6,632 results match your criteria Hearing Research [Journal]


Binaural unmasking of the accuracy of envelope-signal representation in rat auditory cortex but not auditory midbrain.

Hear Res 2019 Apr 8;377:224-233. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences, Beijing Key Laboratory of Behavior and Mental Health, Peking University, Beijing, 100080, China; Speech and Hearing Research Center, Key Laboratory on Machine Perception (Ministry of Education), Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China; Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Beijing, 100096, China. Electronic address:

Accurate neural representations of acoustic signals under noisy conditions are critical for animals' survival. Detecting signal against background noise can be improved by binaural hearing particularly when an interaural-time-difference (ITD) disparity is introduced between the signal and the noise, a phenomenon known as binaural unmasking. Previous studies have mainly focused on the binaural unmasking effect on response magnitudes, and it is not clear whether binaural unmasking affects the accuracy of central representations of target acoustic signals and the relative contributions of different central auditory structures to this accuracy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.04.003DOI Listing

In vivo transcranial flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging of tonotopic map reorganization in the mouse auditory cortex with impaired auditory periphery.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 26;377:208-223. Epub 2019 Mar 26.

Bioengineering and Bioinformatics, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Kita 14, Nishi 9, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 060-0814, Japan. Electronic address:

Ototoxic-drug-induced hearing disturbances in the auditory periphery are associated with tonotopic map reorganization and neural activity modulation, as well as changes in neural correlates in the central auditory pathway, including the auditory cortex (AC). Previous studies have reported that peripheral auditory impairment induces AC plasticity that involves changes in the balance of excitatory vs. inhibitory synapses, within existing and newly forming patterns of connectivity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.019DOI Listing

Resolving front-back ambiguity with head rotation: The role of level dynamics.

Hear Res 2019 Apr 1;377:196-207. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Aalto Acoustics Lab, Department of Signal Processing and Acoustics, School of Electrical Engineering, Aalto University, FI-02150, Espoo, Finland.

Making small head movements facilitates spatial hearing by resolving front-back confusions, otherwise common in free field sound source localization. The changes in interaural time difference (ITD) in response to head rotation provide a robust front-back cue, but whether interaural level difference (ILD) can be used as a dynamic cue is not clear. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to assess the usefulness of dynamic ILD as a localization cue. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03785955183055
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.020DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Linguistic, perceptual, and cognitive factors underlying musicians' benefits in noise-degraded speech perception.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 29;377:189-195. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

School of Communication Sciences & Disorders, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, USA; Institute for Intelligent Systems, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, USA; University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Memphis, TN, USA. Electronic address:

Previous studies have reported better speech-in-noise (SIN) recognition in musicians relative to nonmusicians while others have failed to observe this "musician SIN advantage." Here, we aimed to clarify equivocal findings and determine the most relevant perceptual and cognitive factors that do and do not account for musicians' benefits in SIN processing. We measured behavioral performance in musicians and nonmusicians on a battery of SIN recognition, auditory backward masking (a marker of attention), fluid intelligence (IQ), and working memory tasks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.021DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Vascular regeneration in adult mouse cochlea stimulated by VEGF-A and driven by NG2-derived cells ex vivo.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 29;377:179-188. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Oregon Hearing Research Center, Department of Otolaryngology / Head & Neck Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, 97239, USA. Electronic address:

Can damaged or degenerated vessels be regenerated in the ear? The question is clinically important, as disruption of cochlear blood flow is seen in a wide variety of hearing disorders, including in loud sound-induced hearing loss (endothelial injury), ageing-related hearing loss (lost vascular density), and genetic hearing loss (e.g., Norrie disease: strial avascularization). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.010DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Effect of neural adaptation and degeneration on pulse-train ECAPs: A model study.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 23;377:167-178. Epub 2019 Mar 23.

ENT-Department, Leiden University Medical Centre, PO Box 9600, 2300, RC Leiden, the Netherlands; Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, PO Box 9600, 2300, RC Leiden, the Netherlands.

Electrically evoked compound action potentials (eCAPs) are measurements of the auditory nerve's response to electrical stimulation. ECAP amplitudes during pulse trains can exhibit temporal alternations. The magnitude of this alternation tends to diminish over time during the stimulus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.013DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

A balanced randomised placebo controlled blinded phase IIa multi-centre study to investigate the efficacy and safety of AUT00063 versus placebo in subjective tinnitus: The QUIET-1 trial.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 27;377:153-166. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Autifony Therapeutics Ltd, Stevenage Biosciences Catalyst, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage, SG1 2FX, UK. Electronic address:

AUT00063 is an experimental new medicine that has been demonstrated to suppress spontaneous hyperactivity by modulating the action of voltage-gated potassium-channels in central auditory cortical neurons of a rodent model. This neurobiological property makes it a good candidate for treating the central component of subjective tinnitus but this has not yet been tested in humans. The main purpose of the QUIET-1 (QUest In Eliminating Tinnitus) trial was to examine the effect of AUT00063 on the severity of tinnitus symptoms in people with subjective tinnitus. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03785955183029
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.018DOI Listing
March 2019
6 Reads

Uncertainty in location, level and fundamental frequency results in informational masking in a vowel discrimination task for young and elderly subjects.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 21;377:142-152. Epub 2019 Mar 21.

Cluster of Excellence Hearing4all, Animal Physiology and Behavior Group, Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Oldenburg, D-26111, Oldenburg, Germany. Electronic address:

Informational masking (IM) is defined as the compromised ability to perceive and analyze signals from a single sound source in a cacophony of sounds from other sources even if the excitation patterns produced by these signals in the auditory periphery are well separated from those produced by the sounds from the other sources. IM that causes an elevation of discrimination thresholds is affected by the similarity between target and masker and by stimulus uncertainty. Here, six young and six elderly subjects were asked to discriminate between sequentially presented reference and target vowels of the vowel pairs /I/-/i/, /æ/-/ε/, and /α/-/Λ/. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.015DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Adaptation to noise in amplitude modulation detection without the medial olivocochlear reflex.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 22;377:133-141. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Instituto de Neurociencias de Castilla y León, Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Salamanca, Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; Departamento de Cirugía, Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain. Electronic address:

The detection of amplitude modulation (AM) in quiet or in noise improves when the AM carrier is preceded by noise, an effect that has been attributed to the medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR). We investigate whether this improvement can occur without the MOCR by measuring AM sensitivity for cochlear implant (CI) users, whose MOCR effects are circumvented as a result of the electrical stimulation provided by the CI. AM detection thresholds were measured monaurally for short (50 ms) AM probes presented at the onset (early condition) or delayed by 300 ms (late condition) from the onset of a broadband noise. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.017DOI Listing

Impact of room acoustic parameters on speech and music perception among participants with cochlear implants.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 20;377:122-132. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Music & Media Technology Department, Osnabrück University, Osnabrück, Germany. Electronic address:

Objectives: Besides numerous other factors, listening experience with cochlear implants is substantially impaired by room acoustics. Even for persons without hearing impairment, the perception of auditory scenes, for example, concerning speech intelligibility, acoustic quality or audibility, is considerably influenced by room acoustics. For CI users, complex listening environments are usually associated with heavy losses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.012DOI Listing

The upper frequency limit for the use of phase locking to code temporal fine structure in humans: A compilation of viewpoints.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 15;377:109-121. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Manchester Centre for Audiology and Deafness, The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, M13 9PL, UK; Department of Psychology, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YF, UK. Electronic address:

The relative importance of neural temporal and place coding in auditory perception is still a matter of much debate. The current article is a compilation of viewpoints from leading auditory psychophysicists and physiologists regarding the upper frequency limit for the use of neural phase locking to code temporal fine structure in humans. While phase locking is used for binaural processing up to about 1500 Hz, there is disagreement regarding the use of monaural phase-locking information at higher frequencies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.011DOI Listing

Rising-frequency chirp stimulus to effectively enhance wave-I amplitude of auditory brainstem response.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 22;377:104-108. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Wakayama University, 930 Sakaedani, Wakayama-city, Wakayama, 640-8510, Japan.

This study aims to find an effective chirp signal that enhances the amplitude of wave-I of auditory brainstem response (ABR) to diagnose "cochlear synaptopathy." Although several chirp signals have been proposed to enhance the amplitude of wave-V, the effect on wave-I has not been clarified yet. Ten chirp signals, which have shorter group delays than the commonly used "CE-chirp," were produced to measure the amplitudes of wave-I and wave-V of the ABRs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.016DOI Listing

The search for noise-induced cochlear synaptopathy in humans: Mission impossible?

Hear Res 2019 Mar 9;377:88-103. Epub 2019 Mar 9.

Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, 171 77, Sweden. Electronic address:

Animal studies demonstrate that noise exposure can permanently damage the synapses between inner hair cells and auditory nerve fibers, even when outer hair cells are intact and there is no clinically relevant permanent threshold shift. Synaptopathy disrupts the afferent connection between the cochlea and the central auditory system and is predicted to impair speech understanding in noisy environments and potentially result in tinnitus and/or hyperacusis. While cochlear synaptopathy has been demonstrated in numerous experimental animal models, synaptopathy can only be confirmed through post-mortem temporal bone analysis, making it difficult to study in living humans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.016DOI Listing

The use of animal models to study cell transplantation in neuropathic hearing loss.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 19;377:72-87. Epub 2019 Mar 19.

Centre for Stem Cell Biology and Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S10 2TN, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Auditory neuropathy (AN) is a form of sensorineural deafness specifically affecting the conduction of the nerve impulse from the cochlear hair cells to the auditory centres of the brain. As such, the condition is a potential clinical target for 'cell replacement therapy', in which a functioning auditory nerve is regenerated by transplanting an appropriated neural progenitor. In this review, we survey the current literature and examine possible experimental models for this condition, with particular reference to their compatibility as suitable hosts for transplantation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.014DOI Listing

Tone language experience-dependent advantage in pitch representation in brainstem and auditory cortex is maintained under reverberation.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 15;377:61-71. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Purdue University, Department of Speech Language Hearing Sciences, Lyles-Porter Hall, 715 Clinic Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2122, USA. Electronic address:

Long-term language and music experience enhances neural representation of temporal attributes of pitch in the brainstem and auditory cortex in favorable listening conditions. Herein we examine whether brainstem and cortical pitch mechanisms-shaped by long-term language experience-maintain this advantage in the presence of reverberation-induced degradation in pitch representation. Brainstem frequency following responses (FFR) and cortical pitch responses (CPR) were recorded concurrently from Chinese and English-speaking natives, using a Mandarin word exhibiting a high rising pitch (/yi/). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.009DOI Listing

MEMRO 2018 - Middle ear mechanics - Technology and Otosurgery.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 16. Epub 2019 Mar 16.

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.008DOI Listing

Circadian integration of inflammation and glucocorticoid actions: Implications for the cochlea.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 15;377:53-60. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 17177, Sweden.

Auditory function has been shown to be influenced by the circadian system. Increasing evidence point towards the regulation of inflammation and glucocorticoid actions by circadian rhythms in the cochlea. Yet, how these three systems (circadian, immune and endocrine) converge to control auditory function remains to be established. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.007DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Sensor-actuator component for a Floating Mass Transducer-based fully implantable hearing aid.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 13. Epub 2019 Mar 13.

Technische Universitaet Dresden, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, ERCD Ear Research Center Dresden, Germany.

We propose a novel system based on the Floating Mass Transducer (FMT) to be used as the active component of a fully implantable, Vibrant Soundbridge-like middle ear implant. The new system replaces the external microphone used in the currently available design with an implantable piezoelectric sensor that is inserted into the incudostapedial joint and picks up the vibrations transmitted to the long process of the incus. The FMT is coupled to the round window of the cochlea. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.006DOI Listing

Translating animal models to human therapeutics in noise-induced and age-related hearing loss.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 15;377:44-52. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Department of Otolaryngology, Harvard Medical School, Eaton-Peabody Laboratories, Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary, Boston, 02114-3096, MA, USA.

Acquired sensorineural hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases, and aging and acoustic overexposure are common contributors. Decades of study in animals and humans have clarified the cellular targets and perceptual consequences of these forms of hearing loss, and preclinical studies have led to the development of therapeutics designed to slow, prevent or reverse them. Here, we review the histopathological changes underlying age-related and noise-induced hearing loss and the functional consequences of these pathologies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.003DOI Listing

A time-efficient multi-deviant paradigm to determine the effects of gap duration on the mismatch negativity.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 7;377:34-43. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

School of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.

The insertion of a silent period (or gap) in a frequently occurring standard stimulus elicits a negative-going event-related potential (ERP), called the Deviant-Related Negativity (DRN). This is often studied using a single-deviant paradigm. To study the effects of gaps with multiple durations, a different sequence would be required for each gap. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.004DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Experimental investigation of promontory motion and intracranial pressure following bone conduction: Stimulation site and coupling type dependence.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 11. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland; University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.

Objectives: Investigation of bone conduction sound propagation by osseous and non-osseous pathways and their interactions based upon the stimulation site and coupling method of the actuator from a bone conduction hearing aid (BCHA).

Methods: Experiments were conducted on five Thiel embalmed whole head cadaver specimens. The electromagnetic actuator from a commercial bone conduction hearing aid (BCHA) (Baha Cordelle II) was used to provide a stepped sine stimulus in the range of 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.005DOI Listing
March 2019
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Fully objective hearing threshold estimation in cochlear implant users using phase-locking value growth functions.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 1;377:24-33. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

The Bionics Institute, 384-388 Albert St, East Melbourne, VIC, 3002, Australia; Department of Medical Bionics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia.

Cochlear implant users require fitting of electrical threshold and comfort levels for optimal access to sound. In this study, we used single-channel cortical auditory evoked responses (CAEPs) obtained from 20 participants using a Nucleus device. A fully objective method to estimate threshold levels was developed, using growth function fitting and the peak phase-locking value feature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.013DOI Listing

Glucococorticoid receptor activation exacerbates aminoglycoside-induced damage to the zebrafish lateral line.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 6;377:12-23. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave, Vancouver, WA, 98686, USA; College of Arts and Sciences, Washington State University, 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave, Vancouver, WA, 98686, USA; Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, Washington State University, 14204 NE Salmon Creek Ave, Vancouver, WA, 98686, USA. Electronic address:

Aminoglycoside antibiotics have potent antibacterial properties but cause hearing loss in up to 25% of patients. These drugs are commonly administered in patients with high glucocorticoid stress hormone levels and can be combined with exogenous glucocorticoid treatment. However, the interaction of stress and aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss has not been fully explored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.03.002DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Vibroplasty combined with tympanic membrane reconstruction in middle ear ventilation disorders.

Hear Res 2019 Feb 27. Epub 2019 Feb 27.

Technische Universitaet Dresden, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ear Research Center, Dresden, Germany.

Although the Vibrant Soundbridge is one of the most frequently used active middle ear implants, data regarding how middle ear ventilation disorders may affect the transmission behavior of its floating mass transducer are still insufficient. Studies involving coupling the floating mass transducer to the stapes head are particularly lacking. This temporal bone study evaluated the influence of simulated middle ear ventilation disorders on the middle ear transfer function in the reconstructed middle ear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.012DOI Listing
February 2019

Model-based hearing diagnostics based on wideband tympanometry measurements utilizing fuzzy arithmetic.

Hear Res 2019 Feb 28. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Reutlingen University, Alteburgstr. 150, 72762, Reutlingen, Germany.

Today's audiometric methods for the diagnosis of middle ear disease are often based on a comparison of measurements with standard curves, that represent the statistical range of normal hearing responses. Because of large inter-individual variances in the middle ear, especially in wideband tympanometry (WBT), specificity and quantitative evaluation are greatly restricted. A new model-based approach could transform today's predominantly qualitative hearing diagnostics into a quantitative and tailored, patient-specific diagnosis, by evaluating WBT measurements with the aid of a middle-ear model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.011DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Morphological and neurochemical changes in GABAergic neurons of the aging human inferior colliculus.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 5. Epub 2019 Mar 5.

All India Institute of Medical Sciences New Delhi, Department of Anatomy, India. Electronic address:

It is well known that quality of hearing decreases with increasing age due to changes in the peripheral or central auditory pathway. Along with the decrease in the number of neurons the neurotransmitter profile is also affected in the various parts of the auditory system. Particularly, changes in the inhibitory neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) are known to affect quality of hearing with aging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.005DOI Listing

Review: Using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques to explore the microstructure and connectivity of subcortical white matter tracts in the human auditory system.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 2;377:1-11. Epub 2019 Mar 2.

Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address:

Since its inception 30 years ago, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) has advanced to become a common component of routine clinical MRI examinations. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance offers a way to measure anisotropic diffusion in-vivo, which has led to the development of techniques capable of characterising the orientation of diffusion within living tissue. These modelling techniques can be used to investigate the microstructure and connectivity of white matter tracts within the human brain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.014DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Standardised profiling for tinnitus research: The European School for Interdisciplinary Tinnitus Research Screening Questionnaire (ESIT-SQ).

Hear Res 2019 Mar 2. Epub 2019 Mar 2.

NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, 113 The Ropewalk, Nottingham, NG1 5DU, UK; Hearing Sciences, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Building 40 University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, UK; Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Queens Medical Centre, Derby Road, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK; University of Nottingham Malaysia, Jalan Broga, 43500, Semeniyh, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia.

Background: The heterogeneity of tinnitus is substantial. Its numerous pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical manifestations have hampered fundamental and treatment research significantly. A decade ago, the Tinnitus Research Initiative introduced the Tinnitus Sample Case History Questionnaire, a case history instrument for standardised collection of information about the characteristics of the tinnitus patient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.017DOI Listing

Measuring and modeling speech intelligibility in real and loudspeaker-based virtual sound environments.

Hear Res 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Hearing Systems Section, Department of Health Technology, Technical University of Denmark, Bygning 352, Ørsteds Plads, 2800, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark.

Loudspeaker-based virtual sound environments provide a valuable tool for studying speech perception in realistic, but controllable and reproducible acoustic environments. The evaluation of different loudspeaker reproduction methods with respect to perceptual measures has been rather limited. This study focused on comparing speech intelligibility as measured in a reverberant reference room with virtual versions of that room. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.003DOI Listing
February 2019

Auditory brainstem stimulation with a conformable microfabricated array elicits responses with tonotopically organized components.

Hear Res 2019 Feb 26. Epub 2019 Feb 26.

Eaton-Peabody Laboratories and Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, and Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address:

Auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) restore hearing to deaf individuals not eligible for cochlear implants. Speech comprehension in ABI users is generally poor compared to that of cochlear implant users, and side effects are common. The poor performance may result from activating broad areas and multiple neuronal populations of the cochlear nucleus, however detailed studies of the responses to surface stimulation of the cochlear nucleus are lacking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.010DOI Listing
February 2019

The aging cochlea: Towards unraveling the functional contributions of strial dysfunction and synaptopathy.

Hear Res 2019 May 2;376:111-124. Epub 2019 Mar 2.

Cluster of Excellence 'Hearing4all' and Research Centre Neurosensory Science, Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine and Health Science, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, 26129, Oldenburg, Germany. Electronic address:

Strial dysfunction is commonly observed as a key consequence of aging in the cochlea. A large body of animal research, especially in the quiet-aged Mongolian gerbil, shows specific histopathological changes in the cochlear stria vascularis and the putatively corresponding effects on endocochlear potential and auditory nerve responses. However, recent work suggests that synaptopathy, or the loss of inner hair cell-auditory nerve fiber synapses, also presents as a consequence of aging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.015DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Focal electrical stimulation of dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus modulates auditory response properties of inferior collicular neurons in the albino mouse.

Hear Res 2019 Feb 26. Epub 2019 Feb 26.

Hubei Key Laboratory of Genetic Regulation and Integrative Biology, School of Life Sciences, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, 430079, China. Electronic address:

The inferior colliculus (IC) receives and integrates excitatory and inhibitory inputs from many bilateral lower auditory nuclei, intrinsic projections within IC, contralateral IC through the commissure of IC and from the auditory cortex (AC). These excitatory and inhibitory inputs from both ascending and descending auditory pathways contribute significantly to auditory response properties and temporal signal processing in IC. The present study examines the contribution of gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic (GABAergic) inhibition of dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (DNLL) in influencing the response properties and amplitude sensitivity of contralateral IC neurons using focal electrical stimulation of contralateral DNLL and by the application of bicuculline to the recording site of modulated IC neurons. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.024DOI Listing
February 2019

Standardized questions in English for estimating tinnitus prevalence and severity, hearing difficulty and usage of healthcare resources, and their translation into 11 European languages.

Hear Res 2019 Feb 22. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Hearing Sciences, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, United Kingdom; NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, Ropewalk House, 113 the Ropewalk, Nottingham, NG1 5DU, United Kingdom; Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Queens Medical Centre, Derby Road, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, United Kingdom; University of Nottingham Malaysia, Jalan Broga, 43500 Semeniyh, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia. Electronic address:

Introduction: Prevalence estimates depend largely on the nature of the question asked to define the presence of the health condition, and the literature on the population burden of tinnitus and hearing difficulties is no different in this respect. The lack of standardized questions for data collection limits comparison across studies and across countries. The purpose of this short Technical Note is to report the first attempt to establish a set of standard questions developed for use in population-based surveys, and their adaptation and translation from English into 11 European languages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.008DOI Listing
February 2019

Mapping the Young's modulus distribution of the human tympanic membrane by microindentation.

Hear Res 2019 Feb 23. Epub 2019 Feb 23.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, 75080, USA. Electronic address:

The human tympanic membrane (TM, or eardrum) is composed primarily of layers of collagen fibers oriented in the radial and circumferential directions, as well as epidermal and mucosal layers at the lateral and medial surfaces. The mechanical properties of the TM depend on the microstructures of the collagen fibers, which vary with location, resulting in a spatial variation of Young's modulus. In this study, the Young's modulus of the human TM is measured using microindentation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.009DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Static and dynamic forces in the incudostapedial joint gap.

Hear Res 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Technische Universitaet Dresden, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, ERCD Ear Research Center Dresden, Germany.

Dynamic pressure at the tympanic membrane is transformed and subsequently transferred through the ossicular chain in the form of forces and moments. The forces are primarily transferred to the inner ear. They are transferred partly to the stapedial annular ligament which exhibits non-linear behavior and stiffens for larger static forces. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.004DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

Usher syndrome and non-syndromic deafness: Functions of different whirlin isoforms in the cochlea, vestibular organs, and retina.

Hear Res 2019 Apr 22;375:14-24. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, John A. Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 84132, USA; Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 84132, USA; Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 84132, USA. Electronic address:

Usher syndrome (USH) is the leading cause of inherited combined vision and hearing loss. However, mutations in most USH causative genes lead to other diseases, such as hearing loss only or vision loss only. The molecular mechanisms underlying the variable disease manifestations associated with USH gene mutations are unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.007DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

An optimized, clinically relevant mouse model of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

Hear Res 2019 Apr 22;375:66-74. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. Electronic address:

Cisplatin-induced ototoxicity results in significant, permanent hearing loss in pediatric and adult cancer survivors. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying cisplatin-induced hearing loss as well as the development of therapies to reduce and/or reverse cisplatin ototoxicity have been impeded by suboptimal animal models. Clinically, cisplatin is most commonly administered in multi-dose, multi-cycle protocols. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6416072PMC
April 2019
2 Reads

On the functional compartmentalization of the normal middle ear. Morpho-histological modelling parameters of its mucosa.

Hear Res 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and Audiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.

Background: Middle ear physiology includes both sound pressure transmission and homeostasis of its static air pressure. Pressure gradients are continuously created by gas exchange over the middle ear mucosa as well as by ambient pressure variations. Gas exchange models require actual values for regional mucosa thickness, blood vessel density, and diffusion distance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.023DOI Listing
February 2019
2.968 Impact Factor

Residual inhibition: From the putative mechanisms to potential tinnitus treatment.

Hear Res 2019 Apr 1;375:1-13. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Northeast Ohio Medical University, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Rootstown, OH, USA.

Neurons in various sensory systems show some level of spontaneous firing in the absence of sensory stimuli. In the auditory system spontaneous firing has been shown at all levels of the auditory pathway from spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea to neurons of the auditory cortex. This internal "noise" is normal for the system and it does not interfere with our ability to perceive silence or analyze sound. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.022DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

An analytic approach to identifying the sources of the low-frequency round window cochlear response.

Hear Res 2019 Apr 15;375:53-65. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Hearing & Speech, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.

The cochlear microphonic, traditionally thought of as an indication of electrical current flow through hair cells, in conjunction with suppressing high-pass noise or tones, is a promising method of assessing the health of outer hair cells at specific locations along the cochlear partition. We propose that the electrical potential recorded from the round window in gerbils in response to low-frequency tones, which we call cochlear response (CR), contains significant responses from multiple cellular sources, which may expand its diagnostic purview. In this study, CR is measured in the gerbil and modeled to identify its contributing sources. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6416063PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Capacities and neural mechanisms for auditory statistical learning across species.

Hear Res 2019 May 12;376:97-110. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Skirball Institute for Biomolecular Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; Neuroscience Institute, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; Department of Otolaryngology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; Center for Neural Science, New York University, New York, NY, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute Faculty Scholar, USA. Electronic address:

Statistical learning has been proposed as a possible mechanism by which individuals can become sensitive to the structures of language fundamental for speech perception. Since its description in human infants, statistical learning has been described in human adults and several non-human species as a general process by which animals learn about stimulus-relevant statistics. The neurobiology of statistical learning is beginning to be understood, but many questions remain about the underlying mechanisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.02.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6456437PMC

Neuroprotective effects of MK-801 on auditory cortex in salicylate-induced tinnitus: Involvement of neural activity, glutamate and ascorbate.

Hear Res 2019 Apr 1;375:44-52. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Living Biosystems, Institute of Chemistry, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190, China. Electronic address:

Tinnitus may cause anxiety, depression, insomnia, which impair the quality of life of millions worldwide. However, the mechanism of tinnitus remains to be understood, it has been previously hypothesized that the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is involved in the tinnitus processes and blockade of the NMDA receptor is regarded as a therapeutic strategy for tinnitus treatment even if the rescue treatment is still proved invalid in some cases. To demonstrate the therapeutic effect of the NMDA receptor blocker on tinnitus, we examined here the spontaneous firing rate (SFR) and the neurochemical dynamics in the auditory cortex (AC) of rats after sodium salicylate (SS) injection, which is a widely used model for tinnitus research. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03785955183025
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.021DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Feasibility of direct promontory stimulation by bone conduction: A preliminary study of frequency-response characteristics in cats.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

ENT Institute, Eye & ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Fenyang Road 83, Shanghai, 200031, China; NHC Hearing Medicine Key Laboratory, Shanghai, China. Electronic address:

Background: As an alternative pathway to air conduction, bone conduction is a multipathway process that transmits sound energy to the inner ear through the skull in general. Based on this mechanism, bone conduction devices (BCDs) have been used widely in the rehabilitation of hearing loss. Although great efforts have been devoted to improving BCDs, drawbacks still exist in most categories of BCDs due to the complicated process of bone conduction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.013DOI Listing
January 2019

Frequency following responses to tone glides: Effects of frequency extent, direction, and electrode montage.

Hear Res 2019 Apr 23;375:25-33. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, VA Portland Health Care System, Portland, OR, USA; Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA.

The spectral (frequency) and amplitude cues in speech change rapidly over time. Study of the neural encoding of these dynamic features may help to improve diagnosis and treatment of speech-perception difficulties. This study uses tone glides as a simple approximation of dynamic speech sounds to better our understanding of the underlying neural representation of speech. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.012DOI Listing

Reliability and interrelations of seven proxy measures of cochlear synaptopathy.

Hear Res 2019 Apr 23;375:34-43. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Manchester Centre for Audiology and Deafness, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, UK; Department of Psychology, Lancaster University, UK.

Investigations of cochlear synaptopathy in living humans rely on proxy measures of auditory nerve function. Numerous procedures have been developed, typically based on the auditory brainstem response (ABR), envelope-following response (EFR), or middle-ear-muscle reflex (MEMR). Validation is challenging, due to the absence of a gold-standard measure in humans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6423440PMC
April 2019
4 Reads

Actin-independent trafficking of cochlear connexin 26 to non-lipid raft gap junction plaques.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 30;374:69-75. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

GIGA-Neurosciences, Unit of Cell and Tissue Biology, University of Liège, C.H.U. B36, B-4000, Liège, Belgium.

Hereditary hearing loss affects about 1 per 1000 children. Mutations in GJB2, which encodes the connexin 26 protein (Cx26) involved in cochlear homeostasis, are found in about 50% of patients with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss. Deciphering the trafficking pathway of cochlear Cx26 in situ should represent an advance in understanding the pathogenic significance of many of these mutations. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03785955183023
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.020DOI Listing
March 2019
8 Reads

Time-compression thresholds for Mandarin sentences in normal-hearing and cochlear implant listeners.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 31;374:58-68. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Hearing Research Group, Department of Biomedical Sciences, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Electronic address:

Faster speech may facilitate more efficient communication, but if speech is too fast it becomes unintelligible. The maximum speeds at which Mandarin words were intelligible in a sentence context were quantified for normal hearing (NH) and cochlear implant (CI) listeners by measuring time-compression thresholds (TCTs) in an adaptive staircase procedure. In Experiment 1, both original and CI-vocoded time-compressed speech from the MSP (Mandarin speech perception) and MHINT (Mandarin hearing in noise test) corpora was presented to 10 NH subjects over headphones. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.011DOI Listing

Complementary and distinct roles of autophagy, apoptosis and senescence during early inner ear development.

Hear Res 2019 May 23;376:86-96. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Institute for Biomedical Research "Alberto Sols" (IIBM), Spanish National Research Council-Autonomous University of Madrid (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain; Centre for Biomedical Network Research on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Madrid, Spain; Biology Department, Faculty of Sciences, Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM), Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

The development of the inner ear complex cytoarchitecture and functional geometry requires the exquisite coordination of a variety of cellular processes in a temporal manner. At early stages of inner ear development several rounds of cell proliferation in the otocyst promote the growth of the structure. The apoptotic program is initiated in exceeding cells to adjust cell type numbers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.014DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

The role of monocytes and macrophages in the dynamic permeability of the blood-perilymph barrier.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 20;374:49-57. Epub 2019 Jan 20.

Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

The blood-perilymph barrier serves a critical role by separating the components of blood from inner ear fluids, limiting traffic of cells, proteins and other solutes into the labyrinth, and allowing gas (O-CO) exchange. Inflammation produces changes in the blood-perilymph barrier resulting in increased vascular permeability. It is commonly thought that compromise of the blood-inner ear barrier would lead to hearing impairment through loss of the endocochlear potential (EP). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6459018PMC
March 2019
2 Reads