188 results match your criteria Future Virology[Journal]


How does the human metapneumovirus regulate neutrophil infiltration into the airways?

Future Virol 2018 Apr 21;13(4):233-235. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

Department of Pathobiological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2018-0001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6454900PMC
April 2018
1 Read

Glycosylation of the HIV-1 Env V1V2 loop to form a native-like structure may not be essential with a nanoparticle vaccine.

Future Virol 2019 Feb 10;14(2):51-54. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

U.S. Military HIV Research Program, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, 503 Robert Grant Ave, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2018-0174DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6378949PMC
February 2019

Is regulation preventing the development of therapeutics that may prevent future coronavirus pandemics?

Future Virol 2018 Mar 21;13(3):143-146. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2017-0143DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6289267PMC
March 2018
2 Reads

Please stand by: how oncolytic viruses impact bystander cells.

Future Virol 2018 Sep 8;13(9):671-680. Epub 2018 Aug 8.

The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program, Columbus, 43201 OH, USA.

Oncolytic viruses (OVs) do more than simply infect and kill host cells. The accepted mechanism of action for OVs consists of a primary lytic phase and a subsequent antitumor and antiviral immune response. However, not all cells are subject to the direct effects of OV therapy, and it is becoming clear that OVs can also impact uninfected cells in the periphery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2018-0068DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6219440PMC
September 2018
1 Read

Antiviral therapeutic approaches for human rhinovirus infections.

Future Virol 2018 Jul 12;13(7):505-518. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

School of Applied Sciences, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh EH11 4BN, Scotland.

Human rhinoviruses are the primary etiological agent of the common cold. This infection can be mild and self-limiting in immunocompetent hosts, but can be associated with bronchiolitis in infants, pneumonia in the immunosuppressed and exacerbations of pre-existing pulmonary conditions such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Many of these conditions can place significant economic costs upon healthcare infrastructure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2018-0016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6136076PMC
July 2018
2 Reads

Defective (interfering) viral genomes re-explored: impact on antiviral immunity and virus persistence.

Future Virol 2018 Jul 12;13(7):493-503. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Department of Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Defective viral genomes (DVGs) are natural products of virus replication that occur in many positive and negative sense RNA viruses, including Ebola, dengue and respiratory syncytial virus. DVGs, which have severe genomic truncations and require a helper virus to replicate, have three well-described functions: interference with standard virus replication, immunostimulation, and establishment of virus persistence. These functions of DVGs were first described almost 50 years ago, yet only recent studies have shown the molecular intersection between their immunostimulatory and pro-persistence activities. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/fvl-2018-0021
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2018-0021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6136085PMC
July 2018
6 Reads

Targeting HPV16 DNA using CRISPR/Cas inhibits anal cancer growth .

Future Virol 2018 Jul 12;13(7):475-482. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Departments of Medicine & Molecular Genetics & Microbiology, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

Aim: The goal of this study was to determine if a single AAV vector, encoding Cas9 and guide RNAs specific for the HPV16 E6 and E7 genes, could inhibit the growth of an HPV16-induced tumor .

Materials & Methods: We grew HPV16, patient-derived anal cancer explants in immunodeficient mice and then challenged these by injection of AAV-based vectors encoding Cas9 and control or HPV16-specific guide RNAs.

Results & Conclusion: We observed a significant and selective reduction in tumor growth when the HPV16 E6 and E7 genes were targeted using Cas9. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2018-0010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6136077PMC
July 2018
2 Reads

Latent versus productive infection: the alpha herpesvirus switch.

Future Virol 2018 May 22;13(6):431-443. Epub 2018 May 22.

Department of Molecular Biology and Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA.

Alpha herpesviruses are common pathogens of mammals. They establish a productive infection in many cell types, but a life-long latent infection occurs in PNS neurons. A vast majority of the human population has latent HSV-1 infections. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2018-0023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6021814PMC
May 2018
1 Read

Molecular evolution methods to study HIV-1 epidemics.

Future Virol 2018 May 21;13(6):399-404. Epub 2018 May 21.

Joint Research Unit "Infección y Salud Pública" FISABIO-Salud Pública/Universitat de València-Institute for Integrative Systems Biology (ISysBio, CSIC-UV) Valencia, Spain.

Nucleotide sequences of HIV isolates are obtained routinely to evaluate the presence of resistance mutations to antiretroviral drugs. But, beyond their clinical use, these and other viral sequences include a wealth of information that can be used to better understand and characterize the epidemiology of HIV in relevant populations. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the main methods used to analyze HIV sequences, the data bases where reference sequences can be obtained, and some caveats about the possible applications for public health of these analyses, along with some considerations about their limitations and correct usage to derive robust and reliable conclusions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2017-0159DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6021815PMC
May 2018
2 Reads

Viral manipulation of host mRNA decay.

Future Virol 2018 Mar 23;13(3):211-223. Epub 2018 Feb 23.

Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases & International Medicine, Program in Infection & Immunity, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

Viruses alter host-cell gene expression at many biochemical levels, such as transcription, translation, mRNA splicing and mRNA decay in order to create a cellular environment suitable for viral replication. In this review, we discuss mechanisms by which viruses manipulate host-gene expression at the level of mRNA decay in order to enable the virus to evade host antiviral responses to allow viral survival and replication. We discuss different cellular RNA decay pathways, including the deadenylation-dependent mRNA decay pathway, and various strategies that viruses exploit to manipulate these pathways in order to create a virus-friendly cellular environment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2017-0106DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5939598PMC
March 2018
5 Reads

Designing and building oncolytic viruses.

Future Virol 2017 Apr 31;12(4):193-213. Epub 2017 Mar 31.

Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are engineered and/or evolved to propagate selectively in cancerous tissues. They have a dual mechanism of action; direct killing of infected cancer cells cross-primes anticancer immunity to boost the killing of uninfected cancer cells. The goal of the field is to develop OVs that are easily manufactured, efficiently delivered to disseminated sites of cancer growth, undergo rapid intratumoral spread, selectively kill tumor cells, cause no collateral damage and pose no risk of transmission in the population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2016-0129DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5779534PMC
April 2017
2 Reads

Preventing neonatal herpes infections through maternal immunization.

Future Virol 2017 Dec;12(12):709-711

Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2017-0105DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5751513PMC
December 2017
3 Reads

Maternal nutritional status during pregnancy and infant immune response to routine childhood vaccinations.

Future Virol 2017 Sep 29;12(9):525-536. Epub 2017 Sep 29.

Human Development & Health, Global Health Research Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK.

To systematically review the association between maternal nutritional status in pregnancy and infant immune response to childhood vaccines. We reviewed literature on maternal nutrition during pregnancy, fetal immune system and vaccines and possible relationships. Thereafter, we undertook a systematic review of the literature of maternal nutritional status and infant vaccine response, extracted relevant information, assessed quality of the nine papers identified and present findings in a narrative format. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/fvl-2017-0021
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2017-0021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5716389PMC
September 2017
17 Reads

Recent advances in the development of antiviral therapeutics for Rift Valley fever virus infection.

Future Virol 2017 Nov 23;12(11):651-665. Epub 2017 Oct 23.

Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX 77555, USA.

Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne bunyavirus endemic to sub-Saharan Africa and the Arabian Peninsula and the etiological agent of Rift Valley fever. Rift Valley fever is a disease of major public health and economic concern, affecting livestock and humans. In ruminants, RVFV infection is characterized by high mortality rates in newborns and near 100% abortion rates in pregnant animals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2017-0060DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5696620PMC
November 2017
6 Reads

How do flavivirus-infected cells resist arsenite-induced stress granule formation?

Future Virol 2017 Jun 8;12(6):247-249. Epub 2017 Jun 8.

Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2017-0033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5592642PMC
June 2017
9 Reads

Virulence determinants of West Nile virus: how can these be used for vaccine design?

Future Virol 2017 May 28;12(5):283-295. Epub 2017 Apr 28.

Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA.

West Nile virus (WNV), a neurotropic mosquito-borne flavivirus, has become endemic in the USA and parts of Europe since 1999. There is no licensed WNV vaccine for humans. Considering the robust immunity from immunization with live, attenuated vaccines, a live WNV vaccine is an ideal platform for disease control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2016-0141DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5592643PMC
May 2017
10 Reads

Factors influencing mothers' decision to enroll their HIV-negative children in a hypothetical HIV vaccine trial.

Future Virol 2017 Jan 21;12(1):19-28. Epub 2016 Dec 21.

Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University - RW Wilcocks Building, Ryneveld Street, Stellenbosch 7600, South Africa.

Despite advances in preventive treatments for HIV, children continue to become infected with HIV. Research has investigated adult and adolescents' willingness to participate in hypothetical HIV vaccine trials; however, maternal willingness to enroll their infants in such trials remains underexplored.

Aim: This study explored the factors influencing mothers' decision-making about enrolling their HIV negative infants in a hypothetical HIV vaccine trial. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2016-0090DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5898431PMC
January 2017
14 Reads

HIV-1 latent reservoir: size matters.

Future Virol 2016 Dec 28;11(12):785-794. Epub 2016 Nov 28.

Institute of Microbiology, University Hospital Center & University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.

More than 35 million people remain infected with HIV-1. Upon antiretroviral therapy cessation, HIV-1-positive individuals systematically fail to achieve sustained virological remission, revealing the presence of a reservoir. This reservoir takes into account anatomical sanctuaries where HIV-1 continues to replicate, and latently infected cells also known as the latent reservoir (LR). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2016-0093DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5480782PMC
December 2016
34 Reads

Next-generation sequencing and norovirus.

Future Virol 2016 Nov 11;11(11):719-722. Epub 2016 Nov 11.

Virosciences Department, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/fvl-2016-0099
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2016-0099DOI Listing
November 2016
4 Reads

HIV and reproductive healthcare in pregnant and postpartum HIV-infected women: adapting successful strategies.

Future Virol 2016 Aug 5;11(8):577-581. Epub 2016 Aug 5.

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, 2015 Uppergate Drive NE, 5th Floor, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Linkage and retention in care for many HIV-infected women in the postpartum period is suboptimal, which compromises long-term virologic suppression and the HIV Care Continuum. Efforts are needed to improve individual outcomes by addressing transitions in care. We summarize some successful strategies to engage and retain HIV-infected women in care during the postpartum period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2016-0065DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5365084PMC
August 2016
10 Reads

Innate immune receptors drive dengue virus immune activation and disease.

Future Virol 2017 Mar 17;13(4):287-305. Epub 2017 Nov 17.

Department of Experimental Immunology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Dengue is a worldwide disease with 400 million annual infections that can lead to septic shock and viral hemorrhagic fever with internal bleeding. These symptoms are the result of uncontrolled immune activation. Macrophages and dendritic cells are the main target of dengue virus (DENV) and the cellular source of cytokines associated with this immune activation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2017-0146DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6004600PMC
March 2017
4 Reads

Emerging Nanomedicine Approaches to Targeting HIV-1 and Antiretroviral Therapy.

Future Virol 2016 Feb 3;11(2):101-104. Epub 2016 Feb 3.

Center for Integrated Global Health Sciences; Translational Pharmacology Research Core, New York State Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences; School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA; Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.114DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5257175PMC
February 2016
8 Reads

Rotavirus vaccines: current global impact and future perspectives.

Future Virol 2016 Oct;11(10):699-708

Division of Viral Disease, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA.

As of May 2016, 81 countries have introduced Rotarix or RotaTeq rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization program. Despite initially slow uptake in some countries and differences in vaccine effectiveness (VE) between high-, low- and middle-income countries, impact of the vaccines has been swift and striking in all settings, with good VE against vaccine-type and nonvaccine-type strains. Newly published research indicates poor nutrition is associated with decreased VE and breastfeeding at the time of vaccination does not affect vaccine response. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2016-0082DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5102270PMC
October 2016
5 Reads

Simian adenoviruses as vaccine vectors.

Future Virol 2016 Sep 15;11(9):649-659. Epub 2016 Sep 15.

Jenner Institute, ORCRB, University of Oxford, Off Roosevelt Drive, Headington, Oxford, OX3 7DQ, UK.

Replication incompetent human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-C5) has been extensively used as a delivery vehicle for gene therapy proteins and infectious disease antigens. These vectors infect replicating and nonreplicating cells, have a broad tissue tropism, elicit high immune responses and are easily purified to high titers. However, the utility of HAdV-C5 vectors as potential vaccines is limited due to pre-existing immunity within the human population that significantly reduces the immunogenicity of HAdV-C5 vaccines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2016-0070DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5842362PMC
September 2016
9 Reads

Consortia's critical role in developing medical countermeasures for re-emerging viral infections: a USA perspective.

Future Virol 2016 Mar 29;11(3):187-195. Epub 2016 Feb 29.

School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35233, USA.

Viral infections, such as Ebola, severe acute respiratory syndrome/Middle East respiratory syndrome and West Nile virus have emerged as a serious health threat with no effective therapies. These infections have little commercial potential and are not a high priority for the pharmaceutical industry. However, the academic community has been active in this area for many years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl-2015-0011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4912138PMC
March 2016
6 Reads

Cell entry mechanisms of HSV: what we have learned in recent years.

Future Virol 2015 Oct;10(10):1145-1154

Ocular Virology Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1855 West Taylor Street, M/C 648, Chicago, IL 60612, USA; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, E-704 Medical Sciences Building, University of Illinois at Chicago, M/C 790, 835 South Wolcott Avenue, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.

HSV type-1 and -2 are widespread pathogens producing lifelong infection with multiple sequelae, including oral, ocular and genital disease. The process of herpesvirus entry is a highly complex process involving numerous viral and cellular factors. Entry begins with attachment of virus to the cell surface followed by interactions between viral glycoproteins and cellular receptors to facilitate capsid penetration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.85DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4822157PMC
October 2015
11 Reads

Recent advances in management of the HIV/HCV coinfected patient.

Future Virol 2015;10(8):981-997

Pharmacy Practice (Medicine and Pediatrics), School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University at Buffalo, 285 Kapoor Hall, Buffalo, New York 14214, USA; New York State Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics and Life Sciences, University at Buffalo, 701 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA.

Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global epidemic, affecting approximately 150 million individuals throughout the world. The implications of HCV infection have been magnified in those who are infected with both HCV and the HIV as liver disease progression, liver failure and liver-related death are increased, particularly in those without well-controlled HIV disease. The development of direct-acting antiviral agents for HCV that allow shorter treatment periods with increased efficacy and decreased adverse events have greatly changed the outlook for HCV-infected individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.64DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4751983PMC
January 2015
38 Reads

EBV glycoproteins: where are we now?

Future Virol 2015;10(10):1155-1162

Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Feist-Weiller Cancer Center and Center for Molecular & Tumor Virology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA; Tel.: +1 318 675 4948;

Glycoproteins are critical to virus entry, to spread within and between hosts and can modify the behavior of cells. Many viruses carry only a few, most found in the virion envelope. EBV makes more than 12, providing flexibility in how it colonizes its human host. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.80DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4734392PMC
January 2015
9 Reads

H5N1 influenza virulence, pathogenicity and transmissibility: what do we know?

Authors:
Gabriele Neumann

Future Virol 2015;10(8):971-980

Influenza Research Institute, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 575 Science Drive, Madison, WI 53711, USA; Tel.: +1 608 890 2907; ;

Highly pathogenic influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype have infected more than 600 people since 1997, resulting in the deaths of approximately 60% of those infected. Multiple studies have established the viral hemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein as the major determinant of H5N1 virulence. HA mediates host-specific virus binding to cells, and mutations that allow efficient binding to viral receptors on mammalian cells are critical (although not sufficient) for H5N1 transmissibility among mammals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.62DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4658657PMC
January 2015
19 Reads

Addressing viral resistance through vaccines.

Future Virol 2015;10(8):1011-1022

Division of Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases (NIAID), NIH, 5601 Fishers Lane, Bethesda, MD 20852, USA.

Antimicrobial resistance is a serious healthcare concern affecting millions of people around the world. Antiviral resistance has been viewed as a lesser threat than antibiotic resistance, but it is important to consider approaches to address this growing issue. While vaccination is a logical strategy, and has been shown to be successful many times over, next generation viral vaccines with a specific goal of curbing antiviral resistance will need to clear several hurdles including vaccine design, evaluation and implementation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.53DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4655118PMC
January 2015
18 Reads

Refining the approach to vaccines against influenza A viruses with pandemic potential.

Future Virol 2015;10(9):1033-1047

Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, NIAID, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Vaccination is the most effective strategy for prevention and control of influenza. Timely production and deployment of seasonal influenza vaccines is based on an understanding of the epidemiology of influenza and on global disease and virologic surveillance. Experience with seasonal influenza vaccines guided the initial development of pandemic influenza vaccines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.69DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4648374PMC
January 2015
16 Reads

Norovirus vaccines and potential antinorovirus drugs: recent advances and future perspectives.

Future Virol 2015;10(7):899-913

Department of Biomedical Sciences & Pathobiology, Center for Molecular Medicine & Infectious Diseases, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0913, USA.

Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of acute, nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. The lack of a cell culture system and smaller animal model has delayed the development and commercial availability of vaccines and antiviral drugs. Current vaccines rely on recombinant capsid proteins, such as P particles and virus-like particles (VLPs), which have been promising in clinical trials. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.57DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4643286PMC
January 2015
24 Reads
12 Citations
1.000 Impact Factor

Genes associated with RSV lower respiratory tract infection and asthma: the application of genetic epidemiological methods to understand causality.

Future Virol 2015 Jul;10(7):883-897

Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.

Infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infections (LRIs) are at increased risk for childhood asthma. The objectives of this article are to review the genes associated with both RSV LRI and asthma, review analytic approaches to assessing shared genetic risk and propose a future perspective on how these approaches can help us to understand the role of infant RSV infection as both an important risk factor for asthma and marker of shared genetic etiology between the two conditions. The review of shared genes and thus pathways associated with severity of response to RSV infection and asthma risk can help us to understand mechanisms of disease and ultimately propose new and novel targets for primary prevention of both diseases. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/fvl.15.55
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.55DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4603287PMC
July 2015
5 Reads

A bright future for bioluminescent imaging in viral research.

Future Virol 2015;10(2):169-183

Health Science Center, Department of Microbial Pathogenesis & Immunology, Texas A&M University, 407 Reynolds Medical Building, College Station, TX 77843-1114, USA.

Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has emerged as a powerful tool in the study of animal models of viral disease. BLI enables real-time study of viral infection, host immune response and the efficacy of intervention strategies. Substrate dependent light emitting luciferase enzyme when incorporated into a virus as a reporter gene enables detection of bioluminescence from infected cells using sensitive charge-coupled device (CCD) camera systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.14.96DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4581531PMC
January 2015
7 Reads

Therapeutic intervention in Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever: where are we now?

Future Virol 2015;10(3):203-206

Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA ; Galveston National Laboratory, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA.

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https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jessica_Spengler/public
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http://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/fvl.14.115
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.14.115DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4567545PMC
January 2015
5 Reads

Downregulating viral gene expression: codon usage bias manipulation for the generation of novel influenza A virus vaccines.

Future Virol 2015 Jun;10(6):715-730

Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.

Vaccination represents the best option to protect humans against influenza virus. However, improving the effectiveness of current vaccines could better stifle the health burden caused by viral infection. Protein synthesis from individual genes can be downregulated by synthetically deoptimizing a gene's codon usage. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/fvl.15.31
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.31DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4508661PMC
June 2015
39 Reads

Neurons versus herpes simplex virus: the innate immune interactions that contribute to a host-pathogen standoff.

Future Virol 2015 Jun;10(6):699-714

Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA.

Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a prevalent neurotropic virus, which establishes lifelong latent infections in the neurons of sensory ganglia. Despite our long-standing knowledge that HSV predominately infects sensory neurons during its life cycle, little is known about the neuronal antiviral response to HSV infection. Recent studies show that while sensory neurons have impaired intrinsic immunity to HSV infection, paracrine IFN signaling can potentiate a potent antiviral response. Read More

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http://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/fvl.15.45
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.45DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4508759PMC
June 2015
17 Reads

HSV-I and the cellular DNA damage response.

Future Virol 2015 Apr;10(4):383-397

Department of Molecular Biology & Biophysics, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06030, USA.

Peter Wildy first observed genetic recombination between strains of HSV in 1955. At the time, knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms was limited, and it has only been in the last decade that particular DNA damage response (DDR) pathways have been examined in the context of viral infections. One of the first reports addressing the interaction between a cellular DDR protein and HSV-1 was the observation by Lees-Miller . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4508672PMC
April 2015
5 Reads

A mechanistic overview of dendritic cell-mediated HIV-1 infection: the story so far.

Future Virol 2015 Mar;10(3):257-269

Department of Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA.

Despite progress in antiretroviral therapy, HIV-1 rebound after cessation of antiretroviral therapy suggests that establishment of long-term cellular reservoirs of virus is a significant barrier to functional cure. There is considerable evidence that dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in systemic virus dissemination. Although productive infection of DCs is inefficient, DCs capture HIV-1 and transfer-captured particles to CD4 T cells, a mechanism of DC-mediated HIV-1 trans infection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4508676PMC
March 2015
4 Reads

Therapeutics for postexposure treatment of Ebola virus infection.

Future Virol 2015 Mar;10(3):221-232

Department of Microbiology, Howard University, Washington, DC 20059, USA ; Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Howard University, Washington, DC 20059, USA ; Department of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC 20059, USA ; Department of Pharmacology, Howard University, Washington, DC 20059, USA.

The current Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa is the largest with over 5100 deaths in four West African countries as of 14 November 2014. EVD has high case-fatality rates but no licensed treatment or vaccine is yet available. Several vaccine candidates that protected nonhuman primates are not yet available for clinical use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.14.109DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4508675PMC
March 2015
13 Reads

The multifunctional Ebola virus VP40 matrix protein is a promising therapeutic target.

Future Virol 2015 May;10(5):537-546

Department of Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3800 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

The highly virulent nature of Ebola virus, evident from the 2014 West African pandemic, highlights the need to develop vaccines or therapeutic agents that limit the pathogenesis and spread of this virus. While vaccines represent an obvious approach, targeting virus interactions with host proteins that critically regulate the virus lifecycle also represent important therapeutic strategies. Among Ebola virus proteins at this critical interface is its matrix protein, VP40, which is abundantly expressed during infection and plays a number of critical roles in the viral lifecycle. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4480923PMC
May 2015
7 Reads

Human parvovirus B19: a mechanistic overview of infection and DNA replication.

Future Virol 2015;10(2):155-167

Department of Microbiology, Molecular Genetics & Immunology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Mail Stop 3029, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA.

Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) is a human pathogen that belongs to genus of the family, which is composed of a group of small DNA viruses with a linear single-stranded DNA genome. B19V mainly infects human erythroid progenitor cells and causes mild to severe hematological disorders in patients. However, recent clinical studies indicate that B19V also infects nonerythroid lineage cells, such as myocardial endothelial cells, and may be associated with other disease outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.14.103DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4470565PMC
January 2015
30 Reads

Transition of youth living with HIV from pediatric to adult-oriented healthcare: a review of the literature.

Future Virol 2015;9(10):921-929

Ponce Family & Youth Clinic, Grady Infectious Diseases Program, Grady Health Systems, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA ; Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30342, USA.

Due to advances in antiretroviral therapy, most HIV-infected children and youth now survive into adulthood. Many experts and professional societies have expressed concern about potential disruptions to care when youth living with HIV transition from pediatric to adult-oriented medical care. However, original research focused on this transition process is rare. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.14.73DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4433446PMC
January 2015
37 Reads

The missing pieces of the HCV entry puzzle.

Future Virol 2015;10(4):415-428

Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4295, USA ; Institute of Health Sciences, Anhui University, Hefei, 230601, PR China.

The past decade has witnessed steady and rapid progress in HCV research, which has led to the recent breakthrough in therapies against this significant human pathogen. Yet a deeper understanding of the life cycle of the virus is required to develop more affordable treatments and to advance vaccine design. HCV entry presents both a challenge for scientific research and an opportunity for alternative intervention approaches, owning to its highly complex nature and the myriad of players involved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/FVL.15.12DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4423549PMC
January 2015
4 Reads

Unveiling the roles of HBV polymerase for new antiviral strategies.

Future Virol 2015;10(3):283-295

The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Milton S Hershey Medical Center, PA 17033, USA.

Infection with HBV is common worldwide, with over 350 million chronic carriers. Chronic HBV infection is associated with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. All currently available oral antivirals are directed against the HBV polymerase enzyme, a reverse transcriptase. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/fvl.14.113
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.14.113DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4399241PMC
January 2015
4 Reads

Genomic profiling of host responses to Lassa virus: therapeutic potential from primate to man.

Future Virol 2015 Mar;10(3):233-256

Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.

Lassa virus infection elicits distinctive changes in host gene expression and metabolism. We focus on changes in host gene expression that may be biomarkers that discriminate individual pathogens or may help to provide a prognosis for disease. In addition to assessing mRNA changes, functional studies are also needed to discriminate causes of disease from mechanisms of host resistance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4383259PMC
March 2015
48 Reads

Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy.

Future Virol 2014 Sep;9(9):811-829

Sigmovir Biosystems, Inc., Rockville, MD 20850, USA.

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved 'pathogen-associated molecular patterns' of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release 'danger-associated molecular patterns' that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.14.70DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4303062PMC
September 2014
8 Reads

Could boosting the oligoadenylate synthetase-like pathway bring a new era of antiviral therapy?

Future Virol 2014;9(12):1011-1014

Cancer Virology Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute & Department of Microbiology & Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA; Tel.: +1 412 623 7720;

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.14.81DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4302786PMC
January 2014
9 Reads

Measles in our time: the US experience.

Authors:
Anne Schuchat

Future Virol 2015 20;10(7):1-4. Epub 2015 Jul 20.

National Center for Immunization & Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.15.54DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5730061PMC
July 2015
4 Reads

Mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches for discovery of HIV-host interactions.

Future Virol 2014 ;9(11):979-992

Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center, Affiliate of The Rockefeller University, 455 First Avenue 7th Floor, New York, NY 10016, USA.

A molecular understanding of viral infection requires a multi-disciplinary approach. Mass spectrometry has emerged as an indispensable tool to investigate the complex and dynamic interactions between HIV-1 and its host. It has been employed to study protein associations, changes in protein abundance and post-translational modifications occurring after viral infection. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/fvl.14.86
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fvl.14.86DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4277201PMC
January 2014
6 Reads