1,433 results match your criteria Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America [Journal]


The Endoscopic Hepatologist.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 04;29(2):xv-xvi

The Dr. Henry D. Janowitz Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1069, New York, NY 10029, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2019.02.001DOI Listing

The Endoscopic Hepatologist: Not an Oxymoron.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 04;29(2):xiii-xiv

Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2019.02.002DOI Listing

Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Apr 2;29(2):369-379. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic Phoenix, Phoeniz, AZ, USA. Electronic address:

"Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided ablative therapies have advanced significantly and have led to experimental applications in locations that have been difficult to image and/or reach with percutaneous approaches, such as the caudate and left lobe of the liver. EUS-guided treatments of the liver are under development. The literature has shown that many percutaneous ablative techniques are readily adaptable for EUS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.11.007DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography-Guided Ablation for Cholangiocarcinoma.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Apr 2;29(2):351-367. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Virginia, PO Box 800708, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA. Electronic address:

Most patients with perihilar cholangiocarcinoma present with surgically unresectable disease owing to the insidious nature of this malignancy. Relief of malignant perihilar biliary obstruction is a key aspect of cholangiocarcinoma. Although palliative stenting using uncovered metal stents has been advocated in patients with unresectable malignant perihilar biliary strictures, several endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-guided ablative modalities have emerged. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.11.006DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

Endoscopic Ultrasound for the Diagnosis and Staging of Liver Tumors.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Apr;29(2):339-350

Section of Digestive Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, PO Box 208056, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. Electronic address:

Endoscopic ultrasound examination may provide complementary information to cross-sectional imaging in lesions of the liver, portal vein, and surrounding lymph nodes. With fine needle aspiration, endoscopic ultrasound examination is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of focal liver lesions and has usefulness in the evaluation of indeterminate liver lesions. Endoscopic ultrasound examination may influence hepatocellular cancer staging and Endoscopic ultrasound examination with fine needle aspiration of locoregional nodes and portal vein thromboses changes management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.12.005DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Endoscopic Management of Portal Hypertension-related Bleeding.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Apr;29(2):321-337

Interventional Endoscopy Services, California Pacific Medical Center, 2351 Clay Street, 6th Floor Suite 600, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA.

Gastrointestinal bleeding as a sequela of portal hypertension can be catastrophic and fatal. Endoscopic and endosonographic therapy play a critical role in management of such bleeding- both for hemostasis of active bleeding and bleeding prophylaxis. Variceal band ligation is established as the standard intervention for esophageal varices. Read More

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April 2019
1 Read

Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Interventions for the Measurement and Treatment of Portal Hypertension.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Apr 2;29(2):311-320. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of California - Irvine, 333 The Boulevard West, Suite 400, Orange, CA 92868, USA. Electronic address:

The number of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided interventions is rapidly growing within advanced endoscopy. EUS offers high-resolution imaging of mediastinal and intra-abdominal vasculature, which can be targeted for various interventions, hence a growing number of studies have explored EUS-guided vascular catheterization. Potential clinical applications of EUS-guided portal venous access include angiography, measurement of the portosystemic pressure gradient, and EUS-guided transhepatic intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.12.004DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography and Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Gallbladder Drainage.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Apr;29(2):293-310

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Dr. Henry D. Janowitz Division of Gastroenterology, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1069, New York, NY 10029, USA. Electronic address:

"Gallbladder disease is one of the most common gastrointestinal diseases encountered in clinical practice. Surgical removal and percutaneous drainage are both widely available and effective in the management of acute cholecystitis. Several endoscopic approaches exist as an alternative to these interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.12.002DOI Listing
April 2019
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Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Biliary Drainage.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Apr 4;29(2):277-291. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Dr. Henry D. Janowitz Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Hospital, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1069, New York, NY 10029, USA. Electronic address:

Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is the preferred procedure for biliary drainage in benign and malignant obstructions. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage is an emerging technique for when endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography fails. It is a highly versatile procedure with several options of access point, stent direction, and drainage route. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.11.005DOI Listing

Endoscopic Management of Complex Biliary Stone Disease.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Apr 2;29(2):257-275. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Methodist Dallas Medical Center, 221 West Colorado Boulevard, Pavillion II, Suite 630, Dallas, TX 75208, USA.

Choledocholithiasis is a common disorder that is managed universally by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). For difficult or complex stones, ERCP with conventional techniques may fail to achieve biliary clearance in 10% to 15% of cases. This review summarizes the literature regarding the current available endoscopic techniques for complex stone disease, including mechanical lithotripsy, endoscopic papillary large balloon dilation, cholangioscopy-guided lithotripsy, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary access. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.11.004DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Endoscopic Management of Biliary Issues in the Liver Transplant Patient.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Apr 2;29(2):237-256. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Recanati/Miller Transplantation Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA. Electronic address:

Biliary complications remain a common problem after liver transplantation (LT). The therapeutic endoscopist encounters a variety of situations in LT including strictures at the duct-to-duct biliary anastomosis, strictures elsewhere in the biliary tree caused by an ischemic injury, and bile leaks at the anastomosis or from the cut surface and stone disease. Biliary complications lead to significant morbidity and occasionally reduced graft and patient survival. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.11.003DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Stenting for Benign and Malignant Biliary Strictures.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Apr 23;29(2):215-235. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Interventional Endoscopy, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8124, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address:

Benign and malignant biliary strictures are common indications for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Diagnosis involves high-quality cross-sectional imaging and cholangiography with various endoscopic sampling techniques. Treatment options include placement of plastic biliary stents and self-expanding metal stents, which differ in patency duration and cost effectiveness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.12.001DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Practical Management of Indeterminate Biliary Strictures.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Apr 2;29(2):205-214. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Thomas Jefferson University, 132 South 10th Street, 585 Main Building, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. Electronic address:

Indeterminate biliary strictures pose a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Although underlying malignancy is a primary concern, biliary strictures may result from benign processes. An accurate diagnosis is paramount to define the treatment strategy and minimize morbidity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.12.003DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Advances in Endoscopic Imaging of the Biliary Tree.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Apr;29(2):187-204

David H. Koch Medical Center, Department of Gastroenterology, Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical, College of Cornell University, New York Presbyterian Hospital, 1278 York Avenue, 9th Floor, New York, NY 10065, USA.

Direct endoscopic imaging of the biliary tree is increasingly performed by endoscopists since the introduction of digital single-operator cholangioscopy. In parallel, there have been several advances to overcome the challenges associated with direct peroral cholangioscopy with development of multibending cholangioscopes and new devices to enable direct placement of an endoscope into the biliary tree without a supporting duodenoscope. The indications for cholangioscopy are also evolving with newer indications, such as intraductal lithotripsy, foreign body (mostly stent) removal, guide wire cannulation of specific ducts, photodynamic therapy for cholangiocarcinoma, and performance of fluoroscopy-free cholangiography. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.12.007DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Liver Biopsy.

Authors:
David L Diehl

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Apr 2;29(2):173-186. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Department of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Geisinger Medical Center, 100 North Academy Avenue, 21-11, Danville, PA 17822, USA. Electronic address:

There remains an important role for liver biopsy in the management of liver disorders. Image-guided liver biopsy can be obtained with percutaneous or transjugular approaches. Real-time image-guided liver biopsy can be accomplished with endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.11.002DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

The Use of Endoscopic Ultrasound in the Evaluation of Unexplained Biliary Dilation.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Apr 2;29(2):161-171. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stony Brook University Hospital, 101 Nicolls Road HSC Level 17, Room 60, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA.

Isolated biliary dilation, as an incidental diagnosis, is increasing owing to an increase in the use of noninvasive abdominal imaging and poses a diagnostic challenge to physicians especially when further noninvasive diagnostic testing fails to reveal an etiology. This article reviews available data describing the natural history of this clinical scenario and the impact of endoscopic ultrasound examination in the evaluation of unexplained dilation of the common bile duct. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.11.001DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Gastroparesis: Current Opinions and New Endoscopic Therapies.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 01;29(1):xv-xvi

Division of Digestive Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta 30322, GA, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.09.001DOI Listing
January 2019
22 Reads

Gastroparesis: New Approaches in Management.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 01;29(1):xiii-xiv

Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.09.002DOI Listing
January 2019
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Botulinum Toxin Injection for Treatment of Gastroparesis.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Jan 28;29(1):97-106. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

Department of Gastroenterology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Ross 958, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Electronic address:

Refractory gastroparesis is among the most difficult therapeutic challenges in gastroenterology. Pyloric dysfunction has been described in a subset of patients with gastroparesis, prompting experimentation with botulinum toxin injections into the pylorus, which is relatively safe and has been successfully used in other gastrointestinal disorders. However, causality between pyloric dysfunction and symptoms of gastroparesis has never been demonstrated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6223662PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Surgical Management for Gastroparesis.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Jan 22;29(1):85-95. Epub 2018 Sep 22.

Division of GI/MIS, The Oregon Clinic, 4805 Northeast Glisan, 6N60, Portland, OR 97213, USA; IHU-Strasbourg, 1 Place de l'Hôpital, 67000 Strasbourg, France. Electronic address:

Gastroparesis is a debilitating chronic condition of indeterminate cause. Although conservative management is the mainstay of treatment, a significant percentage of patients will need interventions. Interventions range from supportive measures, such as feeding tubes, to more radical surgeries, including endoscopic pyloromyotomy (per oral pyloromyotomy), laparoscopic pyloroplasty, laparoscopic gastric stimulator placement, and even subtotal or total gastrectomy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.006DOI Listing
January 2019
13 Reads

Gastric Electrical Stimulator for Treatment of Gastroparesis.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Jan;29(1):71-83

Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Louisville, 550 South Jackson Street, ACB A3L15, Louisville, KY 40202, USA. Electronic address:

Patients with gastroparesis sometimes suffer from intractable nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, and bloating, as well as a host of other symptoms that can often be difficult to control. Initially, patients are treated conservatively; some do well with conservative management but unfortunately some do not. Over the years, studies have shown the benefits of gastric electrical stimulation, which often results in symptomatic improvement and improvement in gastric emptying times. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.013DOI Listing
January 2019
12 Reads

Symptomatic Management of Gastroparesis.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Jan 11;29(1):55-70. Epub 2018 Sep 11.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA.

Gastroparesis is a chronic and debilitating neuromuscular disorder of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Symptoms of gastroparesis include nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, early satiety, and weight loss. Treating gastroparesis can be difficult. Read More

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January 2019
21 Reads

Evaluation of Patients with Suspected Gastroparesis.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Jan 11;29(1):39-54. Epub 2018 Sep 11.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address:

There is substantial overlap between the symptoms of gastroparesis and a variety of alternative disorders. These conditions include rumination syndrome, drug-induced gastric emptying delay, cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome, and eating disorders, which can be identified based on the history alone. The remaining patients require a diagnostic approach of physical examination, laboratory tests, evaluation with esophagogastroduodenoscopy or contrast radiography, and a test to measure gastric emptying. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.004DOI Listing
January 2019
16 Reads

Clinical Manifestation and Natural History of Gastroparesis.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Jan;29(1):27-38

Division of Gastroenterology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Paul L Foster School of Medicine, 4800 Alberta Avenue, El Paso, TX 79905, USA. Electronic address:

Although gastroparesis was described more than 60 years ago, the natural history and the long-term outcome are still being clarified. The patients with more severe gastroparesis often seek health care treatment in university medical centers specializing in gastrointestinal motility disorders and hence reports in the literature tend to be based on this population and may not be representative of the entire spectrum. The clinical manifestations of gastroparesis are heterogeneous but a significant proportion of patients end up with substantially poorer quality of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.003DOI Listing
January 2019
14 Reads

Outcomes of Per Oral Endoscopic Pyloromyotomy in the United States.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Jan 22;29(1):151-160. Epub 2018 Sep 22.

Division of Digestive Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, 615 Michael Street, Suite 201, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address:

Per oral endoscopic pyloromyotomy (POP) has emerged as an endoscopic intervention for refractory gastroparesis. Early experience in the United States showed exciting clinical response rate, reduced gastroparesis symptoms, improved quality of life, and decreased gastric-emptying time during midterm follow-up up to 18 months. One recent study also showed that the number of patient emergency room visits and hospitalizations decreased significantly after POP. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.009DOI Listing
January 2019
18 Reads

Diabetic Gastroparesis and Nondiabetic Gastroparesis.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Jan 11;29(1):15-25. Epub 2018 Sep 11.

Division of Digestive Diseases, Emory University, 1365 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address:

Gastroparesis can be divided into diabetic and nondiabetic, and the 3 main causes of gastroparesis are diabetic, postsurgical, and idiopathic. Delayed gastric emptying is the main manifestation of motility disorders for gastroparesis. Symptoms of gastroparesis are nonspecific and severity can vary. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.002DOI Listing
January 2019
18 Reads

Outcomes and Future Directions of Per-Oral Endoscopic Pyloromyotomy: A View from France.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Jan 24;29(1):139-149. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Gastroenterology Department, Rouen University Hospital, 1 rue de Germont, Rouen 76038, France.

Gastroparesis is a challenging functional gastroenterological disorder, the complex pathophysiology of which hampers development of therapeutic modalities. Per-oral pyloromyotomy (POP) is a promising endoscopic therapy with a short-term clinical success rate of greater than 80%. Interest in POP is increasing, particularly in France, a country in which there is considerable expertise in submucosal endoscopy and functional disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.008DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads

Gastric Emptying Scintigraphy Before Gastric per Oral Endoscopic Myotomy: Imaging May Inform Treatment.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Jan;29(1):127-137

Division of Digestive Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, 1365 Clifton Road, B1262, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address:

Gastric emptying scintigraphy (GES) helps to diagnose gastroparesis and is typically only used for whole stomach retention patterns. However, it may provide significantly more information when looking specifically at proximal and distal retention patterns. This article reviews global GES changes following gastric per oral endoscopic myotomy; how global, proximal, and distal GES measurements correlate to gastroparesis symptoms; and how proximal and distal GES may serve as proxies for the various mechanisms involved in gastroparesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.014DOI Listing
January 2019
15 Reads

Technical Aspects of Peroral Endoscopic Pyloromyotomy.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Jan;29(1):117-126

Division of Digestive Disease, Emory University School of Medicine, 1365 Clifton RD NE, Suite B 1262, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA; Advanced Endoscopy Fellowship, Emory University School of Medicine, 1365 Clifton Road, B1262, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address:

Gastric peroral endoscopic pyloromyotomy (G-POEM or POP) is a feasible and effective procedure for the treatment of refractory gastroparesis. G-POEM is a technically demanding endoscopic procedure. As of yet, there is no consensus on the technique. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.012DOI Listing
January 2019
20 Reads

Stent Placement for the Treatment of Gastroparesis.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Jan;29(1):107-115

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Sheikh Zayed Building, 1800 Orleans Street, Suite 7125G, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. Electronic address:

Gastroparesis is a syndrome of delayed gastric emptying. First-line treatment includes prokinetic medications. Those refractory to medical treatment are occasionally considered for endoscopic or surgical treatment options, with unpredictable response. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.011DOI Listing
January 2019
18 Reads

Epidemiology and Pathophysiology of Gastroparesis.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2019 Jan;29(1):1-14

Global Research, Digestive and Health Neurogastroenterology, New Lambton, NSW 2305, Australia.

Gastroparesis is a complex syndrome with symptoms that include nausea, vomiting, and postprandial abdominal pain, and is frequently accompanied by significant delays in gastric emptying. The pathophysiology of diabetic gastroparesis is fairly well understood; however, idiopathic gastroparesis, which accounts for one-third of all cases, may stem from infections, or autoimmune or neurologic disorders, among other causes. To date, few population-based studies have estimated the true prevalence and incidence of gastroparesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.010DOI Listing
January 2019
17 Reads

Preface.

Authors:
John M Poneros

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 10;28(4):xv-xvi

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, Herbert Irving Pavilion, Room 1344, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.07.001DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Management of Benign Pancreatic Diseases.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 10;28(4):xiii-xiv

Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.08.001DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Total Pancreatectomy with Autologous Islet Cell Transplantation.

Authors:
Beth Schrope

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Oct 13;28(4):605-618. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Department of Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

First described in the early 1980s, total pancreatectomy with autologous islet cell transplantation for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis is still only offered in select centers worldwide. Indications, process details including surgery as well as islet isolation, and results are reviewed. In addition, areas for further research to optimize results are identified. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.05.003DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

The Role of Genetics in Pancreatitis.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Oct;28(4):587-603

Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Columbia University Medical Center, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, Suite 862, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

Individuals with acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis may have an inherited predisposition to the development of the disease. Pancreatitis in the setting of a significant family history of the disease can be classified as hereditary or familial pancreatitis. In this article, the authors closely examine the specific genes implicated in pancreatitis, investigate the role of genetic testing for diagnosis, and describe the impact of genetic testing results on clinical management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.06.001DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Celiac Plexus Block and Neurolysis: A Review.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Oct 3;28(4):579-586. Epub 2018 Aug 3.

Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Columbia University Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Pain is often associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Often times opioids are used to treat pain; however, the use of opioids is frequently difficult. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block and celiac plexus nuerolysis are safe and effective modalities used to alleviate pain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.06.004DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Interventional Endoscopic Ultrasonography in the Pancreas.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Oct 3;28(4):569-578. Epub 2018 Aug 3.

Division of Digestive and Liver Disease, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital, 630 West 168th Street, Box 83, P&S3-401, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has enabled therapeutic endoscopists to intervene on conditions that have otherwise not been accessible with conventional endoscopy. Inflammatory fluid collections of the pancreas that may benefit from drainage are often not identifiable without EUS. Furthermore, EUS may improve the safety of transmural drainage by allowing for the identification of intervening blood vessels and reducing the need for fluoroscopy, and is complemented by new devices that simplify the access and stent delivery process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.06.003DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

The Use of Biomarkers in the Risk Stratification of Cystic Neoplasms.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Oct 2;28(4):549-568. Epub 2018 Aug 2.

Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Columbia University, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

Cyst fluid biomarkers may be used to identify pancreatic cyst subtypes. Biomarkers are selected based on their ability to accurately distinguish mucinous from nonmucinous cysts and to risk stratify cysts based on malignant potential. Biomarkers of interest include but are not limited to amylase, oncogenes, DNA analysis, and epigenetic markers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.05.006DOI Listing
October 2018
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Current Guideline Controversies in the Management of Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Oct 1;28(4):529-547. Epub 2018 Aug 1.

Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1069, New York, NY 10029, USA. Electronic address:

Pancreatic cystic lesions are a common clinical entity. The majority are neoplastic and have the potential for malignant transformation. To assist with patient management, a number of clinical guidelines have been developed over the past decade. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10525157183072
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.05.005DOI Listing
October 2018
14 Reads

Pancreatic Insufficiency: What Is the Gold Standard?

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Oct 25;28(4):521-528. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA.

Endoscopic pancreatic function testing assesses exocrine insufficiency and chronic pancreatitis. Indirect pancreatic function tests have limited sensitivity and specificity in early disease stages. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography shows promise in detecting early changes as a direct measure of pancreatic function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.05.004DOI Listing
October 2018
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Management of Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Oct 1;28(4):493-519. Epub 2018 Aug 1.

Section of Digestive Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, Yale Center for Pancreatic Disease, Yale University, LMP 1080, 15 York Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. Electronic address:

Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an IgG-4-related systemic disease that can manifest as a pancreatic disorder or another disorder of presumed autoimmune origin. Type 2 disease is typically characterized by absent IgG-4-positive cells. As patients often present with acute pancreatitis, obstructive jaundice, or pancreatic mass, it is imperative to exclude malignancy, a more common diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.05.002DOI Listing
October 2018
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Systematic Review of Endoscopic Cyst Gastrostomy.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Oct 3;28(4):477-492. Epub 2018 Aug 3.

Division of Gastroenterology, Lenox Hill Hospital, 100 East 77th Street, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10075, USA. Electronic address:

Since the original description of pancreatic fluid collections (PFC) in 1761 by Morgagni, their diagnosis, description, and management have continued to evolve. The mainstay of therapy for symptomatic PFCs has been the creation of a communication between a PFC and the stomach, to enable drainage. Surgical creation of these drainage conduits had been the gold standard of therapy; however, there has been a paradigm shift in recent years with an increasing role of endoscopic drainage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.06.002DOI Listing
October 2018
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The Role of Endotherapy in Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Oct 1;28(4):455-476. Epub 2018 Aug 1.

Columbia University Medical Center, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, Suite 852, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

Patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) have few treatment options available to them to manage their symptoms or prevent progression to chronic pancreatitis. At present, endotherapy is typically pursued as a means to achieve symptom remission and reduce rates of recurrence, hospitalization, abdominal pain, narcotic use, and surgical intervention. However, evidence that endotherapy effectively alters the natural history of disease remains limited. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.05.001DOI Listing
October 2018
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How to Avoid Post-Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Pancreatitis.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Oct;28(4):439-454

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical University of South Carolina, MSC 702, 114 Doughty Street, Suite 249, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. Electronic address:

Pancreatitis remains the most common and potentially devastating complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis. Recent advances in prophylaxis have improved but not eliminated this problem, underscoring the importance of ongoing research toward this goal. This review aims to provide an evidence-based approach to post-ERCP pancreatitis prevention through patient selection, risk stratification, procedural technique, and multimodality prophylaxis, and discusses ongoing and future research initiatives in this important area. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.05.007DOI Listing
October 2018
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Uncomplicated Acute Pancreatitis: Evidenced-Based Management Decisions.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Oct 17;28(4):425-438. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

Division of Gastroenterology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, 1830 East Monument Street, Room 428, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

Acute pancreatitis is among the most common gastrointestinal disorders requiring hospitalization worldwide. Establishing the cause of acute pancreatitis ensures appropriate management and proper health care resource utilization. Causes of acute pancreatitis include biliary, alcohol use, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, drug-induced, autoimmune, hereditary/genetic, and anatomic abnormalities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.05.008DOI Listing
October 2018
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Prevention of Recurrent Lower Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Jul 17;28(3):409-424. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

Division of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Hospital, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1069, New York, NY 10029-6574, USA.

This article summarizes current knowledge regarding the incidence of and risk factors associated with recurrent lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The literature regarding medical, endoscopic, and surgical methods to prevent rebleeding from diverticulosis, angioectasia, and chronic hemorrhagic radiation proctopathy is reviewed. In addition, the evidence for endoscopic clipping as primary prophylaxis against postpolypectomy bleeding is explored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.02.011DOI Listing
July 2018
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The Role of Endoscopic Hemostasis Therapy in Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Jul;28(3):391-408

Clinical Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, Veterans Affairs San Francisco Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Acute severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) can be treated by endoscopy safely and effectively. At present, the data on the efficacy of endoscopy in the treatment of patients with LGIB are still being collected. Thus, guidelines to manage patients with LGIB are still in development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.02.010DOI Listing
July 2018
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Colonoscopy in Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Diagnosis, Timing, and Bowel Preparation.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Jul;28(3):379-390

Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue S-357, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA; Department of Medicine, San Francisco Veteran's Affairs Hospital, 4150 Clement Street, VA 111B/GI Section, San Francisco, CA 94121, USA. Electronic address:

Lower gastrointestinal bleeding is bleeding from a colonic source. Rapid colon purge using 4 to 6 L of polyethylene glycol followed by early colonoscopy, within 24 hours of presentation, is recommended to optimize the detection and management of bleeding sources. Although the data are mixed, early colonoscopy seems to be associated with higher detection of bleeding lesions and therapeutic interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.02.009DOI Listing
July 2018
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Patient Presentation, Risk Stratification, and Initial Management in Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Jul;28(3):363-377

Division of Gastroenterology, The McGill University Health Center, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4, Canada; Division of Clinical Epidemiology, The McGill University Health Center, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4, Canada. Electronic address:

The approach to lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) has evolved over the last few years to incorporate a multidisciplinary management strategy. Although the causes of LGIB vary depending on the age and comorbid conditions of patients, the initial resuscitation and principles of optimizing patients' condition before endoscopic evaluation, when appropriate, are the cornerstones to clinical care. The role of risk stratification is to triage patients as well as to mobilize health care resources based on predicted outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.02.008DOI Listing
July 2018
15 Reads

Managing Antithrombotic Agents in the Setting of Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 2018 Jul;28(3):351-361

Department of Medicine & Therapeutics, Prince of Wales Hospital, 30-32 Ngan Shing Street, Shatin, Hong Kong. Electronic address:

The incidence of antithrombotic-associated gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is increasing due to the growing advanced age population. There is consensus on ceasing anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents during an acute GI bleeding episode but clearer guidance is needed on resumption of these agents. This article reviews evidence for optimal management of antithrombotics in the setting of acute GI bleeding and highlights areas in which future studies are needed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giec.2018.02.007DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads