1,600 results match your criteria Haemostasis[Journal]


Biochemistry of cancer procoagulant.

Authors:
W P Mielicki

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:8-10

Department of Pharmaceutical Biochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, Poland.

Cancer procoagulant (CP), EC3.4.22. Read More

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July 2002
6 Reads

Management of thromboembolic disease in cancer patients.

Authors:
M N Levine

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:68-9

McMaster University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

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July 2002
3 Reads

An overview of thromboprophylaxis in malignancy.

Authors:
A K Kakkar

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:67

Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College, Thrombosis Research Institute, London, England, UK.

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July 2002
8 Reads

Platelets cross-talk with tumor cells.

Authors:
D Varon A Brill

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:64-6

Department of Hematology, Hadassah, Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.

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July 2002
6 Reads

Properties and function of heparanase in cancer metastasis and angiogenesis.

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:60-3

Department of Oncology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.

Cleavage of heparan sulfate proteoglycans affects the integrity and functional state of tissues and thereby fundamental normal and pathological phenomena involving cell migration and response to changes in the extracellular microenvironment. Heparanase, degrading heparan sulfate (HS) at specific intrachain sites, is synthesized as a latent approximately 65 kDa protein that is processed at the N-terminus into a highly active approximately 50 kDa form. The heparanase enzyme is preferentially expressed in human tumors and its overexpression in low-metastatic tumor cells confers a highly invasive phenotype in experimental animals. Read More

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July 2002
5 Reads

u-PA and cell migration: urokinase receptor as a ligand for a chemotactic G-protein-coupled receptor.

Authors:
F Blasi

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:59

Dept. of Cell Biology and Functional Genetics, Università Vito-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy.

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July 2002
5 Reads

Tumor cell-platelet interaction in metastatic disease.

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:55-8

The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.

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July 2002
4 Reads

Cancer metastasis: a model of cell-protease and cell-cell interactions.

Authors:
M B Donati

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:52-4

Department of Vascular Medicine and Pharmacology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Consorzio Mario Negri Sud, Santa Maria Imbaro, Italy.

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July 2002
8 Reads

Molecular regulation of blood clotting in tumor biology.

Authors:
W Ruf

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:5-7

Department of Immunology and Vascular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.

TF expression is a hallmark of cancer progression. The procoagulant functions of TF that lead to thrombin generation are critically important to support metastasis, in part through the generation of fibrin that assures prolonged arrest of tumor cells in target organs. In addition, the coagulation initiation complex, i. Read More

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July 2002
6 Reads

The coagulopathy of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

Authors:
F Rodeghiero

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:49-51

Hematology Department, San Bortolo Hospital, Vicenza, Italy.

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July 2002
6 Reads

Cancer and DIC.

Authors:
M Levi

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:47-8

Academic Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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July 2002
4 Reads

Autoimmune bleeding disorders in cancer patients.

Authors:
P M Mannucci

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:45-6

Angelo Bianchi Bonomi Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, IRCCS Maggiore Hospital and University of Milan, Italy.

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July 2002
2 Reads

Arterial thrombotic syndromes in cancer patients.

Authors:
B Brenner

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:43-4

Department of Hematology, Rambam Medical Center and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa, Israel.

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July 2002
4 Reads

A number needed to screen and cost-effectiveness analysis of the SOMIT-data.

Authors:
H M Otten M H Prins

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:40-2

Department of Internal Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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July 2002
7 Reads

Idiopathic venous thromboembolism as a first manifestation of cancer.

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:37-9

Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua, Italy.

Since Trousseau's time it has been documented the strong two-way relationship between cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Moreover it has been clearly demonstrated that patients with a first episode of idiopathic VTE exhibit a higher risk of newly discovered cancer during follow-up when compared to those suffering from secondary VTE. The performance of a selected diagnostic work-up for cancer detection at the time of referral for index VTE in these patients appears to be capable to identify most of these malignancies and the earlier detection is likely to be associated with improved treatment possibilities and thus prognosis. Read More

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July 2002
3 Reads

Screening for cancer in patients with venous thromboembolism.

Authors:
H T Sørensen

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:34-6

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.

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July 2002
7 Reads

Venous thromboembolism and occult malignancy: an historical perspective.

Authors:
H M Otten M H Prins

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:32-3

Department of Internal Medicine, Academic Hospital Maastricht, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands.

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July 2002
3 Reads

The human vascular mapping project. Selection and utilization of molecules for tumor endothelial targeting.

Authors:
W Arap R Pasqualini

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:30-1

M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston 77030, USA.

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July 2002
4 Reads

Inhibition of angiogenesis with heparin?

Authors:
S M Smorenburg

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:25-9

Department of Cell Biology and Histology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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July 2002
3 Reads

Thrombospondin-1: an inhibitor of angiogenesis.

Authors:
G Taraboletti

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:23-4

Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research, Bergamo, Italy.

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July 2002
4 Reads

Targeted delivery of tissue factor to tumor neovasculature for cancer therapy.

Authors:
D Neri

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:21-2

Deportment of Applied BioSciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich.

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July 2002
5 Reads

Relationship of blood clotting and tumor angiogenesis.

Authors:
F R Rickles

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:16-20

The George Washington University Medical Center and the Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.

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July 2002
3 Reads

Fibrinogen and tumor cell metastasis.

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:11-5

Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Research Foundation and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH 45229-3039, USA.

Detailed studies tumor cell-associated procoagulants and fibrinolytic factors have strongly suggested that local thrombin and plasmin generation may be important in tumor progression. Given that one target for both these serine proteases is fibrinogen, a logical extension of this hypothesis is that local fibrin deposition and dissolution may be key determinants of tumor growth and/or dissemination. To directly test this concept, we initiated studies of tumor growth, experimental metastasis, and spontaneous metastasis in C57Bl/6-inbred mice with and without fibrinogen. Read More

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July 2002
2 Reads

Tumor cell prothrombotic properties.

Authors:
A Falanga

Haemostasis 2001 ;31 Suppl 1:1-4

Dept. Hematology-Oncology, Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo, Italy.

Thrombin generation and fibrin formation are constantly determined in patients with malignancy, who are at increased risk of thromboembolic complications. Most importantly, fibrin formation is also involved in the processes of tumor spread and metastasis. Activation of blood coagulation in cancer is a complex phenomenon, involving many different pathways of the hemostatic system and numerous interactions of the tumor cell with other blood cells, including platelet, monocyte and endothelial cell. Read More

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July 2002
2 Reads

Identification of anticoagulant activities in salivary gland extracts of four horsefly species (Diptera, tabanidae).

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):294-305

Institute of Zoology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-84206 Bratislava, Slovakia.

Anticoagulant activities against the extrinsic and intrinsic coagulation pathways were identified in salivary gland extracts (SGE) prepared from four tabanids (Hybomitra muehlfeldi, Tabanus autumnalis, Haematopota pluvialis, Heptatoma pellucens). All extracts prolonged human plasma clotting time in a dose-dependent manner and inhibited thrombin activity in the chromogenic substrate assay. Horsefly SGE did not inhibit factor Xa. Read More

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September 2003
2 Reads

Lonomia genus caterpillar envenomation: clinical and biological aspects.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):288-93

Centro de Medicina Experimental, Laboratorio de Fisiopatologia, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Apartado 21827, Caracas 1020A, Venezuela.

Persons who have been in contact with Lonomia achelous or Lonomia obliqua caterpillars present external and internal bleeding and opening of recently healed wounds. Hematological tests show normal platelet count, prolonged prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and thrombin time, totally corrected by normal plasma. Decreased fibrinogen (Fg), factor (F) V, FXIII, plasminogen and alpha(2)-antiplasmin with increased FVIII: C, von Willebrand factor, Fg degradation products and D dimers. Read More

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September 2003
3 Reads

Anticoagulant venom and mammalian secreted phospholipases A(2): protein- versus phospholipid-dependent mechanism of action.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):279-87

Département de Biologie, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, Cergy-Pontoise, France.

Some venom and mammalian-secreted phospholipases A(2) (sPLA(2)) have been described to exert an anticoagulant effect. This review will discuss and compare phospholipid-dependent versus protein-dependent mechanisms of action of these sPLA(2) on the coagulation cascade. The importance of venom proteins, and of the study of their pharmacological effects, to explore the physiological functions of homologous mammalian proteins is also pointed out. Read More

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September 2003
2 Reads

Interaction of bothrojaracin with prothrombin.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):273-8

Departamento de Bioquímica Médica/ICB/CCS, Bloco H-2o Andar-Ilha do Fundao, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-590, Brazil.

Bothrojaracin (BJC) is a 27-kD protein from Bothrops jararaca venom that interacts with alpha-thrombin (K(D) = 0.7 nM) through both anion-binding exosites I and II. Recently, it has been shown that BJC interacts with the exosite I precursor (proexosite I) on human prothrombin (K(D) = 75 nM), forming a 1:1 Ca(2+)-independent noncovalent complex with the zymogen. Read More

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September 2003
3 Reads

Protein C activators from snake venoms and their diagnostic use.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):266-72

Pentapharm Ltd., Engelgasse 109, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland.

Proteinases converting the zymogen protein C (PC) of vertebrates into activated PC have been detected in several snake venoms. Most PC activators have been purified from venom of snake species belonging to the genera of the Agkistrodon complex. Unlike the physiological, thrombin-catalyzed PC activation reaction which requires thrombomodulin as a cofactor, most snake venom activators directly convert the zymogen PC into the catalytically active form which can easily be determined by means of coagulation or chromogenic substrate techniques. Read More

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September 2003
3 Reads

Effects of lopap on human endothelial cells and platelets.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):257-65

Laboratory of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Center for Applied Toxinology, CEPID-FAPESP, Butantan Institute, Av. Vital Brazil 1500, 05503-900 São Paulo-SP, Brazil.

Severe consumption coagulopathy has been detected in rats after Lopap (a prothrombin activator from Lonomia obliqua caterpillar bristles) infusion and in humans after accidental contact with L. obliqua bristles. However, platelet count and antithrombin (AT) levels were only modestly affected, suggesting that a different form of blood coagulation activation may be involved in this hemorrhagic syndrome. Read More

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September 2003
6 Reads

Molecular basis for the partition of the essential functions of thrombin among snake venom serine proteinases: the case of thrombin-like enzymes.

Authors:
R C Maroun

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):247-56

Venom Unit, Institut Pasteur, 25 rue du Docteur-Roux, F-75724 Paris Cedex 15, France.

Thrombin is a mammalian serine proteinase that plays a prominent role in the maintenance and regulation of hemostasis through its interaction with various substrates and/or ligands. The venoms of several snakes contain glycosylated serine proteinases that have been recognized to possess one or more of the essential activities of thrombin on fibrinogen (Fg) and/or platelets. These proteinases share about 60% sequence identity. Read More

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September 2003
2 Reads

Factor V activation and inactivation by venom proteases.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):241-6

Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of Maastricht, PO Box 616, NL-6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Blood coagulation factor V is a single-chain glycoprotein with M(r) = 330,000 which plays an important role in the procoagulant and anticoagulant pathways. Thrombin activates factor V into factor Va, a two-chain molecule which is composed of a heavy (M(r) = 105,000) and a light chain (M(r) = 71,000/74,000). Factor Va accelerates factor Xa-catalysed prothrombin activation more than 1,000-fold and under physiological conditions the cofactor activity of factor Va in prothrombin activation is down-regulated by activated protein C. Read More

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September 2003
3 Reads

Snake venom prothrombin activators homologous to blood coagulation factor Xa.

Authors:
J S Joseph R M Kini

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):234-40

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive, Singapore 117543.

We have recently determined the complete amino acid sequence of trocarin, a group D prothrombin activator from the venom of Tropidechis carinatus (Australian rough-scaled snake). This proteinase is both functionally and structurally similar to mammalian blood coagulation factor Xa. It shows approximately 70% homology and possesses the characteristic Gla domain, two EGF domains and serine proteinase domain. Read More

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September 2003
2 Reads

Snake venom activators of factor X: an overview.

Authors:
G Tans J Rosing

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):225-33

Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht University, PO Box 616, NL-6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Activators of blood coagulation factor X have been described in the venom of many snake species belonging to the genus Viperidae and Crotalidae as well as from a few Elapid species. Based on the structural and functional properties of purified activating principles, factor X activators are either metalloproteases or serine proteases. The best known activator is RVV-X from Russell's viper (Daboia russelli), a metalloprotease consisting of a heavy chain containing the catalytic domain and two light chains which share homology with C-type lectins and which are thought to exert a regulatory function in the Ca(2+)-dependent activation of factor X. Read More

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September 2003
4 Reads

Procoagulant proteins from snake venoms.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):218-24

Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Block S2 Room 04-11, 14 Science Drive, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543.

Several procoagulant proteins from snake venoms have been isolated and characterized. They are either serine proteinases or metalloproteinases, which activate specific zymogens of coagulation factors and initiate the coagulation cascade. These procoagulant proteins are useful in treating various thrombotic and hemostatic conditions and contribute to our understanding of molecular details in the activation of specific coagulation factors. Read More

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September 2003
2 Reads

Diagnostic uses of snake venom.

Authors:
N A Marsh

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):211-7

School of Life Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Qld. 4001, Australia.

Snake venom toxins are invaluable for the assay of coagulation factors and for the study of haemostasis generally. Thrombin-like enzymes (SVTLE) are used for fibrinogen and fibrinogen breakdown product assays as well as detecting dysfibrinogenaemias. Since SVTLE are not inhibited by heparin, they can be used for assaying antithrombin III in samples containing heparin. Read More

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September 2003
7 Reads

Lebetin peptides: potent platelet aggregation inhibitors.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):207-10

Laboratoire des Venins et Toxines, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, 13 Place Pasteur, BP 74, 1002 Tunis-Belvédère, Tunisia.

Lebetins from Macrovipera lebetina snake venom constitute a new class of inhibitors of platelet aggregation. There are two groups of peptides: lebetin 1 (L1; 11- to 13-mer) and lebetin 2 (L2; 37- to 38-mer). The short lebetins are identical to the N-terminal segments of the longer ones. Read More

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September 2003
8 Reads

Viper venom components affecting angiogenesis.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):192-206

Pharmacological Institute, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, No. 1 Jen-Ai Road, Sec. 1, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC.

Angiogenesis is a complex process consisting of the proliferation, migration and differentiation of endothelial cells, and it is essential for the progression of malignant solid tumors. In this report, we examine the effects of disintegrins (e.g. Read More

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September 2003
7 Reads

A novel snake venom disintegrin that inhibits human ovarian cancer dissemination and angiogenesis in an orthotopic nude mouse model.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):183-91

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

OVCAR-5 is a human epithelial carcinoma cell line of the ovary, established from the ascitic fluid of a patient with progressive ovarian adenocarcinoma without prior cytotoxic treatment. The unique growth pattern of ovarian carcinoma makes it an ideal model for examining the anticancer activity of contortrostatin (CN), a homodimeric disintegrin from southern copperhead venom. FACS analysis revealed that OVCAR-5 is integrin alphavbeta3 negative, but alphavbeta5 positive. Read More

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September 2003
4 Reads

New insights on disintegrin-receptor interactions: eristostatin and melanoma cells.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):177-82

Department of Medical Technology, McKinly Lab 057, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA.

Viper venom disintegrins have been used frequently to study the cellular receptors which characterize various types of cells, including platelets, endothelial cells and cancer cells. While the majority of such analyses have pointed to involvement of integrin receptors alphavbeta3, alpha5beta1 or alphaIIbbeta3, this may not always be so. Eristostatin, from Eristocophis macmahoni, is a potent inhibitor of ADP-induced platelet aggregation as well as of human and murine melanoma metastases in mouse model systems. Read More

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September 2003
2 Reads

Lebecetin, a C-lectin protein from the venom of Macrovipera lebetina that inhibits platelet aggregation and adhesion of cancerous cells.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):173-6

Laboratoire des Venins et Toxines, Institut Pasteur de Tunis, 13 Place Pasteur, BP 74, 1001 Tunis-Belvédère, Tunisia.

A novel C-lectin protein, lebecetin, was purified and characterized from the venom of Macrovipera lebetina. It is a disulfide-linked heterodimer of 15 and 16 kD. The subunits are homologous to each other and to the other snake venom proteins of the C-type (Ca(2+)-dependent) lectin superfamily. Read More

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September 2003
4 Reads

The use of snake venom toxins as tools to study platelet receptors for collagen and von Willebrand factor.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):155-72

Department of Pharmacology, University of Oxford, Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3QT, UK.

A large proportion of the biologically active proteins and peptides present within snake venoms interact with components of the haemostatic system to promote or inhibit the normal sequence of events that lead to clot formation. The venom proteins achieve their effects through interaction with various components of the coagulation cascade, endothelial matrix and platelets. Within the latter group, a number of venom proteins target the interaction of platelets with the major adhesive proteins, von Willebrand factor and collagen. Read More

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September 2003
2 Reads

Multifunctional snake C-type lectins affecting platelets.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):148-54

Theodor Kocher Institute, University of Berne, Freiestrasse 1, CH-3012 Berne, Switzerland.

Snake venoms contain a wide range of components, many of which affect haemostasis by activation or inhibition of platelets or coagulation factors. They can be classified into groups based on structure and mode of action. One group is the snake C-type lectins, so called because of the typical folding which closely resembles that found in classical C-type lectins, such as selectins and mannose-binding proteins. Read More

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September 2003
6 Reads

Alfimeprase: pharmacology of a novel fibrinolytic metalloproteinase for thrombolysis.

Authors:
C F Toombs

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):141-7

Product Development/Mailstop 27-5-A, Amgen Inc., 1 Amgen Center Drive, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320, USA.

Alfimeprase is a recombinantly produced, truncated form of fibrolase, a known directly fibrinolytic zinc metalloproteinase that was first isolated from the venom of the southern copperhead snake (Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix). Both fibrolase and alfimeprase have been shown to have direct proteolytic activity against the fibrinogen Aalpha chain. In vivo pharmacology studies have shown that thrombolysis with alfimeprase is up to 6 times more rapid than with plasminogen activators. Read More

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September 2003
4 Reads

Snake venom proteinases as tools in hemostasis studies: structure-function relationship of a plasminogen activator purified from Trimeresurus stejnegeri venom.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):133-40

Venoms Unit, Institut Pasteur, 27-28 rue du Docteur-Roux, F-75724 Paris Cedex 15, France.

Snake venom serine proteinases affect many steps of the blood coagulation cascade. Each of them usually acts selectively on one coagulation factor. They are therefore potentially useful components to study the mechanisms of action, the regulation and the structure-function relationships of human serine proteinase coagulation factors. Read More

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September 2003
3 Reads

Proteases from Vipera lebetina venom affecting coagulation and fibrinolysis.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):123-32

National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, 12618 Tallinn, Estonia.

Our studies of the venom from the Levantine viper Vipera lebetina have demonstrated the existence of both coagulants and anticoagulants in the same venom. We showed that V. lebetina venom contains: (1) proteases that degrade fibrinogen, but not fibrin; (2) fibrinolytic enzyme (lebetase); (3) factor X activator (VLFXA); (4) factor V activator (VLFVA). Read More

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September 2003
2 Reads

Vampire bat plasminogen activator DSPA-alpha-1 (desmoteplase): a thrombolytic drug optimized by natural selection.

Authors:
W D Schleuning

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):118-22

Paion GmbH, Research Center Berlin, Tegeler Weg 33, D-10589 Berlin, Germany.

Plasminogen activators are enzymes found in all vertebrate species investigated so far. Their physiological function is the generation of localized proteolysis in the context of tissue remodeling, wound healing and neuronal plasticity. The common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) is a New World species that feeds exclusively on blood. Read More

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September 2003
2 Reads

Successful arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee in a patient with congenital deficiency of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and recurrent haemarthrosis.

Haemostasis 2001 Mar-Apr;31(2):106-12

Department of Pediatrics, Nara Medical University Hospital, 840 Shijo-Cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8522, Japan.

We report the arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) in a 13-year-old Japanese boy with congenital partial deficiency of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). He was admitted to our hospital with recurrent haemarthrosis of his right knee. Characteristic abnormalities of fibrinolysis included shortened euglobulin lysis time, low PAI-1 activity and low PAI-1 antigen levels. Read More

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May 2002
1 Read