16 results match your criteria HIV Therapy [Journal]

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Switching antiretroviral therapy to minimize metabolic complications.

HIV Ther 2010 Nov;4(6):693-711

University of California Los Angeles, Division of Infectious Diseases, Center for Clinical AIDS Research, & Education, 9911 West Pico, Boulevard, Suite 980, Los Angeles, CA 90035, USA.

Advances in HIV therapy have made living with HIV for decades a reality for many patients. However, antiretroviral therapy has been associated with multiple long-term complications, including dyslipidemia, fat redistribution, insulin resistance and increased cardiovascular risk. As newer agents with improved metabolic profiles have become available, there is growing interest in the safety and efficacy of switching ART as a strategy to reduce long-term complications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/hiv.10.47DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3236090PMC
November 2010
2 Reads

Regulatory T cells in HIV immunotherapy.

HIV Ther 2010 Nov;4(6):639-647

HIV/AIDS Program, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Significant research has been conducted on the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in HIV infection. To date, however, it is not clear whether Tregs play a detrimental role or a beneficial role in the pathogenesis of HIV infection. In fact, a number of immunotherapeutic strategies to control HIV infection have revealed a possible antagonistic role for Tregs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/hiv.10.51DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3065023PMC
November 2010
6 Reads

Recent developments in HIV-related kidney disease.

HIV Ther 2010 Sep;4(5):589-603

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, 1830 E Monument Street, Suite 416, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

Although kidney disease has been a recognized complication of HIV infection since the beginning of the HIV epidemic, its epidemiology, underlying causes and treatment have evolved in developed countries where HAART has been widely available. HIV-associated nephropathy and HIV immune complex-mediated kidney disease were the prominent renal diagnoses in the earlier period of the HIV epidemic. While HIV immune complex-mediated kidney disease remains a common finding among HIV-infected individuals with kidney disease, the incidence of HIV-associated nephropathy has been diminishing in developed countries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/hiv.10.42DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3038636PMC
September 2010
5 Reads

Successes and challenges of HIV treatment programs in Haiti: aftermath of the earthquake.

HIV Ther 2010 Mar;4(2):145-160

Division of Global Health Equity, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA; Partners In Health, Boston, MA; the Groupe Haitien d'Etude du Sarcome de Kaposi et des Infections Opportunistes (GHESKIO), Port-au-Prince, Haiti; and the Department of Medicine of Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY.

Haiti's HIV/AIDS program is one of the most successful in the world, with a declining HIV prevalence, and treatment outcomes that rival those of industrialized nations. It is now on the way to providing universal treatment for HIV/AIDS nationwide. This success is tied to a strong foundation for HIV care that was in place before external funding became available that includes national guidelines prepared by the Ministry of Health, political commitment at the highest levels of government, non-governmental organizations that had been providing high quality care in Haiti for decades, and the assistance of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria, the U. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/hiv.10.6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/hiv.10.6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3011860PMC
March 2010
9 Reads

HIV treatment in US prisons.

HIV Ther 2010 Sep;4(4):505-510

Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.

Arguably one of the most marginalized populations in our society, prisoners bear a disproportionate burden of infectious diseases, particularly HIV. In addition, groups known to be at an inordinately higher risk of HIV, including minorities, the addicted, the mentally ill and the impoverished are overrepresented among incarcerated populations. This concentration of HIV among groups that have been historically difficult to reach, with limited intersections with healthcare, provides an opportunity for testing, diagnosis, treatment, linkage to care and prevention. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2953806PMC
September 2010
5 Reads

Comparison of scales to evaluate the progression of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder.

HIV Ther 2010 May;4(3):371-379

Department of Neurologyy, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

AIM: First, to compare the characterization of neurocognitive deficits in milder stages of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) derived from existing dementia rating scales of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) with the 2007 consensus ('Frascati') classification. Second, to identify potential sociodemographic and clinical predictors of HAND progression during 1-year follow-up. METHODS: 104 HIV-infected subjects in an existing cohort system were evaluated with a medical history, exam, neuropsychological test battery and functional assessments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/hiv.10.23DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2933171PMC
May 2010
7 Reads

Innate immune natural killer cells and their role in HIV and SIV infection.

HIV Ther 2010 Jul;4(4):483-504

Faculty of Military Health Sciences, University of Defense & Department of Infectious Diseases, Charles University School of Medicine, Hradec-Kralove, Czech Republic.

The findings that early events during HIV-1 and SIV infection of Asian rhesus macaques dictate the levels of viremia and rate of disease progression prior to the establishment of mature and effective adaptive immune responses strongly suggest an important role for innate immune mechanisms. In addition, the fact that the major target of HIV and SIV during this period of acute infection is the gastrointestinal tissue suggests that whatever role the innate immune system plays must either directly and/or indirectly focus on the GI tract. The object of this article is to provide a general overview of the innate immune system with a focus on natural killer (NK) cells and their role in the pathogenesis of lentivirus infection. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/hiv.10.28
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/HIV.10.28DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2922771PMC
July 2010
3 Reads

Clinical implications of new findings in HIV basic research.

Authors:
Manish Sagar

HIV Ther 2009 Jul;3(4):351-360

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 65 Landsdowne Street, Room 447, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA, Tel.: +1 617 768 8372; ;

HIV has been studied extensively over the past 25 years. Insights into the different stages of the virus' replication cycle and its interaction with host-cell proteins have led to the development of an armamentarium of effective antiretroviral medications. These antiviral drugs have dramatically changed the prognosis for HIV-infected subjects from an inevitable march towards death to a chronic disease with a potentially normal lifespan. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/hiv.09.20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2908407PMC
July 2009
2 Reads

Possible applications for replicating HIV 1 vectors.

HIV Ther 2010 May;4(3):361-369

Laboratory of Experimental Virology, Department of Medical Microbiology, Center for Infection & Immunity Amsterdam (CINIMA), Academic Medical Center of the University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 15, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Since its discovery some 25 years ago, much has been learned about HIV type 1 and the molecular details of its replication cycle. This insight has been used to develop lentiviral vector systems that have advantages over conventional retroviral vector systems. For safety reasons, the lentiviral vector systems are replication incompetent and the risk of generating a replication competent virus has been minimized. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/hiv.10.20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2889699PMC
May 2010
2 Reads

Rethinking the role of the local community in HIV epidemic spread in sub-Saharan Africa: a proximate-determinants approach.

HIV Ther 2009 Sep;3(5):435-445

Africa Centre for Health & Population Studies, University of KwaZulu-Natal, PO Box 198, Mtubatuba 3935, South Africa.

The spread of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa continues largely unabated. To improve prevention interventions, a better understanding of the determinants of HIV infection is required. Conceptual frameworks can guide epidemiological investigation and prevent a misguided focus on single risk factors in isolation. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/hiv.09.33
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/hiv.09.33DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2862641PMC
September 2009
3 Reads

Measurement of antiretroviral drugs in the lungs of HIV-infected patients.

HIV Ther 2010 Mar;4(2):247-251

Indiana University Medical Center, Richard Roudebush VA Medical Center, 1481 West 10th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202 2884, USA Tel.: +1 317 988 3824.

AIMS: Prior studies have shown that HAART is associated with decreased HIV viral load in the lungs. The correlation between antiretroviral exposure in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and virologic response was evaluated in patients starting HAART and enrolled in The AIDS Clinical Trial Group Protocol 723. MATERIALS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; METHODS: A total of 24 subjects underwent blood and BAL sampling prior to starting HAART, and after 4 and 24 weeks of HAART. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/hiv.10.5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2861507PMC
March 2010
8 Reads

The K65R mutation in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: genetic barriers, resistance profile and clinical implications.

HIV Ther 2009 Nov;3(6):583-594

McGill AIDS Centre, Lady Davis Institute, 3755 Cote Ste. Catherine Road, Montreal, Quebec, H3T 1E2, Canada.

Resistance to antiviral therapy is the limiting factor in the successful management of HIV. In general, the K65R mutation is rarely selected (1.7-4%) with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), abacavir (ABC), didanosine (ddI), and stavudine (d4T), as compared with the high incidence (>40%) of thymidine analog mutations associated with zidovudine and d4T. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/hiv.09.40
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/hiv.09.40DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2826981PMC
November 2009
4 Reads

Transmitted drug resistance in nonsubtype B HIV-1 infection.

HIV Ther 2009 Sep;3(5):447-465

HIV-1 nonsubtype B variants account for the majority of HIV infections worldwide. Drug resistance in individuals who have never undergone antiretroviral therapy can lead to early failure and limited treatment options and, therefore, is an important concern. Evaluation of reported transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is challenging owing to varying definitions and study designs, and is further complicated by HIV-1 subtype diversity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/hiv.09.30DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2800377PMC
September 2009
2 Reads

Future directions in the treatment of HIV-HBV coinfection.

HIV Ther 2009 Jul;3(4):405-415

Department of Medicine, Monash University, Victoria, Australia.

Liver disease is a major cause of mortality in individuals with HIV-HBV coinfection. The pathogenesis of liver disease in this setting is unknown, but is likely to involve drug toxicity, infection of hepatic cells with both HIV and HBV, and an altered immune response to HBV. The availability of therapeutic agents that target both HIV and HBV replication enable dual viral suppression, and assessment of chronic hepatitis B is important prior to commencement of antiretroviral therapy. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2783662PMC
July 2009
2 Reads

Adult combination antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa: lessons from Botswana and future challenges.

HIV Ther 2009 Sep;3(5):501-526

Botswana-Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative Partnership for HIV Research & Education (BHP), Gaborone, Botswana.

Numerous national public initiatives offering first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for HIV infection have commenced in sub-Saharan Africa since 2002. Presently, 2.1 million of an estimated seven million Africans in need of cART are receiving treatment. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2774911PMC
September 2009
7 Reads

Implementation of cervical cancer prevention services for HIV-infected women in Zambia: measuring program effectiveness.

HIV Ther 2010 ;4(6):703-722

University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA ; Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.

Background: Cervical cancer kills more women in low-income nations than any other malignancy. A variety of research and demonstration efforts have proven the efficacy and effectiveness of low-cost cervical cancer prevention methods but none in routine program implementation settings of the developing world, particularly in HIV-infected women.

Methods: In our public sector cervical cancer prevention program in Zambia, nurses conduct screening using visual inspection with acetic acid aided by digital cervicography. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/hiv.10.52DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4237284PMC
January 2010
17 Reads
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