56 results match your criteria Gynecologic Care of Women Infected With HIV


Long-acting reversible contraception knowledge, attitudes and use among HIV-infected and -uninfected women and their providers.

Contraception 2019 10 18;100(4):269-274. Epub 2019 Jun 18.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, NY 10032. Electronic address:

Objective(s): To describe differences in contraceptive knowledge, attitudes and use among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women served by an academic medical center in New York City and to describe gaps in knowledge and practice of gynecologic and HIV clinicians providing care at the same clinic sites where patients completed surveys.

Study Design: We conducted a survey comparing contraceptive knowledge, attitudes, reproductive histories and long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) use in HIV-infected and -uninfected women. We also conducted a survey to elicit clinician demographic characteristics and education, contraceptive practice patterns and their knowledge of current contraceptive guidelines. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2019

Gynecologic cancer in HIV-infected women: treatment and outcomes in a multi-institutional cohort.

AIDS 2018 Jan;32(2):171-177

Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Objective: To evaluate gynecologic cancer treatments in HIV-infected women for adherence to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines and to describe survival by adherence to guidelines.

Design: Beyond cervical cancer, there are little data on treatment and outcomes for these women. This is a retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected women with gynecologic cancers. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
January 2018

Practice Bulletin No. 167: Gynecologic Care for Women and Adolescents With Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

Authors:

Obstet Gynecol 2016 10;128(4):e89-e110

In the United States in 2013, there were an estimated 226,000 women and adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (1). Women with HIV are living longer, healthier lives, so the need for routine and problem-focused gynecologic care has increased. The purpose of this document is to educate clinicians about basic health screening and care, family planning, prepregnancy care, and managing common gynecologic problems for women and adolescents who are infected with HIV. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2016

Practice Bulletin No. 167 Summary: Gynecologic Care for Women and Adolescents With Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

Authors:

Obstet Gynecol 2016 Oct;128(4):920-922

In the United States in 2013, there were an estimated 226,000 women and adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (1). Women with HIV are living longer, healthier lives, so the need for routine and problem-focused gynecologic care has increased. The purpose of this document is to educate clinicians about basic health screening and care, family planning, prepregnancy care, and managing common gynecologic problems for women and adolescents who are infected with HIV. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 2016

High-risk human papillomavirus and cervical lesions among women living with HIV/AIDS in Brazilian Amazon, Brazil.

Braz J Infect Dis 2015 Nov-Dec;19(6):557-62. Epub 2015 Aug 7.

Post Graduation Program in Tropical Medicine, Fundação de Medicina Tropical Dr. Heitor Vieira Dourado/ Universidade do Estado do Amazonas, Manaus, AM, Brazil.

Objective: The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus infection infection and cervical lesions and its associated factors among HIV infected women attending an AIDS clinic in Amazonas state, Brazil.

Methods: Cross-sectional study. Women attending an AIDS clinic in the city of Manaus between March and December 2011 for gynecological examination were invited to participate. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Preconception counseling and care in the setting of HIV: clinical characteristics and comorbidities.

Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol 2015 8;2015:240613. Epub 2015 Mar 8.

Division of Gynecologic Specialties, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

Objective: To describe the demographic and clinical characteristics of HIV-infected individuals and HIV-affected couples who were referred for preconception counseling (PCC) at a large urban US-based HIV clinic.

Methods: Electronic medical records were reviewed for HIV-infected individuals and HIV-affected couples. Medical, reproductive, surgical, psychosocial, and family history data were abstracted. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

ACOG Committee Opinion no 596: Committee on Gynecologic Practice: Routine human immunodeficiency virus screening.

Authors:

Obstet Gynecol 2014 May;123(5):1137-1139

Early diagnosis and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can improve survival and reduce morbidity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend that females aged 13-64 years be tested at least once in their lifetime and annually thereafter based on factors related to risk. In addition, obstetrician-gynecologists should annually review patients' risk factors for HIV and assess the need for retesting. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

ACOG Committee Opinion no 595: Committee on Gynecologic Practice: Preexposure prophylaxis for the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus.

Authors:

Obstet Gynecol 2014 May;123(5):1133-1136

Preexposure prophylaxis is defined as the administration of antiretroviral medications to individuals who are not infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and are at the highest risk of acquiring HIV infection. In combination with other proven HIV-prevention methods, preexposure prophylaxis may be a useful tool for women at the highest risk of HIV acquisition. Obstetrician-gynecologists involved in the care of women using preexposure prophylaxis must reinforce adherence to daily medication. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Surgical site infections after hysterectomy among HIV-infected women in the HAART era: a single institution's experience from 1999-2012.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2014 Feb 30;210(2):117.e1-7. Epub 2013 Aug 30.

Division of Gynecologic Specialties, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

Objective: We sought to determine risk factors associated with surgical site infection (SSI) among a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women undergoing hysterectomy during the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

Study Design: This is a retrospective study of HIV-infected women who underwent a hysterectomy for benign indications at a tertiary care center. Electronic medical records were reviewed from January 1999 through December 2012. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2014

Clinical and mental health correlates and risk factors for intimate partner violence among HIV-positive women in an inner-city HIV clinic.

Womens Health Issues 2012 Nov-Dec;22(6):e563-9. Epub 2012 Aug 30.

The Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Maryland.

Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious health concern for women in the United States, and HIV-positive women experience more frequent and severe abuse compared with HIV-negative women. The goals of this study were to determine the prevalence of IPV among HIV-infected women receiving care in an urban clinic and to determine the HIV clinical and mental health correlates of IPV among HIV-positive women.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey among 196 women visiting an inner-city HIV clinic. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
January 2013

Pregnancies in perinatally HIV-infected young women and implications for care and service programs.

J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care 2012 Jan-Feb;23(1):41-51. Epub 2011 Aug 4.

Mailman School of Public Health of Columbia University, New York, USA.

A cohort of individuals with perinatally acquired HIV is maturing into reproductive age. This study describes pregnancy incidence and outcomes among females ages 15-25 with perinatally acquired HIV infection receiving comprehensive family-centered services in New York City. Chart reviews from 1998-2006 indicated 33 pregnancies among 96 young women. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 117: Gynecologic care for women with human immunodeficiency virus.

Authors:

Obstet Gynecol 2010 Dec;116(6):1492-1509

The increased use of screening tests has led to the identification of large numbers of women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Consequently, there is an increased role for obstetrician-gynecologists in caring for infected women. Women infected with HIV are living longer, healthier lives and, therefore, the need for routine gynecologic care has increased. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
December 2010

Barriers to recommended gynecologic care in an urban United States HIV clinic.

J Womens Health (Larchmt) 2010 Aug;19(8):1511-8

Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Background: Despite an increased risk for cervical cytologic abnormalities, HIV-infected women frequently miss their gynecology appointments. We examined barriers to adherence with gynecologic care in an urban HIV clinic.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 200 women receiving gynecologic services in an urban HIV clinic, followed by focus groups. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Prevalence of cervical cancer screening of HIV-infected women in the United States.

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2009 Aug;51(4):430-6

Epidemic Intelligence Service, Office of Workforce and Career Development, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Background: HIV-infected women are at increased risk of cervical cytologic abnormalities. HIV treatment guidelines recommend annual Papanicolaou (Pap) tests for HIV-infected women. We assessed screening prevalence and associated factors among HIV-infected women. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

The missing link: documentation of recognized maternal human immunodeficiency virus infection in exposed infant birth records, 24 United States jurisdictions, 1999-2003.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2007 Sep;197(3 Suppl):S132-6

Epidemiology Branch, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.

Despite substantial improvements, perinatal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission has not been eliminated in the United States. We examined the extent and contribution of missed communication opportunities between obstetric and pediatric providers who cared for HIV-infected women and their infants. This was a retrospective review of HIV-exposed infants whose data were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Enhanced Perinatal Surveillance System from 1999-2003 (n = 8115). Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
September 2007

Special care issues of women living with HIV-AIDS.

Infect Dis Clin North Am 2007 Mar;21(1):133-48, ix

Division of Infectious Diseases, The Miriam Hospital, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI 02806, USA.

Many HIV-infected women are benefiting from highly active antiretroviral therapy and living longer. Their reproductive choices vary over the life cycle, and there is a need to understand the appropriate contraceptives for those not intending pregnancy. There are specific gynecologic issues relevant to HIV-infected women, such as genital tract infections, risk for cervical cancer, and menstrual irregularities. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Frequency of gynecologic follow-up and cervical cancer screening in the Swiss HIV cohort study.

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2006 Dec;43(5):550-5

Data Center of the Swiss HIV Cohort Study, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Background: According to current recommendations, HIV-infected women should have at least 1 gynecologic examination per year.

Objectives: To analyze factors associated with frequency of gynecologic follow-up and cervical cancer screening among HIV-infected women followed in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS).

Methods: Half-yearly questionnaires between April 2001 and December 2004. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
December 2006

High prevalence of cervical squamous cell abnormalities among HIV-infected women with immunological AIDS-defining illnesses.

J Obstet Gynaecol Res 2006 Jun;32(3):324-9

Female Sexually Transmitted Diseases Unit, Division of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Thailand.

Aim: To assess the results of Pap smear at postpartum scheduled visit, especially the prevalence of squamous cell abnormalities including association with CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count (CD4(+) count) levels at delivery among HIV-infected women between the years 1996 and 2004.

Methods: As part of the research and implementation programs of short course antiretroviral regimens for the prevention of mother to child perinatal HIV transmission in HIV-infected pregnant women delivered at Siriraj hospital, CD4(+) count at delivery and Pap smear at postpartum were evaluated.

Results: Among 636 women, 13. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Gynecologic care and family planning for HIV-infected women.

AIDS Read 2005 Aug;15(8):420-3,426-8

Women's Services, Department of Medicine/Division of HIV/AIDS Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Owing to advances in the understanding and treatment of HIV infection, most persons infected with HIV are now living longer, healthier lives. With the dramatic reduction in mother-to-child transmission in the past decade, the outlook on life has changed for women with HIV infection. It is critical that a new strategic plan for prevention of HIV transmission and a proactive approach to reproductive health care be implemented by health care providers who care for these women. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Inhibited interpersonal coping style predicts poorer adherence to scheduled clinic visits in human immunodeficiency virus infected women at risk for cervical cancer.

Ann Behav Med 2004 Dec;28(3):195-202

Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA.

Background: One of the most common gynecologic conditions among HIV+ women is cervical dysplasia, the precancerous phase of cervical cancer. Therefore, adherence to gynecology visits may be among the most important health care practices for HIV+ women. However, no research has evaluated the psychosocial factors associated with health care practices among HIV+ women at risk for cervical cancer. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
December 2004

Women and human immunodeficiency virus: unique management issues.

Am J Med Sci 2004 Jul;328(1):17-25

HIV Outpatient Program, Charity Hospital, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

Women currently account for an increasing proportion of the US population infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Although women suffer from similar HIV-related complications as men, they also can have unique gynecologic manifestations, such as cervical dysplasia or severe pelvic inflammatory disease. Other gender-specific management issues include contraception and pregnancy. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Evaluation and management of HIV-infected women.

Ann Intern Med 2002 Feb;136(3):228-42

Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.

The rate of newly diagnosed AIDS in the United States is increasing fastest in women, who are infected with HIV primarily through heterosexual transmission. Approximately 60% of these women are African American, and 18% are Latina. A gynecologic infection is the most common symptom that leads to initial medical evaluation. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
February 2002

Changing risk factors for HIV infection.

Arch Med Res 2002 Jan-Feb;33(1):61-6

Departamento de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología (INCAN), Mexico City, Mexico.

Background: HIV infection in women is a growing problem in developing countries. Risk factors for HIV infection vary from country to country and may change with time.

Methods: We describe a retrospective review of the epidemiologic characteristics and associated gynecologic diseases of all HIV-infected women seen at two tertiary-care hospitals in Mexico City. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Screening for cervical cancer in HIV-infected women receiving care in the United States.

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2001 Aug;27(5):463-6

Division of General Internal Medicine, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, 593 Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903, USA.

Objective: We examined the sociodemographic, clinical and provider factors associated with screening for cervical cancer among HIV-infected women.

Methods: We studied a national sample representing 43,490 women receiving treatment of HIV infection who completed first follow-up surveys of the HIV Cost and Service Utilization Study (HCSUS). All women were asked, "In the past 12 months, have you had a Pap test?" Women reporting an abnormal Pap test result were asked whether they had been told antibiotics could cure abnormal cells, and whether they were scheduled for another Pap test or for a colposcopy within 3 months. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Vaginitis in HIV-infected women.

Authors:
M Horgan

J Int Assoc Physicians AIDS Care 1997 Oct;3(10):16-9

University College, Cork, Ireland.

View Article and Full-Text PDF
October 1997

Gynecologic care of women infected with HIV.

Authors:
A P Korn

Clin Obstet Gynecol 2001 Jun;44(2):226-42

University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.

View Article and Full-Text PDF

[HIV/AIDS in gynecology. On the treatment readiness of established gynecologists for HIV positive women].

Z Geburtshilfe Neonatol 2000 Nov-Dec;204(6):210-7

Ludwig Boltzmann Institut für Frauengesundheitsforschung, Semmelweis-Frauenklinik Wien.

Background: Decreasing vertical transmission rates of HIV due to highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens faciliate the choice for childbearing in HIV positive women. Recent trends in epidemiology of HIV show increasing incidence of HIV-related gynecologic diseases. These facts implicate the question about the role of gynecologists in primary care of HIV-infected women and furthermore about the use of health services by HIV-infected women. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

Care of vaginal symptoms among HIV-infected women.

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2000 Sep;25(1):51-5

Division of General Medicine, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02903, USA.

Objective: Gynecologic disease is common in HIV-infected women. We examine the sociodemographic, clinical, and provider factors associated with the care of women with vaginal symptoms.

Methods: Women enrolled in the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS), a nationally representative probability sample of HIV-infected adults, were interviewed between January 1996 and April 1997. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
September 2000

Vaginal infections in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2000 Aug;183(2):347-55

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Pansacola 32513, USA.

Objective: This study was undertaken to compare the frequencies of vaginal infections among human immunodeficiency virus-infected women with those among human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative women.

Study Design: Human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive women attending a comprehensive care center for human immunodeficiency virus disease at the outpatient department of an inner-city hospital in Houston underwent rigorous gynecologic evaluation for sexually transmitted diseases, including evidence of vaginal infections such as bacterial vaginosis, vulvovaginal candidiasis, and trichomonal vaginitis. Demographic information was collected, as was information regarding disease classification and degree of immunosuppression. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF

HIV infection among women admitted to the gynaecology service of a district hospital in South Africa.

Int J STD AIDS 1999 Nov;10(11):735-7

Centre for Epidemiological Research in South Africa, Medical Research Council.

Our objective was to determine the prevalence of HIV infection and disease-specific HIV prevalence among women admitted to the gynaecology service of a district hospital in South Africa over a 3-month period in 1997. This was done with the goal of developing HIV education and counselling services in this setting. HIV status was determined among 196 (96%) of 205 consecutive admissions; 82 (42%) tested HIV positive. Read More

View Article and Full-Text PDF
November 1999