2,802 results match your criteria Hawaii medical journal[Journal]


An assessment of the Pacific Regional Cancer Coalition: outcomes and implications of a regional coalition internal and external assessment.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11 Suppl 2):47-53

Office of Public Health Studies, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, 1960 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI, 96822, USA.

Significance: The Pacific Regional Cancer Coalition (PRCC) provides regional leadership in the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) to implement the Regional Comprehensive Control Plan: 2007-2012, and to evaluate its coalition and partnerships. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3254227PMC
November 2011
9 Reads

Higher percent body fat in young women with lower physical activity level and greater proportion Pacific Islander ancestry.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11 Suppl 2):43-6

Department of Human Nutrition, Food, and Animal Science, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, 1955 East West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.

Samoan women exhibit high rates of obesity, which can possibly be attenuated through diet and physical activity. Obesity, and body fatness in particular, is associated with increased risk for chronic diseases. Ancestry, physical activity, and dietary patterns have been associated with body composition. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3254223PMC
November 2011
4 Reads

Cancer mortality following polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination of a Guam village.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11 Suppl 2):40-2

Cancer Research Center of Guam, University of Guam, and Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services, Hagatna, Guam.

Unlabelled: Beginning more than 10 years after the release of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination in the favored fishing grounds of Merizo village, an increase in the proportional cancer mortality rate was observed among residents of the village. This increased rate continued for approximately 20 years after which it returned to near island-wide Guam levels. Although the temporal association between PCB contamination of the environment of this village and an increase in cancer mortality is intriguing, it does not necessarily demonstrate a cause and effect relationship. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3254225PMC
November 2011
5 Reads

Needs and experiences of Samoan breast cancer survivors in Southern California.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11 Suppl 2):35-9

Department of Health Science, California State University, 800 N. State College Blvd., Fullerton, CA 92834-3599, USA.

Objective: Breast cancer rates are increasing among Samoan and other Pacific Islander women, yet studies of their social support needs are nearly non-existent. The purpose of this paper is to report on the cultural dimensions of social support among Samoan breast cancer survivors in Southern California.

Methods: Data for this paper came from a larger one-and-a-half year study of the social support needs of Samoan breast cancer survivors and their family and friends. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3254226PMC
November 2011
4 Reads

Local food policies can help promote local foods and improve health: a case study from the Federated States of Micronesia.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11 Suppl 2):31-4

Island Food Community of Pohnpei, Kolonia, Pohnpei 96941 FM, Federated States of Micronesia.

The Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) and other countries throughout the Pacific are facing an epidemic of non-communicable disease health problems. These are directly related to the increased consumption of unhealthy imported processed foods, the neglect of traditional food systems, and lifestyle changes, including decreased physical activity. The FSM faces the double burden of malnutrition with both non-communicable diseases and micronutrient deficiencies, including vitamin A deficiency and anemia. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3254231PMC
November 2011
12 Reads

Palliative care and traditional practices of death and dying in Wa'ab (Yap Proper) and in the Outer Islands of Yap.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11 Suppl 2):27-30

Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, John A. Burns School of Medicine; 95-390 Kuahelani Avenue, Mililani, HI 96789-1192, USA.

Background: Death remains one of the most important and significant activities in Yap, an event that involves the entire island. A death of a Yapese not only unites the family, it initiates a complex series of reaffirmed kinship ties, rituals and exchanges that refocus the entire community and create new social identities for the participants. How these ties, exchanges, and identities are changing due to new economic challenges and new social pressures were the focus of this preliminary study, which sought to document the resiliency or fragility of traditional structures, measured in the efforts around death and dying in Yap and to identify ways that the health care system can intervene to improve palliative care. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3254221PMC
November 2011
12 Reads

Imi Ho'ola program: producing primary care physicians for Hawai'i and the Pacific.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11 Suppl 2):25-6

University of Hawai'i John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.

Background: The impact on health care delivery due to the impending shortage of primary care physicians is of national concern. To meet the growing health care needs of Hawai'i and the Pacific, the Imi Ho'ala Post-Baccalaureate Program (IHP) provides educational opportunities for students from disadvantaged backgrounds to pursue careers in medicine. Students selected to participate in the IHP have demonstrated a commitment to serve in areas of need of Hawai'i and the Pacific. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3254222PMC
November 2011
6 Reads

Recommendations for medical training: a Native Hawaiian patient perspective.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11 Suppl 2):20-4

Department of Native Hawaiian Health, University of Hawai'i John A. Burns School of Medicine, 677 Ala Moana Blvd., Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.

Background: Culturally competent health care providers are needed to eliminate healthcare disparities. In the State of Hawai'i, Native Hawaiians suffer some of the worst health disparities. Prior to implementing a cultural competency curriculum to address these disparities, the John A. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3254220PMC
November 2011
6 Reads

An innovative approach to developing a cultural competency curriculum; efforts at the John A. Burns School of Medicine, Department of Native Hawaiian Health.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11 Suppl 2):15-9

Department of Native Hawaiian Health, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai‘i, 677 Ala Moana Blvd., Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.

Introduction: Initial efforts to teach cultural competency at the University of Hawai'i John A. Burns School of Medicine began in the late 1990s through the Native Hawaiian Center of Excellence. With the formation of the Department of Native Hawaiian Health in 2003, cultural competency training was added as a key area of focus for the department. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3254230PMC
November 2011
15 Reads

Social determinants of health for Native Hawaiian children and adolescents.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11 Suppl 2):9-14

Native Hawaiian Center of Excellence, Department of Native Hawaiian Health, University of Hawai'i John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, HI, USA.

Introduction: Traditional Hawaiian thought places children in a position of prominence in the family. Yet in Hawai'i, Native Hawaiian children and adolescents face significant inequity in health outcomes. From prenatal alcohol and tobacco use, late or no prenatal care, macrosomia as well as low birth rates, to exclusive breastfeeding rates at 6 months, and high rates of infant mortality, Native Hawaiians face inequities in pre and early childhood indicators. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3254224PMC
November 2011
8 Reads

Health care for Micronesians and constitutional rights.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11 Suppl 2):4-8

University of Hawai'i William S. Richardson School of Law, Honolulu, HI, USA.

Under the Compacts of Free Association (COFA), people from the Freely Associated States--the Republic of Palau (ROP), the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI), and the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM)--have been migrating to the United States in increasing numbers. In 1996, Congress passed broad welfare reform (Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act) which limited certain federal benefits previously available to COFA migrants, including Medicaid benefits. Prior to July 2010, the State of Hawai'i had continued to include COFA migrants under its state-funded Medicaid program. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3254229PMC
November 2011
52 Reads

The health and wellbeing of the Pacific indigenous peoples.

Authors:
Neal Palafox

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11 Suppl 2)

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3254228PMC
November 2011
6 Reads

The weathervane.

Authors:
Russell T Stodd

Hawaii Med J 2011 Dec;70(12):271

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3242424PMC
December 2011
4 Reads

John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) Class of 2015 Profile.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Dec;70(12):269-70

John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i, USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3242423PMC
December 2011
4 Reads

Antibiotic desensitization therapy in secondary syphilis and Listeria infection: case reports and review of desensitization therapy.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Dec;70(12):266-8

Department of Internal Medicine, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859, USA.

Two adult cases, one of secondary syphilis and one of Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia, in which antibiotic desensitization therapy was utilized to assist treatment of active infection in the face of severe penicillin allergy. Clinical considerations are discussed that led to the decision to employ a formal desensitization procedure. Antibiotic desensitization protocols can facilitate optimal and safe antibiotic therapy in the appropriate clinical setting. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3242422PMC
December 2011
8 Reads

Ocular findings in volcanic fog induced conjunctivitis.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Dec;70(12):262-5

Department of Surgery, University of Hawai'i, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, HI, USA.

Objective: To describe the ocular signs and symptoms of patients complaining of eye irritation due to volcanic fog (vog).

Methods: The study utilized a non-comparative, retrospective chart review of 30 patients who had a chief complaint of eye irritation, which the subjects attributed to vog. Ocular signs and symptoms are described and related to the ambient concentration of sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), particulate matter sized 2. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3242421PMC
December 2011
3 Reads

Cancer patient navigation case studies in Hawai'i: the complimentary role of clinical and community navigators.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Dec;70(12):257-61

'Imi Hale Native Hawaiian Cancer Network, Papa Ola Lokahi, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.

This article describes the activities performed by cancer patient navigators in community-based and hospital settings. The case study demonstrates the depth and breadth of navigation activities and illustrates how hospital-based and community-based navigators work together to help individuals access cancer care and complete cancer treatment. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3242420PMC
December 2011
6 Reads

Perceptions related to diet and exercise among Asians and Pacific Islanders with diabetes.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Sep;70(9):196-9

University of Hawai'i at Manoa, School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, Honolulu, USA.

The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of Asians and Pacific Islanders (API) with Type 2 diabetes related to diet and exercise. A descriptive content analysis was conducted on verbalized responses from 15 participants in focus groups who were asked "What role does your culture play in what, when, and how much you eat?" and "If and/or how much you exercise and what type of exercise you do?" The participants recorded responses were transcribed verbatim and analyzed for themes utilizing the social ecological framework.The families, environment, and the local culture in Hawai'i greatly affect the dietary and physical activities of the participants. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3233401PMC
September 2011
4 Reads

Emergence of community-acquired extended-spectrum beta-lactamase Escherichia coli (ESBLEC) in Honolulu: a case series of three individuals with community-acquired ESBLEC bacteriuria.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Sep;70(9):193-5

University of Hawai'i John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, USA.

Community-acquired extended-spectrum beta-lactamase E coli (ESBLEC) have not been previously described in Honolulu. Its emergence as a community-acquired pathogen is concerning. This case series describes three patients who were diagnosed with community-acquired ESBLEC bacteriuria in 2010. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3233400PMC
September 2011
7 Reads

Faculty and resident perceptions regarding overnight student call during the third year OB/GYN clerkship.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Sep;70(9):189-92

University of Hawai'i John A. Burns School of Medicine; Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health; Honolulu, HI, USA.

Objectives: The objective of this study is to identify university faculty, community physician, and resident perceptions of how a schedule that employs overnight call in addition to a traditional weekday schedule affects medical student education, well being, and patient care during the third year obstetrics and gynecology clerkship.

Methods: In July 2007, a descriptive study was performed by distributing surveys to community teaching physicians, current residents, and faculty in the University of Hawai'i Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. A total of 114 surveys were distributed to all current residents, clinical faculty and full-time faculty in the University of Hawai'i Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3233399PMC
September 2011
5 Reads

Medical School Hotline: Developing communication skills for leading family meetings.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Jun;70(6):127-8

The John A. Hartford Center of Excellence in Geriatrics, Department of Geriatric Medicine, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i, USA.

Good clinician-family communication is essential for the provision of high-quality patient care. Families rate the communication skills of clinicians as critical clinical skills. However, there has been no structured training of fellow communication skills while leading family meetings in the University of Hawai'i Geriatric Medicine Fellowship Program. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3233397PMC
June 2011
4 Reads

Atypical presentations of methemoglobinemia from benzocaine spray.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Jun;70(6):125-6

Department of Medicine, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, 96813, USA.

Widely used for local anesthesia, especially prior to endoscopic procedures, benzocaine spray is one of the most common causes of iatrogenic methemoglobinemia. The authors report an atypical case of methemoglobinemia in a woman presenting with pale skin and severe hypoxemia, after a delayed repeat exposure to benzocaine spray. Early recognition and prompt management of methemoglobinemia is needed in order to lessen morbidity and mortality from this entity. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3233396PMC
June 2011
5 Reads
2 Citations

Maggot debridement therapy in the treatment of complex diabetic wounds.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Jun;70(6):121-4

Kaiser Permanente, Division of Infectious Disease, Honolulu, HI 96819, USA.

The growth and aging of the population of Hawai'i with a high incidence of diabetes mandates a need for more effective strategies to manage the healing of complicated wounds. Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is one alternative utilized with successful results. Observations have indicated that maggots have the ability to debride wound beds, provide anti-microbial activity and also stimulate wound healing in diabetic patients. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3233395PMC
June 2011
5 Reads

Cost-benefit estimates of an elderly exercise program on Kaua'i.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Jun;70(6):116-20

County of Kaua'i Agency on Elderly Affairs, Lihue, HI, USA.

The elderly consume a disproportionate amount of health care resources, and the recent trend in obesity will only escalate costs. EnhanceFitness® (EF) is an exercise program designed to increase the strength, flexibility, and balance of older adults. A comprehensive controlled study in Washington state of an elderly population has shown that participants who attend at least one EF class per week reduce healthcare costs by 20% per year. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3233394PMC
June 2011
9 Reads

Improving toxicology knowledge in preclinical medical students using high-fidelity patient simulators.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Jun;70(6):112-5

Emergency Department, Kapi'olani Medical Center for Women and Children, Honolulu, HI 96826, USA.

Background: Superior patient care and optimal physician training are often mutually elusive in the Emergency Department setting. Highfidelity patient simulators (HFPSs) are being used with increasing frequency in the training of medical students (MS) because they enable students to develop and refine medical competency in a non-threatening and safe environment. However, learner outcomes using HFPSs in this setting have not been well studied. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3233393PMC
June 2011
6 Reads

Medical School Hotline: Turning the tragedy of tobacco around: how revenue from cigarettes improves health in Hawai'i.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11):245-7

John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i, USA.

JABSOM takes its responsibility to improve health among Hawai'i's people to heart. The school's vision is, ALOHA: to Attain Lasting Optimal Health for All, a theme adopted through a strategic planning process which engaged JABSOM's partners in the health and life sciences including its private sector collaborators and its sister colleges throughout the University of Hawai'i's ten-campus system. JABSOM's ability to collaborate and contribute in these areas has been irrevocably enhanced by tobacco-related funding that the State of Hawai'i has committed to develop the Kaka'ako campus. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3215990PMC
November 2011
6 Reads

Celiac disease presenting as severe osteopenia.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11):242-4

Department of Internal Medicine, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, USA.

The authors describe a unique presentation of celiac disease as multiple non-traumatic fractures in a young male without gastrointestinal complaints. A 29-year-old man presented with back pain and was found to have a non-traumatic compression fracture of the lumbar and thoracic spine on plain X-ray. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) confirmed osteoporosis at the L3/L4 vertebral bodies. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3215989PMC
November 2011
5 Reads

Towards cultural competency in end-of-life communication training.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11):239-41

The John A. Hartford Center of Excellence in Geriatrics, Department of Geriatric Medicine, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, 96817, USA.

To meet the needs of a more diverse population, a culturally sensitive approach to end-of-life communication is critical. This paper describes a unique communication workshop that introduces future physicians to the delivery of culturally responsive care for patients in palliative and end-of-life treatment. The workshop is embedded within the required fourth year medical student rotation in Geriatrics and Palliative Care. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3215988PMC
November 2011
5 Reads

Pancreaticoduodenectomy in the setting of intestinal malrotation.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11):237-8

Department of Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, USA.

Malrotation is an intestinal gestational disorder which not only affects the positioning of the midgut, but also its vascular supply. While this is generally thought of as a pediatric surgical condition, it can have significant implications for adult surgeries as well. Herein we present a patient with asymptomatic nonrotation of the midgut with a concomitant pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3215987PMC
November 2011
4 Reads

A report on the first case of vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) in Hawai'i.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Nov;70(11):233-6

Department of Medicine, University of Hawai'i John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, USA.

The state of Hawai'i has the highest prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in the United States. Since vancomycin is the most frequently-prescribed antibiotic for healthcare-associated MRSA infection, there is concern for development of vancomycin resistance. We report on a 61 year-old woman with history of previous successful treatments of MRSA bacteremia with vancomycin. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3215986PMC
November 2011
12 Reads

Medical School Hotline: Tobacco dependence and the management of tobacco-related disorders: how John A. Burns School of Medicine is preparing our future physicians.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Oct;70(10):220-1

Office of Medical Education, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i, USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3215983PMC
October 2011
6 Reads

Epidemiology of jellyfish stings presented to an American urban emergency department.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Oct;70(10):217-9

Straub Clinic and Hospital, Emergency Room, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.

Introduction: Cnidarian, or jellyfish, stings are a common malady in tropical Emergency Departments. There are limited studies examining cnidarian stings in the United States. The team investigated the epidemiology and treatments for jellyfish stings presenting to an urban emergency department (ED) in Honolulu, Hawai'i. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3215982PMC
October 2011
5 Reads

Barriers to healthcare of homeless residents of three Honolulu shelters.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Oct;70(10):214-6

University of Hawai'i, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, USA.

In Honolulu, health insurance rates amongst the homeless are one of the highest in the nation, yet significant health care needs are still unmet. In a previous model, health care barriers have been divided into four domains: bureaucratic, personal, programmatic, and financial. This study aimed to determine the risk factors associated with the domains of health care barriers amongst the study's sample of 128 subjects across three Honolulu homeless shelters. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3215981PMC
October 2011
6 Reads

Prevalence of comorbid conditions with aging among patients with diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Oct;70(10):209-13

University of Hawai'i John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, USA.

Objectives: The objectives were to develop a methodology to understand the prevalence of medically complex patients, and to apply the methodology to examine patients with one or more of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and heart disease.

Methods: Prevalence was measured using insurance data by calculating the proportion of days patients in a health state of interest contributed to the total days of enrollment. Graphs summarized the prevalence patterns within age and morbidity categories. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3215980PMC
October 2011
4 Reads

Medical school hotline: first and lasting impressions of the John A. Burns school of medicine.

Authors:
Darrell G Kirch

Hawaii Med J 2011 Aug;70(8):176-7

Association of American Medical Colleges.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158381PMC
August 2011
5 Reads

Student-written simulation scenarios: a novel cognitive assessment method in a trauma curriculum.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Aug;70(8):172-5

University of Hawai'i, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, USA.

Introduction: Global cognitive and psychomotor assessment in simulation based curricula is complex. We describe assessment of novices' cognitive skills in a trauma curriculum using a simulation aligned facilitated discovery method.

Methods: Third-year medical students in a surgery clerkship completed two student-written simulation scenarios (SWSS) as an assessment method in a trauma curriculum employing high fidelity human patient simulators (manikins). Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158380PMC
August 2011
5 Reads

The challenges of collecting data on race and ethnicity in a diverse, multiethnic state.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Aug;70(8):168-71

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health, University of Hawai'i, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, USA.

Race and ethnicity are commonly used predictor variables in medical and public health research. Including these variables has helped researchers to describe the etiology of certain disease states. Including race and ethnicity in research has been hypothesis generating in terms of the relationship between genetic and environmental factors in the development of disease. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158379PMC
August 2011
4 Reads

A polymorphism in the retinol binding protein 4 gene is not associated with gestational diabetes mellitus in several different ethnic groups.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Aug;70(8):164-7

University of Hawai'i, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health, Honolulu, USA.

Objective: Various Asian and Pacifific Islander groups have higher prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes. This increased incidence is likely to include genetic factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the retinol binding protein 4 gene have been linked to the occurrence of type 2 diabetes. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158378PMC
August 2011
6 Reads

Moyamoya disease in pregnancy: a case series and review of management options.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Aug;70(8):161-3

University of Hawai'i, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health, Honolulu, USA.

Background: Pregnancy has a potentially deleterious affect on moyamoya disease (MMD), a cerebrovascular condition characterized by spontaneous occlusion of the distal internal carotid arteries resulting in the neoangiogenesis of fragile collateral blood vessels. The disease renders patients susceptible to both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke.

Methods: A 16-year (1995-2010) chart review was performed at the Kapi'olani Medical Center for Women and Children and the Queen's Medical Center, the two largest birthing centers in Hawai'i. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158377PMC
August 2011
4 Reads

Training the next generation of minority health scientists: a STEP-UP in the right direction.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Jul;70(7):152-3

Department of Tropical Medicine, Medical Microbiology & Pharmacology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, HI, USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158374PMC
July 2011
4 Reads

Breast cancer worry among women awaiting mammography: is it unfounded? Does prior counseling help?

Hawaii Med J 2011 Jul;70(7):149-50

University of Hawai'i at Manoa, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.

The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence of breast cancer anxiety and risk counseling in women undergoing mammography, and the association with known risk factors for cancer. Women awaiting mammography were surveyed regarding anxiety, prior breast cancer risk counseling, demographic and risk factors. Anxiety was assessed via 7-point Likert-type scale (LS). Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158373PMC
July 2011
5 Reads

Koch's postulates, carnivorous cows, and tuberculosis today.

Authors:
Frank L Tabrah

Hawaii Med J 2011 Jul;70(7):144-8

John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.

With Koch's announcement in 1882 of his work with the tubercle bacillus, his famous postulates launched the rational world of infectious disease and an abrupt social change--strict patient isolation. The postulates, so successful at their inception, soon began to show some problems, particularly with cholera, which clearly violated some of Koch's requirements. Subsequent studies of other diseases and the discovery of entirely new ones have so altered and expanded the original postulates that they now are little but a precious touch of history. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158372PMC
July 2011
4 Reads

Dual paraneoplastic syndromes: small cell lung carcinoma-related oncogenic osteomalacia, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion: report of a case and review of the literature.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Jul;70(7):139-43

Department of Medicine, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.

Acquired isolated renal phosphate wasting associated with a tumor, known as oncogenic osteomalacia or tumor-induced osteomalacia, is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome caused by overproduction of fibroblast growth factor 23. Oncogenic osteomalacia is usually associated with benign mesenchymal tumors. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), on the other hand, is a common paraneoplastic syndrome caused by small cell carcinoma (SCC). Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158371PMC
July 2011
12 Reads
2 Citations

Cesarean scar dehiscence associated with intrauterine balloon tamponade placement after a second trimester dilation and evacuation.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Jul;70(7):137-8

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women's Health, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, HI 96826, USA.

While surgical abortion is a safe procedure, the most common complication is excessive bleeding. Methods to conservatively manage hemorrhage are gaining popularity. The authors present a case of a Cesarean scar rupture that occurred after an intrauterine balloon tamponade was placed to treat postabortion bleeding. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158370PMC
July 2011
5 Reads

Letter to the editor: Childhood obesity.

Authors:
Walton K T Shim

Hawaii Med J 2011 Jul;70(7 Suppl 1):52

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158451PMC
July 2011
4 Reads

A Report on the development of the Hawai'i Pediatric Weight Management Toolkit.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Jul;70(7 Suppl 1):49-51

Deer Kerr Consulting, LLC, Honolulu, HI, USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158458PMC
July 2011
4 Reads

Using coalitions to address childhood obesity: the Hawai'i Nutrition and Physical Activity Coalition.

Hawaii Med J 2011 Jul;70(7 Suppl 1):48

Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, HI, USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158453PMC
July 2011
45 Reads
1 Citation