607 results match your criteria Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology[Journal]


Comparing vasopressin and oxytocin fiber and receptor density patterns in the social behavior neural network: Implications for cross-system signaling.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 Feb 9. Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Neurobiology of Social Behavior Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA; Neurobiology of Social Behavior Laboratory, Department of Psychology & Neuroscience Program, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.

Vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OXT) regulate social behavior by binding to their canonical receptors, the vasopressin V1a receptor (V1aR) and oxytocin receptor (OTR), respectively. Recent studies suggest that these neuropeptides may also signal via each other's receptors. The extent to which such cross-system signaling occurs likely depends on anatomical overlap between AVP/OXT fibers and V1aR/OTR expression. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2019.02.001DOI Listing
February 2019

The Influence of Unpredictable, Fragmented Parental Signals on the Developing Brain.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Anatomy/Neurobiology, University of California-Irvine, Irvine CA USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of California-Irvine, Irvine CA, USA; Department of Neurology, University of California-Irvine, Irvine CA, USA.

Mental illnesses originate early in life, governed by environmental and genetic factors. Because parents are a dominant source of signals to the developing child, parental signals - beginning with maternal signals in utero - are primary contributors to children's mental health. Existing literature on maternal signals has focused almost exclusively on their quality and valence (e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2019.01.002DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Mom doesn't care: when increased brain CRF system activity leads to maternal neglect in rodents.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Department of Behavioural and Molecular Neurobiology, Regensburg Center of Neuroscience, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany. Electronic address:

Mothers are the primary caregivers in mammals, ensuring the survival of their offspring. This strongly depends on the adequate expression of maternal behavior, which is the result of a concerted action of "pro-maternal" versus "anti-maternal" neuromodulators such as the oxytocin and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) systems, respectively. When essential peripartum adaptations fail, the CRF system activity has negative physiological, emotional and behavioral consequences for both mother and offspring often resulting in maternal neglect. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2019.01.001DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Conditioned hormonal responses: A systematic review in animals and humans.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 01 25;52:206-218. Epub 2018 Dec 25.

Health, Medical and Neuropsychology Unit, Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, Leiden University, 2333 AK Leiden, the Netherlands; Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, 2300 RC Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center, 2333 ZA Leiden, the Netherlands.

In contrast to classical conditioning of physiological responses such as immune responses and drug effects, only a limited number of studies investigated classical conditioning of endocrine responses. The present paper is the first systematic review that integrates evidence from animal and human trials regarding the possibility to condition the endocrine responses. Twenty-six animal and eight human studies were included in the review. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.12.005DOI Listing
January 2019

Offspring genetic effects on maternal care.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 01 18;52:195-205. Epub 2018 Dec 18.

Division of Evolution and Genomic Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine, and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, United Kingdom.

Parental care is found widely across animal taxa and is manifest in a range of behaviours from basic provisioning in cockroaches to highly complex behaviours seen in mammals. The evolution of parental care is viewed as the outcome of an evolutionary cost/benefit trade-off between investing in current and future offspring, leading to the selection of traits in offspring that influence parental behaviour. Thus, level and quality of parental care are affected by both parental and offspring genetic differences that directly and indirectly influence parental care behaviour. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.12.004DOI Listing
January 2019

Imprinted genes influencing the quality of maternal care.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 Dec 13. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Biomedicine Division, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK, CF10 3AX, UK. Electronic address:

In mammals successful rearing imposes a cost on later reproductive fitness specifically on the mother creating the potential for parental conflict. Loss of function of three imprinted genes in the dam result in deficits in maternal care suggesting that, like maternal nutrients, maternal care is a resource over which the parental genomes are in conflict. However, the induction of maternal care is a complex and highly regulated process. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.12.003DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads

Pathophysiological mechanisms implicated in postpartum depression.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 01 12;52:165-180. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Department of Neuroscience, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111, USA. Electronic address:

This review aims to summarize the diverse proposed pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to postpartum depression, highlighting both clinical and basic science research findings. The risk factors for developing postpartum depression are discussed, which may provide insight into potential neurobiological underpinnings. The evidence supporting a role for neuroendocrine changes, neuroinflammation, neurotransmitter alterations, circuit dysfunction, and the involvement of genetics and epigenetics in the pathophysiology of postpartum depression are discussed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.12.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6370514PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

The insulin-like growth factor-1 system in the adult mammalian brain and its implications in central maternal adaptation.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 01 12;52:181-194. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

MTA-ELTE Laboratory of Molecular and Systems Neurobiology, Department of Physiology and Neurobiology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences and Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary; Laboratory of Neuromorphology, Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary; Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.

Our knowledge on the bioavailability and actions of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) has markedly expanded in recent years as novel mechanisms were discovered on IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) and their ability to release IGF-1. The new discoveries allowed a better understanding of the endogenous physiological actions of IGF-1 and also its applicability in therapeutics. The focus of the present review is to summarize novel findings on the neuronal, neuroendocrine and neuroplastic actions of IGF-1 in the adult brain. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.12.002DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Sexual differentiation of microglia.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 01 24;52:156-164. Epub 2018 Nov 24.

Center of Excellence on Neurodegenerative Diseases and Dept of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Milan, via Balzaretti, 9, Milan, Italy. Electronic address:

Sex plays a role in the incidence and outcome of neurological illnesses, also influencing the response to treatments. Despite sexual differentiation of the brain has been extensively investigated, the study of sex differences in microglia, the brain's resident immune cells, has been largely neglected until recently. To fulfill this gap, our laboratory developed several tools, including cellular and animal models, which bolstered in-depth studies on sexual differentiation of microglia and its impact on brain physiology, as well as on the onset and progression of neurological disorders. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.11.003DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Menstrual cycle-related fluctuations in oxytocin concentrations: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 01 17;52:144-155. Epub 2018 Nov 17.

Division of Clinical Psychological Intervention, Department of Education and Psychology, Freie Universität Berlin, Schwendenerstraße 27, 14195 Berlin, Germany. Electronic address:

Oxytocin affects physiological and psychological functions that are often expressed sex-specifically, suggesting interactions between oxytocin and sex hormones. As female sex hormone concentrations change during the menstrual cycle, oxytocin might fluctuate, too. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated endogenous oxytocin concentrations across menstrual cycle phases in healthy women. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.11.002DOI Listing
January 2019
10 Reads

Pseudoacromegaly.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 01 15;52:113-143. Epub 2018 Nov 15.

Centre for Endocrinology, William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK. Electronic address:

Individuals with acromegaloid physical appearance or tall stature may be referred to endocrinologists to exclude growth hormone (GH) excess. While some of these subjects could be healthy individuals with normal variants of growth or physical traits, others will have acromegaly or pituitary gigantism, which are, in general, straightforward diagnoses upon assessment of the GH/IGF-1 axis. However, some patients with physical features resembling acromegaly - usually affecting the face and extremities -, or gigantism - accelerated growth/tall stature - will have no abnormalities in the GH axis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.11.001DOI Listing
January 2019
12 Reads

What magnetic resonance imaging reveals - A systematic review of the relationship between type II diabetes and associated brain distortions of structure and cognitive functioning.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 01 28;52:79-112. Epub 2018 Oct 28.

Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-4), Medical Imaging Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, Germany; JARA - Translational Brain Medicine & INM-11, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen, Germany; Department of Neurology, University Clinic Aachen, 52074 Aachen, Germany; Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering, and Monash Biomedical Imaging, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Due to its increasing prevalence, Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) represents a major health challenge for modern society. Despite it being of fundamental interest, only a few MRI studies have conducted statistical analyses to draw scientifically valid conclusions about the complex interplay of T2DM and its associated clinical, structural, functional, metabolite, as well as cognitive distortions. Therefore, a systematic review of 68 manuscripts, following the PRISMA guidelines, was conducted. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00913022183005
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.10.001DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

The relationship between oxytocin, dietary intake and feeding: A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies in mice and rats.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 01 10;52:65-78. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia; Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. Electronic address:

The neuropeptide oxytocin has been associated with food intake and feeding behaviour. This systematic review aimed to investigate the impact of oxytocin on dietary intake and feeding behaviour in rodent studies. Six electronic databases were searched to identify published studies to April 2018. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.09.002DOI Listing
January 2019

Molecular mechanisms involved in the protective actions of Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators in brain cells.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 01 14;52:44-64. Epub 2018 Sep 14.

Departamento de Nutrición y Bioquímica, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá D.C., Colombia; Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas, Universidad Autónoma de Chile, Santiago, Chile. Electronic address:

Synthetic selective modulators of the estrogen receptors (SERMs) have shown to protect neurons and glial cells against toxic insults. Among the most relevant beneficial effects attributed to these compounds are the regulation of inflammation, attenuation of astrogliosis and microglial activation, prevention of excitotoxicity and as a consequence the reduction of neuronal cell death. Under pathological conditions, the mechanism of action of the SERMs involves the activation of estrogen receptors (ERs) and G protein-coupled receptor for estrogens (GRP30). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00913022183009
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.09.001DOI Listing
January 2019
13 Reads

A case for gender-based approach to multiple sclerosis therapeutics.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 07 21;50:123-134. Epub 2018 Jul 21.

Weill Institute for the Neurosciences, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, 675 Nelson Rising Lane, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Electronic address:

Despite established sex differences in multiple sclerosis (MS) risk and course, sex-specific efficacy and toxicity of existing MS therapies, and possible sex-specific therapeutic approaches, remain underexplored. We systematically reviewed published sex differences from Phase III pivotal trials for FDA or EMA-approved MS disease modifying therapies (DMTs), along with additional information from pharmaceutical companies, for pre-specified or post-hoc baseline characteristics, efficacy and safety outcomes by sex, and sex-specific concerns. Then, we reviewed trials testing hormonal therapies in MS. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.07.001DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

Improving pharmacological treatment in brain and mental health disorders: the need for gender and sex analyses.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 07 28;50:1-2. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Dept Psychology, Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.06.007DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

The forgotten effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone: Metabolic functions and medical applications.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 01 22;52:29-43. Epub 2018 Jun 22.

Internal Medicine (Dept. of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Angiology, Nephrology and Clinical Chemistry), University of Tuebingen, Otfried-Muellerstrasse 10, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany. Electronic address:

Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) causes a variety of thyroidal and non-thyroidal effects, the best known being the feedback regulation of thyroid hormone levels. This was employed in the TRH stimulation test, which is currently little used. The role of TRH as a cancer biomarker is minor, but exaggerated responses to TSH and prolactin levels in breast cancer led to the hypothesis of a potential role for TRH in the pathogenesis of this disease. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.06.006DOI Listing
January 2019
19 Reads
7.040 Impact Factor

Sex differences in how inflammation affects behavior: What we can learn from experimental inflammatory models in humans.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 07 20;50:91-106. Epub 2018 Jun 20.

Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, USA. Electronic address:

Human models demonstrate that experimental activation of the innate immune system has profound effects on brain activation and behavior, inducing fatigue, worsened mood and pain sensitivity. It has been proposed that inflammation is a mechanism involved in the etiology and maintenance of depression, chronic pain and long-term fatigue. These diseases show a strong female overrepresentation, suggesting that a better understanding of sex differences in how inflammation drives behavior could help the development of individualized treatment interventions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.06.005DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

Orexins and stress.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 10 19;51:132-145. Epub 2018 Jun 19.

Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address:

The neuropeptides orexins are important in regulating the neurobiological systems that respond to stressful stimuli. Furthermore, orexins are known to play a role many of the phenotypes associated with stress-related mental illness such as changes in cognition, sleep-wake states, and appetite. Interestingly, orexins are altered in stress-related psychiatric disorders such as Major Depressive Disorder and Anxiety Disorders. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.06.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6345253PMC
October 2018
1 Read

Exogenous melatonin as a treatment for secondary sleep disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 01 15;52:22-28. Epub 2018 Jun 15.

Key Laboratory of Resource Biology and Biotechnology in Western China, Ministry of Education, Faculty of Life Sciences, Northwest University, 229 Taibai North Road, Xi'an 710069, China; Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Fourth Military Medical University, 169 Changle West Road, Xi'an 710032, China. Electronic address:

Melatonin is a physiological indoleamine involved in circadian rhythm regulation and it is currently used for secondary sleep disorders supported by empirical evidence. A small amount of evidence and some controversial results have been obtained in some randomized controlled trials (RCT). The objective of this meta-analysis is to determine the efficacy of exogenous melatonin versus placebo in managing secondary sleep disorders. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.06.004DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads
7.040 Impact Factor

Precision medicine and drug development in Alzheimer's disease: the importance of sexual dimorphism and patient stratification.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 07 12;50:31-51. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

AXA Research Fund & Sorbonne University Chair, Paris, France; Sorbonne University, GRC n° 21, Alzheimer Precision Medicine (APM), AP-HP, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Boulevard de l'hôpital, F-75013 Paris, France; Brain & Spine Institute (ICM), INSERM U 1127, CNRS UMR 7225, Boulevard de l'hôpital, F-75013 Paris, France; Institute of Memory and Alzheimer's Disease (IM2A), Department of Neurology, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, AP-HP, Boulevard de l'hôpital, F-75013 Paris, France. Electronic address:

Neurodegenerative diseases (ND) are among the leading causes of disability and mortality. Considerable sex differences exist in the occurrence of the various manifestations leading to cognitive decline. Alzheimer's disease (AD) exhibits substantial sexual dimorphisms and disproportionately affects women. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.06.001DOI Listing
July 2018
24 Reads
7.040 Impact Factor

Homeostatic sensing of dietary protein restriction: A case for FGF21.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 10 8;51:125-131. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, United States. Electronic address:

Restriction of dietary protein intake increases food intake and energy expenditure, reduces growth, and alters amino acid, lipid, and glucose metabolism. While these responses suggest that animals 'sense' variations in amino acid consumption, the basic physiological mechanism mediating the adaptive response to protein restriction has been largely undescribed. In this review we make the case that the liver-derived metabolic hormone FGF21 is the key signal which communicates and coordinates the homeostatic response to dietary protein restriction. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.06.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6175661PMC
October 2018
1 Read

TRPCing around the hypothalamus.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 10 31;51:116-124. Epub 2018 May 31.

Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA; Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, OR, USA.

All of the canonical transient receptor potential channels (TRPC) with the exception of TRPC 2 are expressed in hypothalamic neurons and are involved in multiple homeostatic functions. Although the metabotropic glutamate receptors have been shown to be coupled to TRPC channel activation in cortical and sub-cortical brain regions, in the hypothalamus multiple amine and peptidergic G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and growth factor/cytokine receptors are linked to activation of TRPC channels that are vital for reproduction, temperature regulation, arousal and energy homeostasis. In addition to the neurotransmitters, circulating hormones like insulin and leptin through their cognate receptors activate TRPC channels in POMC neurons. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.05.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6175656PMC
October 2018
18 Reads

The impact of sex as a biological variable in the search for novel antidepressants.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 07 31;50:107-117. Epub 2018 May 31.

Department of Psychology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, United States. Electronic address:

A roadblock to successful treatment for anxiety and depression is the high proportion of individuals that do not respond to existing treatments. Different underlying neurobiological mechanisms may drive similar symptoms, so a more personalized approach to treatment could be more successful. There is increasing evidence that sex is an important biological variable modulating efficacy of antidepressants and anxiolytics. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00913022183004
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.05.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6139050PMC
July 2018
5 Reads

Thalamic integration of social stimuli regulating parental behavior and the oxytocin system.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 10 26;51:102-115. Epub 2018 May 26.

Center for Translational Social Neuroscience, Silvio O. Conte Center for Oxytocin and Social Cognition, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, USA. Electronic address:

Critically important components of the maternal neural circuit in the preoptic area robustly activated by suckling were recently identified. In turn, suckling also contributes to hormonal adaptations to motherhood, which includes oxytocin release and consequent milk ejection. Other reproductive or social stimuli can also trigger the release of oxytocin centrally, influencing parental or social behaviors. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.05.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6175608PMC
October 2018
1 Read

Ischemic stroke across sexes: what is the status quo?

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 May 12. Epub 2018 May 12.

Center for Molecular Cardiology, University of Zürich, Wagistrasse 12, CH-8952 Schlieren, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Stroke prevalence is expected to increase in the next decades due to the aging of the Western population. Ischemic stroke (IS) shows an age- and sex-dependent distribution in which men represent the most affected population within 65 years of age, being passed by post-menopausal women in older age groups. Furthermore, a sexual dimorphism concerning risk factors, presentation and treatment of IS has been widely recognized. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.04.001DOI Listing
May 2018
1 Read

Sex-related responses after traumatic brain injury: Considerations for preclinical modeling.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 07 18;50:52-66. Epub 2018 May 18.

Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, University of Kentucky, 101 Sanders-Brown Bldg., 800 S. Limestone Street, Lexington, KY 40536, USA; Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center (SCoBIRC), University of Kentucky, B481, BBSRB, 741 S. Limestone Street, Lexington, KY 40536, USA; Department of Neuroscience, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, UK Medical Center MN 150, Lexington, KY 40536, USA. Electronic address:

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has historically been viewed as a primarily male problem, since men are more likely to experience a TBI because of more frequent participation in activities that increase risk of head injuries. This male bias is also reflected in preclinical research where mostly male animals have been used in basic and translational science. However, with an aging population in which TBI incidence is increasingly sex-independent due to falls, and increasing female participation in high-risk activities, the attention to potential sex differences in TBI responses and outcomes will become more important. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.03.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6139061PMC
July 2018
3 Reads

Ischemic stroke across sexes: What is the status quo?

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 07 16;50:3-17. Epub 2018 May 16.

Center for Molecular Cardiology, University of Zürich, Wagistrasse 12, CH-8952 Schlieren, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Stroke prevalence is expected to increase in the next decades due to the aging of the Western population. Ischemic stroke (IS) shows an age- and sex-dependent distribution in which men represent the most affected population within 65 years of age, being passed by post-menopausal women in older age groups. Furthermore, a sexual dimorphism concerning risk factors, presentation and treatment of IS has been widely recognized. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.05.001DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

The Neuroendocrinology of the Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis: A Behavioural Perspective.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 10 16;51:80-101. Epub 2018 May 16.

APC Microbiome Ireland, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland; Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. Electronic address:

The human gut harbours trillions of symbiotic bacteria that play a key role in programming different aspects of host physiology in health and disease. These intestinal microbes are also key components of the gut-brain axis, the bidirectional communication pathway between the gut and the central nervous system (CNS). In addition, the CNS is closely interconnected with the endocrine system to regulate many physiological processes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.04.002DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Regulation of LH secretion by RFRP-3 - From the hypothalamus to the pituitary.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2019 01 30;52:12-21. Epub 2018 Mar 30.

Beijing Key Laboratory of Reproductive Endocrinology and Assisted Reproductive Technology and Key Laboratory of Assisted Reproduction, Ministry of Education, Center of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100191, China.

RFamide-related peptides (RFRPs) have long been identified as inhibitors of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis in mammals. However, less progress has been made in the detailed roles of RFRPs in the control of LH secretion. Recent studies have suggested that RFRP-3 neurons in the hypothalamus can regulate the secretion of LH at different levels, including kisspeptin neurons, GnRH neurons, and the pituitary. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.03.005DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

The short-term stress response - Mother nature's mechanism for enhancing protection and performance under conditions of threat, challenge, and opportunity.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 26;49:175-192. Epub 2018 Mar 26.

Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Mail Stop M877, 1550 NW 10th Avenue, Miami, FL 33136-1000, United States. Electronic address:

Our group has proposed that in contrast to chronic stress that can have harmful effects, the short-term (fight-or-flight) stress response (lasting for minutes to hours) is nature's fundamental survival mechanism that enhances protection and performance under conditions involving threat/challenge/opportunity. Short-term stress enhances innate/primary, adaptive/secondary, vaccine-induced, and anti-tumor immune responses, and post-surgical recovery. Mechanisms and mediators include stress hormones, dendritic cell, neutrophil, macrophage, and lymphocyte trafficking/function and local/systemic chemokine and cytokine production. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.03.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5964013PMC
April 2018
30 Reads

Fifty years of stress and more to come: A tribute to Bruce S. McEwen.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 21;49:1-2. Epub 2018 Mar 21.

Department of Psychology, Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.03.003DOI Listing
April 2018
3 Reads

More than a feeling: A unified view of stress measurement for population science.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 15;49:146-169. Epub 2018 Mar 15.

Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco, 401 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA, USA. Electronic address:

Stress can influence health throughout the lifespan, yet there is little agreement about what types and aspects of stress matter most for human health and disease. This is in part because "stress" is not a monolithic concept but rather, an emergent process that involves interactions between individual and environmental factors, historical and current events, allostatic states, and psychological and physiological reactivity. Many of these processes alone have been labeled as "stress. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.03.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6345505PMC
April 2018
2 Reads

Transposons, stress and the functions of the deep genome.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 15;49:170-174. Epub 2018 Mar 15.

University of Massachusetts Boston, Department of Psychology, University of Massachusetts, Boston, MA, USA; Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address:

The brain is responsible for both recognition and adaptation to stressful stimuli. Many molecular mechanisms have been implicated in this response including those governing neuronal plasticity, neurogenesis and, changes gene expression. Far less is known regarding effects of stress on the deep genome. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.03.002DOI Listing
April 2018
1 Read

Stress: Common themes toward the next frontier.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 19;49:3-7. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, United States. Electronic address:

"Stress is complicated". A phrase uttered by many a stress researcher. This is true, from the vast array of stimuli considered "stressors" to the interactive and hormetic nature of the molecular, cellular, endocrine, and behavioral responses generated by such stressors. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.02.006DOI Listing
April 2018
1 Read

Neurogenesis and sexual behavior.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 10 10;51:68-79. Epub 2018 Feb 10.

Instituto de Neurobiología - Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Blvd Juriquilla 3001, Campus UNAM-Juriquilla, 76230 Querétaro, QRO, México. Electronic address:

Different conditions induce proliferation, migration and integration of new neurons in the adult brain. This process of neurogenesis is a clear example of long lasting plastic changes in the brain of different species. Sexual behavior is a motivated behavior that is crucial for the survival of the species, but an individual can spend all his life without displaying sexual behavior. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.02.004DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Importance of the brain corticosteroid receptor balance in metaplasticity, cognitive performance and neuro-inflammation.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 8;49:124-145. Epub 2018 Feb 8.

Department of Translational Neuroscience, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands; University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

Bruce McEwen's discovery of receptors for corticosterone in the rat hippocampus introduced higher brain circuits in the neuroendocrinology of stress. Subsequently, these receptors were identified as mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) that are involved in appraisal processes, choice of coping style, encoding and retrieval. The MR-mediated actions on cognition are complemented by slower actions via glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) on contextualization, rationalization and memory storage of the experience. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.02.003DOI Listing
April 2018
2 Reads

The impact from the aftermath of chronic stress on hippocampal structure and function: Is there a recovery?

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 8;49:114-123. Epub 2018 Feb 8.

Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, Box 1104, Tempe, AZ 85287-1104, United States.

Chronic stress results in functional and structural changes to the brain and especially the hippocampus. Decades of research have provided insights into the mechanisms by which chronic stress impairs hippocampal-mediated cognition and the corresponding reduction of hippocampal CA3 apical dendritic complexity. Yet, when chronic stress ends and time passes, which we refer to as a "post-stress rest period," hippocampal-mediated spatial memory deficits begin to improve and CA3 apical dendritic arbors increase in complexity. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.02.005DOI Listing
April 2018
2 Reads

The effects of chronic stress on the human brain: From neurotoxicity, to vulnerability, to opportunity.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 5;49:91-105. Epub 2018 Feb 5.

Centre for Studies on Human Stress, Montreal Mental Health University Institute, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Canada.

For the last five decades, science has managed to delineate the mechanisms by which stress hormones can impact on the human brain. Receptors for glucocorticoids are found in the hippocampus, amygdala and frontal cortex, three brain regions involved in memory processing and emotional regulation. Studies have shown that chronic exposure to stress is associated with reduced volume of the hippocampus and that chronic stress can modulate volumes of both the amygdala and frontal cortex, suggesting neurotoxic effects of stress hormones on the brain. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00913022183000
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.02.001DOI Listing
April 2018
13 Reads

Behavioral and structural adaptations to stress.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 5;49:106-113. Epub 2018 Feb 5.

Section on Neuroplasticity, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Unpredictable aversive experiences, or stressors, lead to changes in depression- and anxiety-related behavior and to changes in hippocampal structure including decreases in adult neurogenesis, granule cell and pyramidal cell dendritic morphology, and volume. Here we review the relationship between these behavioral and structural changes and discuss the possibility that these changes may be largely adaptive. Specifically, we suggest that new neurons in the dentate gyrus enhance behavioral adaptability to changes in the environment, biasing behavior in novel situations based on previous experience with stress. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.02.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5963997PMC
April 2018
2 Reads

Impacts of stress on reproductive and social behaviors.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 2;49:86-90. Epub 2018 Feb 2.

Laboratory of Neurobiology and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, United States.

Impacts of steroid stress hormones on the brain have provided multiple opportunities for linking specific molecular phenomena to behavioral state. The negative impacts of stress on female reproductive biological processes have been documented thoroughly at the endocrine and behavioral levels. More recently, a '3-hit' theory of autism has identified early stress as one of the hits. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.01.002DOI Listing
April 2018
2 Reads

An energetic view of stress: Focus on mitochondria.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 12;49:72-85. Epub 2018 Jan 12.

Brain Mind Institute, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.

Energy is required to sustain life and enable stress adaptation. At the cellular level, energy is largely derived from mitochondria - unique multifunctional organelles with their own genome. Four main elements connect mitochondria to stress: (1) Energy is required at the molecular, (epi)genetic, cellular, organellar, and systemic levels to sustain components of stress responses; (2) Glucocorticoids and other steroid hormones are produced and metabolized by mitochondria; (3) Reciprocally, mitochondria respond to neuroendocrine and metabolic stress mediators; and (4) Experimentally manipulating mitochondrial functions alters physiological and behavioral responses to psychological stress. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00913022183000
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2018.01.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5964020PMC
April 2018
9 Reads

Deciphering sex differences in the immune system and depression.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 07 27;50:67-90. Epub 2017 Dec 27.

Department of Neuroscience, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1981 Kraft Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA. Electronic address:

Certain mood disorders and autoimmune diseases are predominately female diseases but we do not know why. Here, we explore the relationship between depression and the immune system from a sex-based perspective. This review characterizes sex differences in the immune system in health and disease. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2017.12.004DOI Listing
July 2018
4 Reads

The neuroendocrinology of sexual attraction.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 10 26;51:46-67. Epub 2017 Dec 26.

Department of Psychology, University of Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address:

Sexual attraction has two components: Emission of sexually attractive stimuli and responsiveness to these stimuli. In rodents, olfactory stimuli are necessary but not sufficient for attraction. We argue that body odors are far superior to odors from excreta (urine, feces) as sexual attractants. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00913022173010
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2017.12.006DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads

Glucocorticoid hormones are both a major circadian signal and major stress signal: How this shared signal contributes to a dynamic relationship between the circadian and stress systems.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 26;49:52-71. Epub 2017 Dec 26.

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA. Electronic address:

Glucocorticoid hormones are a powerful mammalian systemic hormonal signal that exerts regulatory effects on almost every cell and system of the body. Glucocorticoids act in a circadian and stress-directed manner to aid in adaptation to an ever-changing environment. Circadian glucocorticoid secretion provides for a daily waxing and waning influence on target cell function. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2017.12.005DOI Listing
April 2018
6 Reads

The metamorphosis of adolescent hormonal stress reactivity: A focus on animal models.

Authors:
Russell D Romeo

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 21;49:43-51. Epub 2017 Dec 21.

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and Behavior Program, Barnard College of Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, United States. Electronic address:

As adolescents transition from childhood to adulthood, many physiological and neurobehavioral changes occur. Shifts in neuroendocrine function are one such change, including the hormonal systems that respond to stressors. This review will focus on these hormonal changes, with a particular emphasis on the pubertal and adolescent maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2017.12.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5963973PMC
April 2018
9 Reads

Sensing and signaling mechanisms linking dietary methionine restriction to the behavioral and physiological components of the response.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 10 21;51:36-45. Epub 2017 Dec 21.

Laboratory of Nutrient Sensing and Adipocyte Signaling, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, United States. Electronic address:

Dietary methionine restriction (MR) is implemented using a semi-purified diet that reduces methionine by ∼80% and eliminates dietary cysteine. Within hours of its introduction, dietary MR initiates coordinated series of transcriptional programs and physiological responses that include increased energy intake and expenditure, decreased adiposity, enhanced insulin sensitivity, and reduction in circulating and tissue lipids. Significant progress has been made in cataloguing the physiological responses to MR in males but not females, but identities of the sensing and communication networks that orchestrate these responses remain poorly understood. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2017.12.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6013330PMC
October 2018
8 Reads

Chronic stress from adolescence to aging in the prefrontal cortex: A neuroimmune perspective.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 16;49:31-42. Epub 2017 Dec 16.

University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Neuroscience, Columbia, SC, United States; Wm. Jennings Bryan Dorn VA Medical Center, Columbia, SC, United States.

The development of the organism is a critical variable which influences the magnitude, duration, and reversibility of the effects of chronic stress. Such factors are relevant to the prefrontal cortex (PFC), as this brain region is the last to mature, the first to decline, and is highly stress-sensitive. Therefore, this review will examine the intersection between the nervous system and immune system at glutamatergic synapses in the PFC across three developmental periods: adolescence, adulthood, and aging. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2017.12.001DOI Listing
April 2018
10 Reads

Neuroactive steroids and metabolic axis.

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 01 13;48:1-2. Epub 2017 Nov 13.

Dipartimento di Neuroscienze "Rita Levi Montalcini", Università degli Studi di Torino, Neuroscience Institute Cavalieri Ottolenghi (NICO), Orbassano, Italy.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2017.11.002DOI Listing
January 2018
4 Reads

Redefining neuroendocrinology: Epigenetics of brain-body communication over the life course.

Authors:
Bruce S McEwen

Front Neuroendocrinol 2018 04 10;49:8-30. Epub 2017 Nov 10.

Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Ave, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address: http://www.rockefeller.edu/labheads/mcewen/mcewen-lab.php.

The brain is the central organ of stress and adaptation to stress that perceives and determines what is threatening, as well as the behavioral and physiological responses to the stressor, and it does so somewhat differently in males and females. The expression of steroid hormone receptors throughout the brain has broadened the definition of 'neuroendocrinology' to include the reciprocal communication between the entire brain and body via hormonal and neural pathways. Mediated in part via systemic hormonal influences, the adult and developing brain possess remarkable structural and functional plasticity in response to stress, including neuronal replacement, dendritic remodeling, and synapse turnover. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yfrne.2017.11.001DOI Listing
April 2018
3 Reads