778 results match your criteria History of Psychiatry[Journal]


The introduction of leucotomy in Germany: National Socialism, émigrés, a divided Germany and the development of neurosurgery.

Authors:
Lara Rzesnitzek

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Apr 22:957154X19843036. Epub 2019 Apr 22.

Charité Psychiatric University Hospital at St Hedwig's Hospital; Charité Institute for the History of Medicine, Germany.

Thinking about the chronology of the introduction of leucotomy in Germany sheds new light on the hypothesis of a special 'radical' approach of German psychiatry to the treatment of the mentally ill during the period of National Socialism. Moreover, it offers new insights into the transnational and interdisciplinary conditions of the introduction of leucotomy in early divided post-war Germany. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X19843036DOI Listing

The Kirkbride buildings in contemporary culture (1850-2015): from 'moral management' to horror films.

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Apr 17:957154X19839912. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Universidad Camilo José Cela, Madrid.

The so-called 'Kirkbride Plan' is a type of mental institution designed by the American psychiatrist Thomas Story Kirkbride. The Kirkbride-design asylums were built from 1848 to the end of the nineteenth century. Their structural characteristics were subordinated to a certain approach to moral management: exposure to natural light, beautiful views and good air circulation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X19839912DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

The 'Poitrot Report', 1945: the first public document on Nazi euthanasia.

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Apr 16:957154X19842017. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

University of Ulm at Ravensburg, Germany.

The aim of this paper is to shed light on the so-called 'Poitrot Report', submitted to the French Military Government in Baden-Baden, Germany, in December 1945 and published in a reduced German version in 1946. Its author was the French-Moroccan psychiatrist Robert Poitrot, who had been put in charge of the public mental asylums in Südwürttemberg after World War II. Poitrot took responsibility for restoring psychiatric care during the occupation, and was also eager to document Nazi 'euthanasia' and to start investigating the role of staff in mental hospitals during National Socialism. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X19842017DOI Listing

'Dementia praecocissima': the Sante De Sanctis model of mental disorder in child psychiatry in the 20th century.

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Feb 28:957154X19832776. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Sapienza University of Rome.

The aim of this article is to describe the nosographical contribution of the Italian psychiatrist Sante De Sanctis (1862-1935) to early twentieth-century child psychiatry. De Sanctis first proposed the category of 'dementia praecocissima' in 1906, and it was recognized by Kraepelin. Dementia praecocissima has its roots in a theoretical and methodological conception of mental disorder based on 'psycho-physical proportionalism' and the 'law of circle'. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X19832776DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Jules Bernard Luys on magnetic pathology.

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Feb 22:957154X19830955. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Parapsychology Foundation, USA.

In the mesmeric movement, one of the phenomena cited to defend the existence of magnetic and nervous forces was the visual perception of them in the form of luminous emanations from people, or effluvia. This Classic Text is an 1892 article by French neurologist, Jules Bernard Luys (1828-97), about the observation of such effluvia by hypnotized individuals. Interestingly, the luminous phenomena perceived from mentally diseased individuals and from healthy ones had particular properties. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X19830955DOI Listing
February 2019

The Baldovan Institution Abuse Inquiry: a forgotten scandal.

Authors:
David May

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Feb 22:957154X19832765. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

University of Dundee, U.K.

In this paper, I resurrect a long-forgotten inquiry into abuse and maladministration at an institution for people with learning disabilities, the Baldovan Institution near Dundee, that has lain buried in the archives for the past 60 years. I contrast the response to it with the very different response to the similar revelations of the Ely Hospital Inquiry more than a decade later. Whereas Ely opened up the institutional sector to greater public scrutiny and brought with it a formal commitment from the government to shift the balance of care away from the long-term hospital, Baldovan produced recommendations that were limited to the institution and had no impact on public policy or institutional practice. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X19832765DOI Listing
February 2019

The theory of symptom complexes, mind and madness.

Authors:
Mauricio V Daker

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Feb 15:957154X19829671. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais - UFMG, Brazil.

Kahlbaum's seminal approach to symptom complexes, as opposed to disease entities, is still relevant. Many psychopathologists have approached mental symptom complexes without prejudging them as necessary physical deficits or diseases, favouring a broader dimensional and anthropological view of mental disorders. Discussions of symptom complexes gained prominence in psychiatry in the early twentieth century - through Hoche - and in the period leading up to World War II - through Carl Schneider. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X19829671DOI Listing
February 2019

Not just a one-man revolution: the multifaceted anti-asylum watershed in Italy.

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Feb 4:957154X19827479. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

University of Milano Bicocca, Italy.

The Italian psychiatric 'revolution' is the story of a range of flexible, changing formulas, exposed to many 'contaminations'. Historical reconstructions have remained anchored to the lure of a founding myth and an eponymous hero. This essay aims to shed light on the multi-faceted concept of the Italian 'moral management revolution'. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X19827479DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Karl Jaspers and Karl Popper: the shared legacy.

Authors:
Chris Walker

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Feb 4:957154X19826473. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Consultant psychiatrist, retired, UK.

Jaspers and Popper have nothing in common beyond the legacy of Immanuel Kant's philosophy. Popper dismisses Jaspers 'existentialism' as nihilistic and historicist; Jaspers never cites Popper. Jaspers describes Kant as 'the philosopher for me'; Popper is an unorthodox Kantian whose critical rationalism put the finishing touch to Kant. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X19826473DOI Listing
February 2019

Confusion about confusion: Édouard Toulouse's dementia test, 1905-20.

Authors:
Elizabeth Nelson

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Jan 31:957154X19825623. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis (IUPUI), USA.

Psychiatrist Édouard Toulouse (1865-1947) is known today for his 1896 psychometric study of the novelist Émile Zola, and his contributions to mental hygiene, sexology, eugenics, and labour efficiency in inter-war France. This paper examines research undertaken in Toulouse's Laboratory of Experimental Psychology at the Villejuif asylum near Paris. In 1905, Toulouse created a test that could differentiate between dementia and mental confusion, a test that could aid in the classification of patients at the overcrowded Villejuif facility. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X19825623DOI Listing
January 2019

As good as it gets: an empirical study on mentally-ill patients and their stay at a general hospital in Sweden, 1896-1905.

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Jan 23:957154X18822930. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

General hospital care and treatment of mentally ill patients in a Swedish town was studied in records for 503 patients, 1896-1905. Restraint was extremely rare; 65% left the hospital as healthy or improved. Non-psychotic and alcoholic patients spent fewer days in hospital than patients with psychosis or dementia. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18822930DOI Listing
January 2019

Through a glass darkly: patients of the Illinois State Hospital for the Insane at Jacksonville, USA (1854-80).

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Jan 11:957154X18821059. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Genealogist, Waverly, IL, USA.

The State Hospital for the Insane at Jacksonville, Morgan County, Illinois, was the first public hospital of its kind to be established in the state and among the earliest to be built on the 'Kirkbride Plan'. It opened for patients in 1851. We describe the background to the establishment of the hospital and, so far as is possible from publicly available sources, its catchment area, the nature of the patients held there up to 1880, its mechanisms of discharge, and supposed causes of death. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18821059DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

'The present state and statistical observation of mental patients under home custody', by Kure Shūzō and Kashida Gorō (1918).

Authors:
Akira Hashimoto

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Dec 14:957154X18818045. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Aichi Prefectural University, Japan.

This text, dealing with the private confinement of the mentally ill at home, or shitaku kanchi, has often been referred to as a 'classic text' in the history of Japanese psychiatry. Shitaku kanchi was one of the most prevalent methods of treating mental disorders in early twentieth-century Japan. Under the guidance of Kure Shūzō (1865-1932), Kure's assistants at Tokyo University inspected a total of 364 rooms of shitaku kanchi across Japan between 1910 and 1916. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18818045DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

From Evolutive Paranoia, by August Wimmer (1902): Part 2.

Authors:
Johan Schioldann

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Mar 26;30(1):116-124. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

University of Adelaide, Australia.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0957154X18807632
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18807632DOI Listing
March 2019
11 Reads

Colonial surgeon Patrick Hill (1794-1852): unacknowledged pioneer of Australian mental healthcare.

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Mar 12;30(1):90-103. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

University of Tasmania, Sydney, Australia.

Despite making a substantial contribution to the development of mental health services in colonial Australia, until now the story of Dr Patrick Hill's (1794-1852) life has been overlooked by historians. This paper reviews primary sources including clinical notes, patient lists, letters, government documents and newspaper articles which reveal that Dr Hill was a dedicated physician who played a vital role in the development of Australian mental healthcare. He was held in such esteem that by the time of his sudden death in 1852 he had been elevated to the most senior medical office in New South Wales. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0957154X18809925
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18809925DOI Listing
March 2019
14 Reads

From Evolutive Paranoia, by August Wimmer (1902).

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Dec;29(4):478-495

University of Adelaide, Australia.

Literature on the history of 'paranoia' (as a clinical concept) is large and confusing. This is partly explained by the fact that over the centuries the word 'paranoia' has been made to participate in several convergences (clinical constructs), and hence it has named different forms of behaviour and been linked to different explanatory concepts. The Classic Text that follows provides information on the internal clinical evolution of the last convergence in which 'paranoia' was made to participate. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0957154X18789598
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18789598DOI Listing
December 2018
13 Reads

Psychiatrists and mental health activism during the final phase of the Franco regime and the democratic transition.

Authors:
Rafael Huertas

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Mar 1;30(1):77-89. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Spain.

In the final years of the Franco dictatorship and during the period known as the democratic transition, there were a significant number of protests in the sphere of mental health in Spain. This article analyses the origins and functioning of the Psychiatric Network, which emerged in 1971, its connection to the formation of professional organizations and its role in the reception of anti-psychiatry ideas in Spain. We reach the conclusion that, although the Network's activities took place within a left-wing political and ideological framework, and at such an important time of social change as the end of the dictatorship, its discourse and practices always demonstrated a marked professional approach. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18808127DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Eugenic concerns, scientific practices: international relations in the establishment of psychiatric genetics in Germany, Britain, the USA and Scandinavia, c.1910-60.

Authors:
Volker Roelcke

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Mar 1;30(1):19-37. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Giessen University, Germany.

The article describes the emergence of research programmes, institutions and activities of the early protagonists in the field of psychiatric genetics: Ernst Rüdin in Munich, Eliot Slater in London, Franz Kallmann in New York and Erik Essen-Möller in Lund. During the 1930s and well into the Nazi period, the last three had been research fellows at the German Research Institute for Psychiatry in Munich. It is documented that there was a continuous mutual exchange of scientific ideas and practices between these actors, and that in all four contexts there were intrinsic relations between eugenic motivations and genetic research, but with specific national adaptations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18808666DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Ancient philosophers on mental illness.

Authors:
Marke Ahonen

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Mar 9;30(1):3-18. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

University of Helsinki, Finland.

This article explores how the ancient philosophers from Plato to late antiquity understood mental illness. It outlines when, how and in what kind of contexts the phenomenon of mental illness was recognized in the ancient philosophical texts, how mental illness was understood in terms of the body-mind interaction, and how mental disorders of the medical kind were distinguished from non-medical psychic disturbances. It establishes that, while the philosophers mostly understood mental illness along the lines of ancient medical thinking, their ideas, for example on the nature and location of the soul, informed their theories of mental illness. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18803508DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Managing difficult and violent adolescents ( adolescents difficiles) in France: a genealogical approach.

Authors:
Yannis Gansel

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Mar 4;30(1):104-115. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Hospices civils de Lyon and Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, France.

'Difficult adolescent' is a clinical category defined by psychiatrists' expertise. Since the end of the 1990s, it has been extensively used to describe a population of disruptive, violent yet vulnerable adolescents, at the margins of public institutions that manage youth deviancy in France. For the present study, an interconnected network of 49 documents was analysed using a genealogical method in order to provide comprehensive elements in the results. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18801769DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Amok: a mirror of time and people. A historical review of literature.

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Mar 25;30(1):38-57. Epub 2018 Sep 25.

Kyoto University, Japan.

The conceptualization of psychiatric disorders changes continuously. This study examined 'amok', a culture-bound syndrome related to sudden mass homicide, to elucidate changing and varied concepts. A historical review of 88 English articles revealed that the meanings and assumed causes of amok have changed over time. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0957154X18803499
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18803499DOI Listing
March 2019
13 Reads

Showers: from a violent treatment to an agent of cleansing.

Hist Psychiatry 2019 Mar 24;30(1):58-76. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand.

In the early nineteenth century, physicians designed the first manufactured showers for the purpose of curing the insane. Sustained falls of cold water were prescribed to cool hot, inflamed brains, and to instil fear to tame impetuous wills. By the middle of the century showers had appeared in both asylums and prisons, but shower-related deaths led to their decline. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18801766DOI Listing
March 2019
8 Reads

Introduction: Pow Meng Yap and the culture-bound syndromes.

Authors:
Ivan Crozier

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Sep;29(3):363-385

The University of Newcastle, Australia.

PM Yap's most significant intellectual achievement was his development of the concept of the culture-bound syndrome, which synthesized years of research into transcultural psychiatry, and situated this work within this field by drawing on elaborated nosological schema that challenged some of the ethnocentric assumptions made by previous psychiatrists who had tried to understand mental illnesses that presented in non-western cultures. This introduction to Yap's 1951 paper emphasizes that Yap needs to be understood as working within the western tradition of transcultural psychiatry, and argues that his English training and his continual engagement with western psychiatric and philosophical frameworks is the best way to conceive of his contributions to this field. Yap's paper, republished below as the Classic Text, was his first foray into comparative transcultural psychiatry. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18782746DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Creating a new psychiatry: on the origins of non-institutional psychiatry in the USA, 1900-50.

Authors:
Andrew Scull

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Dec 13;29(4):389-408. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

University of California, San Diego, USA.

This paper examines the early origins of the shift away from institutional psychiatry in the USA. It focuses on the period between 1900 and 1950. Attention is paid to the role of neurologists and disaffected asylum doctors in the early emergence of extra-institutional practice; to the impact of the National Committee for Mental Hygiene and Thomas Salmon; to the limited role of psychoanalysis during most of this period; and to the influence of the Rockefeller Foundation's decision to focus most of its effort in the medical sciences on psychiatry. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18793596DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

A History of the Mind and Mental Health in Classical Greek Medical Thought.

Authors:
Chiara Thumiger

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Dec 13;29(4):456-469. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

University of Warwick, UK, and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany.

This book on ancient medicine offers a unique resource for historians of medicine, historians of psychology, and classicists - and also cultural historians and historians of art. The Hippocratic texts and other contemporary medical sources have often been overlooked when it comes to their approaches to psychology, which are considered more mechanical and less elaborated than contemporary poetic and philosophical representations, but also than later medical works, notably Galenic. This book aims to do justice to early medical accounts by illustrating their richness and sophistication, their links with contemporary cultural products, and the indebtedness of later medicine to their observations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18793592DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

'Pinel of Istanbul': Dr Luigi Mongeri (1815-82) and the birth of modern psychiatry in the Ottoman Empire.

Authors:
Fatih Artvinli

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Dec 6;29(4):424-437. Epub 2018 Aug 6.

Acıbadem Mehmet Ali Aydınlar University School of Medicine, Turkey.

Italian physician/alienist Dr Luigi Mongeri (1815-82), who graduated from the School of Medicine in Pavia and worked as chief physician at Süleymaniye and Toptaşı Lunatic Asylums, introduced important reforms that shaped modern psychiatry in the Ottoman Empire. Because of his projects and practices he was likened to Philippe Pinel (1745-1826), and was called the 'Pinel of Istanbul' or 'Pinel of the Turks'. This article aims to examine the birth of modern psychiatry in the Ottoman Empire, through the biography of Luigi Mongeri and his writings on insanity. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18792186DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Stanley Cobb, the Rockefeller Foundation and the evolution of American psychiatry.

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Dec 25;29(4):438-455. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles.

Stanley Cobb founded the Harvard Departments of Neurology (1925) and Psychiatry (1934) with Rockefeller Foundation funding. Cobb was an important transitional figure in both neurology and psychiatry. He and his friend Alan Gregg were the most visible parts of the Rockefeller Foundation psychiatry project, which prepared American psychiatry for the rapid growth of psychiatric research after World War II. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0957154X18788813
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18788813DOI Listing
December 2018
15 Reads

Mental disorders in commentaries by the late medieval theologians Richard of Middleton, John Duns Scotus, William Ockham and Gabriel Biel on Peter Lombard's Sentences.

Authors:
Vesa Hirvonen

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Dec 20;29(4):409-423. Epub 2018 Jul 20.

University of Eastern Finland, Finland.

In their commentaries on the Sentences, Richard of Middleton, John Duns Scotus, William Ockham and Gabriel Biel reflect whether mentally-disturbed people can receive the sacraments (Baptism, Eucharist, confession, marriage) and fulfil juridical actions (make a will or take an oath). They consider that the main problem in 'madmen' in relation to the sacraments and legal actions is their lack of the use of reason. Scotus and Ockham especially are interested in the causes of mental disorders and the phenomena which happen in madmen's minds and bodies. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18788514DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Culture and psychism: the ethnopsychoanalysis of Georges Devereux.

Authors:
Alessandra Cerea

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Sep 25;29(3):297-314. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

Università di Bologna, Italy.

This paper introduces the significant theoretical contribution of Georges Devereux (1908-85) on the relationship between culture and psychism, which he developed in his work at the interface of anthropology, psychoanalysis and quantum epistemology during the mid-twentieth century. Devereux was one of the key early contributors to the field of transcultural psychiatry; he was in touch with its most important exponents, although he remained critical of many of the popular trends developed in this field of research in the USA, where Devereux conducted most of his research between 1932 and 1963. As a part of his critique, he founded a new epistemology: ethnopsychoanalysis, which was largely based on the concept of complementarity and countertransference. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18782750DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Evaluating the Aboriginal child's mind: assimilation and cross-cultural psychology in Australia.

Authors:
David Robertson

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Sep 19;29(3):331-349. Epub 2018 Jun 19.

Princeton University, USA.

This article examines two psychological interventions with Australian Aboriginal children in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The first involved evaluating the cognitive maturation of Aboriginal adolescents using a series of Piagetian interviews. The second, a more extensive educational intervention, used a variety of quantitative tests to measure and intervene in the intellectual performance of Aboriginal preschoolers. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18782638DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Henri Collomb and the emergence of a psychiatry open to otherness through interdisciplinary dialogue in post-independence Dakar.

Authors:
René Collignon

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Sep 4;29(3):350-362. Epub 2018 Jun 4.

CNRS/Université Paris Nanterre, France.

During decolonization, Henri Collomb was appointed to the first Chair of Psychiatry at the University of Dakar. Using a neuropsychiatric approach, he quickly made significant advances in the field, despite the colonial era's poor legacy of assistance facilities for mentally ill people. Through alliances with professors and researchers from the university Departments of Psychology and Sociology, an original interdisciplinary dialogue was set up to build up a research team which would develop rich and varied activities in the fields of transcultural psychiatry, medical anthropology and psychoanalytic anthropology. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18777210DOI Listing
September 2018
6 Reads

Race, alcohol and general paralysis: Emil Kraepelin's comparative psychiatry and his trips to Java (1904) and North America (1925).

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Sep 4;29(3):263-281. Epub 2018 Jun 4.

Independent scholar.

This article examines Emil Kraepelin's notion of comparative psychiatry and relates it to the clinical research he conducted at psychiatric hospitals in South-East Asia (1904) and the USA (1925). It argues that his research fits awkwardly within the common historiographic narratives of colonial psychiatry. It also disputes claims that his work can be interpreted meaningfully as the fons et origio of transcultural psychiatry. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18770601DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

'Brain Disorders', by Henry Calderwood (1879).

Authors:
G E Berrios

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Jun;29(2):232-248

University of Cambridge, UK.

Henry Calderwood, a nineteenth-century Scottish philosopher interested in madness, published in 1879 an important work on the interaction between philosophy of mind, the nascent neurosciences and mental disease. Holding a spiritual view of the mind, he considered the phrase 'mental disease' (as Feuchtersleben had in 1845) to be but a misleading metaphor. His analysis of the research work of Ferrier, Clouston, Crichton-Browne, Maudsley, Tuke, Sankey, etc. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X17745435DOI Listing
June 2018
1 Read

Historicizing transcultural psychiatry: people, epistemic objects, networks, and practices.

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Sep 14;29(3):257-262. Epub 2018 May 14.

University of Newcastle, NSW.

The history of transcultural psychiatry has recently attracted much historical attention, including a workshop in March 2016 in which an international panel of scholars met at the Maison de Sciences de l'Homme Paris-Nord (MSH-PN). Papers from this workshop are presented here. By conceiving of transcultural psychiatry as a dynamic social field that frames its knowledge claims around epistemic objects that are specific to the field, and by focusing on the ways that concepts within this field are used to organize intellectual work, several themes are explored that draw this field into the historiography of psychiatry. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18775589DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Eric Wittkower and the foundation of Montréal's Transcultural Psychiatry Research Unit after World War II.

Authors:
Emmanuel Delille

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Sep 27;29(3):282-296. Epub 2018 Mar 27.

Humboldt University, Germany.

Eric Wittkower founded McGill University's Transcultural Psychiatry Unit in 1955. One year later, he started the first international newsletter in this academic field: Transcultural Psychiatry. However, at the beginning of his career Wittkower gave no signs that he would be interested in social sciences and psychiatry. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18765417DOI Listing
September 2018
6 Reads

The politics and practice of Thomas Adeoye Lambo: towards a post-colonial history of transcultural psychiatry.

Authors:
Matthew M Heaton

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Sep 27;29(3):315-330. Epub 2018 Mar 27.

Virginia Tech, USA.

This article traces the career of Thomas Adeoye Lambo, the first European-trained psychiatrist of indigenous Nigerian (Yoruba) background and one of the key contributors to the international development of transcultural psychiatry from the 1950s to the 1980s. The focus on Lambo provides some political, cultural and geographical balance to the broader history of transcultural psychiatry by emphasizing the contributions to transcultural psychiatric knowledge that have emerged from a particular non-western context. At the same time, an examination of Lambo's legacy allows historians to see the limitations of transcultural psychiatry's influence over time. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0957154X18765422
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18765422DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads

Abrupt treatments of hysteria during World War I, 1914-18.

Authors:
Ad Sandy Macleod

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Jun 26;29(2):187-198. Epub 2018 Feb 26.

University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Case reports of the abrupt recovery of hysterical disorders during World War I (1914-18), though undoubtedly subject to publication bias, raise both aetiological and treatment issues regarding pseudo-neurological conversion symptoms. Published clinical anecdotes report circumstantial, psychotherapeutic, hypnotic, persuasive (and coercive) methods seemingly inducing recovery, and also responses to fright and alterations of consciousness. The ethics of modern medical practice would not allow many of these techniques, which were reported to be effective, even in the chronic cases. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18757338DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

'A more perfect arrangement of plants': the botanical model in psychiatric nosology, 1676 to the present day.

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Jun 26;29(2):131-146. Epub 2018 Feb 26.

Stanford University Hospital and Clinics, California.

Psychiatric classification remains a complex endeavour; since the Enlightenment, nosologists have made use of various models and metaphors to describe their systems. Here we present the most common model, botanical taxonomy, and trace its history from the nosologies of Sydenham, Sauvages and Linnaeus; to evolutionary models; to the later contributions of Hughlings-Jackson, Kraepelin and Jaspers. Over time, there has been a shift from explicit attempts to pattern disease classification on botanical systems, to a more metaphorical use. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18757341DOI Listing
June 2018
5 Reads

'A matter for conjecture': leucotomy in Western Australia, 1947-70.

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Jun 26;29(2):199-215. Epub 2018 Feb 26.

University of Western Australia.

Very little has been published on the rise and fall of psychosurgery in Australia. In the mid-twentieth century, Western Australia was the largest but most sparsely-populated of the six Australian States, and its local psychiatry practice was, as one commentator put it, 'backward'. Nonetheless, electroconvulsive therapy was introduced in 1945, and leucotomy in 1947. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18757363DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

Mental illness in Sweden (1896-1905) reflected through case records from a local general hospital.

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Jun 22;29(2):216-231. Epub 2018 Feb 22.

Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Mental illness in a hospital in a medium-sized town in Sweden was studied. Consecutive case records from 1896 to 1905, and also from 2011, were selected. In the historical sample, neurasthenia was the most common diagnosis, followed by affective disorders and alcohol abuse. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18756528DOI Listing
June 2018
4 Reads

Psychiatry in Portugal: Key actors and conceptual history (1884-1924).

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Jun 8;29(2):147-164. Epub 2018 Feb 8.

University of Coimbra, Portugal.

The aim of this article is the study of psychiatry in Portugal between 1884 and 1924, the period when it became institutionalized, and when works that marked its scientific evolution were published. This paper summarizes the various historiographical approaches, and its approach to the subject is closest to the conceptual history carried out by German Berrios in Cambridge. The study attempts to correlate the key actors and their works with the history of different scientific ideas, its differences, and the influences of foreign authors. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X18756525DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

Late medieval philosophical and theological discussions of mental disorders: Witelo, Oresme, Gerson.

Authors:
Vesa Hirvonen

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Jun 4;29(2):165-186. Epub 2018 Jan 4.

University of Eastern Finland, Finland.

No matter from which perspective Witelo, Oresme and Gerson approach mental disorders, they think that madness usually has a bodily, such as a humoral or organic, origin. They do, however, consider divine or demonic causes as possibly being behind immediate causes. According to Witelo and the Parisians, because of a change in the body, madmen's sensory fantasy is disturbed and in this situation their intellect does not act normally, and their will lacks freedom. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X17748312DOI Listing
June 2018
4 Reads

Health and hierarchy: soldiers, civilians and mental healthcare in Scotland, 1914-34.

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Mar 14;29(1):79-95. Epub 2017 Dec 14.

Glasgow Caledonian University, UK.

During the First World War injured servicemen were constructed as a better class of patient than civilians, and their care was prioritized in social and political discourses. For the mentally disordered servicemen themselves, however, these distinctions were permeable and transient. This article will challenge the reality of the 'privileged' service patient in civil asylums in Scotland. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X17745262DOI Listing
March 2018
6 Reads

Eugenics, medicine and psychiatry in Peru.

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Mar 29;29(1):96-109. Epub 2017 Nov 29.

Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.

Eugenics was defined by Galton as 'the science which deals with all influences that improve the inborn qualities of a race'. In Peru, eugenics was related to social medicine and mental hygiene, in accordance with the neo-Lamarckian orientation, that predominated in Latin America. Peruvian eugenists assumed the mission of fighting hereditary and infectious diseases, malnutrition, alcoholism, drug addiction, prostitution, criminality and everything that threatened the future of the 'Peruvian race'. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X17741232DOI Listing
March 2018
5 Reads

Understanding the DSM-5: stasis and change.

Authors:
Rachel Cooper

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Mar 29;29(1):49-65. Epub 2017 Nov 29.

Lancaster University.

This paper aims to understand the DSM-5 through situating it within the context of the historical development of the DSM series. When one looks at the sets of diagnostic criteria, the DSM-5 is strikingly similar to the DSM-IV. I argue that at this level the DSM has become 'locked-in' and difficult to change. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X17741783DOI Listing
March 2018
5 Reads

History of lobotomy in Poland.

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Mar 20;29(1):3-21. Epub 2017 Nov 20.

Jagiellonian University and University of Warsaw, Poland.

In Poland, there were 176 cases of prefrontal leucotomy performed by Moniz's method between 1947 and 1951. There were also several cases in which alternative psychosurgical techniques were used: prefrontal topectomy by Bilikiewicz and colleagues, and prefrontal topischemia by Ziemnowicz. This article analyses the following: publications by Choróbski, who performed lobotomy in Poland, and by Korzeniowski, who assessed its short-term results; a report by Bornsztajn, who reviewed general results of the method; and clinical research by Broszkiewicz and by Konieczyńska, who assessed Polish patients in terms of long-term results of lobotomy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X17741231DOI Listing
March 2018
4 Reads

'Motility Psychoses', by Erik Strömgren (1940).

Hist Psychiatry 2017 Dec;28(4):489-505

University of Adelaide, Australia.

The motility psychoses are a group of acute psychiatric conditions characterized by salient disorders of movement (increased, decreased and disorganized), psychotic experiences, confusion and good prognosis. The debate on whether they are just atypical forms of schizophrenia or manic-depressive insanity or constitute an independent group of psychoses has not yet been settled. Erik Strömgren's classical chapter deals with the history and clinical aspects of the motility psychoses. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X17719387DOI Listing
December 2017
7 Reads

François Leuret: the last moral therapist.

Authors:
Edward M Brown

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Mar 26;29(1):38-48. Epub 2017 Oct 26.

Brown University, USA.

By the 1840s French psychiatrists had abandoned Moral Treatment as an individual psychological therapy, as opposed to an institutional practice. One advocate of Moral Treatment, however, would not go along with this movement. In three books and several papers published between 1834 and 1846, François Leuret (1797-1851) advocated aggressive psychological treatment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X17735782DOI Listing
March 2018
6 Reads

Strategic voices of care and compassion. Describing the mad, their afflictions and situations in Amsterdam and Utrecht in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Hist Psychiatry 2018 Mar 25;29(1):66-78. Epub 2017 Oct 25.

University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Painting a picture of the lives of the early modern mad outside institutions has not yet been done in the Netherlands. However, by looking at notarial documents and admission requests, we can learn more about how the mad were cared for outside the institutions, and the impact their behaviour had on the people close to them. Investigating these sources for both Amsterdam and Utrecht in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries has unravelled a story of community care in which families played a key role and used their options strategically. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0957154X17736236DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5788075PMC
March 2018
3 Reads