2,325 results match your criteria Hematology/oncology clinics of North America[Journal]


Immunotherapy: An Old and New Modality for the Treatment of Cancer.

Authors:
Patrick A Ott

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Apr 23;33(2):xi-xii. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Melanoma Center & Center for Immuno-Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215-5450, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2019.01.001DOI Listing
April 2019
13 Reads

The Current Status of Immunotherapies in Esophagogastric Cancer.

Authors:
Geoffrey Y Ku

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Apr;33(2):323-338

Gastrointestinal Oncology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 300 East 66th Street, Room 1035, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address:

This review summarizes completed and ongoing studies evaluating the activity of immune checkpoint inhibitors in esophagogastric cancer. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.12.007DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Immunotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Apr;33(2):301-321

Earle A. Chiles Research Institute, Robert W. Franz Cancer Center, Providence Portland Medical Center, Providence Cancer Institute, 4805 Northeast Glisan Street, Suite 2N35, Portland, OR 97213, USA; Head and Neck Institute, 1849 NW Kearney, Suite 300, Portland, Oregon 97209, USA. Electronic address:

The immune system has a vital role in the development, establishment, and progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Immune evasion of cancer cells leads to progression of HNSCC. An understanding of this mechanism provides the basis for improved therapies and outcomes for patients. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.12.006DOI Listing
April 2019
8 Reads

Prognostic and Predictive Immunohistochemistry-Based Biomarkers in Cancer and Immunotherapy.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Apr 17;33(2):291-299. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of Medicine, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, 650 West 168th Street, Black Building 8-816, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

Immunotherapy has drastically improved the prognosis of many patients with cancer, but it can also lead to severe immune-related adverse events. Biomarkers, which are molecular markers that indicate a patient's disease outcome or a patient's response to treatment, are therefore crucial to helping clinicians weigh the potential benefits of immunotherapy against its potential toxicities. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) has thus far been a powerful technique for discovery and use of biomarkers such as CD8 tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.12.005DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

Immunotherapy Toxicity.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Apr 28;33(2):275-290. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Dana 2, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Electronic address:

The development of immunotherapy to target cancer has led to improved treatment of many types of malignancy. The immune checkpoint inhibitors are a class of medications that block cell signaling and allow the immune system to recognize and attack cancer cells. CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1 inhibitors have been approved as treatment options in many different types of localized and advanced malignancies. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.12.008DOI Listing

Cytokine Therapy.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Apr 28;33(2):261-274. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Medical Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, 1500 East Duarte Road, Duarte, CA 91010, USA. Electronic address:

The processes controlled by cytokines may be co-opted by pathologic states, contributing to processes that threaten host well-being. A nuanced understanding of this immense web of chemical communications will allow us to understand the mechanisms and limitations of current therapies and to enhance their therapeutic benefits while minimizing their toxicities. This article reviews the current state of cytokine science in malignancy, focusing on agents that are approved for therapy or are in late-stage development. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.12.004DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Intralesional Cancer Immunotherapies.

Authors:
Patrick A Ott

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Apr 28;33(2):249-260. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Medical Oncology, Melanoma Center, Center for Immuno-Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215-5450, USA; Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address:

Melanoma and other solid cancers with low or absent T-cell inflammation respond poorly to immune checkpoint inhibitors. Tumor infiltration with T cells that are directed against tumor antigens requires the induction of an innate immune response leading to production of type I interferons and maturation and activation of dendritic cells that can cross-present tumor antigens to T cells. Intralesional therapies, including oncolytic viral therapies, inflammatory cytokines, and agonists of Toll-like receptors and stimulator of interferon genes, can provide the necessary stimuli to trigger such an innate immune response. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.12.009DOI Listing
April 2019
8 Reads

Radiation Therapy and Immune Modulation.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Apr 17;33(2):233-248. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Electronic address:

Radiotherapy has known immunomodulatory effects and there exists a strong preclinical rationale for combining radiotherapy with immunotherapies. Broadly, the concurrent administration of immunotherapies and radiotherapy does not seem to result in undue toxicity, even when radiotherapy is administered to definitive doses. Recently reported results from prospective clinical trials evaluating radiotherapy/ICB combinations, such as the PACIFIC trial, provide important information on safety and efficacy in the definitive setting and identify potential abscopal effects. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.12.003DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Innate Immune Stimulation in Cancer Therapy.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Apr 9;33(2):215-231. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Center of Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPS-M), Klinikum der Universität München, Lindwurmstrasse 2a, Munich 80337, Germany. Electronic address:

The innate immune system has evolved as a first line of defense against invading pathogens and acts via classes of germline-encoded receptor systems to respond with proinflammatory cytokines. Innate immune cells, predominantly cells of the myeloid compartment, are capable of providing a potent basis for boosting adaptive immunity in malignant diseases. The authors review their current understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby innate pattern recognition receptors participate in immunosurveillance of cancer cells. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.12.002DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Cancer Vaccines.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Apr 28;33(2):199-214. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Genitourinary Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Building 10, Room B2L324B, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Cancer vaccines are a promising strategic approach within the rapidly growing field of immuno-oncology. Therapeutic cancer vaccines are distinct from prophylactic vaccines and vary by both target antigen and vaccine platform. There are currently 3 FDA-approved therapeutic cancer vaccines: intravesical BCG live, sipuleucel-T, and T-VEC. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.12.001DOI Listing

Cutaneous Malignancy.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):xv-xvi

Harvard Medical School, Department of Dermatology, Center for Cutaneous Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.09.007DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Erratum.

Authors:

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):xiii

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.11.001DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Cutaneous Sarcomas.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):87-101

Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 221 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Cutaneous Oncology Program, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Electronic address:

Cutaneous sarcomas are rare malignancies that may present with a variety of clinical manifestations. This article focuses on 4 of the most common cutaneous sarcomas (Kaposi sarcoma, cutaneous angiosarcoma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, and cutaneous leiomyosarcoma) and reviews clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of these rare skin malignancies. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.08.007DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Extramammary Paget's Disease.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):73-85

Department of Dermatology, The Centers for Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) is a rare cutaneous malignancy most commonly affecting the genitals, perineum, and perianal area of the elderly. Despite its rarity, to those impacted, the disease and its treatment can have a tremendous impact on quality of life. Commonly confined to the epidermis, EMPD can be invasive, associated with contiguous extension or upward pagetoid spread of underlying malignancy or with distant synchronous malignancy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.09.003DOI Listing
February 2019
17 Reads

Malignant Sweat Gland Tumors.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):53-71

Department of Pathology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston Salem, NC 27157, USA. Electronic address:

Malignant sweat gland neoplasms are a confusing area within dermatopathology, with many entities reported under several designations in the literature. This review describes the key clinical and histopathologic features of select malignant adnexal neoplasms, including porocarcinoma, papillary carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, cribriform carcinoma, apocrine hidradenocarcinoma, malignant mixed tumor of the skin, syringoid carcinoma, cylindrocarcinoma, spiradenocarcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, polymorphous sweat gland carcinoma, microcystic adnexal carcinoma, secretory carcinoma of the skin, and primary cutaneous signet ring cell carcinoma. For entities with overlapping features, differential diagnoses are discussed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.09.002DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

Merkel Cell Carcinoma Review.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):39-52

Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA; Department of Dermatology, Center for Cutaneous Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare and aggressive cutaneous malignancy of neuroendocrine origin-an often-missed diagnosis due to the wide histopathologic differential diagnosis of malignant small blue cell tumors. The advent of electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry staining for cytokeratin 20, a shared neuroendocrine marker, greatly improved diagnostic accuracy. Over the past decade, staging, treatment, and surveillance of the cancer have progressed at a remarkably rapid pace. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.08.002DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Cutaneous Melanoma-A Review in Detection, Staging, and Management.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):25-38

Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 41 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Room 319, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Melanoma Program, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

Melanoma is an increasingly common cancer in the United States, although mortality has likely stabilized. Diagnosis relies on a skilled practitioner with the aid of dermoscopy and initial local surgical management is a mainstay of treatment. Recent changes in staging emphasize continued use of sentinel lymph node biopsy to aid in prognostication although routine complete lymph node dissection has fallen out of favor. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.09.005DOI Listing
February 2019
21 Reads

Cutaneous Metastasis.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):173-197

James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, 529 S. Jackson Street, Louisville, KY 40202, USA; Division of Dermatology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, 3810 Springhurst Boulevard, Suite. 200, Louisville, KY 40241, USA; Onco-Dermatology Program, Norton Cancer Institute, 676 South Floyd Street, Suite 200, Louisville, KY 40202, USA. Electronic address:

Although rare, cutaneous metastases portend a poor prognosis and are often an indicator of widespread disease. Breast cancer and melanoma are the most common types of cancer that are associated with spread to and within the skin; however, other malignancies, such as lung, colon, head and neck, and hematologic, have been described with a degree of relative frequency. A variety of clinical appearances and syndromes of cutaneous metastases are presented and described in this article. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.08.008DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Cutaneous Involvement of Hematologic Malignancies.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):163-172

Lymphoma Clinic, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Electronic address:

In reviewing cutaneous manifestations of various hematologic malignancies, the authors focus on secondary cutaneous lymphomas and cutaneous manifestations of histiocyte disorders. Secondary cutaneous lymphomas are defined as skin lesions that develop secondary to infiltration by systemic lymphomas with predominantly extracutaneous involvement. In their review of histiocytic disorders with skin involvement, the authors focus on Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Rosai-Dorfman disease. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898588183078
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.08.005DOI Listing
February 2019
19 Reads

Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):149-161

Section of Dermatology, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, One Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA. Electronic address:

Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas are non-Hodgkin lymphomas that present in the skin without evidence of extracutaneous involvement at diagnosis. There are 3 types of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas: primary cutaneous marginal zone lymphoma, primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma, and primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg-type. Because it is most frequently diagnosed on skin biopsy, intravascular large B-cell lymphoma is commonly included with pcBCL. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.08.006DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads
2.295 Impact Factor

Rare Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphomas.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):135-148

Department of Dermatology, University of Pittsburgh, 3708 Fifth Avenue, 5th Floor, Suite 500.68, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. Electronic address:

Rare lymphoma includes the entities that occur in less than 1% of cases of all lymphomas. Although the percentage is low, there are more than eight lymphomas classified as rare lymphomas. This article describes clinical presentation, diagnosis, prognosis, and management of the most common rare lymphomas, including primary cutaneous γδ T-cell lymphoma, primary cutaneous CD4 small/medium T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder, primary cutaneous acral CD8 T-cell lymphoma, primary cutaneous CD8 aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma, extranodal NK-/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, and subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.08.004DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Basal Cell Carcinoma Review.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):13-24

High-Risk Skin Cancer Clinic, Dana Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, Mohs and Dermatologic Surgery Center, Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1153 Centre Street, Suite 4J, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130-3446, USA. Electronic address:

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignancy and the incidence is rising. BCCs have low mortality but can cause significant morbidity primarily through local destruction. The pathogenesis is linked to the interplay between environmental and patient-derived characteristics. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.09.004DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

A Review of Primary Cutaneous CD30 Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):121-134

Department of Dermatology, Columbia University, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

Primary cutaneous CD30 lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs) comprise a range of diseases (LyP, pcALCL, and borderline lesions) with broad histologic and phenotypical characteristics, although they all share the common feature of a favorable prognosis notwithstanding histology suggestive of a high-grade lymphoma. Given their cytomorphologic similarities, accurate diagnosis and workup are needed to differentiate these distinct entities in order to best use novel biologic therapies and avoid aggressive overtreatment. Moreover, although CD30 LPDs have a favorable prognosis, secondary malignancies should be considered as part of the initial evaluation, and patients should have ongoing surveillance. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.08.003DOI Listing
February 2019
11 Reads

Mycosis Fungoides and Sézary Syndrome: An Update.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):103-120

Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous collection of non-Hodgkin lymphomas that arise from skin-tropic memory T lymphocytes. Among them, mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS) are the most common malignancies. Diagnosis requires the combination of clinical, pathologic, and molecular features. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.09.001DOI Listing
February 2019
11 Reads

Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2019 Feb;33(1):1-12

Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 1153 Centre Street, Suite 4J, Boston, MA 02130, USA.

Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma represents 20% of all skin cancers, resulting in 1 million cases in the United States each year. The lifetime risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma continues to increase annually and will likely continue to increase because of the aging population. Most cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma are treated locally, with a subset leading to recurrence, metastasis, and death. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.08.001DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Ovarian Cancer.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12 25;32(6):xiii-xiv. Epub 2018 Sep 25.

Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898588183079
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.09.006DOI Listing
December 2018
5 Reads

Targeting DNA Damage Response and Repair as a Therapeutic Strategy for Ovarian Cancer.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12;32(6):997-1010

Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

Large-scale genomic studies have demonstrated that ovarian cancer is characterized by frequent genetic and epigenetic alterations of gene members of the homologous recombination repair pathway. Homologous recombination repair deficiency induces genomic instability and hyperdependence on alternative DNA repair mechanisms, and is associated with enhanced sensitivity to double-strand break-inducing agents such as platinum analogues and poly(adenosine diphosphate)-ribose polymerase inhibitors. The authors review the DNA repair pathway alterations that are present in ovarian cancer, and discuss current and emerging therapeutic approaches that target the DNA damage response and repair focusing on chemotherapy and poly(adenosine diphosphate)-ribose polymerase inhibitors. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898588183075
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.006DOI Listing
December 2018
16 Reads

Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12;32(6):983-996

Cancer Research Division, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, 305 Grattan Street, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia; Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia. Electronic address:

Resistance in ovarian cancer is driven by a range of mechanisms, some of which are therapy specific whereas others confer multidrug resistance. This review outlines our current understanding of the heterogeneous mechanisms of both primary and acquired drug resistance in high-grade serous ovarian cancer with a focus on the most common therapeutics, including platinum and taxanes. Current therapeutic strategies for overcoming resistance, including the use of non-P- glycoprotein substrate therapies, are outlined, with an emphasis on the importance of developing resistance biomarkers to guide future therapy approaches and improve patient outcomes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.007DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Management and Treatment of Recurrent Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12;32(6):965-982

Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1155 Herman Pressler, Unit 1362, Houston, TX 77030-1362, USA; Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 1444, P.O. Box 301402, Houston, TX 77230-1402, USA. Electronic address:

Most women with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer will experience many episodes of recurrent disease with progressively shorter disease-free intervals. For women whose disease continues to respond to platinum-based drugs, the disease can often be controlled for 5 years or more. Enormous progress has been made in the management of this disease, and new targeted treatments such as antiangiogenic drugs, poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, and immune checkpoint inhibitors offer potential for improved survival. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898588183075
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.005DOI Listing
December 2018
15 Reads

Diagnosis and Treatment of Ovarian Cancer.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12;32(6):943-964

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. Electronic address:

Epithelial ovarian cancer classically presents with vague persistent gastrointestinal, urologic, or nonacute abdominal/pelvic symptoms (bloating, early satiety, discomfort). Ultimately, a pelvic examination or imaging identifies an adnexal mass typically with accompanied advanced peritoneal dissemination. Management involves aggressive cytoreductive surgery in combination with platinum and taxane chemotherapy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.010DOI Listing
December 2018
4 Reads

Pathogenesis, Genetics, and Genomics of Non-High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancers.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12 1;32(6):929-942. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Nicola Murray Centre for Ovarian Cancer Research, Cancer Research UK Edinburgh Centre, MRC Institute of Genetics & Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Crewe Road South, Edinburgh EH4 2XR, UK. Electronic address:

The 5 main non-high grade serous epithelial ovarian cancers (clear cell, low grade endometrioid, low grade serous, mucinous, and carcinosarcoma) are discrete in terms of their pathogenesis, molecular biology, and treatment sensitivity. This article reviews the current understanding of their pathogenesis and molecular biology, highlighting areas of uncertainty where future research efforts should be focused. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.004DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Frontiers in the Pathology and Pathogenesis of Ovarian Cancer: Cancer Precursors and "Precursor Escape".

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12;32(6):915-928

Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

This article summarizes the pathogenesis of ovarian carcinoma, focusing on the paradox of high-grade serous carcinogenesis. The fallopian tube is the prime site of origin in early serous cancers. Because a subset of serous cancers is associated with early serous proliferations absent intramucosal carcinomas, "precursor escape" is emerging, whereby some advanced cancers trace their roots to early serous proliferations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.013DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads

Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12 28;32(6):903-914. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Early detection of ovarian cancer could reduce mortality by 10% to 30%. Effective screening requires high sensitivity (>75%) and extremely high specificity (99.7%). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898588183075
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6376972PMC
December 2018
12 Reads

Risk Factors for Ovarian Carcinoma.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12 27;32(6):891-902. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive MCC-CANCONT, Tampa, FL 33612, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

Ovarian cancer is the leading gynecologic killer of women in the United States. At diagnosis, most women present with advanced-stage disease. There are currently no effective screening strategies for average-risk women, thus understanding disease development and progression is important for developing risk-reduction strategies and identifying high-risk populations who can benefit from preventive surgery. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898588183075
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.002DOI Listing
December 2018
14 Reads

Palliative Care and Symptom Management for Women with Advanced Ovarian Cancer.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12;32(6):1087-1102

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Women's Health, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1695 Eastchester Road, Bronx, NY 10461, USA; Albert Einstein Cancer Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. Electronic address:

The purpose of this article is to review data supporting the benefit of palliative care, specifically for women with advanced ovarian cancer. Authors discuss barriers to implementation of palliative care, including confusion with hospice and challenges of prognostication. Generalist-level palliative techniques for treatment of pain, shortness of breath, bowel obstruction, and ascites are described. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898588183076
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.012DOI Listing
December 2018
17 Reads

Living Through Ovarian Cancer Treatment: Acute and Long-Term Toxicities of Chemotherapy for Advanced-Stage Disease.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12;32(6):1073-1085

Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Toxicities during chemotherapy for patients with ovarian cancer who present with advanced-stage disease are frequent and diverse. This review aims to describe common toxicities and management strategies for classic cytotoxic treatments and to briefly discuss the current understanding of toxicities associated with targeted therapies. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.009DOI Listing
December 2018

Antibody Drug Conjugates in the Treatment of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12 1;32(6):1057-1071. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Institute, The University of Oklahoma, 800 Northeast 10th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA.

Antibody drug conjugates are novel mechanisms for delivering chemotherapy. They vary based on the targeted antigen, conjugated cytotoxic, and the type of linker used. These differences determine what cells are targeted. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898588183076
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.014DOI Listing
December 2018
18 Reads

Targeting Angiogenesis: Taming the Medusa of Ovarian Cancer.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12;32(6):1041-1055

Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, ON, Canada; Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 700 University Avenue, Suite 7-925, Toronto, ON M5G 1Z5, Canada.

Epithelial ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic cancers with a 5-year survival rate of less than 50%. Cytotoxic combinations are associated with incremental toxicity, leading to interest in evaluating cytotoxic/biologic combinations with improved therapeutic ratios. Angiogenesis is critical to the normal physiology of the gynecologic tract and a novel drug target. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898588183075
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.008DOI Listing
December 2018
5 Reads

Emerging Role and Future Directions of Immunotherapy in Advanced Ovarian Cancer.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12 1;32(6):1025-1039. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Center for Immunotherapy, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA; Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA. Electronic address:

Clinical progress in cancer immunotherapy has been slow; however, within the last 5 years, breakthrough successes have brought immunotherapy to the forefront in cancer therapy. Promising results have been observed in solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Most treatment modalities have shown limited efficacy as monotherapy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898588183076
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.011DOI Listing
December 2018
15 Reads

Treatment of Rare Epithelial Ovarian Tumors.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 12;32(6):1011-1024

Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1155 Pressler, Unit 1362, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Traditionally, the management of epithelial ovarian cancer has been approached using a one-size-fits-all mentality. This strategy does not acknowledge the differences in epidemiology and clinical behavior of many of the histologic and molecular subgroups of ovarian cancer, specifically the rare histologies. While cytoreductive surgery followed by adjuvant platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy is the mainstay of primary treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer as a group, further investigation of novel therapeutics is critical for improving outcomes of these rare histologies. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898588183076
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.015DOI Listing
December 2018
7 Reads

Waldenström Macroglobulinemia: Lessons Learned from Basic and Clinical Research.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 10;32(5):xiii-xiv

Bing Center for Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 450 Brookline Avenue, M548, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898588183075
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.07.001DOI Listing
October 2018
5 Reads

Novel Approaches in Waldenström Macroglobulinemia.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 Oct 19;32(5):875-890. Epub 2018 Jul 19.

Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford Cancer Institute, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Electronic address:

Recent advances in the understanding of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) biology have paved the way for development of a plethora of novel therapeutic strategies. The success of ibrutinib in WM has shifted treatment paradigms away from conventional chemoimmunotherapy approaches. Recognition of high-risk genomic subgroups as well as mechanisms of acquired resistance to ibrutinib have led to targeting of additional pathways. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898588183074
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.05.014DOI Listing
October 2018
9 Reads

High-Dose Therapy and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Waldenström Macroglobulinemia.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 Oct 27;32(5):865-874. Epub 2018 Jul 27.

Department of Haematology, University College London, Huntley Street, London WC1E 6AG, UK. Electronic address:

Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is an indolent low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by bone marrow infiltration by lymphoplasmacytic cells and associated clonal IgM paraproteinemia. Recent insights into the biology and genomic characteristics of WM have provided a further platform for more targeted therapies. Despite the high response rates and better depth and duration of responses, the disease remains incurable. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.05.013DOI Listing
October 2018
9 Reads

First-Generation and Second-Generation Bruton Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Waldenström Macroglobulinemia.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 Oct 19;32(5):853-864. Epub 2018 Jul 19.

Department of Medicine, Lymphoma Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address:

Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is an indolent B-cell lymphoma that is heavily dependent on Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) hyperactivation. Ibrutinib is a first-generation BTK inhibitor that has shown high activity and durable responses in patients with relapsed/refractory WM. Newer and more selective BTK inhibitors are currently being tested in several clinical trials and are expected to address the toxicity and the acquired resistance observed in patients receiving ibrutinib. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.05.012DOI Listing
October 2018
10 Reads

Monoclonal Antibodies for Waldenström Macroglobulinemia.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 Oct 21;32(5):841-852. Epub 2018 Jul 21.

Bing Center for Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 450 Brookline Avenue, Mayer 221, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Electronic address:

For the last 2 decades, anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies have revolutionized the treatment of patients with B-cell lymphomas. These agents have shown efficacy when used as single agents and also have improved response and survival rates when added to chemotherapy. Monoclonal antibodies are safe and effective as well in patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.05.010DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Proteasome Inhibitors in Waldenström Macroglobulinemia.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 Oct 25;32(5):829-840. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

Department of Clinical Therapeutics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens School of Medicine, 80 Vassilisis Sofias Avenue, Athens 11528, Greece.

Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) remains an incurable B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder, yet therapy is only considered for patients with symptomatic disease. Primary therapy options for WM include combinations based on anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, mainly rituximab. However, proteasome inhibitors have become an important part of WM therapy both as primary therapy and as salvage option. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08898588183073
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.05.011DOI Listing
October 2018
13 Reads

Alkylating Agents in the Treatment of Waldenström Macroglobulinemia.

Authors:
Christian Buske

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 10 25;32(5):821-827. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

Comprehensive Cancer Center Ulm, Institute of Experimental Cancer Research, University Hospital Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm 89081, Germany. Electronic address:

The introduction of ibrutinib has grossly changed the treatment landscape in patients with Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia. Nevertheless, chemotherapy in combination with rituximab is still a cornerstone treatment. Among chemotherapeutics, alkylating agents are most frequently used. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.05.009DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Initial Evaluation of the Patient with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 10 23;32(5):811-820. Epub 2018 Jul 23.

Bing Center for Waldenström Macroglobulinemia, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 450 Brookline Avenue, Mayer 221, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

The initial evaluation of the patient with Waldenström macroglobulinemia can be challenging. Not only is it a rare disease, but the clinical features can vary greatly from patient to patient. In this article, we aim at providing concise and practical recommendations for the initial evaluation of patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia, specifically regarding history taking, physical examination, laboratory testing, bone marrow aspiration, and biopsy evaluation and imaging studies. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.05.008DOI Listing
October 2018
7 Reads

Familial Waldenström Macroglobulinemia: Families Informing Populations.

Authors:
Mary L McMaster

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 10 26;32(5):787-809. Epub 2018 Jul 26.

Clinical Genetics Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Room 6E516, MSC 9772, Bethesda, MD 20892-9772, USA; Commissioned Corps of the US Public Health Service, US Department of Health and Human Services, 330 C Street SW, Washington, DC 20416, USA. Electronic address:

Familial clustering of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) has been observed for nearly 6 decades. Family studies have provided seminal observations in delineating the phenotypic spectrum of WM susceptibility and confirming the importance of immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (IgM MGUS) as a precursor condition for WM, providing the rationale for large population-based epidemiologic studies of IgM MGUS and WM, and providing both the basis and the material for ongoing genetic studies aimed at identifying WM predisposition genes. Together, these investigations may help elucidate the host factors underlying WM development. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.05.006DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

The Bone Marrow Microenvironment in Waldenström Macroglobulinemia.

Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 2018 10 25;32(5):777-786. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address:

Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is an indolent B-cell lymphoma defined predominantly by infiltration of lymphoplasmacytic cells into the bone marrow (BM) and increased production of monoclonal immunoglobulin M (IgM) by lymphoplasmacytic cells, and the secretion of IgM is enhanced by cytokines in the bone marrow microenvironment. This article highlights the available data regarding the interaction of WM cells with both the cellular and noncellular compartments of the BM microenvironment and discusses how the BM promotes malignant cell growth and increases IgM production in this disease. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2018.05.005DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads