417 results match your criteria Gender Medicine[Journal]


Sex differences in the biomechanics and contractility of intramural coronary arteries in angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

Gend Med 2012 Dec;9(6):548-56

Institute of Human Physiology and Clinical Experimental Research, Semmelweis University, Faculty of Medicine, Budapest, Hungary.

Background: It is well known that sex differences occur in both the pathogenesis and therapy of hypertension. A deeper understanding of the underlying processes may be helpful when planning a personalized therapeutic strategy.

Objective: In laboratory animal experiments, we studied the early mechanisms of vascular adaptation of the intramural small coronary arteries that play a fundamental role in the blood supply of the heart. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.10.012DOI Listing
December 2012
9 Reads

Effect of sex on lifespan, disease progression, and the response to methionine sulfoximine in the SOD1 G93A mouse model for ALS.

Gend Med 2012 Dec;9(6):524-35

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 E. Canfield St, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.

Objective: To investigate the role of sex and the role of ammonia and amino acid metabolism, specifically the activity of glutamine synthetase, in survival and disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Methods: We tested treatment with methionine sulfoximine (MSO) on the lifespan and neuromuscular ability of male and female SOD1 mice as measured by their ability to maintain their grip on an inverted wire grid. We also tested the effects of castration and ovariectomization on those measurements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.10.014DOI Listing
December 2012
4 Reads

Gender differences in Latin-American patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Gend Med 2012 Dec;9(6):490-510.e5

Center for Autoimmune Diseases Research (CREA), School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universidad del Rosario, Bogotá, Colombia.

Background: Data on the effect of gender in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in non-Caucasian populations is scarce. Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) is a large population with unique characteristics, including high admixture.

Objective: Our aim was to examine the effect of gender in patients with RA in LAC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.10.005DOI Listing
December 2012
15 Reads
9 Citations
1.554 Impact Factor

Analysis of sex differences in cancer-specific survival and perioperative mortality following radical cystectomy: results of a large German multicenter study of nearly 2500 patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

Gend Med 2012 Dec;9(6):481-9

Department of Urology, Caritas St. Josef Medical Centre, University of Regensburg, Landshuterstrasse 65, Regensburg, Germany.

Background: Outcome of patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) varies between sexes. Although overall incidence is higher in men, cancer-specific survival (CSS) has been suggested to be lower in women. Although the former effect is attributed to greater exposure to carcinogens in men, the latter has not been elucidated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.11.001DOI Listing
December 2012
24 Reads

Newborns of preeclamptic women show evidence of sex-specific disparity in fetal growth.

Gend Med 2012 Dec;9(6):424-35

Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Background: Evidence suggests that in response to in utero insults, male versus female infants have greater disadvantages in pregnancy outcome. In addition, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that there is a sex-specific fetal response to maternal disease during pregnancy. We considered that a sex-specific relationship may exist between preeclampsia and reduced fetal growth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.10.013DOI Listing
December 2012
9 Reads

The end of an era: the final chapter of Gender Medicine.

Gend Med 2012 Dec;9(6):389

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.11.002DOI Listing
December 2012
4 Reads

Low testosterone concentrations in men contribute to the gender gap in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

Gend Med 2012 Dec 20;9(6):557-68. Epub 2012 Nov 20.

Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.

Background: Across the industrialized world, men experience an earlier onset of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and a life expectancy 5 to 10 years shorter than women. Low total testosterone (TT) concentrations in men have been suggested as a novel CVD risk factor, but its contribution to this gender gap is less well studied.

Methods: We used data of 4152 individuals (2113 women and 2039 men) aged 20 to 79 years from the longitudinal population-based cohort Study of Health in Pomerania, Germany. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.10.007DOI Listing
December 2012
23 Reads

Sex and life expectancy.

Gend Med 2012 Dec 17;9(6):390-401. Epub 2012 Nov 17.

Faculty of Human Kinetics, Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada.

Background: A sexual dimorphism in human life expectancy has existed in almost every country for as long as records have been kept. Although human life expectancy has increased each year, females still live longer, on average, than males. Undoubtedly, the reasons for the sex gap in life expectancy are multifaceted, and it has been discussed from both sociological and biological perspectives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.10.001DOI Listing
December 2012
8 Reads

Mainstreaming sex and gender analysis in public health genomics.

Gend Med 2012 Dec 17;9(6):402-10. Epub 2012 Nov 17.

Department of Medical Humanities, VU University Medical Center, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: The integration of genome-based knowledge into public health or public health genomics (PHG) aims to contribute to disease prevention, health promotion, and risk reduction associated with genetic disease susceptibility. Men and women differ, for instance, in susceptibilities for heart disease, obesity, or depression due to biologic (sex) and sociocultural (gender) factors and their interaction. Genome-based knowledge is rapidly increasing, but sex and gender issues are often not explored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.10.006DOI Listing
December 2012
4 Reads

A sex- and gender-based analysis of allostatic load and physical complaints.

Gend Med 2012 Dec 13;9(6):511-23. Epub 2012 Nov 13.

Fernand-Seguin Research Centre, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Background: Biological sex and sociocultural gender influence stress-related diseases. Our goal was to explore whether sex and gender roles would predict both allostatic load and physical complaints.

Objective: This study investigated whether sex- and gender-based factors would correspond to objective and subjective health outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.10.008DOI Listing
December 2012
5 Reads

Sex of newborns associated with place and mode of delivery: a population-based study in northern Vietnam.

Gend Med 2012 Dec 13;9(6):418-23. Epub 2012 Nov 13.

Hanoi School of Public Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Background: There is increasing evidence of an elevated sex ratio at birth (SRB) in many Asian countries, including Vietnam, and that this prenatal gender inequity is related to sex-selective abortion. However, few studies have investigated the relation between the sex of offspring and delivery care utilization.

Objective: The aim of the present study was to relate sex of newborns to place and mode of delivery in a province in northern Vietnam. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.10.010DOI Listing
December 2012
34 Reads

The contribution of low serum testosterone levels to mortality in men.

Gend Med 2012 Dec 11;9(6):569-70. Epub 2012 Nov 11.

Male Sexual and Reproductive Medicine Program, Urology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.10.011DOI Listing
December 2012
3 Reads

Does sex affect 30-day mortality in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia?

Gend Med 2012 Dec 7;9(6):463-70. Epub 2012 Nov 7.

Pharmacy Services, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital, and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Petah-Tiqva, Israel.

Background: Sex-related differences in complications and mortality of infection were examined with conflicting results. Further studies are required to bring new light in this topic in Staphylococcus aureus infections.

Objective: We examined the outcomes of S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.10.009DOI Listing
December 2012
8 Reads

Gender differences in questions asked in an online preoperative patient education program.

Gend Med 2012 Dec 7;9(6):457-62. Epub 2012 Nov 7.

Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.

Background: Although osteoarthritis more commonly affects women than men, women are 3 times less likely to undergo hip or knee replacement surgery compared with men. Disparity in the appropriate utilization of surgery between men and women is a complex subject that must take into account the willingness of a patient to proceed with the operation. Adequately addressing patient concerns before surgery may influence such willingness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.10.002DOI Listing
December 2012
4 Reads

Tacrolimus as a part of immunosuppressive treatment in kidney transplantation patients: sex differences.

Gend Med 2012 Dec 8;9(6):471-80. Epub 2012 Nov 8.

Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Nis, Bulevar dr Zorana Djindjica 81, Nis, Serbia.

Background: Metabolism interaction between corticosteroids and tacrolimus (Tac) exists and can be an important factor in providing rational pharmacotherapy in kidney transplantation patients. Both Tac and corticosteroids can induce adverse metabolic effects, such as hyperglycemia, post-transplantation diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia.

Objective: The main goal of this study was to detect corticosteroid dose influence on Tac level within the first 6 months of immunosuppressive therapy. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15508579120018
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.10.003DOI Listing
December 2012
8 Reads

Gender differences in anthropometric predictors of physical performance in older adults.

Gend Med 2012 Dec 2;9(6):445-56. Epub 2012 Nov 2.

Center on Aging, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA.

Background: Both high body fat and low muscle mass have been associated with physical disability in older adults. However, men and women differ markedly in body composition; men generally have more absolute and relative lean muscle mass and less fat mass than women. It is not known how these anthropometric differences differentially affect physical ability in men and women. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.10.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3536819PMC
December 2012
6 Reads

Evaluation of metabolic risk in prepubertal girls versus boys in relation to fitness and physical activity.

Gend Med 2012 Dec 24;9(6):436-44. Epub 2012 Oct 24.

Department of Corporal Expression, Faculty of Education, University of Cordoba, Córdoba, Spain.

Background: Low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and physical activity (PA) are associated with a risk of the development of metabolic syndrome. Contradictory findings are reported in the literature regarding the influence of sex and CRF and PA on metabolic changes.

Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of CRF and PA on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism biomarkers in boys and girls. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S155085791200164
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.08.006DOI Listing
December 2012
7 Reads

Perinatal maternal and neonatal outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus according to fetal sex.

Gend Med 2012 Dec 23;9(6):411-7. Epub 2012 Oct 23.

Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: Male sex is a well-known risk factor for unfavorable perinatal outcomes. Fetal sex has been considered only occasionally in diabetic pregnancy.

Objective: Our aim was to evaluate perinatal outcomes in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) according to fetal sex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.09.002DOI Listing
December 2012
8 Reads

Inflammatory biomarkers as risk factors for future atrial fibrillation. An eleven-year follow-up of 6315 men and women: the Tromsø study.

Gend Med 2012 Dec 6;9(6):536-547.e2. Epub 2012 Oct 6.

Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.

Background: Inflammatory biomarkers are reported as risk factors for atrial fibrillation (AF), but their impact is uncertain.

Objective: We investigated the associations between inflammatory biomarkers and future AF in a large general cohort.

Methods: Available markers were white blood cells (WBCs) with subgroups, fibrinogen, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and osteoprotegerin (OPG). Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15508579120016
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.09.001DOI Listing
December 2012
10 Reads

Women and heart disease: shifting the paradigm in the 21st century.

Gend Med 2012 Oct;9(5):385-6

Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois 60602-2843, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.08.004DOI Listing
October 2012
3 Reads

Mood and the menstrual cycle: a review of prospective data studies.

Gend Med 2012 Oct;9(5):361-84

Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Otago Wellington New Zealand.

Background: The human menstrual cycle (MC) has historically been the focus of myth and misinformation, leading to ideas that constrain women's activities.

Objectives: We wished to examine one pervasive idea, that the MC is a cause of negative mood, by studying the scientific literature as a whole. We briefly reviewed the history of the idea of premenstrual syndrome and undertook a systematic review of quality studies. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15508579120013
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.07.003DOI Listing
October 2012
9 Reads

Increased medical costs in elders with the metabolic syndrome are most evident with hospitalization of men.

Gend Med 2012 Oct 20;9(5):348-60. Epub 2012 Sep 20.

Division of Health Policy Translation, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan, Republic of China.

Background: Little is known about health care costs associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS).

Objective: We assessed annualized health care costs and health outcomes for both genders in different health care settings among representative Taiwanese elders.

Methods: The Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan (1999-2000) provided 1378 individuals aged 65 years or older with known MetS status. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.08.005DOI Listing
October 2012
9 Reads
1 Citation
1.554 Impact Factor

Endogenous androgen deficiency enhances diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

Gend Med 2012 Oct 13;9(5):319-28. Epub 2012 Sep 13.

Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA.

Background: Despite numerous clinical and animal studies, the role of sex steroid hormones on lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis remain controversial.

Objective: We sought to determine the effects of endogenous estrogen and testosterone on lipoprotein levels and atherosclerosis using mice fed a low-fat diet with no added cholesterol.

Methods: Male and female low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice were fed an open stock low-fat diet (10% of kcals from fat) for 2, 4, or 17 weeks. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S155085791200160
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.08.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3483072PMC
October 2012
8 Reads

H-Y antigen in kidney transplant: does gender matter?

Authors:
Steven Wagner

Gend Med 2012 Oct 1;9(5):387-8. Epub 2012 Sep 1.

Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.08.002DOI Listing
October 2012
5 Reads

Impaired health-related quality of life in elderly women is associated with multimorbidity: results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Gend Med 2012 Oct 31;9(5):309-18. Epub 2012 Aug 31.

Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Background: Multimorbidity is a common problem in elderly populations and is significantly associated with functional decline, disability, and mortality. However, the sex-specific characteristics of multimorbidity and its effect on patients' quality of life (QOL) have not been clearly established.

Methods: We analyzed the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey database. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S155085791200158
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.08.001DOI Listing
October 2012
7 Reads

Donor-recipient sex mismatch in kidney transplantation.

Gend Med 2012 Oct 18;9(5):335-347.e2. Epub 2012 Aug 18.

Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA.

Background: The lack of reliable human proxies for minor (ie, non-HLA) histocompatibility loci hampers the ability to leverage these factors toward improving transplant outcomes. Despite conflicting reports of the effect of donor-recipient sex mismatch on renal allografts, the association between acute rejection of renal allografts and the development of human alloantibodies to the male H-Y antigen suggested to us that donor-recipient sex mismatch deserved re-evaluation.

Objective: To evaluate whether the relationships between donor sex and allograft failure differed by recipient sex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.07.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3478108PMC
October 2012
4 Reads
8 Citations
1.554 Impact Factor

Dietary genistein induces sex-dependent effects on murine body weight, serum profiles, and vascular function of thoracic aortae.

Gend Med 2012 Oct 3;9(5):295-308. Epub 2012 Aug 3.

Department of Physiology, Midwestern University, Glendale, Arizona, USA.

Background: The influence on, or interaction of, sex and dietary genistein on serum markers of cardiovascular health and cardiovascular function remain unclear.

Objectives: Our purpose was to examine the effects of a genistein-containing diet (600 mg/kg food) (600G) and a genistein-free diet (0G), on cardiovascular risk parameters of male and female mice.

Methods: C57BL/6J mice were fed the diets for 1 month, after which time blood pressure, serum markers, and in vitro vascular reactivity was measured. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.07.001DOI Listing
October 2012
18 Reads

Analysis of sex differences in preadmission management of ST-segment elevation (STEMI) myocardial infarction.

Gend Med 2012 Oct 31;9(5):329-34. Epub 2012 Jul 31.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network, Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA.

Background: Many reports suggest gender disparity in cardiac care as a contributor to the increased mortality among women with heart disease.

Objective: We sought to identify gender differences in the management of Myocardial Infarction (MI) Alert-activated ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients that may have resulted from prehospital initiation.

Methods: A retrospective database was created for MI Alert STEMI patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) of an academic community hospital with 74,000 annual visits from April 2000 through December 2008. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.07.002DOI Listing
October 2012
24 Reads

Sexual dimorphism in development of kidney damage in aging Fischer-344 rats.

Gend Med 2012 Aug 20;9(4):219-31. Epub 2012 Jul 20.

Department of Physiology and Functional Genomics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Background: Aging kidneys exhibit slowly developing injury and women are usually protected compared with men, in association with maintained renal nitric oxide.

Objectives: Our purpose was to test 2 hypotheses: (1) that aging intact Fischer-344 (F344) female rats exhibit less glomerular damage than similarly aged males, and (2) that loss of female ovarian hormones would lead to greater structural injury and dysregulation of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) system in aging F344 rat kidneys.

Methods: We compared renal injury in F344 rats in intact, ovariectomized, and ovariectomized with estrogen replaced young (6 month) and old (24 month) female rats with young and old intact male rats and measured renal protein abundance of NOS isoforms and oxidative stress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.06.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3461833PMC
August 2012
6 Reads

Sex differences in cardiovascular disease risk in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

Gend Med 2012 Aug 13;9(4):251-8. Epub 2012 Jul 13.

Children's Medical Research Institute Diabetes and Metabolic Research Program, Section of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA.

Background: Cardiovascular disease is seen at a younger age and at a higher prevalence in patients with type 1 diabetes than in the general population. It is well described that women with type 1 diabetes have a higher relative risk of cardiovascular disease than men with type 1 diabetes, unlike that seen in the general population. The pathophysiology behind this is unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.05.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3481996PMC
August 2012
7 Reads

Sex differences in hypertension: contribution of the renin-angiotensin system.

Gend Med 2012 Aug 12;9(4):287-91. Epub 2012 Jul 12.

Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2500 N State St., Jackson, MS 39216-4505, USA.

Numerous studies have shown that female human beings exhibit lower blood pressure levels over much of their life span compared with their age-matched counterparts. This sexual dimorphism is apparent in human beings as well as most, if not all, mammals. However, after the onset of menopause blood pressure levels in women increase and become similar to those in men, suggesting an important role of sex hormones in the regulation of blood pressure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.06.005DOI Listing
August 2012
4 Reads

Sexual dimorphism in urinary angiotensinogen excretion during chronic angiotensin II-salt hypertension.

Gend Med 2012 Aug 12;9(4):207-18. Epub 2012 Jul 12.

Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Tulane University, 1430 Tulane Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

Background: The intrarenal renin-angiotensin system contributes to hypertension by regulating sodium and water reabsorption throughout the nephron. Sex differences in the intrarenal components of the renin-angiotensin system have been involved in the greater incidence of high blood pressure and progression to kidney damage in males than females.

Objective: This study investigated whether there is a sex difference in the intrarenal gene expression and urinary excretion of angiotensinogen (AGT) during angiotensin II (Ang II)-dependent hypertension and high-salt (HS) diet. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.06.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3419837PMC
August 2012
17 Reads

Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer knowledge.

Gend Med 2012 Aug 7;9(4):292; author reply 293-4. Epub 2012 Jul 7.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.06.002DOI Listing
August 2012
3 Reads

Sex differences in lung gas volumes after lipopolysaccharide-induced chorioamnionitis in fetal sheep.

Gend Med 2012 Aug 3;9(4):278-86. Epub 2012 Jul 3.

Department of Pediatrics, School of Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

Background: Preterm female infants have a survival advantage and enhanced lung development, which is an important determinant of preterm survival.

Objective: Given the modulation of lung development by fetal exposure to infection/inflammation, we hypothesized that female fetuses have enhanced lung maturational responses to chorioamnionitis compared with male fetuses.

Methods: Time-pregnant ewes received intra-amniotic injections with saline (n = 60) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at 2 days (n = 30) or 7 days (n = 45) before surgical delivery at 123 to 125 days of gestation (term: ∼147 days). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.05.005DOI Listing
August 2012
6 Reads

Age-dependent influence of gender on the association between obesity and a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors.

Gend Med 2012 Aug 28;9(4):267-77. Epub 2012 Jun 28.

Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Hyogo, Japan.

Background: Obesity is a main risk factor in metabolic syndrome. Gender is known to influence the risk of obesity and other cardiovascular risk factors. However, it remains to be determined whether there is a gender-specific difference in the relationship between obesity and accumulation of other cardiometabolic risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.05.004DOI Listing
August 2012
6 Reads

Testosterone levels and androgen receptor gene polymorphism predict specific symptoms of depression in young men.

Gend Med 2012 Aug 23;9(4):232-43. Epub 2012 Jun 23.

Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St, London, ON, Canada.

Background: Testosterone (T) has been hypothesized to modulate the expression of depressive symptoms in men; however, support for this proposition is mixed.

Objective: To investigate bioavailable T, measured from saliva, and androgen receptor gene (AR) polymorphism (the number of glutamine [CAG] repeats in exon 1 of AR) and their relation to discrete symptoms of depression in 150 men aged 17 to 27 years who varied in mood status from depressed to nondepressed.

Methods: Participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.05.001DOI Listing
August 2012
6 Reads

Biomarkers for abdominal aortic aneurysms from a sex perspective.

Gend Med 2012 Aug 20;9(4):259-266.e2. Epub 2012 Jun 20.

Department of Vascular Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) differ in men and women. Women are older at diagnosis, have a higher risk of rupture, and worse outcome after surgery compared with men. The higher occurrence of AAAs in men accounts for the dominance of men in biomarker analyses. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S155085791200120
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.05.002DOI Listing
August 2012
27 Reads

Challenges of work-life balance for women physicians/mothers working in leadership positions.

Gend Med 2012 Aug 23;9(4):244-50. Epub 2012 May 23.

Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna/Vienna General Hospital, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, Vienna, Austria.

Background: Female leadership in medicine is still disproportionately small, which might be due to the barriers of combining work and family.

Objectives: The aim of this study was, first, to perform a strengths, weakness, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis and, second, to create a strategic concept for career development.

Methods: In this study, all women in leadership positions in the health care system in Vienna, Austria, with at least 1 child (n = 8), were interviewed about the advantages and disadvantages of gender with regard to career development, the strengths and weaknesses of female leadership, and their work-life balance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.04.002DOI Listing
August 2012
4 Reads

Age-dependent reductions in mitochondrial respiration are exacerbated by calcium in the female rat heart.

Gend Med 2012 Jun 2;9(3):197-206. Epub 2012 May 2.

Department of Kinesiology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.

Background: Cardiovascular disease mortality increases rapidly after menopause by poorly defined mechanisms.

Objective: Because mitochondrial function and Ca(2+) sensitivity are important regulators of cell death after myocardial ischemia, we sought to determine whether aging and/or estrogen deficiency (ovariectomy) increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) sensitivity.

Methods: Mitochondrial respiration was measured in ventricular mitochondria isolated from adult (6 months; n = 26) and aged (24 months; n = 25), intact or ovariectomized female rats using the substrates α-ketoglutarate/malate (complex I); succinate/rotenone (complex II); ascorbate/N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine/antimycin (complex IV). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.04.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3374891PMC
June 2012
5 Reads

Diabetic polyneuropathy relates to bone metabolism and markers of bone turnover in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: greater effects in male patients.

Gend Med 2012 Jun 12;9(3):187-96. Epub 2012 Apr 12.

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Background: There is evidence that diabetic polyneuropathy (PNP) is associated with reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in type 1 diabetes but little is known about the impact of diabetic PNP on bone metabolism in type 2 diabetes.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in bone metabolism by measuring markers of bone turnover and BMD in men and postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes and diabetic PNP compared with those without PNP. Gender differences were analyzed for both groups of patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.03.004DOI Listing
June 2012
4 Reads

Agonistic autoantibodies to the angiotensin II type I receptor cause pathophysiologic characteristics of preeclampsia.

Gend Med 2012 Jun 11;9(3):139-46. Epub 2012 Apr 11.

Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology/Physiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39216-4505, USA.

Background: Preeclampsia (PE), new-onset hypertension with proteinuria during pregnancy, is associated with increased reactive oxygen species, the vasoactive peptide endothelin-1 (ET-1), T and B lymphocytes, soluble antiangiogenic factors sFlt-1 and sEndoglin (sFlt-1 and sEng), and agonistic autoantibodies to the angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1-AA).

Objectives: One important area of investigation for our laboratory was to determine what role AT1-AA plays in the pathophysiology associated with PE.

Methods: To achieve this goal, we examined the effect of AT1-AA suppression on hypertension in response to placental ischemia as well as the effect of AT1-AA on increased blood pressure, ET-1, reactive oxygen species, and sFlt-1 in normal pregnant rats (NP). Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S155085791200075
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.03.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3483641PMC
June 2012
23 Reads

Explaining poorer stroke outcomes in women: women surviving 3 months have more severe strokes than men despite a lower 3-month case fatality.

Gend Med 2012 Jun 11;9(3):147-53. Epub 2012 Apr 11.

The Stroke Unit, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

Background: Women who survive stroke are more disabled and more often institutionalized than men.

Objective: We explore this phenomenon by studying case fatality and stroke severity in stroke survivors separately for men and women.

Methods: A Danish stroke registry (2000-2007) contains information about 26,818 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke, including stroke severity (Scandinavian Stroke Scale, 0 worst to 58 best), computed tomography scan, cardiovascular risk factors, and death 3 months after stroke. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.03.002DOI Listing
June 2012
5 Reads

Baroreflex function in females: changes with the reproductive cycle and pregnancy.

Gend Med 2012 Apr;9(2):61-7

Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA.

This review briefly describes the changes in baroreflex function that occur during female reproductive life, specifically during the reproductive cycle and pregnancy. The sensitivity or gain of baroreflex control of heart rate and sympathetic activity fluctuates during the reproductive cycle, reaching a peak when gonadal hormone levels increase, during the follicular phase in women and proestrus in rats. The increase in baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is likely mediated by estrogen because ovariectomy in rats eliminates the BRS increase, the cyclic profile of changes in BRS mirror the changes in estrogen, and estrogen acts in the brainstem to increase BRS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.02.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3350105PMC
April 2012
4 Reads

The vasodilatory effect of testosterone on renal afferent arterioles.

Gend Med 2012 Apr 22;9(2):103-11. Epub 2012 Mar 22.

Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi 39216, USA.

Background: Sex differences exist in a variety of cardiovascular and renal diseases, and testosterone may contribute to the discrepancy. Afferent arterioles (Af-Arts) are the major resistance vessels in the kidney, and they play an important role in the development of renal injury and hypertension.

Objective: We sought to determine the acute effect and underlying mechanism(s) of action of testosterone on Af-Arts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.02.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3322301PMC
April 2012
5 Reads

Age- and ethnic-specific sex differences in stroke risk.

Gend Med 2012 Apr 23;9(2):121-8. Epub 2012 Mar 23.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Background: In white populations, age seems to modify the effect of sex on stroke risk, and compared with men, women are protected from stroke until approximately age 75 to 85 years, after which the protection is lost or reversed. Compared with non-Hispanic whites (NHWs), Mexican Americans (MAs) are at higher risk of stroke; however, age- and sex-specific stroke incidence data are currently not available for this population.

Objective: This study was performed to compare the age-specific sex differences in stroke risk in MAs and NHWs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.02.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3481549PMC
April 2012
9 Reads

Gender, brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met, and frequency of methamphetamine use.

Gend Med 2012 Apr 23;9(2):112-20. Epub 2012 Mar 23.

Department of Family Medicine and Substance Abuse Pharmacotherapy Unit, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA.

Background: Frequency of pretreatment methamphetamine (MA) use is an important predictor of outcomes of treatment for MA dependence. Preclinical studies suggest females self-administer more MA than males, but few clinical studies have examined potential sex differences in the frequency of MA use. Estrogen increases expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which has effects on MA-induced striatal dopamine release and protects against MA-induced neurotoxicity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.02.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3322259PMC
April 2012
3 Reads

Effect of gender on awareness of cardiovascular risk factors, preventive action taken, and barriers to cardiovascular health in a group of Austrian subjects.

Gend Med 2012 Apr 21;9(2):94-102. Epub 2012 Mar 21.

Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Background: The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing in industrialized countries. Preventive action is an important factor in minimizing CVD-associated morbidity and mortality. However, it is not known whether gender differences affect CVD or risk factor awareness influencing self-assessment of personal risk and preventive action. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.02.001DOI Listing
April 2012
15 Reads

Pharmacologic effects of 2-methoxyestradiol on angiotensin type 1 receptor down-regulation in rat liver epithelial and aortic smooth muscle cells.

Gend Med 2012 Apr 25;9(2):76-93. Epub 2012 Feb 25.

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Amarillo, TX 79106, USA.

Background: Delayed onset of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in female patients is not well understood, but could be due in part to the protective effect of estrogen before menopause. Experimental studies have identified the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) as a key factor in the progression of CVD.

Objective: We examined the effects of the estrogen metabolite 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) on AT1R expression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.01.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3322289PMC
April 2012
3 Reads

Y chromosome gene expression in the blood of male patients with ischemic stroke compared with male controls.

Gend Med 2012 Apr 24;9(2):68-75.e3. Epub 2012 Feb 24.

Department of Neurology and the MIND Institute, University of California at Davis, Sacramento, California 95817, USA.

Background: Sex is suggested to be an important determinant of ischemic stroke risk factors, etiology, and outcome. However, the basis for this remains unclear. The Y chromosome is unique in males. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.01.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3454519PMC
April 2012
16 Reads

Sex-dependent programming of glucose and fatty acid metabolism in mouse offspring by maternal protein restriction.

Gend Med 2012 Jun 22;9(3):166-179.e13. Epub 2012 Feb 22.

Department of Pediatrics, Center for Liver, Digestive, and Metabolic Diseases, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Background: Nutritional conditions during fetal life influence the risk of the development of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases in adult life (metabolic programming). Impaired glucose tolerance and dysregulated fatty acid metabolism are hallmarks of metabolic syndrome.

Objective: We aimed to establish a mouse model of metabolic programming focusing on the sex-specific effects of a maternal low-protein diet during gestation on glucose and lipid metabolism in the adult offspring. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genm.2012.01.004DOI Listing
June 2012
13 Reads
4 Citations
1.550 Impact Factor