788 results match your criteria Heart Failure Clinics [Journal]


Imaging Heart Failure: Beyond Modalities of Pathophysiology, Prognosis, Therapy, and Practice.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr;15(2):xiii-xiv

Division of Cardiology, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Via A. Cardarelli, 9 - 80131 Naples, Italy. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2019.02.001DOI Listing

Biomarkers and Imaging: Complementary or Subtractive?

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr 2;15(2):321-331. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University, Via Pansini 5, Naples 80138, Italy; Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Biomedical Materials (CRIB), Piazzale Tecchio 80, Naples 80125, Italy. Electronic address:

Heart failure is a life-threatening disease. Its prevalence is characterized by a slow, steady increase, with unacceptable high mortality. Slowing disease progression is imperative. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.008DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads
1.408 Impact Factor

Imaging Device Therapy: Essentials for the Imager.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr 10;15(2):305-320. Epub 2019 Feb 10.

Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, 473 West 12th Avenue, Suite 200, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

Treatment of patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction has evolved. Recently, a fully implantable remote hemodynamic monitoring sensor in the pulmonary artery was approved in the treatment of patients at risk of heart failure readmissions. Several novel devices designed to offload the left atrium by creating a small interatrial shunt are being investigated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.011DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

Ultrasound of the Lungs: More than a Room with a View.

Authors:
Luna Gargani

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr 10;15(2):297-303. Epub 2019 Feb 10.

Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Via Moruzzi, 1, Pisa 56124, Italy. Electronic address:

Lung ultrasound B-lines are the sonographic pattern of partial deaeration of the lung. In patients with pulmonary edema they are detected as multiple, diffuse, and bilateral, by placing the ultrasound probe in the intercostal spaces. B-lines can be used for bedside monitoring of pulmonary decongestion, and can guide diuretic therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.010DOI Listing

Imaging-Specific Cardiomyopathies: A Practical Guide.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr;15(2):275-295

Division of Cardiology, Peter Munk Cardiac Center, Ted Rogers Program in Cardiotoxicity Prevention, Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, 4N-490, 585 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2N2, Canada. Electronic address:

Heart failure is a clinical syndrome with a broad spectrum of presentations. Cardiovascular imaging techniques such as echocardiography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, computed tomography, and nuclear imaging play a crucial role in diagnosis, guiding management, and providing prognostic information. Each of these imaging modalities has their own respective strengths and weaknesses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.007DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Ventricular Stiffness and Ventricular-Arterial Coupling in Heart Failure: What Is It, How to Assess, and Why?

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr;15(2):267-274

Division of Cardiology, Severance Cardiovascular Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

The heart and blood vessels are constantly interfering with each other in a closed system. For a few decades, the concept of ventricular-arterial coupling has been considered as a key pathogenesis of heart failure especially in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.006DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Intraventricular Flow: More than Pretty Pictures.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr 2;15(2):257-265. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Division of Cardiology, Severance Cardiovascular Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodae mun-gu, Seoul 03722, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Patients with heart failure show myocardial, valvular, and electrical dysfunction, which results in enlarged cardiac chambers and increased intracardiac volume and pressure. Intracardiac flow analysis can provide information regarding the shape and wall properties, chamber dimensions, and flow efficiency throughout the cardiac cycle. There is increasing interest in vortex flow analysis for patients with heart failure to overcome limitations of conventional parameters. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.005DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

The Role of Echocardiography in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction: What Do We Want from Imaging?

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr 2;15(2):241-256. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, MN 55906, USA. Electronic address:

Noninvasive imaging, particularly echocardiography, plays a central role in the evaluation for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Echocardiography helps to rule in HFpEF among patients with unexplained dyspnea when the diagnosis is uncertain. In established HFpEF, echocardiography provides important insights into pathophysiology and phenotyping, such as isolated left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, left atrial dysfunction, abnormal right ventricular-pulmonary artery coupling, ischemia, or obesity phenotypes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6402610PMC

Resting and Exercise Doppler Hemodynamics: How and Why?

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr 2;15(2):229-239. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Department of Cardiology, The Alfred, 55 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia; Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, 75 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia.

Exercise intolerance is the clinical hallmark of the failing heart. Evidence of hemodynamic derangement is not always present at rest, often necessitating dynamic challenges to accentuate abnormalities. Although cardiac catheterization, particularly with exercise, remains the gold standard method for hemodynamic assessment, it is limited by practicality, access, risk, and its invasive nature; consequently, there is a need to better understand noninvasive measures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.003DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

Valve Disease in Heart Failure: Secondary but Not Irrelevant.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr 10;15(2):219-227. Epub 2019 Feb 10.

King's Health Partners, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS, UK.

Secondary regurgitation caused by the remodeling and dysfunction of the left or right heart chamber may complicate heart failure, worsening both symptoms and prognosis. Outcome studies have shown that patients' prognosis worsened as the severity of secondary regurgitation increases. Imaging and more specifically echocardiography plays a central role for diagnosis and serial assessment of secondary regurgitation as well as for timing the intervention and guiding the procedure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.014DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Right Ventricular Size and Function in Chronic Heart Failure: Not to Be Forgotten.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr 10;15(2):205-217. Epub 2019 Feb 10.

Cardiology Division, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples, Italy. Electronic address:

A comprehensive multi-imaging evaluation of the right heart structure, function, and pressures represents an essential step in the diagnostic and prognostic algorithm of patients with heart failure. Furthermore, it provides important information for detecting early signs of right ventricular unfavorable remodeling, and consequently, guiding appropriate therapeutic interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.015DOI Listing

Importance of the Left Atrium: More Than a Bystander?

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr 2;15(2):191-204. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging Laboratories, Section of Cardiology, Heart & Vascular Center, University of Chicago Medicine, The University of Chicago Medical Center, 5758 South Maryland Avenue, MC 9067, DCAM 5509, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. Electronic address:

Left atrial size and function parameters are associated with adverse outcomes in multiple disease states, including heart failure with reduced and preserved ejection fraction. Recent data suggest that phasic left atrial function and left atrial stain measurements also hold prognostic information. Three-dimensional echocardiography provides more accurate and reproducible quantification of left atrial volumes than 2-dimensional echocardiography when compared with cardiac magnetic resonance reference standards. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.001DOI Listing

Myocardial Scar and Fibrosis: The Ultimate Mediator of Outcomes?

Authors:
Erik B Schelbert

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr 2;15(2):179-189. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

UPMC Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Heart and Vascular Institute, UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 200 Lothrop Street, PUH E E354.2, Pittsburgh, PA 15101, USA; Clinical and Translational Science Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Electronic address:

The cardiology community lacks a taxonomy to prioritize the origins of the complex myocardial pathology underlying heart failure. The key question, "Why does heart muscle fail?", remains unanswered. A large body of literature indicates that myocardial fibrosis represents a principal pathway mediating outcomes in heart failure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.009DOI Listing

Myocardial Strain and Dyssynchrony: Incremental Value?

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr 2;15(2):167-178. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Gentofte Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Niels Andersens Vej 65, Hellerup 2900, Denmark. Electronic address:

Heart failure (HF) has evolved in an epidemic manner and constitutes a major public health issue. Currently, several prognostic markers and treatment options exist to guide treatment of HF with reduced ejection fraction, but echocardiographic deformation imaging suggests novel pathophysiologic aspects that could help optimize treatment further. Even though no formal treatment options currently exist for patients with HF with preserved ejection fraction, some HF medication does seem to attenuate strain measures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.002DOI Listing

Left Ventricular Mass and Thickness: Why Does It Matter?

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr 10;15(2):159-166. Epub 2019 Feb 10.

Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Department, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.

Several left ventricular geometric patterns have been described both in healthy and pathologic hearts. Left ventricular mass, wall thickness, and the ratio of wall thickness to radius are important measures to characterize the spectrum of left ventricular geometry. For clinicians, an increase in left ventricular mass is the hallmark of left ventricular hypertrophy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.013DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Left Ventricular Size and Ejection Fraction: Are They Still Relevant?

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Apr 2;15(2):147-158. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, University of Zagreb School of Medicine, University Hospital Centre Zagreb, Kispaticeva 12, Zagreb 10000, Croatia. Electronic address:

Despite the rapid development of emerging imaging technologies, left ventricular ejection fraction represents the cornerstone of diagnosis, choice of treatment, and prognosis in heart failure. However, true myocardial function often remains underestimated or overestimated in different conditions underlying this heterogeneous syndrome. Changes in left ventricular size and left ventricular ejection fraction, termed reverse remodeling, are among the main goals of treatment in heart failure, aimed at halting or attenuating disease progression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.12.012DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read
1.408 Impact Factor

Heart Failure in Women: An Increasing Health Concern.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Jan;15(1):xiii-xiv

Preventative Cardiology and Women's Cardiovascular Health, Division of Cardiology, The Ohio State University, 473 West 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43065, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.10.001DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Advanced Therapies for Advanced Heart Failure in Women.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Jan 24;15(1):97-107. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Center for Advanced Cardiac Care, Columbia University Medical Center, 622 West 168th Street PH1273, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Women with advanced heart failure (HF) are underrepresented in trials of short-term and durable mechanical circulatory support although they derive similar benefit. In acute HF, intensive medical and interventional therapies are effective but underutilized. The smaller, newer generation, left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have increased the feasibility of durable support in women. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15517136183007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.08.010DOI Listing
January 2019
22 Reads

Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction in Women.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Jan;15(1):9-18

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address:

Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is an increasingly prevalent condition, particularly in women. Comorbidities, including older age, obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, are risk factors and define phenotypic profiles of HFpEF in women. The condition has a relatively high burden of morbidity and mortality, with phenotypic profiles potentially characterizing risk of hospitalization and mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.08.002DOI Listing
January 2019
14 Reads

Heart Failure in Women with Congenital Heart Disease.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Jan 24;15(1):87-96. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Heart failure remains the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Although gender-specific outcomes are not robust, it seems that women with CHD may be more affected by late heart failure (HF) than men. A specialized and experienced adult CHD team is required to care for these women as they age, including assessment for reversible causes of HF and in the management of pregnancy, labor, and delivery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.08.009DOI Listing
January 2019
10 Reads

Valvular Heart Disease and Heart Failure in Women.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Jan;15(1):77-85

Division of Cardiology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street Blake 256, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address:

Valvular heart disease and heart failure remain important causes of cardiovascular disease among women in the United States. Mitral regurgitation, aortic stenosis, and tricuspid regurgitation are the most common valvular lesions among men and women. This review focuses on gender differences in the epidemiology, treatment, and outcomes of mitral regurgitation, aortic stenosis, and tricuspid regurgitation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.08.008DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Breast Cancer and Heart Failure.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Jan;15(1):65-75

Department of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, 1364 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA; Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, 1365 Clifton Road Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Heart failure and breast cancer have shared risks and morbidities. Multimodality therapies for breast cancer, including conventional chemotherapy, targeted therapeutics, radiation therapy, and hormonal agents, may make patients more susceptible to asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction and clinical heart failure during and after treatment. New or preexisting left ventricular dysfunction may lead to interruptions in cancer treatment and limit options of breast cancer systemic therapy, leading to adverse outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.08.007DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure in Women.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Jan 24;15(1):55-64. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Department of Medicine, Cardiology Division, Rush University Medical Center, 1725 W. Harrison Street, Room 1159, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. Electronic address:

Atrial fibrillation often occurs as a cause or consequence of heart failure. Clinical outcomes are worse when atrial fibrillation and heart failure coexist. There are important sex-related differences in the incidence, prevalence, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcomes of these patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.08.006DOI Listing
January 2019
13 Reads

Stress-Induced Cardiomyopathy.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Jan;15(1):41-53

Division of Cardiology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1825 Eastchester Road, 2nd Floor Cardiology, Bronx, NY 10467, USA. Electronic address:

Stress-induced cardiomyopathy is characterized by reversible myocardial injury with distinctive regional wall motion abnormalities of the left ventricle, usually precipitated by an emotional or physical stressor. This condition has a strong predilection for older women and has a trend of increasing incidence. The diagnosis can be made based on symptoms, biomarkers, electrocardiogram, coronary angiogram, and noninvasive imaging. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15517136183007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.08.005DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Peripartum Cardiomyopathy: Progress in Understanding the Etiology, Management, and Prognosis.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Jan 25;15(1):29-39. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 1st Street Southwest, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Occurring in approximately 1 in 1000 live births in the United States, peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is characterized by left ventricular ejection fraction reduced to less than 45% near the end of pregnancy or within the first 5 months after delivery. Although the cause of PPCM remains unclear, increasing evidence supports a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors contributing to angiogenic imbalance, which may lead to myocardial dysfunction in a susceptible woman. This article reviews the progress that has been made regarding understanding of the cause, management, and natural history of PPCM. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.08.004DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction in Women: Epidemiology, Outcomes, and Treatment.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Jan 24;15(1):19-27. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Heart and Vascular Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 9500 Euclid Avenue, J3-4, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.

There are millions of people affected by heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) as diagnosed with ejection fraction 40% or less by imaging. Established therapies have been proven through clinical trials on lifestyle interventions, medications, and devices for HFrEF to improve quality of life, heart function, and survival. Although there are more men than women suffering with HFrEF, there are no prospectively proven, sex-specific guideline therapies because women have been underrepresented in clinical trials. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15517136183006
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.08.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6298793PMC
January 2019
12 Reads

Pulmonary Hypertension in Women.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Jan 24;15(1):137-145. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is higher in women, and the mechanism remains unclear. Prognosis is overall better for female compared with male patients with PAH. Pregnancy is associated with significant risk, mortality, and morbidity in patients with PAH; consensus guidelines recommend against pregnancy and counsel about early termination in these patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.08.013DOI Listing
January 2019
17 Reads
1.408 Impact Factor

Heart Transplantation in Women.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Jan 24;15(1):127-135. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Education in Heart Failure and Transplantation, Heart Failure Research, Smidt Heart Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8536 Wilshire Boulevard Suite 301, Los Angeles, CA 90211, USA. Electronic address:

Over the past 5 decades, heart transplantation has become an established therapy with greater quality of life and survival than expected from end-stage heart failure. Nonetheless, challenges still exist, especially for women undergoing heart transplantation. Women have greater post-transplant survival than their male counterparts but worse quality of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.08.012DOI Listing
January 2019
12 Reads

Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators and Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Women.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Jan;15(1):109-125

Cooper University Hospital, 1 Cooper Plaza, 3 Dorrance, Camden, NJ 08103, USA.

Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices have been prescribed for patients with heart failure for several decades. Factors leading to increased usage include significant enhancements in technology and availability of multiple randomized clinical trials demonstrating their benefit with improved implementation of evidence-based guidelines. Despite these advances, gaps still exist in the utilization and referral of these devices, particularly among women. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.08.011DOI Listing
January 2019
18 Reads

Sex-Specific Differences in Risk Factors for Development of Heart Failure in Women.

Heart Fail Clin 2019 Jan 24;15(1):1-8. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

The Ohio State University, 410 West 10th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

Sex specific differences exist in the impact of risk factors for the development of heart failure (HF). Addressing these differences can have an impact on prevention of HF. This article reviews sex-specific risk factors associated with development of HF. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.08.001DOI Listing
January 2019
26 Reads

Preface.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 10;14(4):xiii-xiv

Cardiology Division, "Cava de' Tirreni and Amalfi Coast" Hospital, Cardiothoracic and Vascular Department-, University Hospital, Salerno, Italy; Via Pr. Amedeo, 36, Lauro, Avellino 83023, Italy. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.08.014DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Management of Sleep Apnea in Heart Failure.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 18;14(4):635-642. Epub 2018 Aug 18.

Department of Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, Sydney Street, London SW3 6NP, UK; Royal Brompton Hospital, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Dovehouse Street, London SW3 6LR, UK; Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 2109 Adelbert Rd, Cleveland, Ohio 44106, USA.

Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is highly prevalent in heart failure (HF). The presence of SDB in patients with HF appears to be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this article, we describe the types, pathophysiology, and consequences of SDB and discuss ways in which SDB can be diagnosed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.06.008DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Interventional Heart Failure and Hemodynamic Monitoring.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 18;14(4):625-634. Epub 2018 Aug 18.

Department of Cardiology, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 473 West 12th Avenue, Suite 200, Columbus, OH 43210-1252, USA; Interventional Cardiology, 473 West 12th Avenue, Suite 200, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Electronic address:

Convergence of the fields of heart failure (HF) and interventional cardiology has led to the formation of a discipline referred to as interventional HF. Although the term may be applied to essentially any invasive procedure performed in patients with HF (eg, coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, invasive assessment of hemodynamics), it is more commonly reserved for the application of invasive diagnostic or therapeutic procedures to improve the clinical decision-making, functional status, and outcomes of HF patients. This article reviews developing modalities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.06.007DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Palliative Therapy in Heart Failure.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 16;14(4):617-624. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Division of Palliative Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, McCampbell Hall, 5th Floor, 1581 Dodd Drive, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Electronic address:

Cardiac palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach provided alongside standard heart failure management to improve a patient's quality of life. In this article the authors review the role of palliative care in heart failure management, including recent studies exploring the benefits of palliative care consultation in the inpatient and outpatient setting. They also discuss approaches to goals-of-care discussions and challenges providing end-of-life care in this patient population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.06.011DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Current Status of Inotropes in Heart Failure.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 17;14(4):601-616. Epub 2018 Aug 17.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Harrington Heart & Vascular Institute, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Inotropes are medications that improve the contractility of the heart and are used in patients with low cardiac output or evidence of end-organ dysfunction. Since their initial discovery, inotropes have held promise in alleviating symptoms and potentially increasing longevity in such patients. Decades of intensive study have further elucidated the benefits and risks of using inotropes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.06.010DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Mitral Valve Surgery for Congestive Heart Failure.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 18;14(4):585-600. Epub 2018 Aug 18.

Senior Associate Consultant, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address:

Mitral valve diseases are common causes of congestive heart failure. Chronic primary and secondary (functional) mitral valve regurgitation are the most common reasons. Valve repair for primary mitral regurgitation cures mitral valve disease, whereas in functional regurgitation, mitral valve repair is associated with high failure rates secondary to persistent/progressive ventricular dysfunction and remodeling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.06.006DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Short-Term Circulatory and Right Ventricle Support in Cardiogenic Shock: Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation, Tandem Heart, CentriMag, and Impella.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 20;14(4):579-583. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

Division of Cardiac Surgery, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 600 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21234, USA.

Severe right ventricular (RV) failure is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, with an in-hospital mortality rate up to 70% to 75%. Medical management is employed and is successful for most of these patients. However, a small percentage of patients will continue to have persistent RV failure, for which mechanical support is used for management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.06.014DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Management of Heart Failure in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 20;14(4):569-577. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, The Ohio State University, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, 473 West 12th Avenue Suite 200, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

There are more than 1 million adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) in the United States. Heart failure (HF) is the most common late cardiovascular complication. These patients are challenging to manage given their diverse presentation, anatomy, and complex hemodynamics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.06.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6204213PMC
October 2018
18 Reads

Management of Cancer Therapeutics-Related Cardiac Dysfunction.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 18;14(4):553-567. Epub 2018 Aug 18.

Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University, 410 West 10th, Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

Improvements in detection and treatment of cancer have resulted in a significant increase in cancer survivors. However, cancer survivorship comes with long-term risk of adverse effects of cancer therapies, including cardiomyopathy, heart failure, arrhythmias, ischemic heart disease, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and hypertension. There is a renewed interest in understanding the pathophysiology of cancer therapeuticserelated cardiac dysfunction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.06.004DOI Listing
October 2018
25 Reads

Management of Pulmonary Hypertension: Associated with Left Heart Disease.

Authors:
Veronica Franco

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 18;14(4):545-551. Epub 2018 Aug 18.

Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Pulmonary Hypertension Program, Advanced Heart Failure, LVAD and Transplantation Program, The Ohio State University, DHLRI Suite 200, 473 West 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Electronic address:

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to left heart disease, or WHO group 2 PH, is the most frequent cause of PH. It affects approximately 50% to 60% of patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction as well as 60% of those with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and contributes significantly to disease progression and unfavorable outcomes. The diagnosis of PH is associated with poor prognosis and significant morbidity and mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.06.009DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads
1.410 Impact Factor

Intravenous Iron Therapy in Heart Failure.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 18;14(4):537-543. Epub 2018 Aug 18.

Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation, St. Vincent Medical Group, 8333 Naab Road, Suite 400, Indianapolis, IN 46260, USA.

Iron deficiency anemia is both a comorbid condition and an indicator of poor prognosis in heart failure. The mechanisms by which this occurs are multiple and complex. Recent robust randomized clinical trials have shown significant improvements in quality of life and rates of hospitalization with intravenous repletion of iron. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.06.003DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Aldosterone Receptor Blockade in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 18;14(4):525-535. Epub 2018 Aug 18.

Department of Medicine, Section of Cardiology, Baylor College of Medicine and Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, 2002 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

More than 50% of patients with clinical heart failure have a preserved ejection fraction. Despite mortality that is similar to or slightly lower than heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, trials to date have not shown a therapy that imparts a mortality benefit in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). HFpEF represents a heterogeneous disorder with a complex pathophysiologic basis, and this may contribute to the negative results in clinical trials. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.06.002DOI Listing
October 2018
8 Reads

Ultrafiltration for the Treatment of Acute Heart Failure.

Authors:
Sitaramesh Emani

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 20;14(4):517-524. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 473 West 12th Avenue, Suite 200 DHLRI, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Electronic address:

Ultrafiltration (UF) mechanically removes excess fluid volume through an extracorporeal circuit and has been applied to clinical situations in which volume removal is the mainstay of therapy. Because of this ability, UF serves as an enticing method to treat acute heart failure (AHF) in which most symptoms are driven by congestion due to excess volume. Additional physiologic properties of UF and the biochemical composition of the extracted fluid confer additional theoretic benefits in the treatment of AHF. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.06.013DOI Listing
October 2018
8 Reads

Growth Hormone Therapy in Heart Failure.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 17;14(4):501-515. Epub 2018 Aug 17.

Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Federico II University, School of Medicine, Via Pansini 5, Naples, 80131, Italy; Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Biomedical Materials, Federico II University, Naples, 80100, Italy. Electronic address:

Several studies have shown that growth hormone (GH) deficiency is common in chronic heart failure and is associated with impaired functional capacity and poor outcomes. Data derived from animal models showed beneficial effects of GH treatment on peripheral vascular resistance, cardiac function, and survival. Despite this solid background, when translated onto the clinical field, these results did not lead to unequivocal results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.05.002DOI Listing
October 2018
14 Reads
1.410 Impact Factor

The Use and Indication of Ivabradine in Heart Failure.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 18;14(4):493-500. Epub 2018 Aug 18.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Ohio state University Wexner Medical Center, 473 W12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Electronic address:

Heart failure affects more than 6 million people in the United States each year and the prognosis is poor. The elevated heart rate in heart failure patents is problematic, because it increases myocardial oxygen demand, decreases myocardial perfusion, and has been associated with increased rates of hospitalization and mortality. For these reasons, heart rate reduction has long been a therapeutic target in heart failure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.06.001DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Sacubitril/Valsartan: The Newest Neurohormonal Blocker for Guideline-Directed Medical Therapy for Heart Failure.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Oct 17;14(4):479-491. Epub 2018 Aug 17.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 200 Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute (HLRI), 473 West 12th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1252, USA. Electronic address:

The burden of heart failure is projected to increase over the next decade; it is predicted that 1 in every 33 Americans will be affected by heart failure. Given that heart failure currently results in more than 1 million hospitalizations every year and the estimated 5-year mortality is approximately 50%, therapies that will improve survival and the economic burden are urgently needed. It is anticipated that the cost of managing heart failure is going to be approximately $70 billion in 2030. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.06.012DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Erratum.

Authors:

Heart Fail Clin 2018 07;14(3):xvii

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.03.002DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

The RIGHT Heart International NETwork (RIGHT-NET): A Road Map Through the Right Heart-Pulmonary Circulation Unit.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 07;14(3):xix-xx

Institute of Clinical Physiology-, National Research Council, via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa, Italy. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.05.001DOI Listing
July 2018
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Right Heart Catheterization for the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Hypertension: Controversies and Practical Issues.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Jul;14(3):467-477

Department of Cardiology, Erasme University Hospital, University of Brussels, Route de Lennik 808, Brussels 1070, Belgium.

Right heart catheterization (RHC) is the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of pulmonary hypertension. Significant expertise is required for safely performing a full RHC and for the acquisition of reliable and reproducible information. Physicians performing an RHC should have adequate training not only in vascular access, catheter insertion, and manipulation but also in the interpretation of waveforms, potential pitfalls, and strict quality control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.03.011DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

The Right Heart International Network (RIGHT-NET): Rationale, Objectives, Methodology, and Clinical Implications.

Heart Fail Clin 2018 Jul;14(3):443-465

Cardiology Division, Heart Department, "Cava de' Tirreni and Amalfi Coast" Hospital, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy. Electronic address:

The Right Heart International Network is a multicenter international study aiming to prospectively collect exercise Doppler echocardiography tests of the right heart pulmonary circulation unit (RHPCU) in large cohorts of healthy subjects, elite athletes, and individuals at risk of or with overt pulmonary hypertension. It is going to provide standardization of exercise stress echocardiography of RHPCU and explore the full physiopathologic response. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hfc.2018.03.010DOI Listing
July 2018
18 Reads