176 results match your criteria Herpes [Journal]


Summary of the 6th International Conference on HHV-6 and -7.

Herpes 2008 Nov;15(2):36-8

Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

This article reports on selected presentations at the 6th International Conference on Human Herpesvirus (HHV)-6 and -7, organized by the HHV-6 Foundation. The 98 presentations--which explored in some detail the biology of HHV-6, chromosomally integrated HHV-6, diagnostic testing and manifestations of HHV-6 infection in disease. Associations between HHV-6 and -7 and a wide variety of diseases were reported, and are made plausible by the remarkably broad cellular tropism of the viruses in vitro. Read More

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November 2008
6 Reads

Case report and literature review: HHV-6-associated meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent adult.

Herpes 2008 Nov;15(2):33-5

Department of Internal Medicine, James H Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University Medical Service, Johnson, TN 37614, USA.

Human herpesvirus type 6 (HHV-6) has been well described as an agent of meningoencephalitis in post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients, but is a rare cause of meningoencephalitis in immunocompetent adults. We report an immunocompetent adult with HHV-6-associated meningoencephalitis. The patient was an elderly diabetic man who presented with fever and confusion, with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis. Read More

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November 2008
4 Reads

Importance of chromosomally integrated HHV-6A and -6B in the diagnosis of active HHV-6 infection.

Herpes 2008 Nov;15(2):28-32

Department of Virology, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London, UK.

Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) exists as two closely related variants: A and B. Whereas no disease has been firmly associated with HHV-6A, variant B causes febrile illness in young children and is pathogenic in immunosuppressed transplant recipients. Chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (with either variant A or B) occurs in a minority of people. Read More

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November 2008
5 Reads

The importance of cytomegalovirus-specific antibodies for the prevention of fetal cytomegalovirus infection or disease.

Herpes 2008 Nov;15(2):24-7

Department of Pediatrics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA.

Primary maternal infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) during or just before pregnancy is responsible for nearly all congenital infections where the baby is symptomatic at birth. If primary maternal CMV infection occurs during the first or second trimester, between one-third and one-half of fetuses become infected, and between one-half and one-third of infected fetuses go on to have symptoms at birth. Experiments using a guinea-pig model of CMV infection in pregnant dames (and subsequent observational studies in humans) indicate a beneficial effect is associated with administering high-titre CMV hyperimmunoglobulin (HIg) to pregnant women with primary CMV infection. Read More

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November 2008
6 Reads

Provocation and progress.

Authors:
Robert F Pass

Herpes 2008 Nov;15(2):23

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November 2008
3 Reads

Treatment for Epstein-Barr virus-associated PTLD.

Authors:
Thomas G Gross

Herpes 2009 Jan;15(3):64-7

Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH 43205, USA.

The association between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) has been recognized since the early days of transplantation. The major pathogenetic defect is the insufficient EBV-specific cytotoxic T-cell control of EBV-driven B-cell proliferations. Despite this understanding, PTLD remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for transplant recipients. Read More

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January 2009
4 Reads

Varicella zoster virus redux.

Authors:
Lawrence D Gelb

Herpes 2009 Jan;15(3):62-3

Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA.

In May 2008, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the USA recommended the routine administration of a live-attenuated high-potency varicella zoster vaccine to all adults over 60 years of age without specific contraindications, for the prevention and attenuation of herpes zoster (HZ). Nevertheless, many physicians still consider this vaccine to be of marginal value. This is not a reasonable conclusion. Read More

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January 2009
3 Reads

Common questions about herpes: analysis of chat-room transcripts.

Herpes 2009 Jan;15(3):57-61

Division of Research and Health Communications, American Social Health Association, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA.

Patients diagnosed with genital herpes typically undergo a period of psychological adjustment. Although healthcare providers can play a key role in this adjustment, in several patient surveys patients have expressed dissatisfaction with the information and counselling offered by professionals. To address this gap, providers must first identify the common questions and myths that are not addressed, or are addressed inadequately. Read More

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January 2009
6 Reads

Genital herpes education and counselling: testing a one-page 'FAQ' intervention.

Herpes 2009 Jan;15(3):51-6

Division of Research and Health Communications, American Social Health Association, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA.

Approximately 17% of adults in the USA have antibodies to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), 85-90% of whom are unaware of their infection. Diagnosed patients are more likely to detect HSV reactivation, disclose infection status to partner(s) and employ risk-reduction strategies; therefore, diagnosing more cases may reduce herpes transmission rates. Providers are reluctant to identify genital herpes because of potentially lengthy counselling visits or discomfort in dealing with patients' emotional reactions. Read More

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January 2009
4 Reads

Seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus-2 infection among women seeking medical care for signs and symptoms of vaginitis.

Herpes 2009 Jan;15(3):46-50

Ob/Gyn Specialists of the Palm Beaches, PA., West Palm Beach, FL 33401, USA. SharonR@obgyn2000

Two identically designed studies were conducted to determine the prevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection and viral shedding among women with no known history of genital herpes or HSV-2 seropositivity, who sought care at a US-based obstetrics/gynaecology clinic because of recurrent signs and symptoms of vaginitis. Samples comprised 50 women of any race (All-Comers Sample; Study 1) and 49 black women (Black Sample; Study 2) diagnosed at the clinic visit with vaginitis on the basis of standard work-up and medical history. In the All-Comers Sample, 15 (30%) women were HSV-2 seropositive and two (4%) were positive for HSV-2 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); these two patients were also HSV-2 seropositive. Read More

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January 2009
9 Reads

Cytomegalovirus vaccines: at last, a major step forward.

Authors:
Mark R Schleiss

Herpes 2009 Jan;15(3):44-5

Center for Infectious Diseases and Microbiology Translational Research, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

Yow and Demmler published an editorial in 1992 entitled Congenital cytomegalovirus disease--20 years is long enough. This editorial pointed out that, despite the long-standing recognition of the major public health importance of congenital human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, few solutions had been forthcoming. In no area has the lack of progress been more frustrating than in the realm of CMV vaccine development. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4385584PMC
January 2009
2 Reads

Magnetic resonance and diffusion-weighted imaging findings of herpes simplex encephalitis.

Herpes 2008 Oct;15(1):13-7

Department of Radiology, Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a rare, life-threatening disease. This paper draws attention to the role of imaging in early HSE diagnosis. Five consecutive patients diagnosed with HSE (type 1) between June 2005 and June 2006 (three males, two females, mean age 44 [range 16-68] years) were included in this retrospective study. Read More

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October 2008
3 Reads

Contemporary management of cytomegalovirus infection in transplant recipients: guidelines from an IHMF workshop, 2007.

Herpes 2008 Oct;15(1):4-12

Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, UK.

An international workshop reviewed the evidence base for deploying antiviral drugs to prevent cytomegalovirus (CMV) end-organ diseases (EOD) as well as the indirect effects of CMV in transplant recipients. Published studies demonstrate that both prophylaxis and pre-emptive therapy can be effective strategies for preventing EOD. However, the optimal drug, dosage and duration of treatment have not been defined for either prophylaxis or pre-emptive therapy and vary by transplant population. Read More

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October 2008
3 Reads

New guidelines for cytomegalovirus infection management in transplant recipients.

Authors:
Antonio Volpi

Herpes 2008 Oct;15(1)

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October 2008
3 Reads

Recurrent herpes and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Herpes 2007 Dec;14(3):72-4

CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Pôle Urgences, Clermont-Ferrand, France.

A 33-year-old male presented with recurrent outbreaks of perioral herpes of disfiguring nature that remained unresolved following therapy. The first perioral outbreak occurred following a road accident. The psychiatric interview conducted with the patient suggested post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) secondary to the accident. Read More

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December 2007
17 Reads

Cytomegalovirus retinitis in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

Herpes 2007 Dec;14(3):66-71

Department of Ophthalmology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common opportunistic infection in individuals with AIDS. Moreover, CMV retinitis represents a significant portion of end-organ disease in patients with CMV and AIDS. Prior to the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), almost one-third of people with AIDS developed CMV retinitis during their lifetime. Read More

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December 2007
5 Reads

The continuing evolution of antiviral therapy for recurrent genital herpes: 1-day patient-initiated treatment with famciclovir.

Authors:
Fred Y Aoki

Herpes 2007 Dec;14(3):62-5

University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Increased understanding of the clinical and virological characteristics of recurrent genital herpes simplex virus infection in healthy adults, recognition of the critical importance of early initiation of therapy, which is best achieved by self-initiated therapy, and an appreciation of the excellent tolerance and safety of relatively high doses of available antiviral drugs have facilitated refinements to treatment regimens that are more convenient as well as efficacious and well-tolerated. This paper reviews the progressive convergence of these concepts to an efficacious, well-tolerated, 1-day, patient-initiated regimen for treating episodes of recurrent genital herpes. Read More

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December 2007
5 Reads

Management and prevention of recurrent herpes labialis in immunocompetent patients.

Herpes 2007 Dec;14(3):56-61

Dermatology and Laser Center Northwest, Bellingham, WA 98225, USA.

A range of topical and systemic therapies exists for treating recurrent herpes labialis. Among the topical agents, aciclovir and its derivatives can lessen the symptoms and duration of disease if applied frequently in the proper vehicle and started during the prodromal phase. Delivering these agents to the lesion via novel devices or vehicles may enhance their topical efficacy in the future. Read More

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December 2007
4 Reads

Tailoring herpes labialis treatments.

Herpes 2007 Dec;14(3):55

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December 2007
2 Reads

Factors affecting an economic model for zoster vaccination.

Authors:
Giovanni Fattore

Herpes 2007 Sep;14 Suppl 2:52-5

Centre for Research on Healthcare Management (CERGAS), Bocconi University, Milan, Italy.

Results from the recent Shingles Prevention Study indicate that zoster vaccination can reduce the incidence and severity of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN), raising the possibility of a widespread vaccination programme. Such a programme would incur substantial costs, mandating the need for rigorous cost-effectiveness analyses prior to implementation. Suitably robust analyses of the cost benefits of zoster vaccination, capturing the duration of benefits and impact on quality of life resulting from vaccination, are lacking. Read More

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September 2007
6 Reads

Prevention strategies: experience of varicella vaccination programmes.

Authors:
David Patrick

Herpes 2007 Sep;14 Suppl 2:48-51

University of British Columbia, Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Widespread immunization programmes have had a dramatic effect on the morbidity associated with varicella in the USA; mortality has declined by 66% (from 0.41 to 0.14 deaths / million population) and the reduction in hospitalizations is at least 4-fold (from 2. Read More

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September 2007
2 Reads

Prevention strategies: herpes zoster, post-herpetic neuralgia and immunogenicity.

Herpes 2007 Sep;14 Suppl 2:45-7

Section of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO 80262, USA.

Herpes zoster is a common condition that can have a significant impact on quality of life among older adults. A significant proportion of older subjects with herpes zoster develop post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN), a chronic condition that is difficult to treat. The Shingles Prevention Study was a large-scale clinical trial to determine the efficacy of a live, attenuated varicella zoster virus (VZV) vaccine ('zoster vaccine') for preventing or attenuating herpes zoster in subjects aged > or =60 years. Read More

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September 2007
2 Reads

Epidemiology and burden of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia in Australia, Asia and South America.

Herpes 2007 Sep;14 Suppl 2:40-4

Federal University of São Paulo, UNIFESP, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Following the development of a herpes zoster vaccine and the successful introduction of widespread varicella vaccination in the USA, many countries are considering similar vaccination programmes. However, before implementing such programmes, it is important to describe the regional baselines of varicella and herpes zoster epidemiology, both to aid the design of vaccination strategies and to observe trends after the introduction of vaccination. In many areas of the world, this information is difficult to gather, and the epidemiology of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia in these regions is poorly understood. Read More

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September 2007
3 Reads

Severe complications of herpes zoster.

Authors:
Antonio Volpi

Herpes 2007 Sep;14 Suppl 2:35-9

Department of Public Health, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.

The usual presentation of herpes zoster is as a self-limiting vesicular rash, often accompanied by post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN), its most common complication. However, herpes zoster can give rise to other complications, many of which have unusual presentations and serious sequelae. The incidence and burden of many of these less common complications are poorly understood. Read More

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September 2007
3 Reads

Zoster-associated pain: what is known, who is at risk and how can it be managed?

Authors:
Robert W Johnson

Herpes 2007 Sep;14 Suppl 2:30-4

University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

Herpes zoster episodes commence with a prodromal period of about 4 days with symptoms including pain and malaise. This is followed by a rash lasting approximately 2-4 weeks, with possible subacute herpetic neuralgia for up to 3 months, followed, in some patients, by a period of post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) lasting months or possibly years. Severe acute pain is more likely in older females and those with a prodrome or severe rash. Read More

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September 2007
2 Reads

Varicella zoster virus: natural history and current therapies of varicella and herpes zoster.

Herpes 2007 Sep;14 Suppl 2:25-9

Centre for Infectious Disease, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts, UK.

The natural history of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection and the molecular mechanisms of viral pathogenesis are incompletely understood. Although no animal model yet reproduces all aspects of VZV infection, recently developed models of VZV infection, and the creation of genetically altered VZV recombinants, are yielding new information about primary viraemia and latency. During viraemia, T-cells transport VZV to the skin, where cell-free viral replication facilitates person-to-person spread and transmission to the neurons where latency is established. Read More

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September 2007
12 Reads

Global strategies to prevent herpes zoster and its associated complications.

Herpes 2007 Sep;14 Suppl 2:24

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September 2007
2 Reads

Case report: herpes meningitis complicating genital herpes presenting as anal fissure.

Herpes 2007 Sep;14(2):48-9

Department of General Surgery, Royal Shrewsbury Hospital, Shrewsbury, West Midlands, UK.

A 33-year-old woman presented with stabbing perianal pain and intermittent headache and photophobia. Examination revealed atypical multiple perianal fissures with non-specific neurological findings. Polymerase chain reaction of the perianal swab and cerebrospinal fluid examination confirmed the diagnosis of perianal herpes simplex type 2 ulcer with herpes meningitis. Read More

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September 2007
4 Reads

Case reports: zoster pain in haematological malignancies: effective pain relief with oxycodone in patients unresponsive to other analgesic measures.

Herpes 2007 Sep;14(2):45-7

Haematology Division, Sant'Eugenio Hospital, Tor Vergata University, Rome, Italy.

Varicella zoster virus (VZV) outbreak is a significant cause of morbidity in patients suffering from blood-related malignancies, occurring mostly among those affected by lymphoproliferative disorders and in those receiving haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. The elucidated pathological mechanisms of VZV-related painful complications have provided the rationale for acute zoster pain (AZP) and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) treatment with antiviral therapy combined with neuroactive agents, such as tricyclic or anticonvulsant agents. The role of opioids in this setting is less clearly established. Read More

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September 2007
13 Reads

Case report: severe gastrointestinal inflammation and persistent HHV-6B infection in a paediatric cancer patient.

Herpes 2007 Sep;14(2):41-4

Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacotherapy, Heinrich-Heine-University of Düsseldorf, Germany.

Lymphotropic herpesviruses such as human herpesvirus type 6 (HHV-6) have enhanced pathogenicity in some immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and HIV-infected patients. The clinical relevance of HHV-6 infections in cancer patients undergoing conventional cytotoxic therapy is undetermined, however. Here we report on a 10-month-old boy with an anaplastic astrocytoma, who acquired an HHV-6 variant B infection during chemotherapy. Read More

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September 2007
25 Reads
2 Citations

Situational antiviral drug prophylaxis for HSV type 1 recurrences.

Herpes 2007 Sep;14(2):37-40

Department of Dermatology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA.

Recurrent herpes simplex virus type 1 infection is generally associated with mild morbidity. However, frequent recurrences may have a significant psychosocial impact, and reactivation in certain high-risk situations may cause considerable morbidity. Controlled trials demonstrate that antiviral drug prophylaxis can be efficacious in selected circumstances; even for other situations, clinical reports suggest that such antiviral drug prophylaxis remains effective. Read More

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September 2007
2 Reads

Managing herpes zoster in immunocompromised patients.

Herpes 2007 Sep;14(2):32-6

Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.

Herpes zoster infections are more common and often more complicated in immunocompromised patients. The key clinical objective in these patients is to reduce the incidence of cutaneous and visceral dissemination that can lead to life-threatening complications. This is best achieved with prompt antiviral therapy, which should be instituted in all immunosuppressed zoster patients if presentation occurs within 1 week of rash onset or any time before full crusting of lesions. Read More

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September 2007
4 Reads

Herpes zoster in immunocompromised patients.

Herpes 2007 Sep;14(2):31

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September 2007
2 Reads

An update on short-course intermittent and prevention therapies for herpes labialis.

Herpes 2007 Jun;14 Suppl 1:13A-18A

Dermatology and Laser Center Northwest, Bellingham, WA 98225, USA.

Infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) has increased in prevalence worldwide over the past two decades, making it a major public health concern. Approximately 90% of recurrent HSV type 1 (HSV-1) infections manifest as non-genital disease, primarily as orofacial lesions known as herpes labialis. Improvements in our understanding of the natural history of herpes labialis support the rationale for early treatment (during the prodrome or erythema stages) with high doses of antiviral agents in order to maximize drug benefit. Read More

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June 2007
5 Reads

An update on short-course episodic and prevention therapies for herpes genitalis.

Herpes 2007 Jun;14 Suppl 1:5A-11A

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA.

The prevalence of herpes genitalis (genital herpes) has increased markedly over the past three decades. The most common cause is infection with the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), but it can also occur as a result of HSV-1 infection. Herpes genitalis can cause substantial psychosexual as well as physical morbidity and, in immunocompromised individuals, such as those who are HIV-positive, HSV infection can result in severe disease with progressive and extensive lesions. Read More

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June 2007
2 Reads

Review of recent HSV recurrent-infection treatment studies.

Herpes 2007 Jun;14(1):23-6

Southampton University Hospitals, University of Southampton, UK.

Antiviral management options for recurrent herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection include daily suppressive and episodic therapy. New data on patient-initiated, short-course, high-dose antiviral therapy provide a new, more convenient option for patients who choose episodic therapy. A head-to-head comparison of suppressive valaciclovir versus famciclovir treatment indicates that both drugs have comparable clinical benefits, but that valaciclovir may have a greater impact on virological end-points. Read More

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June 2007
2 Reads

Viral load in congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

Herpes 2007 Jun;14(1):17-22

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) affects 50-80% of adults in the USA by the age of 40 and is the virus most commonly transmitted to the fetus before birth. Extensive research into quantitative CMV assays, and the proven value of CMV DNA load measurement in guiding antiviral therapy in haematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients, has paved the way for evaluating viral load (VL) in the management of congenital CMV infection. This article discusses the rapidly evolving methods of VL measurement. Read More

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June 2007
7 Reads

Management of HSV encephalitis in adults and neonates: diagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

Herpes 2007 Jun;14(1):11-6

Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35233, USA.

Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are infrequent in occurrence, but potentially devastating in outcome. Tremendous advances in the ability to diagnose HSV CNS disease without the need for invasive procedures such as brain biopsy, coupled with the establishment of safe and effective antiviral therapies, have improved overall outcomes. However, the seriousness of HSV CNS infections requires that clinicians maintain a high index of suspicion to initiate evaluation under suitable circumstances. Read More

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June 2007
10 Reads

Herpetic retinitis.

Herpes 2007 Jun;14(1):4-10

Massachusetts Eye Research and Surgery Institute, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.

This paper provides an appreciation of the various forms and consequences of retinal inflammation caused by human herpesviruses. Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus are known to cause retinitis. The prognosis of herpetic retinitis remains poor because it is associated with a high incidence of complications, both during and after the acute disease phase. Read More

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June 2007
38 Reads

Highlights from 5th International Conference on HHV-6 and -7.

Herpes 2006 Nov;13(3):81-2

Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

This article reports on key presentations at the 5th International Conference on Human Herpesvirus (HHV)-6 and -7, organized by the HHV-6 Foundation. New assays for HHV-6 and -7 promise to be more accurate and better able to distinguish between HHV-6A and B or differentiate active from latent infection. Nevertheless, more research is needed to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of these assays. Read More

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November 2006
22 Reads

Investigations of the pathogenesis of Varicella zoster virus infection in the SCIDhu mouse model.

Authors:
Ann M Arvin

Herpes 2006 Nov;13(3):75-80

Departments of Pediatrics, and Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a medically important human herpesvirus that causes varicella, establishes latency in sensory ganglia and may reactivate to cause herpes zoster in healthy and immunocompromised patients. Experiments in the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model have provided new insights about VZV pathogenesis. In addition, the evaluation of VZV recombinant viruses, with targeted mutations of viral genes or their promoters in SCIDhu skin, T-cell and dorsal root ganglia xenografts, has the potential to identify options for the design of a recombinant 'second-generation' VZV vaccine. Read More

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November 2006
7 Reads

Case report: primary infection by human herpesvirus 6 variant a with the onset of myelitis.

Herpes 2006 Nov;13(3):72-4

Department of Diagnostic Services and Legal Medicine, University of Moderna and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.

A case of primary infection by human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) variant A in a 54-year-old woman, which occurred at the same time as the onset of encephalomyelitis, is reported. The correlation between the two events is discussed. It is speculated that, during the early phase of the infection, the HHV-6 spread to the central nervous system and triggered a pathogenic process that initially developed without symptoms. Read More

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November 2006
13 Reads

Oncolytic HSV-1 for the treatment of brain tumours.

Herpes 2006 Nov;13(3):66-71

Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-3410, USA.

The prognosis for patients diagnosed with malignant glioma, the most common primary tumour of the central nervous system, remains poor despite decades of research and advances in surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. The development of new approaches for the treatment of these tumours has led to the emergence of oncolytic viral therapy, with the use of conditionally replicating viruses, as a potential new intervention. Herpes simplex virus type 1 has emerged as the leading candidate oncolytic virus, with six different trials either completed or underway for patients with malignant glioma. Read More

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November 2006
2 Reads

Varicella Pathogenesis: from Hox to Mutated gE glycoproteins.

Authors:
Charles Grose

Herpes 2006 Nov;13(3):59

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November 2006
3 Reads

Prevention of VZV infection in immunosuppressed patients using antiviral agents.

Authors:
Michael Boeckh

Herpes 2006 Nov;13(3):60-5

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Program in Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.

Antiviral agents play a key role in the prevention and treatment of varicella zoster virus (VZV) disease in immunosuppressed patients. Randomized trials show that aciclovir is effective in preventing VZV reactivation disease; however, no consensus exists on dose, duration and patient population for its use. The recent shortage of VZV-specific immunoglobulin has generated renewed interest in the use of antiviral agents as post-exposure prophylaxis. Read More

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November 2006
2 Reads

New approaches to the therapy of HSV infections.

Authors:
R Whitley

Herpes 2006 Aug;13(2):53-5

University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35233-0011, USA.

Two recent studies have demonstrated single-day regimens of high-dose antiviral therapy (famciclovir 1000 mg twice daily for genital herpes, and famciclovir 1500 mg single dose for herpes labialis) to be effective episodic treatment strategies. Both have the potential to improve patient compliance and therapeutic satisfaction. Patient-initiated episodic therapy (PIE) regimens such as these may improve the time to treatment initiation, which can halt lesion development: PIE allows antiviral drugs to be administered in the narrow therapeutic window that occurs early in the course of a herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection episode. Read More

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August 2006
2 Reads

Adolescents anticipated experience of screening for genital herpes.

Herpes 2006 Aug;13(2):49-52; discussion 48

Department of Pediatrics, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX77555-0319, USA.

Screening asymptomatic adolescents for genital herpes will require sensitivity to adolescents' developmental needs. Twenty-four adolescents (age range 1619 years) were interviewed to explore their perceptions of screening. In general, adolescents thought screening for genital herpes would be viewed as taking care of themselves, although there were concerns that their peers might view getting screened as implying that the adolescent was infected or sexually promiscuous. Read More

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August 2006
2 Reads

Defining a role for antiviral drugs in the treatment of persons with HHV-8 infection.

Authors:
C Casper

Herpes 2006 Aug;13(2):42-7

The Department of Medicine, University of Washington, and The Program in Infectious Disease, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA 98122, USA.

Human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV-8) is the most recently identified member of the human herpesvirus family and the aetiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. While highly active antiretroviral therapy has led to impressive declines in the incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma, HHV-8- associated infections remain common and morbid across the globe. Although comprehensive clinical trials of therapy for HHV-8-associated infections are lacking, numerous studies have found current treatment modalities to be ineffective for many patients. Read More

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August 2006
2 Reads

Toll-like receptors, innate immunity and HSV pathogenesis.

Herpes 2006 Aug;13(2):37-41

Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0436, USA.

In the last decade, substantial progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in initial host responses to viral infections, and how viral recognition leads to the innate responses that ultimately shape the adaptive immune response. Viruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, trigger toll-like receptors (TLRs) that elicit cytokine and chemokine production. In turn, this can create local resistance and modulate T- and B-cell-mediated immunity. Read More

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August 2006
2 Reads