3 results match your criteria HIV-1 Associated Acute Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

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[Diseases of the peripheral and visual nervous system during infection with human immunodeficiency virus].

Rev Neurol 2003 Sep 1-15;37(5):481-5

Neurología, Policlínico Docente, La Habana, Cuba.

Introduction: Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is often accompanied by neurological complications. One of these includes disorders affecting the peripheral and visual nervous system, especially during the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) stage.

Development: The peripheral neuropathies associated with infection by HIV are an assorted group of disorders, which include acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, multiple mononeuropathy and neuropathies related to the herpes zoster virus or cytomegalovirus. Read More

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April 2004
5 Reads

Epidemiology and clinical features of HIV-1 associated neuropathies.

Authors:
A Verma

J Peripher Nerv Syst 2001 Mar;6(1):8-13

Department of Neurology, University of Miami School of Medicine and Jackson Memorial Hospital, Florida, USA.

Peripheral neuropathy is common in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection. Peripheral neuropathies complicate all stages of the HIV-1 disease and cause considerable morbidity and disability in HIV-1 infected individuals and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. Whereas symptomatic neuropathies occur in approximately 10% to 15% of HIV-1-infected patients overall, pathologic evidence of peripheral nerve involvement is present in virtually all end-stage AIDS patients. Read More

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March 2001
10 Reads

Renal insufficiency and failure associated with immune globulin intravenous therapy--United States, 1985-1998.

Authors:

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 1999 Jun;48(24):518-21

Immune globulin intravenous (IGIV) is a sterile, highly purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) preparation made from pooled human plasma stabilized with glucose, maltose, glycine, sucrose, sorbitol, or albumin and is used as prophylaxis or therapy for various medical disorders. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first licensed IGIV in 1981 and has approved its use for six conditions: primary immunodeficiencies, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, Kawasaki syndrome, recent bone marrow transplantation in patients aged > or =20 years, chronic B-cell lymphocytic leukemia, and pediatric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. In clinical practice, IGIV has been known to be used to treat 50-60 unapproved conditions, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, adult HIV infection, multiple sclerosis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Read More

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June 1999
2 Reads
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