6,589 results match your criteria Hearing Research [Journal]


Feasibility of direct promontory stimulation by bone conduction: A preliminary study of frequency-response characteristics in cats.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

ENT Institute, Eye & ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Fenyang Road 83, Shanghai, 200031, China; NHC Hearing Medicine Key Laboratory, Shanghai, China. Electronic address:

Background: As an alternative pathway to air conduction, bone conduction is a multipathway process that transmits sound energy to the inner ear through the skull in general. Based on this mechanism, bone conduction devices (BCDs) have been used widely in the rehabilitation of hearing loss. Although great efforts have been devoted to improving BCDs, drawbacks still exist in most categories of BCDs due to the complicated process of bone conduction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.013DOI Listing
January 2019

Frequency following responses to tone glides: Effects of frequency extent, direction, and electrode montage.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, VA Portland Health Care System, Portland, OR, USA; Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA.

The spectral (frequency) and amplitude cues in speech change rapidly over time. Study of the neural encoding of these dynamic features may help to improve diagnosis and treatment of speech-perception difficulties. This study uses tone glides as a simple approximation of dynamic speech sounds to better our understanding of the underlying neural representation of speech. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.012DOI Listing
January 2019

Reliability and interrelations of seven proxy measures of cochlear synaptopathy.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Manchester Centre for Audiology and Deafness, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, UK; Department of Psychology, Lancaster University, UK.

Investigations of cochlear synaptopathy in living humans rely on proxy measures of auditory nerve function. Numerous procedures have been developed, typically based on the auditory brainstem response (ABR), envelope-following response (EFR), or middle-ear-muscle reflex (MEMR). Validation is challenging, due to the absence of a gold-standard measure in humans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.018DOI Listing
January 2019

Actin-independent trafficking of cochlear connexin 26 to non-lipid raft gap junction plaques.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 30;374:69-75. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

GIGA-Neurosciences, Unit of Cell and Tissue Biology, University of Liège, C.H.U. B36, B-4000, Liège, Belgium.

Hereditary hearing loss affects about 1 per 1000 children. Mutations in GJB2, which encodes the connexin 26 protein (Cx26) involved in cochlear homeostasis, are found in about 50% of patients with autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss. Deciphering the trafficking pathway of cochlear Cx26 in situ should represent an advance in understanding the pathogenic significance of many of these mutations. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03785955183023
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.020DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Time-compression thresholds for Mandarin sentences in normal-hearing and cochlear implant listeners.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 31;374:58-68. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Hearing Research Group, Department of Biomedical Sciences, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Electronic address:

Faster speech may facilitate more efficient communication, but if speech is too fast it becomes unintelligible. The maximum speeds at which Mandarin words were intelligible in a sentence context were quantified for normal hearing (NH) and cochlear implant (CI) listeners by measuring time-compression thresholds (TCTs) in an adaptive staircase procedure. In Experiment 1, both original and CI-vocoded time-compressed speech from the MSP (Mandarin speech perception) and MHINT (Mandarin hearing in noise test) corpora was presented to 10 NH subjects over headphones. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.011DOI Listing

Complementary and distinct roles of autophagy, apoptosis and senescence during early inner ear development.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Institute for Biomedical Research "Alberto Sols" (IIBM), Spanish National Research Council-Autonomous University of Madrid (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain; Centre for Biomedical Network Research on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Madrid, Spain; Biology Department, Faculty of Sciences, Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM), Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

The development of the inner ear complex cytoarchitecture and functional geometry requires the exquisite coordination of a variety of cellular processes in a temporal manner. At early stages of inner ear development several rounds of cell proliferation in the otocyst promote the growth of the structure. The apoptotic program is initiated in exceeding cells to adjust cell type numbers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.014DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The role of monocytes and macrophages in the dynamic permeability of the blood-perilymph barrier.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 20;374:49-57. Epub 2019 Jan 20.

Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

The blood-perilymph barrier serves a critical role by separating the components of blood from inner ear fluids, limiting traffic of cells, proteins and other solutes into the labyrinth, and allowing gas (O-CO) exchange. Inflammation produces changes in the blood-perilymph barrier resulting in increased vascular permeability. It is commonly thought that compromise of the blood-inner ear barrier would lead to hearing impairment through loss of the endocochlear potential (EP). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.006DOI Listing

Evidence for age-related cochlear synaptopathy in humans unconnected to speech-in-noise intelligibility deficits.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 24;374:35-48. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Instituto de Neurociencias de Castilla y León, Universidad de Salamanca, 37007, Salamanca, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Salamanca, Universidad de Salamanca, 37007, Salamanca, Spain; Departamento de Cirugía, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Salamanca, 37007, Salamanca, Spain. Electronic address:

Cochlear synaptopathy (or the loss of primary auditory synapses) remains a subclinical condition of uncertain prevalence. Here, we investigate whether it affects humans and whether it contributes to suprathreshold speech-in-noise intelligibility deficits. For 94 human listeners with normal audiometry (aged 12-68 years; 64 women), we measured click-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), self-reported lifetime noise exposure, and speech reception thresholds for sentences (at 65 dB SPL) and words (at 50, 65 and 80 dB SPL) in steady-state and fluctuating maskers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.017DOI Listing

Distortion product otoacoustic emissions: Sensitive measures of tympanic -membrane perforation and healing processes in a gerbil model.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Research Service, VA Loma Linda Healthcare System, Loma Linda, CA 92357, USA; Department of Otolaryngology--Head & Neck Surgery, Loma Linda University Health, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA.

Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) evoked by two pure tones carry information about the mechanisms that generate and shape them. Thus, DPOAEs hold promise for providing powerful noninvasive diagnostic details of cochlear operations, middle ear (ME) transmission, and impairments. DPOAEs are sensitive to ME function because they are influenced by ME transmission twice, i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.015DOI Listing
January 2019

Sound localization in the lizard using internally coupled ears: A finite-element approach.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Biophysics and Biomedical Physics, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 121, 2020, Antwerp, Belgium.

A number of interesting differences become apparent when comparing the hearing systems of terrestrial vertebrates, especially between mammals and non-mammals. Almost all non-mammals possess only a single ossicle, enabling impedance matching and hearing below 10 kHz. The middle ear (ME) evolved as a chain of three ossicles in mammals, enabling sound transmission up to higher frequencies than in similar-sized non-mammals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.016DOI Listing
January 2019

Effects of selective auditory-nerve damage on the behavioral audiogram and temporal integration in the budgerigar.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 23;374:24-34. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Department of Otolaryngology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14642, USA; Department of Neuroscience, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14642, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14642, USA. Electronic address:

Auditory-nerve fibers are lost steadily with age and as a possible consequence of noise-induced glutamate excitotoxicity. Auditory-nerve loss in the absence of other cochlear pathologies is thought to be undetectable with a pure-tone audiogram while degrading real-world speech perception (hidden hearing loss). Perceptual deficits remain unclear, however, due in part to the limited behavioral capacity of existing rodent models to discriminate complex sounds. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03785955183054
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.019DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Progressive hearing damage after exposure to repeated low-intensity blasts in chinchillas.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 17. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA. Electronic address:

Hearing damage caused by blast waves is a frequent and common injury for Service members. However, most studies have focused on high-intensity blast exposures that are known to cause moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and fewer studies have investigated the progressive hearing damage caused by low-intensity blast exposures (below mild TBI). In this paper, we report our recent study in chinchillas to investigate the auditory function changes over the time course after repetitive exposures to low-intensity blast. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03785955183038
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.010DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Gap-induced inhibition of the post-auricular muscle response in humans and guinea pigs.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 17;374:13-23. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Medical Research Council Institute of Hearing Research, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; Hearing Sciences, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. Electronic address:

A common method for measuring changes in temporal processing sensitivity in both humans and animals makes use of GaP-induced Inhibition of the Acoustic Startle (GPIAS). It is also the basis of a common method for detecting tinnitus in rodents. However, the link to tinnitus has not been properly established because GPIAS has not yet been used to objectively demonstrate tinnitus in humans. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03785955183043
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.009DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Insulin-like growth factor 1 promotes cochlear synapse regeneration after excitotoxic trauma in vitro.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 17;374:5-12. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan. Electronic address:

In the context of acquired sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), cochlear hair cells have long been thought to be among the most vulnerable elements in mammalian cochleae. However, recent studies have indicated that the synaptic connection between inner hair cells (IHC) and spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) can be an important target for the treatment of SNHL. Our previous studies in patients with sudden SNHL demonstrated delayed and gradual hearing recovery following topical application of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), suggesting that not only protective but also regenerative mechanisms may account for hearing recovery after treatment with IGF-1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.008DOI Listing
March 2019
2.968 Impact Factor

Approaches for the study of epigenetic modifications in the inner ear and related tissues.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 12. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Departments of Pharmacology and Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, IL 62711, USA. Electronic address:

DNA methylation and histone modifications such as methylation, acetylation, and phosphorylation, are two types of epigenetic modifications that alter gene expression. These additions to DNA regulatory elements or to the tails of histones can be inherited or can also occur de novo. Since epigenetic modifications can have significant effects on various processes at both the cellular and organismal level, there has been a rapid increase in research on this topic throughout all fields of biology in recent years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.007DOI Listing
January 2019

Normal audiogram but poor sensitivity to brief sounds in mice with compromised voltage-gated sodium channels (Scn8a).

Hear Res 2019 Mar 4;374:1-4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Department of Psychology, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, United States. Electronic address:

The Scn8a mutation of the gene for sodium channels at the nodes of Ranvier slows nerve conduction, resulting in motor abnormalities. This mutation is also associated with loss of spontaneous bursting activity in the dorsal cochlear nucleus. However initial tests of auditory sensitivity in mice homozygous for this mutation, using standard 400-ms tones, demonstrated normal hearing sensitivity. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03785955183049
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.001DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Hereditary hearing loss; about the known and the unknown.

Authors:
Hannie Kremer

Hear Res 2019 Jan 10. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Hearing & Genes Division, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Department of Human Genetics, Donders Institute of Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

Hereditary hearing loss is both clinically and genetically very heterogeneous. Despite the large number of genes that have been associated with the condition, many cases remain unexplained. Novel gene associations with hearing loss are to be expected but also are defects of regulatory regions of the genome which are currently not routinely addressed in molecular genetic testing and research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.003DOI Listing
January 2019

An improved method of obtaining electrocochleography recordings from Nucleus Hybrid cochlear implant users.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 9;373:113-120. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Interest in electrocochleography (ECoG) has recently resurged as a potential tool to assess peripheral auditory function in cochlear implant (CI) users. ECoG recordings can be evoked using acoustic stimulation and recorded from an extra- or intra-cochlear electrode in CI users. Recordings reflect contributions from cochlear hair cells and the auditory nerve. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.002DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Influence of angular positioning of the prosthesis in stapes surgeries with a NiTiBond prosthesis: Investigation in cadaveric temporal bones.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 10. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Zürich, Switzerland; University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. Electronic address:

In incus stapedotomy surgeries, the longitudinal direction of the piston prosthesis should ideally be perpendicular to the stapes footplate. However, in reality, some amounts of angular deviation of the prosthesis from the ideal angular position is unavoidable due to anatomical constraints and surgical conditions. This study aims to evaluate the influence of angular positioning of the prosthesis on surgical outcomes in incus stapedotomy and to provide surgical guidelines related to practical tolerance of the angular positioning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.005DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Effect of competing noise on cortical auditory evoked potentials elicited by speech sounds in 7- to 25-year-old listeners.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 9;373:103-112. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA; Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.

Child listeners have particular difficulty with speech perception when competing speech noise is present; this challenge is often attributed to their immature top-down processing abilities. The purpose of this study was to determine if the effects of competing speech noise on speech-sound processing vary with age. Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) were measured during an active speech-syllable discrimination task in 58 normal-hearing participants (age 7-25 years). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2019.01.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6359968PMC
March 2019
2 Reads
2.968 Impact Factor

Special edition on unilateral deafness and hearing loss: An introduction and overview.

Hear Res 2019 Feb;372:1-2

Archie's Cochlear Implant Laboratory, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada; Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, ON, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.12.007DOI Listing
February 2019

The onset and post-onset auditory responses of cochlear nucleus neurons are modulated differently by cortical activation.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 31;373:96-102. Epub 2018 Dec 31.

Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address:

Auditory cortex exhibit a capacity of modulating the functions of subcortical auditory nuclei and even inner ear through descending pathways. The cochlear nucleus (CN), which acts as the gateway from the auditory periphery to the central auditory system, is also subjected to corticofugal modulation. Cortical modulation of subcortical nuclei is highly specific to the frequency tunings of cortical and subcortical neurons. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03785955183046
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.12.013DOI Listing
March 2019
6 Reads

Building and repairing the stereocilia cytoskeleton in mammalian auditory hair cells.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Department of Physiology, University of Kentucky, 800 Rose St., Lexington, KY, 40536-0298, USA. Electronic address:

Despite all recent achievements in identification of the molecules that are essential for the structure and mechanosensory function of stereocilia bundles in the auditory hair cells of mammalian species, we still have only a rudimentary understanding of the mechanisms of stereocilia formation, maintenance, and repair. Important molecular differences distinguishing mammalian auditory hair cells from hair cells of other types and species have been recently revealed. In addition, we are beginning to solve the puzzle of the apparent life-long stability of the stereocilia bundles in these cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.12.012DOI Listing
January 2019

Dual-laser measurement and finite element modeling of human tympanic membrane motion under blast exposure.

Hear Res 2018 Dec 14. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA. Electronic address:

Hearing damage is one of most prevalent injuries in military personnel and civilians exposed to a blast. However, the mechanism of how the blast overpressure interacts with the tympanic membrane (TM) and impairs the peripheral auditory system still remains unclear. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the human ear has been developed to predict the blast overpressure transmission through the ear (Leckness et al. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.12.003DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Ontogeny of auditory brainstem responses in the bat, Phyllostomus discolor.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 27;373:85-95. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Division of Neurobiology, Dept. Biology II, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Großhaderner Str. 2, 82152, Planegg-Martinsried, Germany. Electronic address:

Hearing is the primary sensory modality in bats, but its development is poorly studied. For newborns, hearing appears essential in maintaining contact with their mothers and to develop echolocation abilities. Here we measured auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to clicks and narrowband tone pips covering a large frequency range (5-90 kHz) in juveniles (p7 to p200) and adults of the bat, Phyllostomus discolor. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.12.010DOI Listing

Inhibitory mechanisms shaping delay-tuned combination-sensitivity in the auditory cortex and thalamus of the mustached bat.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 24;373:71-84. Epub 2018 Dec 24.

Department of Biology, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA. Electronic address:

Delay-tuned auditory neurons of the mustached bat show facilitative responses to a combination of signal elements of a biosonar pulse-echo pair with a specific echo delay. The subcollicular nuclei produce latency-constant phasic on-responding neurons, and the inferior colliculus produces delay-tuned combination-sensitive neurons, designated "FM-FM" neurons. The combination-sensitivity is a facilitated response to the coincidence of the excitatory rebound following glycinergic inhibition to the pulse (1st harmonic) and the short-latency response to the echo (2nd-4th harmonics). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.12.008DOI Listing

The ion channels and synapses responsible for the physiological diversity of mammalian lower brainstem auditory neurons.

Authors:
Ricardo M Leão

Hear Res 2018 Dec 26. Epub 2018 Dec 26.

Department of Physiology, School of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14019-900, Brazil. Electronic address:

The auditory part of the brainstem is composed of several nuclei specialized in the computation of the different spectral and temporal features of the sound before it reaches the higher auditory regions. There are a high diversity of neuronal types in these nuclei, many with remarkable electrophysiological and synaptic properties unique to these structures. This diversity reflects specializations necessary to process the different auditory signals in order to extract precisely the acoustic information necessary for the auditory perception by the animal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.12.011DOI Listing
December 2018

Phase-locking of irregular guinea pig primary vestibular afferents to high frequency (>250 Hz) sound and vibration.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 24;373:59-70. Epub 2018 Dec 24.

Vestibular Research Laboratory, School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Phase-locking of cochlear neurons to sound has been of great value in understanding cochlear transduction. Phase-locking has also been reported previously in irregular vestibular afferents, but detailed information about it is sparse. We measured the phase-locking of guinea pig irregular otolithic neurons and canal neurons (after a semicircular canal dehiscence allowed them to respond) to both sound and vibration stimuli. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03785955183045
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.12.009DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Multiphoton imaging for morphometry of the sandwich-beam structure of the human stapedial annular ligament.

Hear Res 2018 Nov 29. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland; University of Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland.

Background: The annular ligament of the human stapes constitutes a compliant connection between the stapes footplate and the peripheral cochlear wall at the oval window. The cross section of the human annular ligament is characterized by a three-layered structure, which resembles a sandwich-shaped composite structure. As accurate and precise descriptions of the middle-ear behavior are constrained by lack of information on the complex geometry of the annular ligament, this study aims to obtain comprehensive geometrical data of the annular ligament via multiphoton imaging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.11.011DOI Listing
November 2018

Effects of tympanic membrane perforation on middle ear transmission in gerbil.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 15;373:48-58. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

VA Loma Linda Healthcare System, Loma Linda, CA, 92357, USA; Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Loma Linda University Health, Loma Linda, CA, 92350, USA. Electronic address:

Perforations of the tympanic membrane (TM) alter its structural and mechanical properties, thus resulting in a deterioration of sound transmission through the middle ear (ME), which presents itself clinically as a conductive hearing loss (CHL). The resulting CHL is proposed to be due to the loss of the pressure difference across the TM between the outer ear canal space and the ME cavity, a hypothesis which has been tested with both theoretical and experimental approaches. In the past, direct experimental observations had been either from the ME input (umbo) or the output of the stapes, and were focused mainly on the low frequency region. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03785955183025
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.12.005DOI Listing
March 2019
9 Reads

The power of language: Functional brain network topology of deaf and hearing in relation to sign language experience.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 15;373:32-47. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

Biomedical MR Imaging and Spectroscopy Group, Center for Image Sciences, University Medical Center Utrecht and Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands; Department of Pediatric Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Prolonged auditory sensory deprivation leads to brain reorganization. This is indicated by functional enhancement in remaining sensory systems and known as cross-modal plasticity. In this study we investigated differences in functional brain network topology between deaf and hearing individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.12.006DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Neural envelope tracking as a measure of speech understanding in cochlear implant users.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 14;373:23-31. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Research Group Experimental Oto-rhino-laryngology (ExpORL), Department of Neurosciences, KU Leuven - University of Leuven, 3000, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address:

The speech envelope is essential for speech understanding and can be reconstructed from the electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded while listening to running speech. This so-called "neural envelope tracking" has been shown to relate to speech understanding in normal hearing listeners, but has barely been investigated in persons wearing cochlear implants (CI). We investigated the relation between speech understanding and neural envelope tracking in CI users. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.12.004DOI Listing

p27 down-regulation as achieved by two clinically feasible means did not induce proliferation of supporting cells in the rat neonatal cochlea in vivo.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 6;373:10-22. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

Department of Otolaryngology, Hospital Clínico Universidad de Chile and Interdisciplinary Program of Physiology and Biophysics, Institute of Biomedical Sciences (ICBM), Faculty of Medicine, Universidad de Chile, Av. Independencia 1027, 8380453, Independencia, Santiago, Chile; Department of Otolaryngology, Clínica Alemana de Santiago, Facultad de Medicina Clínica Alemana-Universidad del Desarrollo, Av. Vitacura 5951, 7650568, Vitacura, Santiago, Chile. Electronic address:

In mammals, the cochlear sensory epithelium becomes quiescent early during development. After the first postnatal week, there is no cell replacement or proliferation, and severe damage leads to permanent deafness. Supporting cells' trans-differentiation has been suggested as a way to regenerate cochlear hair cells after damage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.12.002DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Electrophysiological and behavioral measures of some speech contrasts in varied attention and noise.

Hear Res 2019 Mar 6;373:1-9. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

Lund University Department of Psychology, Paradisgatan 5, Lund, 22100, Sweden. Electronic address:

This paper investigates the salience of speech contrasts in noise, in relation to how listening attention affects scalp-recorded cortical responses. The contrasts that were examined with consonant-vowel syllables, were place of articulation, vowel length and voice-onset time (VOT) and our analysis focuses on the correspondence between the effect of attention on the electrophysiology and the decrement in behavioral results when noise was added to the stimuli. Normal-hearing subjects (n = 20) performed closed-set syllable identification in no noise, 0, 4 and 8 dB signal-noise ratio (SNR). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.12.001DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Human middle-ear muscles rarely contract in anticipation of acoustic impulses: Implications for hearing risk assessments.

Hear Res 2018 Dec 4. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

United States Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, 6901 Farrel Road, Fort Rucker, AL, 36362, USA. Electronic address:

The current study addressed the existence of an anticipatory middle-ear muscle contraction (MEMC) as a protective mechanism found in recent damage-risk criteria for impulse noise exposure. Specifically, the experiments reported here tested instances when an exposed individual was aware of and could anticipate the arrival of an acoustic impulse. In order to detect MEMCs in human subjects, a laser-Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was used to measure tympanic membrane (TM) motion in response to a probe tone. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.11.006DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Microvascular networks in the area of the auditory peripheral nervous system.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 4;371:105-116. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Oregon Hearing Research Center, Department of Otolaryngology / Head & Neck Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, 97239, USA. Electronic address:

Using transgenic fluorescent reporter mice in combination with an established tissue clearing method, we detail heretofore optically opaque regions of the spiral lamina and spiral limbus where the auditory peripheral nervous system is located and provide insight into changes in cochlear vascular density with ageing. We found a relatively dense and branched vascular network in young adults, but a less dense and thinned network in aged adults. Significant reduction in vascular density starts early at the age of 180 days in the region of the spiral limbus (SL) and continues into old age at 540 days. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.11.012DOI Listing
January 2019

Noise-induced trauma produces a temporal pattern of change in blood levels of the outer hair cell biomarker prestin.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 30;371:98-104. Epub 2018 Nov 30.

Sensorion, 375 Rue Du Professeur Blayac, 34080, Montpellier, France.

Biomarkers in easy-to-access body fluid compartments, such as blood, are commonly used to assess health of various organ systems in clinical medicine. At present, no such biomarkers are available to inform on the health of the inner ear. Previously, we proposed the outer-hair-cell-specific protein prestin, as a possible biomarker and provided proof of concept in noise- and cisplatin-induced hearing loss. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.11.013DOI Listing
January 2019

Effect of blindness on mismatch responses to Mandarin lexical tones, consonants, and vowels.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 29;371:87-97. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Beijing Key Laboratory of Applied Experimental Psychology, National Demonstration Center for Experimental Psychology Education, Faculty of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875, China. Electronic address:

According to the hypothesis of auditory compensation, blind listeners are more sensitive to auditory input than sighted listeners. In the current study, we employed the passive oddball paradigm to investigate the effect of blindness on listeners' mismatch responses to Mandarin lexical tones, consonants, and vowels. Twelve blind and twelve sighted age- and verbal IQ-matched adults with normal hearing participated in this study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.11.010DOI Listing
January 2019
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Targeted single-cell electroporation loading of Ca indicators in the mature hemicochlea preparation.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 10;371:75-86. Epub 2018 Nov 10.

Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. Electronic address:

Ca is an important intracellular messenger and regulator in both physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms in the hearing organ. Investigation of cellular Ca homeostasis in the mature cochlea is hampered by the special anatomy and high vulnerability of the organ. A quick, straightforward and reliable Ca imaging method with high spatial and temporal resolution in the mature organ of Corti is missing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.11.004DOI Listing
January 2019

Investigating peripheral sources of speech-in-noise variability in listeners with normal audiograms.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 22;371:66-74. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Northwestern University, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Evanston, IL, USA. Electronic address: http://www.brainvolts.northwestern.edu.

A current initiative in auditory neuroscience research is to better understand why some listeners struggle to perceive speech-in-noise (SIN) despite having normal hearing sensitivity. Various hypotheses regarding the physiologic bases of this disorder have been proposed. Notably, recent work has suggested that the site of lesion underlying SIN deficits in normal hearing listeners may be either in "sub-clinical" outer hair cell damage or synaptopathic degeneration at the inner hair cell-auditory nerve fiber synapse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.11.008DOI Listing
January 2019
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Development of intra-operative assessment system for ossicular mobility and middle ear transfer function.

Hear Res 2018 Nov 22. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Daiichi Medical Co., Ltd, Japan.

Objective measurements of the ossicular mobility have not been commonly performed during the surgery, and the assessment of ossicular mobility is made by palpation in most cases. Palpation is inherently subjective and may not always be reliable, especially in milder degrees of ossicular fixation and in the case of multiple fixation. Although several devices have been developed to quantitatively measure the ossicular mobility during surgery, they have not been widely used. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.11.007DOI Listing
November 2018
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Differential responses to spectrally degraded speech within human auditory cortex: An intracranial electrophysiology study.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 22;371:53-65. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; Iowa Neuroscience Institute, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; Pappajohn Biomedical Institute, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.

Understanding cortical processing of spectrally degraded speech in normal-hearing subjects may provide insights into how sound information is processed by cochlear implant (CI) users. This study investigated electrocorticographic (ECoG) responses to noise-vocoded speech and related these responses to behavioral performance in a phonemic identification task. Subjects were neurosurgical patients undergoing chronic invasive monitoring for medically refractory epilepsy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.11.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6309487PMC
January 2019
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The effect of single-ossicle ear flexibility and eardrum cone orientation on quasi-static behavior of the chicken middle ear.

Hear Res 2018 Oct 19. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

University of Antwerp, Biophysics and Biomedical Physics, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020, Antwerp, Belgium.

In the single-ossicle ear of chickens, the quasi-static displacement of the umbo shows great asymmetry; umbo displacements are much larger for negative than for positive pressure in the middle ear, which is opposite to the typical asymmetry observed in mammal ears. To better understand this behavior, a finite-element model was created of the static response of the chicken middle ear. The role of flexibility of the extracolumella in the model was investigated, and the potential effect of the outward orientation of the tympanic-membrane cone was studied by building two adapted models with a flat membrane and an inverted conical membrane. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.10.011DOI Listing
October 2018
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Tonotopy in calcium homeostasis and vulnerability of cochlear hair cells.

Hear Res 2018 Nov 16. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14627, USA.

Ototoxicity, noise overstimulation, or aging, can all produce hearing loss with similar properties, in which outer hair cells (OHCs), principally those at the high-frequency base of the cochlea, are preferentially affected. We suggest that the differential vulnerability may partly arise from differences in Ca balance among cochlear locations. Homeostasis is determined by three factors: Ca influx mainly via mechanotransducer (MET) channels; buffering by calcium-binding proteins and organelles like mitochondria; and extrusion by the plasma membrane CaATPase pump. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.11.002DOI Listing
November 2018
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Intracochlear near infrared stimulation: Feasibility of optoacoustic stimulation in vivo.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 12;371:40-52. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

Institute of AudioNeuroTechnology and Department of Experimental Otology, ENT Clinics, Hannover Medical School, Stadtfelddamm 34, 30625, Hannover, Germany; DFG Cluster of Excellence, Hearing 4 All, Germany. Electronic address:

Intracochlear optical stimulation has been suggested as an alternative approach to hearing prosthetics in recent years. This study investigated the properties of a near infrared laser (NIR) induced optoacoustic effect. Pressure recordings were performed at the external meatus of anaesthetized guinea pigs during intracochlear NIR stimulation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.11.003DOI Listing
January 2019
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Neural crest contributions to the ear: Implications for congenital hearing disorders.

Hear Res 2018 Nov 14. Epub 2018 Nov 14.

Department of Pediatrics, The University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. Electronic address:

Congenital hearing disorders affect millions of children worldwide and can significantly impact acquisition of speech and language. Efforts to identify the developmental genetic etiologies of conductive and sensorineural hearing losses have revealed critical roles for cranial neural crest cells (NCCs) in ear development. Cranial NCCs contribute to all portions of the ear, and defects in neural crest development can lead to neurocristopathies associated with profound hearing loss. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03785955183041
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.11.005DOI Listing
November 2018
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The frequency-following response (FFR) to speech stimuli: A normative dataset in healthy newborns.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 9;371:28-39. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

Brainlab - Cognitive Neuroscience Research Group, Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, University of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institute of Neurosciences, University of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu, Esplugues de Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address:

The Frequency-Following Response (FFR) is a neurophonic auditory evoked potential that reflects the efficient encoding of speech sounds and is disrupted in a range of speech and language disorders. This raises the possibility to use it as a potential biomarker for literacy impairment. However, reference values for comparison with the normal population are not yet established. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.11.001DOI Listing
January 2019
8 Reads

Anatomical basis of drug delivery to the inner ear.

Hear Res 2018 Oct 27;368:10-27. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.

The isolated anatomical position and blood-labyrinth barrier hampers systemic drug delivery to the mammalian inner ear. Intratympanic placement of drugs and permeation via the round- and oval window are established methods for local pharmaceutical treatment. Mechanisms of drug uptake and pathways for distribution within the inner ear are hard to predict. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03785955183001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.06.017DOI Listing
October 2018
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Improved interaural timing of acoustic nerve stimulation affects sound localization in single-sided deaf cochlear implant users.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 29;371:19-27. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Department for Hearing, Speech and Voice Disorders, Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria.

The main impairment associated with single-sided deafness (SSD) is the loss of binaural hearing. Currently, the most effective treatment to compensate for this deficit is to supply patients suffering from SSD with a cochlear implant (CI) in the deaf ear. With this approach binaural hearing abilities can be restored to a certain extent, which is expressed in an improvement in such patients with regard to sound source localization and speech comprehension in noise after receipt of a CI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.10.015DOI Listing
January 2019
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The effect of presentation level on spectrotemporal modulation detection.

Hear Res 2019 Jan 2;371:11-18. Epub 2018 Nov 2.

KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Dept. of Neurosciences, ExpORL, Herestraat 49, Bus 721, 3000, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address:

The understanding of speech in noise relies (at least partially) on spectrotemporal modulation sensitivity. This sensitivity can be measured by spectral ripple tests, which can be administered at different presentation levels. However, it is not known how presentation level affects spectrotemporal modulation thresholds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2018.10.017DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads