French thought, and the university connection, 1955-1976.

Hist Psychol 2018 Aug;21(3):254-272

National Scientific and Technical Research Council.

The hegemonic place acquired by psychoanalysis in the Argentinean psychotherapeutic field is recognized by friend and foe alike. Nevertheless, the historical process leading to this situation is less well known. In this article, I focus on 2 periods crucial to understanding the unusual scope of Freudian ideas and practices in that country. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000071DOI Listing
August 2018
2 Reads

Psychedelics and psychotherapy in Canada: Humphry Osmond and Aldous Huxley.

Hist Psychol 2018 Aug;21(3):240-253

Independent Researcher.

The decade of the 1950s is well known among historians of psychiatry for the unprecedented shift toward psychopharmacological solutions to mental health problems. More psychiatric medications were introduced than ever before or since (Healy, 2002). While psychiatric researchers later credited these drugs, in part, for controlling psychotic, depressive, and anxious symptoms-and subsequently for emptying decaying psychiatric institutions throughout the Western world-psychiatrists also produced a number of other theories that relied on a more delicate and nuanced blending of psychotherapy and psychopharmacology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000088DOI Listing
August 2018
1 Read

In the shadow of the double: Psychiatry and spiritism in Cuba.

Authors:
Jennifer Lambe

Hist Psychol 2018 Aug;21(3):223-239

Brown University.

This article traces the history of Cuba's first and only Spiritist mental clinic, founded in the 1940s in the central province of Camagüey and shut down by the revolutionary government in the 1960s. It analyzes the history of the clinic with respect to the virtual absence of institutional psychiatric care outside of Havana in these decades, but also in the context of a more enduring problematic: the persistent preference shown by Cubans for religiously grounded forms of mental healing. Namely, "In the Shadow of the Double" explores the broader geography of mental care within which Spiritists defined the uniqueness of their healing practice, vis-à-vis both institutional psychiatry, to which they theorized a relationship of strategic complementarity, and other forms of religiously grounded healing, which they disparaged as "backwards" and even dangerous. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000034DOI Listing
August 2018
2 Reads

Combining psychiatry and spiritism: Therapies employed in a Brazilian sanatorium (1934-1948).

Hist Psychol 2018 Aug;21(3):208-222

Department of Psychology, Federal University of Sergipe.

The purpose of this article is to present an historical account of an intersection that occurred in Brazil between popular healing treatments and conventional psychiatric practices during the first half of the 20th century. To illustrate our argument, we analyzed data retrieved from the medical records of patients admitted to the Spiritist Sanatorium of Uberaba, Brazil, between 1934 and 1948. Although the Uberaba Spiritist movement founded the institution, it was directed by a physician educated in the biomedical tradition at the Rio de Janeiro School of Medicine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000101DOI Listing
August 2018
14 Reads

Warren Felt Evans: 19th-century mystic, wounded healer, and seminal theorist-practitioner of mind cure.

Authors:
David T Schmit

Hist Psychol 2018 Aug;21(3):187-207

St. Catherine University.

The Methodist-Episcopalian minister-turned-physician and philosopher of healing Warren Felt Evans (1817-1889) was one of the earliest practitioners of mental healing, also known as "mind cure." Originating in New England in the second half of the 19th century, mind cure spread through the country in the 1880s. Drawing from Evans's unpublished journals, I recount his struggles with chronic ill health and his turn to the Quietist mystics and Swedenborg, and then to the mesmerist-turned-mental-healer P. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000070DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

History and the topsy-turvy world of psychotherapy.

Authors:
Rachael I Rosner

Hist Psychol 2018 Aug;21(3):177-186

This special issue talks about the history of psychotherapy. It was inspired by the events of a 3-day conference, "From Moral Treatments to Psychotherapeutics: Histories of Psychotherapy From the York Retreat to the Present Day". The conference was small and the ideas were exciting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000102DOI Listing
August 2018
2 Reads

Before the deluge: The 1932 International Congress of Psychology in Copenhagen.

Authors:
Jörgen L Pind

Hist Psychol 2019 Feb 16;22(1):63-86. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

University of Iceland.

The Tenth International Congress of Psychology, held in Copenhagen in late August of 1932, was the last International Congress held before events leading up to World War II came to interfere with the course of the congresses. Despite the difficult times, primarily because of the Great Depression and the fragile political situation, the congress nevertheless managed to bring together participants from many countries, thus emphasizing the international profile of psychology. The 1932 congress was characterized by the wide range of topics presented and discussed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000100DOI Listing
February 2019

The biosocial foundation of the early Vygotsky: Educational psychology before the zone of proximal development.

Hist Psychol 2018 Nov 14;21(4):384-401. Epub 2018 May 14.

University of Girona.

One of Lev Vygotsky's most widely known concepts in educational psychology is the zone of proximal development (ZPD), which he began to articulate in the last 2 years of his life and work (1933-1934). This article explores an earlier period in Vygotsky's career-well before he developed the concept of the ZPD-when he was actively involved in pedagogy and educational psychology. With reference to the research and teaching that Vygotsky carried out in Gomel and gathered together for publication some years later, this article highlights his initial conception of educational psychology, and then critically reviews four of his ideas from this first period, namely, (a) the pedagogical importance of the learner's individual experience ("ultimately, the child teaches himself"), (b) the pedagogical applications of interest ("from one interest of the child's to a new interest"), (c) the psychological value of play ("games are the child's first school of thought"), and (d) the link between life and education ("ultimately, only life educates"). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000092DOI Listing
November 2018
3 Reads

"Great aspirations: The postwar American college counseling center": Correction to McCarthy (2014).

Authors:

Hist Psychol 2018 May;21(2):175

Reports an error in "Great aspirations: The postwar American college counseling center" by Tom McCarthy (, 2014[Feb], Vol 17[1], 1-18). In the article, the copyright attribution was incorrect. The copyright is "In the public domain". Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000089DOI Listing
May 2018
1 Read

Poetry corner.

Authors:
Eric P Charles

Hist Psychol 2018 May;21(2):172-175

U.S. Marine Corps.

Presents a piece of poetry by A. A. Milne who is now best known as the author of the (1926) book but was quite well reputed before its publication for his plays and his poetry, including collections such as (1924). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000091bDOI Listing
May 2018
3 Reads

The (ab)normal-social-personality catena: Exploring The Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology during the interwar years.

Authors:
Ian J Davidson

Hist Psychol 2018 May;21(2):151-171

York University.

This article is a cocitation network analysis of () from 1925 to 1942. The analysis was conducted to help shed light on the historical roots of the intellectual and institutional relationships among social, personality, and abnormal psychology. was a main venue for the boundary work of early- to mid-twentieth-century American psychologists. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000090DOI Listing
May 2018
2 Reads

Pierre Janet and the enchanted boundary of psychical research.

Hist Psychol 2018 May;21(2):100-125

Department of Psychology, Lund University.

Among the founders of French psychology, Pierre Janet (1859-1947) is recognized for both his scientific and institutional roles. The psychology born at the turn of the 20th century was initially partly receptive to, but then engaged in, a battle with the "psychical marvelous," and Janet was no exception. He was involved in the split between psychology and parapsychology (or "metapsychics" in France), developed at that time, playing several successive roles: the pioneer, the repentant, and the gatekeeper. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000086DOI Listing
May 2018
2 Reads

Pluralism and heterogeneity as criticism: Undergraduate history and systems of psychology courses in Argentinian psychology education (1983-2017).

Authors:
Catriel Fierro

Hist Psychol 2018 May 5;21(2):126-150. Epub 2018 Mar 5.

National Council of Scientific and Technical Research.

Multiple studies have analyzed the aims, resources, and approaches to undergraduate and graduate history of psychology education in several countries. Argentina is one of the countries with the highest historiographical production in Latin America. However, to date, there are no published studies on the collective debates among professionals, institutions, and associations that were instrumental in the development of the historiography of science becoming a mandatory part of the curriculum in Argentinian psychology programs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000085DOI Listing
May 2018
3 Reads

The 100th anniversary of the death of Julian Ochorowicz (1850-1917).

Hist Psychol 2018 Feb;21(1):74-78

SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities.

This article talks about the life of Julian Ochorowicz. It encompasses his life as a scientist, psychologist, his works, reputation and other events. In conclusion, this article denotes the relevancy of Ochorowicz's life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000076DOI Listing
February 2018
3 Reads

Poetry corner.

Authors:
Shayna Fox Lee

Hist Psychol 2018 Feb;21(1):73-74

This issue's poem is of historical interest due to its biographical features and celebratory tone, if not for its craft or lyricism per se. It was written by Joyce M. Hoffman for E. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000084aDOI Listing
February 2018
6 Reads

William James and the Heidelberg fiasco.

Authors:
Horst Gundlach

Hist Psychol 2018 Feb;21(1):47-72

Wuerzburg University.

Urged on by his father to become a physician instead of a painter, William James pursued 3 evasion stratagems. First, to avoid becoming a practitioner, he declared that he wanted to specialize in physiology. Based upon this premise, he left for Germany in the spring of 1867. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000083DOI Listing
February 2018
7 Reads

Through the looking-glass: PsycINFO as an historical archive of trends in psychology.

Hist Psychol 2018 Nov 5;21(4):302-333. Epub 2018 Feb 5.

University of Groningen.

Those interested in tracking trends in the history of psychology cannot simply trust the numbers produced by inputting terms into search engines like PsycINFO and then constraining by date. This essay is therefore a critical engagement with that longstanding interest to show what it is possible to do, over what period, and why. It concludes that certain projects simply cannot be undertaken without further investment by the American Psychological Association. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000082DOI Listing
November 2018
5 Reads

Temperamental workers: Psychology, business, and the Humm-Wadsworth Temperament Scale in interwar America.

Authors:
Kira Lussier

Hist Psychol 2018 May 5;21(2):79-99. Epub 2018 Feb 5.

University of Toronto.

This article traces the history of a popular interwar psychological test, the Humm-Wadsworth Temperament Scale (HWTS), from its development in the early 1930s to its adoption by corporate personnel departments. In popular articles, trade magazines, and academic journals, industrial psychologist Doncaster Humm and personnel manager Guy Wadsworth trumpeted their scale as a scientific measure of temperament that could ensure efficient hiring practices and harmonious labor relations by screening out "problem employees" and screening for temperamentally "normal" workers. This article demonstrates how concerns about the epistemological and scientific credibility of the HWTS were intimately entangled with concerns about its value to business at every step in the test's development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000081DOI Listing
May 2018
4 Reads

Quantification of virtue in late Medieval Europe.

Authors:
Simon Kemp

Hist Psychol 2018 Feb 27;21(1):33-46. Epub 2017 Nov 27.

University of Canterbury.

Fourteenth century Europe saw a growing interest in quantification. This interest has been well studied by historians of physical sciences, but medieval scholars were also interested in the quantification of psychological qualities. In general, the quantification issues addressed by medieval scholars were theoretical, even (by our standards) mathematical, rather than those of practical measurement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000077DOI Listing
February 2018
9 Reads

The digitization of the Wundt estate at Leipzig University.

Hist Psychol 2017 Aug;20(3):342-345

Leipzig University.

Wilhelm M. Wundt (1832-1920) was one of the most important German scholars of the 19th and early 20th centuries and famously founded the first institute for experimental psychology in Leipzig in 1879. Wundt's institute established a teaching and research facility that attracted a large number of students from all over the world and contributed greatly to the development of modern psychology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000068DOI Listing
August 2017
4 Reads

"Perplexed in the extreme": The Holt-James controversy of 1902.

Authors:
Edward J Vinski

Hist Psychol 2017 Aug;20(3):337-342

St. Joseph's College.

Although William James never again reprised his lectures on psychology for teachers at Harvard, he spent most of the 1890s presenting them throughout the country. For all his complaints about them, this was a fine source of income and he used the opportunity to revise and refine them over the rest of the decade. By the end of the 1890s, he was prepared to put the talks down in book form, and turned to his long-time publisher, Henry Holt. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000072DOI Listing
August 2017
4 Reads

Framing psychology as a discipline (1950-1999): A large-scale term co-occurrence analysis of scientific literature in psychology.

Hist Psychol 2018 Nov 20;21(4):334-362. Epub 2017 Jul 20.

Centre for Science and Technology Studies, Leiden University.

This study investigated the structure of psychological literature as represented by a corpus of 676,393 articles in the period from 1950 to 1999. The corpus was extracted from 1,269 journals indexed by PsycINFO. The data in our analysis consisted of the relevant terms mined from the titles and abstracts of all of the articles in the corpus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000067DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Professional psychology in Germany, National Socialism, and the Second World War.

Hist Psychol 2017 Nov 17;20(4):387-407. Epub 2017 Jul 17.

Freie Universität Berlin.

Hundreds of positions for psychologists were established after the National Socialists seized power in 1933. It has accordingly been asserted that professional psychology in Germany experienced significant growth during the National Socialist period. An analysis of archival materials and of a recent collection of biographies indicates otherwise, however. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000065DOI Listing
November 2017
4 Reads

Planes of phenomenological experience: The psychology of deafness as an early example of American Gestalt psychology, 1928-1940.

Authors:
Marion A Schmidt

Hist Psychol 2017 Nov 17;20(4):347-364. Epub 2017 Jul 17.

Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg.

When, in 1928, the Clarke School for the Deaf in Northampton, Massachusetts, opened a psychological research division, it was nothing unusual in a time fascinated with the sciences of education. Yet with its longstanding ties to Northampton's Smith College, the school was able to secure the collaboration of eminent Gestalt psychologist Kurt Koffka, who, in turn, engaged 2 more German-speaking emigrants, Margarete Eberhardt and social psychologist Fritz Heider, and Heider's American wife Grace Moore Heider. This collaboration has seen little attention from historians, who have treated Koffka's and Heider's time in Northampton as a transitory phase. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000074DOI Listing
November 2017
11 Reads

Localizationism, antilocalizationism, and the emergence of the unitary construct of consciousness in Luigi Luciani (1840-1919).

Hist Psychol 2017 Nov 17;20(4):365-386. Epub 2017 Jul 17.

Department of Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome.

This article aims to present the construct of unitary consciousness as it emerged in the work of the Italian physiologist Luigi Luciani (1840-1919). We highlight how Luciani's work, conducted during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, integrated experimental research with the clinical observation of patients, enabling him to develop elaborate theoretical conceptions. From our historical analysis of Luciani's main works, an innovative model of unitary consciousness emerges with respect to his contemporary context. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000073DOI Listing
November 2017
11 Reads

Buried layers: On the origins, rise, and fall of stratification theories.

Authors:
Martin Wieser

Hist Psychol 2018 Feb 26;21(1):1-32. Epub 2017 Jun 26.

Sigmund Freud Private University Berlin.

This article presents a historical analysis of the origins, rise, and demise of theories of stratification (). Following their roots in the ancient metaphysical idea of the "great chain of being," Aristotle's , the medieval "Jacob's ladder," and Leibniz's concept of the lex continua, I argue that theories of stratification represent the modern heir to the ancient cosmological idea of a harmonious, hierarchical, and unified universe. Theories of stratification reached their heyday during the interwar period within German academia, proliferating over a vast number of disciplines and rising to special prominence within personality psychology, feeding the hope for a unitary image of the world and of human beings, their biological and mental development, their social organization and cultural creations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000066DOI Listing
February 2018
3 Reads

Sandor Rado, American psychoanalysis, and the question of bisexuality.

Authors:
Matthew Tontonoz

Hist Psychol 2017 Aug 5;20(3):263-289. Epub 2017 Jun 5.

The Hungarian-born physician and psychoanalyst Sandor Rado (1890-1972), who practiced for most of his career in the United States, played a central role in shaping American psychoanalysts' views toward homosexuality. Historians have pointed to Rado's rejection of Freud's notion of constitutional bisexuality as the key theoretical maneuver that both pathologized homosexuality and inspired an optimistic approach to its treatment. Yet scholarly analysis of the arguments that Rado made for his rejection of bisexuality is lacking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hop0000061DOI Listing
August 2017
3 Reads

Poetry corner.

Authors:
Shayna Fox Lee

Hist Psychol 2017 May;20(2):258-261

This section briefly presents poetry with a psychology theme. This submission was made by The Cummings Center for the History of Psychology's reference archivist Lizette Royer. Two transcribed poems by Knight Dunlap are presented. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0101584DOI Listing
May 2017
11 Reads

Review of Hermann Lotze: An intellectual biography.

Authors:
Horst Gundlach

Hist Psychol 2017 May;20(2):256-258

Reviews the book, by William R. Woodward (see record 2015-31971-000). Lotze (1817-1881), the once-renowned physician, philosopher, and psychologist, as well as professor in Leipzig, Göttingen, and Berlin, was one of the last philosophers who actually planned a system of philosophy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0101583DOI Listing
May 2017
3 Reads

The collection of historical instruments at National Taiwan University.

Hist Psychol 2017 May;20(2):251-256

Department of Psychology, Kaoshiung Medical University.

This article presents three of the historical instruments from the National Taiwan University collection. The instruments were built between 1894 and 1902. The instruments are (1) Meumann's Largest Time Sense Apparatus, (2) Wundt's Pendulum Tachistoscope, and (3) Schumann's Wheel Tachistoscope. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h0101582DOI Listing
May 2017
17 Reads