800 results match your criteria Health Research Policy and Systems [Journal]


Addressing fragility through community-based health programmes: insights from two qualitative case study evaluations in South Sudan and Haiti.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Feb 14;17(1):20. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002, Basel, Switzerland.

Background: Fragility can have a negative effect on health systems and people's health, and poses considerable challenges for actors implementing health programmes. However, how such programmes, in turn, affect the overall fragility of a context is rarely considered. The Swiss Red Cross has been active in South Sudan and Haiti since 2008 and 2011, respectively, and commissioned a scoping study to shed new light on this issue within the frame of a learning process launched in 2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-019-0420-7DOI Listing
February 2019

The National Institute for Health Research Hyperacute Stroke Research Centres and the ENCHANTED trial: the impact of enhanced research infrastructure on trial metrics and patient outcomes.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Feb 13;17(1):19. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

The George Institute for Global Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Background: The English National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network first established Hyperacute Stroke Research Centres (HSRCs) in 2010 to support multicentre hyperacute (< 9 h) and complex stroke research. We assessed the impact of this investment on research performance and patient outcomes in a post-hoc analysis of country-specific data from a large multicentre clinical trial.

Methods: Comparisons of baseline, outcome and trial metric data were made for participants recruited to the alteplase-dose arm of the international Enhanced Control of Hypertension and Thrombolysis Stroke study (ENCHANTED) at National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network HSRCs and non-HSRCs between June 2012 and October 2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-019-0417-2DOI Listing
February 2019

A bibliometric analysis of health-related literature on natural disasters from 1900 to 2017.

Authors:
Waleed M Sweileh

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Feb 11;17(1):18. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Physiology, Pharmacology/Toxicology, Division of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine.

Background: Worldwide, natural disasters have caused a large number of deaths and considerable morbidity. Nevertheless, limited information is available on how the health-related literature on natural disasters has evolved. The current study aims to assess the growth and pattern of health-related literature on natural disasters. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-019-0418-1DOI Listing
February 2019

Evidence map of knowledge translation strategies, outcomes, facilitators and barriers in African health systems.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Feb 7;17(1):16. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

School of Public Health and Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, 7925, South Africa.

Background: The need for research-based knowledge to inform health policy formulation and implementation is a chronic global concern impacting health systems functioning and impeding the provision of quality healthcare for all. This paper provides a systematic overview of the literature on knowledge translation (KT) strategies employed by health system researchers and policy-makers in African countries.

Methods: Evidence mapping methodology was adapted from the social and health sciences literature and used to generate a schema of KT strategies, outcomes, facilitators and barriers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-019-0419-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6367796PMC
February 2019

Addressing the affordability of cancer drugs: using deliberative public engagement to inform health policy.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Feb 7;17(1):17. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

McMaster Health Forum, 1280 Main Street West, MML-417, Ontario, Hamilton, L8S 4L6, Canada.

Background: Health system expenditure on cancer drugs is rising rapidly in many OECD countries given the costly new treatments and increased rates of use due to a growing and ageing population. These factors put considerable strain on the sustainability of health systems worldwide, sparking public debate among clinicians, pharmaceutical companies, policy-makers and citizens on issues of affordability and equity. We engaged Canadians through a series of deliberative public engagement events to determine their priorities for making cancer drug funding decisions fair and sustainable in Canada's publicly financed health system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-019-0411-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6367823PMC
February 2019

Kenya's Health in All Policies strategy: a policy analysis using Kingdon's multiple streams.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Feb 6;17(1):15. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Heidelberg Institute of Global Health, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 130.3, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: Health in All Policies (HiAP) is an intersectoral approach that facilitates decision-making among policy-makers to maximise positive health impacts of other public policies. Kenya, as a member of WHO, has committed to adopting HiAP, which has been included in the Kenya Health Policy for the period 2014-2030. This study aims to assess the extent to which this commitment is being translated into the process of governmental policy-making and supported by international development partners as well as non-state actors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-019-0416-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6366019PMC
February 2019

Understanding political priority development for public health issues in Turkey: lessons from tobacco control and road safety.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Feb 6;17(1):13. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21205, United States of America.

Background: Tobacco use and road traffic injuries are major public health problems in Turkey. During the last decade, the former issue received political priority in the country, while the latter did not despite the immense health and economic burden that road traffic injuries pose on the Turkish population. Political priority can facilitate the attainment of public health goals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-019-0412-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6364388PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Increasing the capacity of policy agencies to use research findings: a stepped-wedge trial.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Feb 6;17(1):14. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

The Sax Institute, PO Box K617, Haymarket, Sydney, NSW, 1240, Australia.

Background: This paper describes the trial of a novel intervention, Supporting Policy In health with evidence from Research: an Intervention Trial (SPIRIT). It examines (1) the feasibility of delivering this kind of programme in practice; (2) its acceptability to participants; (3) the impact of the programme on the capacity of policy agencies to engage with research; and (4) the engagement with and use of research by policy agencies.

Methods: SPIRIT was a multifaceted, highly tailored, stepped-wedge, cluster-randomised, trial involving six health policy agencies in Sydney, Australia. Read More

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https://health-policy-systems.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0408-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6366302PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Lessons learned from Evidence-Informed Decision-Making in Nutrition & Health (EVIDENT) in Africa: a project evaluation.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Jan 31;17(1):12. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Public Health, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium.

Background: Evidence-informed Decision-making in Nutrition and Health (EVIDENT) is an international partnership that seeks to identify information needs in nutrition and health in Africa and build local capacity in knowledge management to help translate the best available evidence into context-appropriate recommendations aligned to the priorities of decision-makers. This study evaluates the extent to which EVIDENT achieved its intended activities, documents the lessons learned and draws on these lessons learned to inform future activities of EVIDENT, as well as in evidence-informed decision-making (EIDM) in nutrition overall.

Methods: Purposive and snowball sampling were used to identify participants that were either directly or indirectly involved with EVIDENT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-019-0413-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6357392PMC
January 2019

Understanding the implementation of Direct Health Facility Financing and its effect on health system performance in Tanzania: a non-controlled before and after mixed method study protocol.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Jan 30;17(1):11. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, 15-17 Tavistock Place, London, WC1H 9SH, United Kingdom.

Background: Globally, good health system performance has resulted from continuous reform, including adaptation of Decentralisation by Devolution policies, for example, the Direct Health Facility Financing (DHFF). Generally, the role of decentralisation in the health sector is to improve efficiency, to foster innovations and to improve quality, patient experience and accountability. However, such improvements have not been well realised in most low- and middle-income countries, with the main reason cited being the poor mechanism for disbursement of funds, which remain largely centralised. Read More

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https://health-policy-systems.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0400-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6354343PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

New indicators and indexes for benchmarking university-industry-government innovation in medical and life science clusters: results from the European FP7 Regions of Knowledge HealthTIES project.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Jan 28;17(1):10. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Sir William Dunn School, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Background: While the European Union is striving to become the 'Innovation Union', there remains a lack of quantifiable indicators to compare and benchmark regional innovation clusters. To address this issue, a HealthTIES (Healthcare, Technology and Innovation for Economic Success) consortium was funded by the European Union's Regions of Knowledge initiative, research and innovation funding programme FP7. HealthTIES examined whether the health technology innovation cycle was functioning differently in five European regional innovation clusters and proposed regional and joint actions to improve their performance. Read More

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https://health-policy-systems.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-019-0414-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6350323PMC
January 2019
6 Reads

What, why and how do health systems learn from one another? Insights from eight low- and middle-income country case studies.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Jan 21;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Oxford Policy Management (OPM), Oxford, United Kingdom.

Background: All health systems struggle to meet health needs within constrained resources. This is especially true for low-income countries. It is critical that they can learn from wider contexts in order to improve their performance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0410-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6341535PMC
January 2019

Sustainability of public health interventions: where are the gaps?

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Jan 15;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 15.

School of Health Studies, Arthur and Sonia Labatt Health Sciences Building, Rm. 222, London, Ontario, N6A 5B9, Canada.

The current scholarly focus on implementation science is meant to ensure that public health interventions are effectively embedded in their settings. Part of this conversation includes understanding how to support the sustainability of beneficial interventions so that limited resources are maximised, long-term public health outcomes are realised, community support is not lost, and ethical research standards are maintained. However, the concept of sustainability is confusing because of variations in terminology and a lack of agreed upon measurement frameworks, as well as methodological challenges. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0405-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6334403PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Contemporary issues in north-south health research partnerships: perspectives of health research stakeholders in Zambia.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Jan 15;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Department of Health Promotion and Education, University of Zambia, School of Public Health, P O Box 50110, Lusaka, Zambia.

Background: The late 1990s and early 2000s have seen a growth in north-south health research partnerships resulting from scientific developments such as those in genetic studies and development of statistical techniques and technological requirements for the analysis of large datasets. Despite these efforts, there is inadequate information representing the voice of African researchers as stakeholders experiencing partnership arrangements, particularly in Zambia. Furthermore, very little attention has been paid to capturing the practice of guidelines within partnerships. Read More

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https://health-policy-systems.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0409-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6334387PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Novel methods of qualitative analysis for health policy research.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Jan 14;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Medical School, Autonomous Metropolitan University, Calzada del Hueso 1100, Mexico City, 04960, Mexico.

Background: Currently, thanks to the growing number of public database resources, most evidence on planning and management, healthcare institutions, policies and practices is becoming available to everyone. However, one of the limitations for the advancement of data and literature-driven research has been the lack of flexibility of the methodological resources used in qualitative research. There is a need to incorporate friendly, cheaper and faster tools for the systematic, unbiased analysis of large data corpora, in particular regarding the qualitative aspects of the information (often overlooked). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0404-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6332644PMC
January 2019

Barriers and opportunities in the translation of mobile phone and social media interventions between research and health promotion practice in Australia: a qualitative study of expert perspectives.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Jan 10;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Centre for Population Health, Burnet Institute, 85 Commercial Rd, Melbourne, Victoria, 3004, Australia.

Background: Newer technologies, such as smartphones and social networking sites, offer new opportunities for health promotion interventions. There is evidence to show that these technologies can be effectively and acceptably used for health promotion activities. However, most interventions produced in research do not end up benefitting non-research populations, while the majority of technology-facilitated interventions which are available outside of research settings are either undocumented or have limited or no evidence to support any benefit. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0406-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6329110PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Optimising decentralisation for the health sector by exploring the synergy of decision space, capacity and accountability: insights from the Philippines.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Jan 10;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland.

Background: Several studies on decentralisation have used the 'decision space' approach to assess the breadth of space made available to decision-makers at lower levels of the health system. However, in order to better understand how decentralisation becomes effective for the health sector, analysis should go beyond assessing decision space and include the dimensions of capacity and accountability. Building on Bossert's earlier work on the synergy of these dimensions, we analysed decision-making in the Philippines where governmental health services have been devolved to local governments since 1992. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0402-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6327786PMC
January 2019
1 Read

The determinants of vaccination in a semi-rural area of Vientiane City, Lao People's Democratic Republic: a qualitative study.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Jan 9;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Nossal Institute for Global Health, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, 5th Floor, 333 Exhibition St, Melbourne, 3000, Australia.

Background: Immunisation is a cost-effective and highly efficacious public health intervention, saving over 20 million lives in the last two decades due to decreases in childhood bacterial infections. In the Lao People's Democratic Republic, significant gaps in childhood immunisation coverage rates remain, which are a cause for concern and a barrier to the country reaching its Sustainable Development Goal targets for child health. Efforts to increase coverage have had limited success, with widening inequities being observed between urban and remote and rural areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0407-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325875PMC
January 2019
4 Reads

The challenges of implementation of clinical governance in Iran: a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Jan 9;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Department of Health Services Management, School of Health Management and Information Sciences, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Policy- and decision-makers seek to improve the quality of care in the health sector and therefore aim to improve quality through appropriate policies. Higher quality of care will satisfy service providers and the public, reduce costs, increase productivity, and lead to better organisational performance. Clinical governance is a method through which management can be improved and made more accountable, and leads to the provision of better quality of care. Read More

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https://health-policy-systems.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0399-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6327528PMC
January 2019
4 Reads

Integrating implementation and user-centred design strategies to enhance the impact of health services: protocol from a concept mapping study.

Health Res Policy Syst 2019 Jan 8;17(1). Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Room BB1644, Box 356560, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA.

Background: Innovative approaches are needed to maximise the uptake and sustainment of evidence-based practices in a variety of health service contexts. This protocol describes a study that will seek to characterise the potential of one such approach, user-centred design (UCD), which is an emerging field that seeks to ground the design of an innovation in information about the people who will ultimately use that innovation. The use of UCD to enhance strategies for implementation of health services, although promising, requires a multidisciplinary perspective based on a firm understanding of how experts from each discipline perceives the interrelatedness and suitability of these strategies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0403-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6323703PMC
January 2019

The value of a causal loop diagram in exploring the complex interplay of factors that influence health promotion in a multisectoral health system in Australia.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Dec 29;16(1):126. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Southgate Institute for Health, Society and Equity, Flinders University, South Australia, Bedford Park, Australia.

Background: Despite calls for the application of complex systems science in empirical studies of health promotion, there are very few examples. The aim of this paper was to use a complex systems approach to examine the key factors that influenced health promotion (HP) policy and practice in a multisectoral health system in Australia.

Methods: Within a qualitative case study, a schema was developed that incorporated HP goals, actions and strategies with WHO building blocks (leadership and governance, financing, workforce, services and information). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0394-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6310960PMC
December 2018

Getting smarter with data: understanding tensions in the use of data in assurance and improvement-oriented performance management systems to improve their implementation.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Dec 22;16(1):125. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

Public Service Research Group, School of Business, UNSW Canberra, PO Box 7196, Canberra BC, 2610, Australia.

Background: A better understanding of the conditions under which performance indicators can be used to improve accountability for outcomes and promote quality improvement could help policy-makers develop more effective performance management systems. One problem is the lack of conceptual models and empirical data that describe the processes through which different approaches use data together with other incentives to influence motivation.

Discussion: Drawing on the performance governance and quality improvement literature, we developed a framework that distinguishes between the practice of using information to verify levels of performance in market-oriented performance management approaches and using indicators to monitor and promote improvement through building capacity for using data in service and professional networks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0401-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6303867PMC
December 2018

Convergence model for effectual prevention and control of zoonotic diseases: a health system study on 'One Health' approach in Ahmedabad, India.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Dec 19;16(1):124. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Center for Development Research (ZEF), University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.

The complexity and increasing burden of zoonotic diseases create challenges for the health systems of developing nations. Public health systems must therefore be prepared to face existing and future disease threats at the human-animal interface. The key for this is coordinated action between the human and the animal health systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0398-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6299981PMC
December 2018

Opportunities for linking research to policy: lessons learned from implementation research in sexual and reproductive health within the ANSER network.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Dec 17;16(1):123. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

International Centre for Reproductive Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.

Background: The uptake of findings from sexual and reproductive health and rights research into policy-making remains a complex and non-linear process. Different models of research utilisation and guidelines to maximise this in policy-making exist, however, challenges still remain for researchers to improve uptake of their research findings and for policy-makers to use research evidence in their work.

Methods: A participatory workshop with researchers was organised in November 2017 by the Academic Network for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights Policy (ANSER) to address this gap. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0397-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6297973PMC
December 2018

Getting evidence to travel inside public systems: what organisational brokering capacities exist for evidence-based policy?

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Dec 17;16(1):122. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

ENAP École Nationale d'Administration Publique, 4750 Henri Julien, Montréal, QC, H2T 3E5, Canada.

Background: Implementing research findings into healthcare policy is an enduring challenge made even more difficult when policies must be developed and implemented with the help and support of multiple ideas, agendas and actors taking part in determinants of health. Only looking at mechanisms to feed policy-makers with evidence or to interest researchers in the policy process will simply bring partial clues; implementing evidence-based policy also requires organisations to lead and to partner in the production and intake of scientific evidence from academics and practical evidence from one another.

Main Body: This Commentary argues for the need to better understand the capacities required by organisations to foster evidence-based policy in a dispersed environment. Read More

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https://health-policy-systems.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0393-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6296131PMC
December 2018
3 Reads

How can the impact of national recommendations for physical activity be increased? Experiences from Germany.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Dec 14;16(1):121. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Department of Sport Science and Sport, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Gebbertstraße 123b, 91058, Erlangen, Germany.

Background: Clearly stated national recommendations for physical activity (PA) are available in many nations. Yet, their impact on national level policy-making might be considered modest at best. This paper analyses the approach selected to curtail this problem in Germany. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0396-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6295091PMC
December 2018

Deconstructing knowledge brokering for commissioned rapid reviews: an observational study.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Dec 12;16(1):120. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

The Sax Institute, PO Box K617, Haymarket NSW 1240, Ultimo, NSW 2007, Australia.

Background: Knowledge brokers are increasingly used by policy agencies, yet little is known about how they engage with policy-makers and facilitate discussions with them about their research needs. This study examines knowledge brokers' behaviour in one-off interactions with policy-makers commissioning rapid reviews. It describes how knowledge brokers engage with policy-makers, build trust and gain agreement about the review's parameters. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0389-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6292028PMC
December 2018

Mental health research priorities in Australia: a consumer and carer agenda.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Dec 12;16(1):119. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Research School of Psychology, The Australian National University, Acton, Australia.

Background: The perspectives of mental health consumers and carers are increasingly recognised as important to the development and conduct of research. However, research directions are still most commonly developed without consumer and carer input. This project aimed to establish priorities for mental health research driven by the views of consumers and carers in Australia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0395-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6292010PMC
December 2018

Embracing complexity and uncertainty to create impact: exploring the processes and transformative potential of co-produced research through development of a social impact model.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Dec 11;16(1):118. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, University Road, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, United Kingdom.

The potential use, influence and impact of health research is seldom fully realised. This stubborn problem has caused burgeoning global interest in research aiming to address the implementation 'gap' and factors inhibiting the uptake of scientific evidence. Scholars and practitioners have questioned the nature of evidence used and required for healthcare, highlighting the complex ways in which knowledge is formed, shared and modified in practice and policy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0375-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6288891PMC
December 2018

Application of the i-PARIHS framework for enhancing understanding of interactive dissemination to achieve wide-scale improvement in Indigenous primary healthcare.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 29;16(1):117. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

The University of Sydney, University Centre for Rural Health, 61 Uralba Street, Lismore, NSW, 2480, Australia.

Background: Participatory research approaches improve the use of evidence in policy, programmes and practice. Few studies have addressed ways to scale up participatory research for wider system improvement or the intensity of effort required. We used the integrated Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (i-PARIHS) framework to analyse implementation of an interactive dissemination process engaging stakeholders with continuous quality improvement (CQI) data from Australian Indigenous primary healthcare centres. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0392-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6267798PMC
November 2018
9 Reads

An analysis of research priority-setting at the World Health Organization - how mapping to a standard template allows for comparison between research priority-setting approaches.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 29;16(1):116. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

TDR, the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases, World Health Organization, 20 avenue Appia, 1211, Geneva 27, Switzerland.

Background: A review of research priorities completed by WHO technical units was undertaken. Results of the mapping were recorded in a database that was used to generate analysis and compare research priorities and the different methodological approaches used in their development.

Methods: A total of 116 documents were reviewed for this study. Read More

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https://health-policy-systems.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0391-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6264050PMC
November 2018
7 Reads

Budgeting for a billion: applying health technology assessment (HTA) for universal health coverage in India.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 29;16(1):115. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Health Intervention and Technology Assessment Program (HITAP), Nonthaburi, Thailand.

Background: India recently launched the largest universal health coverage scheme in the world to address the gaps in providing healthcare to its population. Health technology assessment (HTA) has been recognised as a tool for setting priorities as the government seeks to increase public health expenditure. This study aims to understand the current situation for healthcare decision-making in India and deliberate on the opportunities for introducing HTA in the country. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0378-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6262968PMC
November 2018

Healthy bi-regional connection: The EU-LAC Health initiative has promoted equitable and collaborative health research and innovation.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 23;16(1):114. Epub 2018 Nov 23.

Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Monforte de Lemos 5, 28029, Madrid, Spain.

The European Union and Latin America and the Caribbean regions have enjoyed privileged relations since the first bi-regional Summit of Heads of State and Government, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 1999, and the lunching of a Strategic Partnership. Health research stands as one of the major areas of research and development expenditure in both regions and has also been the focus of roughly 30% of all bilateral cooperation agreements and programmes.EU-LAC Health, a project funded by the European Union from 2011 to 2017, had the main objective to develop a consensus roadmap to enhance and coordinate the bi-regional collaboration between the European Union member states and Latin America and Caribbean countries in health research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0390-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6251221PMC
November 2018
10 Reads

A deliberative dialogue as a knowledge translation strategy on road traffic injuries in Burkina Faso: a mixed-method evaluation.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 20;16(1):113. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

IRD (French Institute for Research on sustainable Development), CEPED (IRD-Université Paris Descartes), Universités Paris Sorbonne Cités, ERL INSERM SAGESUD, Paris, France.

Introduction: Deliberative dialogues are increasingly being used, particularly on the African continent. They are a promising interactive knowledge translation strategy that brings together and leverages the knowledge of diverse stakeholders important to the resolution of a societal issue. Following a research project carried out in Burkina Faso on road traffic injuries, a 1-day workshop in the form of a deliberative dialogue was organised in November 2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0388-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247528PMC
November 2018
9 Reads

Subjective judgements - no more, no less? A response to Malterud, Bjelland and Elvbakken.

Authors:
Atle Fretheim

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 20;16(1):111. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.

In 2016, three researchers published a report where they concluded that systematic reviews from my institution, the Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, are of little use for health policy decision-making. Based on their reading of the conclusion section in 14 reports, they argue that our systematic reviews are not useful due to their lack of clear and conclusive findings. I have reviewed the same documents and I beg to differ. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0386-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6245815PMC
November 2018

Systematic reviews for policy-making - critical reflections are needed.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 20;16(1):112. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Department of Administration and Organization Theory, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0387-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6245825PMC
November 2018
8 Reads

An integrative review of potential enablers and barriers to accessing mental health services in Ghana.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 16;16(1):110. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

Health Services Research Centre, Faculty of Business and Economics, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.

Introduction: The importance of accessible mental health treatment is a global concern, particularly when one in five people will experience a mental health problem in their lifespan. This is no less important in Ghana; however, no studies have yet attempted to appraise and synthesise the potential enablers and barriers to accessing services in Ghana. The aim of this integrative review is therefore to identify and synthesise existing evidence on the barriers and enablers to accessing mental health services in Ghana. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0382-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240297PMC
November 2018
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Knowledge mobilisation for chronic disease prevention: the case of the Australian Prevention Partnership Centre.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 16;16(1):109. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre, The Sax Institute, Ultimo, NSW, 2007, Australia.

Background: Cross-sectoral, multidisciplinary partnership research is considered one of the most effective means of facilitating research-informed policy and practice, particularly for addressing complex problems such as chronic disease. Successful research partnerships tend to be underpinned by a range of features that enable knowledge mobilisation (KMb), seeking to connect academic researchers with decision-makers and practitioners to improve the nature, quality and use of research. This paper contributes to the growing discourse on partnership approaches by illustrating how knowledge mobilisation strategies are operationalised within the Australian Prevention Partnership Centre (the Centre), a national collaboration of academics, policy-makers and practitioners established to develop systems approaches for the prevention of lifestyle-related chronic diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0379-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240292PMC
November 2018
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Decisions in health technology assessment: should we speak with one voice?

Authors:
Tracy Merlin

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 15;16(1):108. Epub 2018 Nov 15.

Adelaide Health Technology Assessment (AHTA), School of Public Health, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, 5005, Australia.

Decisions regarding the regulation of individual medicines differ from country to country. In the case of Relenza, Mulinari and Davis (Health Res Policy Syst 15:93, 2017) have suggested that these inconsistencies are primarily due to processes, statistical methodologies and technical capacity varying between regulatory agencies. They go on to name specific individuals involved in the evaluation of this anti-influenza medicine and imply that differences in the judgements of these individuals has affected public policy concerning the market access of this medicine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0385-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6237006PMC
November 2018
6 Reads

Regulatory scientists' work has important ramifications for public health and should be open to public scrutiny.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 15;16(1):98. Epub 2018 Nov 15.

Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Faculty of Social Science and Public Policy, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom.

The Swedish Medical Products Agency (MPA) objects to the fact that we occasionally refer to one of its senior ex-employees by name. However, names of individual MPA assessors, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reviewers, and European Medicines Agency rapporteurs and co-rapporteurs are cited in regulatory documents and are a matter of public record. In our paper (Health Res Policy Syst 15:93, 2017), we in no way suggest that regulatory decisions were left to individual reviewers or assessors, although we do emphasise that individual MPA and FDA employees' scientific assessments and benefit-risk evaluations are critical to the decision-making process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0371-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6237023PMC
November 2018

The Swedish Medical Products Agency's rules of procedure.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 15;16(1):100. Epub 2018 Nov 15.

Swedish Medical Products Agency, SE -751 03, Uppsala, Sweden.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0372-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6237002PMC
November 2018

The potential of an online educational platform to contribute to achieving sustainable development goals: a mixed-methods evaluation of the Peoples-uni online platform.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 12;16(1):106. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

People's Open Access Education Initiative (Peoples-uni), Manchester, United Kingdom.

Background: This paper reports on an online platform, People's Open Access Education Initiative (Peoples-uni), as a means of enhancing access to master's level public health education for health professionals. Peoples-uni seeks to improve population health in low- and middle-income countries by building public health capacity through e-learning at very low cost. We report here an evaluation of the Peoples-uni programme, conducted within the context of Sustainable Development Goal 4, which seeks to "ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning" by 2030. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0381-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6233379PMC
November 2018
6 Reads

Evaluating the impact of a network of research partnerships: a longitudinal multiple case study protocol.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 12;16(1):107. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University of British Columbia Okanagan, Kelowna, BC, Canada.

Background: Conducting and/or disseminating research together with community stakeholders (e.g. policy-makers, practitioners, community organisations, patients) is a promising approach to generating relevant and impactful research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0377-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6233573PMC
November 2018
10 Reads

Evaluating health research priority-setting in low-income countries: a case study of health research priority-setting in Zambia.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 7;16(1):105. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

Department of Diseases Surveillance Control and Research, Ministry of Health, Lusaka, Zambia.

Priority-setting (PS) for health research presents an opportunity for the relevant stakeholders to identify and create a list of priorities that reflects the country's knowledge needs. Zambia has conducted several health research prioritisation exercises that have never been evaluated. Evaluation would facilitate gleaning of lessons of good practices that can be shared as well as the identification of areas of improvement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0384-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6223066PMC
November 2018

Advancing the evaluation of integrated knowledge translation.

Authors:
Sara A Kreindler

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 6;16(1):104. Epub 2018 Nov 6.

Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, 451-753 McDermot Ave., Winnipeg, MB, R3E 0T6, Canada.

Background: Integrated knowledge translation (IKT) flows from the premise that knowledge co-produced with decision-makers is more likely to inform subsequent decisions. However, evaluations of manager/policy-maker-focused IKT often concentrate on intermediate outcomes, stopping short of assessing whether research findings have contributed to identifiable organisational action. Such hesitancy may reflect the difficulty of tracing the causes of this distal, multifactorial outcome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0383-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6218993PMC
November 2018

Exploring the synergies between focused ethnography and integrated knowledge translation.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Nov 3;16(1):103. Epub 2018 Nov 3.

St. Paul's Hospital, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z1Y6, Canada.

Background: Issues with the uptake of research findings in applied health services research remain problematic. Part of this disconnect is attributed to the exclusion of knowledge users at the outset of a study, which often results in the generation of knowledge that is not usable at the point of care. Integrated knowledge translation blended with qualitative methodologies has the potential to address this issue by working alongside knowledge users throughout the research process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0376-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6215639PMC
November 2018
9 Reads

A new interministerial strategy for the promotion of healthy eating in Portugal: implementation and initial results.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Oct 30;16(1):102. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

Secretário de Estado Adjunto e da Saúde, XXI Governo Constitucional, Lisbon, Portugal.

Objective: To describe the implementation, main intervention areas and initial results of the Integrated Strategy for the Promotion of Healthy Eating (EIPAS) in Portugal.

Methods: EIPAS was published as a Law, in December of 2017, as a result of a collaboration between several ministries, including the Finance, Internal Affairs, Education, Health, Economy, Agriculture, and Sea Ministries, aiming at improving the dietary habits of the Portuguese population. The working group, led by the Ministry of Health, developed this strategy for over a year. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0380-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6208124PMC
October 2018
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Knowledge translation for realist reviews: a participatory approach for a review on scaling up complex interventions.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Oct 22;16(1):101. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Public Health Agency of Canada, 130 Colonnade Road A.L. 6501H, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0K9, Canada.

Background: Knowledge syntheses that use a realist methodology are gaining popularity. Yet, there are few reports in the literature that describe how results are summarised, shared and used. This paper aims to inform knowledge translation (KT) for realist reviews by describing the process of developing a KT strategy for a review on pathways for scaling up complex public health interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0374-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6198505PMC
October 2018

Exploring the complex pathway of the primary health care response to intimate partner violence in New Zealand.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Oct 19;16(1):99. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Centre for Interdisciplinary Trauma Research, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland, 1142, New Zealand.

Background: Integrating sustainable responses to intimate partner violence in health care is a persistent and complex problem internationally. New Zealand holds a leading role, having established national health system infrastructure for responding to intimate partner violence within hospital and selected community settings. However, resources for, and engagement with, the primary health care sector has been limited. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0373-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6194704PMC
October 2018

Globalisation and neoliberalism as structural drivers of health inequities.

Health Res Policy Syst 2018 Oct 9;16(Suppl 1):91. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

Achutha Menon Centre for Health Science Studies, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute of Medical Science and Technology, Trivandrum, India.

In this paper, we draw upon and build on three presentations which were part of the plenary session on 'Structural Drivers of Health Inequities' at the National Conference on Health Inequities in India: Transformative Research for Action, organised by the Achutha Menon Centre for Health Science Studies in Trivandrum, India. The three presentations discussed the influential role played by globalisation and neoliberalism in shaping economic, social and political relationships across developed and developing countries. The paper further argues that the twin process of globalisation and liberalisation have been important drivers of health inequities. Read More

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https://health-policy-systems.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12961-018-0365-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6178247PMC
October 2018
1 Read