446 results match your criteria Foreign Body Removal Nose


Management of Foreign Bodies in the Ear: A Retrospective Review of 123 Cases in Nigeria.

Ear Nose Throat J 2020 May 12:145561320920510. Epub 2020 May 12.

Department of Ear, Nose, and Throat Surgery, Federal Medical Centre, Ido Ekiti, Nigeria.

Foreign bodies in the ear are relatively common in emergency medicine. However, attempts at removal made outside the healthcare setting by untrained persons can result in complications of varying degrees. We conducted a 3-year retrospective review of 123 cases of aural foreign bodies at our hospital in Nigeria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0145561320920510DOI Listing
May 2020
0.881 Impact Factor

A potential post-removal pH neutralization strategy to mitigate nasal button battery injuries.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2020 Jun 17;133:110011. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Ministry of Health, University of Medical Sciences, Samsun Training and Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, Samsun, Turkey. Electronic address:

Objective: Button batteries (BBs) impacted in the nose of children can cause septal perforation, synechia, atrophy, necrosis and deformities such as saddle nose. Developing mitigation strategies that can reduce tissue damage after BB removal can decrease these complications.

Methods: 3 V lithium BBs were placed on the cadaveric sheep nasal septum model segments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2020.110011DOI Listing

More to it than meets the eye: a case of retained intraorbital foreign body removed using transcutaneous orbital endoscopic surgery.

BMJ Case Rep 2020 Feb 18;13(2). Epub 2020 Feb 18.

ENT, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College and General Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

The possibility of a retained foreign body should always be considered when a patient presents with a history of orbital trauma, especially when the patient is unresponsive or temporarily responsive to treatment. Not all cases of retained foreign body present with decreased vision or restricted mobility or fever. The entry wound is also not apparent on examination in all cases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2019-233198DOI Listing
February 2020

Management and Outcomes of Button Batteries in the Aerodigestive Tract: A Multi-institutional Study.

Laryngoscope 2020 Feb 18. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Objectives/hypothesis: To describe the clinical presentation, management, and complications associated with button battery impaction in the aerodigestive tract in children.

Study Design: Retrospective case series.

Methods: This multi-institutional study, endorsed by the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology research consortium, is a retrospective medical record review, including all children at five tertiary-care institutions presenting with button batteries impacted in the aerodigestive tract between January 2002 and December 2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lary.28568DOI Listing
February 2020
2.032 Impact Factor

Surgical fenestrated approach to the maxillary sinus like alternative to Caldwell-Luc technique.

Minerva Stomatol 2019 12;68(6):308-316

Unit of Otorhinolaryngology, Department of Neuroscience and Head and Neck, Infermi Hospital, Rimini, Italy.

Introduction: In the last few years the surgical treatment of patients with maxillary sinus disease has shifted from more invasive maneuvers to more conservative approaches in order to save intraoral mucosa. Recently, some authors have proposed a modification to the classical Caldwell-Luc's approach (CL) for the removal of dental implants displaced into the maxillary sinus. The modified approach involves a fenestrated approach to the maxillary sinus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0026-4970.19.04255-9DOI Listing
December 2019

The Utility of the Maxillary Heuwieser for Oropharyngeal Foreign Body Removal Under Nebulized Local Anesthesia: A Case Series.

Ear Nose Throat J 2020 Feb 13:145561320906329. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.

We describe a novel and safe use of existing instrumentation in the removal of select foreign bodies in the upper aerodigestive tract to minimize health-care costs. A retrospective review of 4 cases involving visualized upper aerodigestive tract foreign bodies were identified via flexible laryngoscopy and extracted under local anesthesia from 2016 to 2018. All 4 patients were not in any airway distress and underwent successful removal of the foreign body, which included 2 fishbones, a sewing pin, and a wire bristle with a maxillary Heuwieser or giraffe instrument under flexible laryngoscopy visualizing using local anesthesia without complications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0145561320906329DOI Listing
February 2020

Clinical Characteristics of External Auditory Canal Foreign Bodies in Children and Adolescents.

Ear Nose Throat J 2019 Dec 9:145561319893164. Epub 2019 Dec 9.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Objectives: Foreign bodies (FBs) in external auditory canal (EAC) can occur at any age but are especially common in children and adolescents. The aims of the study were to evaluate the clinical characteristics of EAC FBs in children and adolescents and to discuss their proper management.

Methods: A retrospective medical chart review was performed on patients who were treated for EAC FBs in a tertiary referral center from January 2007 to December 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0145561319893164DOI Listing
December 2019

Risk factors for recurrence of laryngeal amyloidosis treated by microforceps and CO laser.

Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2020 Feb 19;277(2):521-525. Epub 2019 Nov 19.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Hospital of Fudan University, Room 205, Building 10, No. 83, Fenyang Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai, 200031, People's Republic of China.

Introduction: Laryngeal amyloidosis is a benign, slowly progressive disease. The factors affecting the recurrence of LA have not been studied before for the rarity and incomplete understanding of this disease. To investigate the risk factors for the laryngeal amyloidosis treated by microforceps or carbon dioxide laser under microlaryngoscope, a retrospective review was conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-019-05730-zDOI Listing
February 2020

[Health damages after ingestion of button batteries in childhood].

Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz 2019 Nov;62(11):1354-1361

Klinik für allgemeine Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Zentrum für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin (Departement), Universitätsklinikum Freiburg, Mathildenstr. 1, 79106, Freiburg, Deutschland.

Background: Exposure of children under 5 years to button batteries may result in severe corrosive injury, especially when they get stuck in the oesophagus. The injury is caused by the discharge current of the batteries. An increasing number of button battery ingestions have been described worldwide. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00103-019-03029-2DOI Listing
November 2019

Removal of a Dental Implant Displaced Into the Maxillary Sinus After Final Restoration.

Compend Contin Educ Dent 2019 Sep;40(8):530-535

Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Periodontology and Implant Dentistry, New York University, New York, New York.

Displacement of a dental implant into the maxillary sinus has become a more frequent occurrence due to a greater number of implant-supported prostheses being placed in the atrophic posterior maxillary area. In addition, dentists are increasingly placing implants into augmented maxillary posterior areas. Reasons for displacement of dental implants into the maxillary sinus may include poor bone quality or quantity, failure of a sinus augmentation procedure, and poor surgical technique. Read More

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September 2019

Dentures discovered in larynx 8 days after general anaesthetic.

BMJ Case Rep 2019 Aug 12;12(8). Epub 2019 Aug 12.

East of England Deanery, UK.

An active 72-year-old man presented to the accident and emergency department (A&E) with odynophagia, dysphagia and haemoptysis 6 days after a minor operation and was discharged after treatment for an aspiration pneumonia. He presented to A&E 2 days later with worsening symptoms and was found to have dentures lodged in his larynx which were then removed in theatre. For 6 weeks after removal, he had periodic episodes of frank haemoptysis requiring multiple blood transfusions and, after extensive investigation, was found to have an erosion into an arterial vessel on his right parapharyngeal wall, just posterior to the glossopharyngeal sulcus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2019-230055DOI Listing
August 2019
6 Reads

Removal of an inhaled stoma button distal to a reactionary tracheal stenosis: a difficult airway case.

BMJ Case Rep 2019 Aug 10;12(8). Epub 2019 Aug 10.

Thoracic Surgery, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, UK.

We present the complex and rare case of an inhaled stoma button causing proximal tracheal stenosis in a laryngectomy patient. The patient was unaware he had inhaled his button and presented with increasing shortness of breath and noisy breathing. In this case we discuss the challenging management of the stenotic tracheal segment above the impacted stoma button and the surgical approach to this difficult airway. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2019-230392DOI Listing
August 2019
3 Reads

Management of an Unusual Intranasal Foreign Body Abutting the Cribriform Plate: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

Clin Med Insights Ear Nose Throat 2019 1;12:1179550619858606. Epub 2019 Jul 1.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.

A 35-year-old man with history of schizophrenia presented 3 weeks after placing a screw in his right nostril. Initial imaging showed a screw in the right ethmoid sinus with the tip penetrating the right cribriform plate. On exam, the patient was hemodynamically stable with purulent drainage in the right nasal cavity but no visible foreign body. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1179550619858606DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6604121PMC
July 2019
3 Reads

Endoscopic removal of ectopic sinonasal teeth: a systematic review.

J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2019 Jul 5;48(1):30. Epub 2019 Jul 5.

Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.

Introduction: Ectopic sinonasal teeth are uncommon. The classic approach to removal of such foreign bodies was the Caldwell-Luc. In recent years however, endoscopic approaches have become increasingly utilized. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40463-019-0353-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6612209PMC

Traumatic transnasal penetrating injury with cerebral spinal fluid leak.

EXCLI J 2019 8;18:223-228. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Serdang Hospital, Jalan Puchong, Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan, 43000 Malaysia.

CSF leak in penetrating skull base injury is relatively rare compared to close head injury involving skull base fracture. We report a 5-year-old boy presented with epistaxis and impacted pencil into the left nostril. The child was hemodynamically stable without any neurological deficit. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.17179/excli2018-1971DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6558516PMC
April 2019
19 Reads

Removal of ear, nose and throat foreign bodies: A review

Aust J Gen Pract 2018 10;47(10):682-685

MBBS, Principal House Officer, Ear Nose and Throat Surgery, Toowoomba Base Hospital, Qld

Background: Patients with foreign bodies in their ear, nose or throat typically present to general practitioners. The safe and timely removal of foreign bodies ensures good patient outcomes and limits complications.

Objectives: The aim of this paper is to outline common foreign objects and review the associated anatomy that may make removal difficult. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.31128/AJGP-02-18-4503DOI Listing
October 2018
11 Reads

Removal of a Fixation Screw That Was Forced Into the Postsuperior Maxillary Sinus Wall: Case Report.

Implant Dent 2019 Jun;28(3):313-316

Professor of Chairman, Division of Medicine for Function and Morphology of Sensor Organs, Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Takatsuki, Japan.

We have encountered a rare case in which the subject underwent maxillary sinus floor elevation at another hospital, and a screw to fix the grafted bone substitute was forced into the maxillary sinus and intruded into the bone. Various different foreign bodies have been reported as being forced into the maxillary sinus due to dental treatment, and these foreign bodies are often retained on the maxillary sinus mucous membrane. However, no reports have described a screw forced in and intruded into the peculiar position in the bone, as seen in the present case, which we report here with additional discussion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ID.0000000000000867DOI Listing
June 2019
2 Reads

Expansile Superabsorbent Polymer Ball Foreign Body in the Ear.

J Emerg Med 2019 Jun 17;56(6):e115-e117. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Department of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery, UPMC, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Background: Superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) are materials that can absorb large quantities of water. Small spherical SAPs are commonly marketed as toys for children.

Case Report: We report the case of a 4-year-old female who presented to a pediatric emergency department with a small, marble-sized SAP that was placed in her ear by herself during the course of play at daycare. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07364679193012
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2019.02.016DOI Listing
June 2019
28 Reads

Craniofacial penetration by a wooden stick.

Eur Ann Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Dis 2019 Oct 13;136(5):393-395. Epub 2019 Mar 13.

Dolphin west-Funabashi ENT clinic, 2-335-1 Katsushika, Funabashi-City, Chiba 273-0032, Japan.

Introduction: Penetrating craniofacial injuries caused by stick-like foreign bodies occur as a result of accidents particularly in children, and often lead to significant morbidity.

Case Summary: We describe a 5-year-old boy who sustained facial trauma after falling on a wooden stick which penetrated his left cheek. At the initial visit, his vital and neurological signs were normal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anorl.2018.07.008DOI Listing
October 2019
3 Reads

Accidental Swallowing of Dental Implant: Complication of Transnasal Endoscopic Removal From Maxillary Sinus.

J Oral Implantol 2019 Jun 15;45(3):219-222. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

1   Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chonnam National University Medical School and Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju, South Korea.

Transnasal endoscopic removal of displaced dental implants in the maxillary sinus can be done easily under local anesthesia. However, very little is known regarding the precaution of this technique. In this report, we present the case of a 63-year-old man who visited the otolaryngologic department with a displaced dental implant in the maxillary sinus. Read More

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http://www.joionline.org/doi/10.1563/aaid-joi-D-18-00231
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1563/aaid-joi-D-18-00231DOI Listing
June 2019
26 Reads

Nasal foreign bodies in the paediatric emergency department.

Ir J Med Sci 2019 Nov 11;188(4):1401-1405. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Emergency Department, Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin, Drimnagh Road, Dublin 12, Ireland.

Background: Nasal foreign body(-ies) (FB) cause local irritation, inflammation, and mucosal erosion and carry a potential risk of aspiration. The aim is to describe the management of nasal FBs in our Emergency Department (ED).

Method: A retrospective study of 100 sequential suspected nasal FB presentations to a tertiary paediatric ED. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11845-019-02000-zDOI Listing
November 2019
47 Reads

A Rare Penetrating Trauma of Both Orbit and Nasal Cavity.

Iran J Otorhinolaryngol 2018 Nov;30(101):365-367

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt.

Introduction: Diagnosis of orbital foreign body (FB) penetration is usually obvious when part of the FB is still attached at the entry wound (1). However, the depth and course of the FB in this case was not visible.

Case Report: A 5-year old female presented with a pencil penetrating the left orbit. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6291816PMC
November 2018
10 Reads

From the maxillary sinus to the stomach: a rare case report of a displaced fragment of dental implant.

Eur J Oral Implantol 2018 ;11(4):469-473

Purpose: To present a rare clinical case of migration of a displaced implant fragment from the maxillary sinus to the stomach.

Materials And Methods: A 66-year-old man was referred from a local dental clinic to remove a displaced implant apical fragment in the left maxillary sinus. After 15 days from the displacement, no foreign body was seen in the maxillary sinus or in any other craniofacial cavity. Read More

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February 2020
9 Reads

Displaced Dental Materials in the Maxillary Sinus: An Original Series. Analysis and Definition of a Surgical Decision-Making Process.

Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 2019 Mar 21;128(3):177-183. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

Department of Neuroscience DNS, Maxillofacial Surgery Unit, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.

Objectives: Displacement of dental materials into the maxillary sinus occurs in daily dental practice; dental implants have become a new common foreign body (FB), as implantation has become routine. The main goal of the present study was to analyze an original series of patients consecutively treated for maxillary sinus FBs. A secondary goal was to propose a decision-making flowchart on the basis of the authors' experience and a critical analysis of literature to select the most appropriate surgical approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003489418812898DOI Listing

Foreign Bodies of the Ear, Nose and Throat.

Authors:
Leslie C Oyama

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):121-130

Department of Emergency Medicine, UC San Diego, 200 West Arbor Drive, MC 8676, San Diego, CA 92103-8676, USA. Electronic address:

Foreign bodies to the ear, nose, and throat often can be managed in the emergency department, particularly if the patient offers a history consistent with foreign body and is calm and compliant with the examination and removal attempts. Tips for success include analgesia, adequate visualization, immobilization of the patient's head, dexterity and experience level of the provider, and minimizing attempts at removal. It is critical to recognize the risks involved with certain retained objects (button batteries or sharp objects) and when to call a consultant to help facilitate safe, successful removal of objects to the ear, nose, and throat. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07338627183009
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.009DOI Listing
February 2019
15 Reads

Characteristics and outcome of impacted button batteries among young children less than 7 years of age in China: a retrospective analysis of 116 cases.

World J Pediatr 2018 Dec 17;14(6):570-575. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Department of ENT, Wuhan Children's Hospital (Wuhan Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital), Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430016, China.

Background: Ingestion of button batteries occurs in about ten persons per one million persons each year, with most of them children, and one in every 1000 battery ingestions leads to serious injuries. This study aimed to describe the clinical features and outcome of ingestion or inhalation of button batteries in children spanning a decade from January, 2006 to December, 2016 at a tertiary care hospital.

Methods: We reviewed the clinical records of children who sought treatment for inhaled or ingested button batteries at our hospital during the study period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12519-018-0188-9DOI Listing
December 2018
18 Reads

A large-scale study of treatment methods for foreign bodies in the maxillary sinus.

J Oral Sci 2018 ;60(3):321-328

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nihon University School of Dentistry.

Recently, reports regarding a foreign body in the maxillary sinus have considerably increased, with the majority being iatrogenic cases resulting from dental treatment. This study involves an extensive review of the Japanese literature, including 112 papers from 1978 to 2017. These papers documented total 407 cases of a foreign body in the maxillary sinus. Read More

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https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/josnusd/60/3/60_18-0109
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.2334/josnusd.18-0109DOI Listing
February 2019
39 Reads

Transnasal Endoscopic Removal of a Knife Causing Penetrating Brain Injury in a Child.

J Craniofac Surg 2018 Oct;29(7):e694-e695

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Konya Research and Education Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Konya, Turkey.

Transnasal penetrating brain injuries are rare and a medical emergency, which needs to be treated promptly. A 4-year-old male patient was brought to our emergency room with a knife sticking out of his nose. The patient was immediately taken to the operating room and the knife was removed under general anesthesia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0000000000004940DOI Listing
October 2018
22 Reads

[Fabrication and verification of three-dimensional prototyped models of nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses].

Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi 2018 Aug;53(8):615-620

Department of Rhinology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, China.

To make three-dimensional prototyped models of nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses for endoscopic skills training and teaching and to verify and evaluate the fidelity of the models. Imaging data of a patient with nasal septum deviation was selected for prototyping the nasal cavities model, and the imaging data of a patient with chronic rhinosinusitis who underwent the endoscopic sinus surgery 4 months ago was selected for the paranasal sinuses model. Both patients came from the Department of Rhinology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.1673-0860.2018.08.011DOI Listing
August 2018
2 Reads

Clinical Features and Surgical Outcomes of Posterior Segment Intraocular Foreign Bodies in Children in East China.

J Ophthalmol 2018 25;2018:5861043. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

Department of Ophthalmology, Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031, China.

Purpose: To report the long-term follow-up results of posterior segment intraocular foreign body (IOFB) removal in children and to determine the prognostic factors for visual outcome.

Methods: Design: retrospective, noncomparative, interventional case series; a single tertiary care center study. Participants or samples: eleven eyes (11 patients) under 16 years of age with posterior segment IOFB injuries from May 2014 to November 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/5861043DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6036811PMC
June 2018
15 Reads

Sinusitis Due to the Presence of a Dental Implant Inside the Maxillary Sinus.

J Craniofac Surg 2018 Sep;29(6):e591

Department of Surgery and Integrated Clinics, Faculty of Dentistry of Araçatuba, UNESP, São Paulo, Brazil.

The migration of a dental implant into the maxillary sinus is an uncommon event of occurrence. Disrespect for concepts of implantology, low alveolar bone density at the site, high incidence of masticatory force in posterior region, and clinical intercurrences predispose to failure in rehabilitation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0000000000004668DOI Listing
September 2018
6 Reads

Will children ever learn? Removal of nasal and aural foreign bodies: a study of hospital episode statistics.

Ann R Coll Surg Engl 2018 Jul 3:1-3. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

Birmingham Women's and Children's NHS Foundation Trust , Birmingham , UK.

Introduction Foreign body removal is a common reason for children to attend the emergency department. Generally, aural and nasal foreign bodies are not associated with immediate morbidity unless they are button batteries. There can be consequences of migration and removal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1308/rcsann.2018.0115DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6204523PMC
July 2018
12 Reads

Retained Foreign Body in the Nasal Cavity After Oral Maxillofacial Surgery.

Anesth Prog 2018 ;65(2):111-112

Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.

Retained foreign bodies sometimes occur in various surgical procedures and can lead to severe complications. Foreign bodies in the oral and maxillofacial region are not rare because of the use of many small items and the natural communication with the outside environment in some areas. We experienced a case of foreign body in the nasal cavity, which was discovered 1 year later at a second operation for hardware removal after maxillofacial surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2344/anpr-65-01-07DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6022801PMC
October 2019
17 Reads

A migratory shark bone.

BMJ Case Rep 2018 Jun 23;2018. Epub 2018 Jun 23.

Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust, Harlow, UK.

Fish bone ingestion is a common presentation in ENT. If not managed correctly, it can cause serious complications for the patient and dilemmas for the clinician. A 49-year-old Sri Lankan woman presented to the emergency department following shark bone ingestion with a 'pricking' sensation in her throat. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2017-220066DOI Listing
June 2018
13 Reads

Usual suspects: the foreign bodies of the aerodigestive tract.

BMJ Case Rep 2018 Jun 21;2018. Epub 2018 Jun 21.

Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India.

This case series is about four different foreign bodies lodged in different locations of the aerodigestive tract. All four cases had delayed diagnosis due to inconspicuous history. Radiology in the form of computed tomography aided the appropriate diagnosis in most of these cases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2018-224979DOI Listing
June 2018
27 Reads

Treatment options for odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: a review.

Stomatologija 2018 ;20(1):22-26

Faculty of Odontology, Medical Academy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Miglos g. 6, 53273 Garliava, Lithuania.

Objective: The aim of this article is to review the main treatment options for odontogenic sinusitis that are used today.

Material And Methods: Search on PubMed, Cochrane Library, PMC, Science Direct data bases. For a literature review search keywords were used: odontogenic sinusitis, odontogenic maxillary sinusitis treatment OR diagnosis, maxillary sinusitis of dental source OR dental origin OR etiology. Read More

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November 2018
12 Reads

[Wry nose and rhinolith: a case report].

Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi 2017 Sep;31(17):1373-1375

This report described a case of the wry nose and rhinolith patients. A 25 years old female patient complained a sense of persistent left side of nasal congestion runny with 10 years. During the 10 years the symptom repeatedly occurrence, aggravated with peculiar smell of 1 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.13201/j.issn.1001-1781.2017.17.021DOI Listing
September 2017
4 Reads

[Huge glass foreign body penetrating into the infratemporal fossa through the maxillary sinus:a case report].

Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi 2017 Sep;31(17):1372-1373

We report a rare case of glass foreign body penetrating into the infratemporal fossa through the maxillary sinus. The patient felt a little difficulty to open mouth. Both CT and DSA are helpful in diagnosis and treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.13201/j.issn.1001-1781.2017.17.020DOI Listing
September 2017
4 Reads

ENT Foreign Bodies: An Experience.

Int Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2018 Apr 14;22(2):146-151. Epub 2017 Jul 14.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt.

 Ear, nose and throat (ENT) foreign bodies (FBs) are common occurrences, particularly among children. The proper recognition, study, and management of FBs are required to prevent complications. Their consequences are greatly variable, from mild disturbances that may not require hospitalization up to life-threatening complications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0037-1603922DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5882369PMC
April 2018
18 Reads

Trend in otolaryngological surgeries in an era of super-aging: Descriptive statistics using a Japanese inpatient database.

Auris Nasus Larynx 2018 Dec 27;45(6):1239-1244. Epub 2018 Mar 27.

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, 1130033, Japan.

Objective: To reveal the age distribution and capture the longitudinal trend in otolaryngological surgeries performed in Japan, where society is rapidly aging.

Methods: Using the Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we extracted data on patients who were hospitalized and underwent any type of otolaryngological surgery in departments of otolaryngology or head and neck surgery from fiscal year 2007 to fiscal year 2013. Type of surgery, patient's age, and fiscal year were compared. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anl.2018.03.001DOI Listing
December 2018
16 Reads

Cyanoacrylate Injury To The Ear Canal.

J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad 2017 Oct-Dec;29(4):694-696

Walsall Manor NHS Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

This is a case regarding a 35-year-old gentleman who presented to the Accident and Emergency department at Walsall Manor Hospital. He had mistakenly placed cyanoacrylate ('superglue') into his right ear canal in the early morning. In terms of its removal, an initial attempt was made in the Ear, Nose and throat (ENT) outpatient clinic which proved to be unsuccessful due to the amount of discomfort it caused the patient. Read More

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June 2018
22 Reads

The art of removing nasal foreign bodies.

Open Access Emerg Med 2017 6;9:107-112. Epub 2017 Nov 6.

Ear, Nose and Throat Unit, Department of Surgery, Frankston Hospital, Peninsula Health, Frankston, VIC, Australia.

Objective: The removal of nasal foreign bodies (NFBs) can be a difficult task for the inexperienced physician, and the more unsuccessful attempts are made, the more difficult the extraction becomes. We have formulated this simple "four-step" approach to improve success, especially on the first try.

Methods: A retrospective review of cases requiring NFB removal, seen by one registrar from 2012 to 2016 at Frankston Hospital, was performed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAEM.S150503DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5683766PMC
November 2017
20 Reads

External Auditory Canal Foreign Body Extraction Outcomes.

Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 2017 Nov 28;126(11):755-761. Epub 2017 Sep 28.

1 Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis Missouri, USA.

Objectives: To compare pediatric external auditory canal (EAC) foreign body extraction outcomes by clinical setting and identify factors predictive of successful removal.

Methods: Retrospective review of pediatric patients with EAC foreign bodies to a single institution emergency department (ED) and otolaryngology clinic (OTO) between January 2010 and April 2015. Patient characteristics, foreign body type, removal attempts, instrumentation utilized, and complications were evaluated with respect to clinical setting and patient outcome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003489417731578DOI Listing
November 2017
22 Reads

Older siblings are at increased risk for foreign bodies.

Ear Nose Throat J 2017 Sep;96(9):E22-E26

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center, Maguire Building, 2160 S. First Ave. Maywood, IL 60302.

A prospective, case-control study was performed to describe the role that siblings play in foreign bodies of the head and neck and to recognize situations in which children are most at risk for foreign bodies. Any child or adolescent (0 to 17 years old) with a foreign body removed from the head or neck was included. The data collected included location of the foreign body, location of acquisition (e. Read More

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September 2017
55 Reads
0.881 Impact Factor

Tracheal Foreign Body Removal Using Flexible Bronchoscope in a Pediatric Patient. A Novel Approach.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2017 Oct;196(8):1071-1072

1 Department of Anesthesia and Pain Management, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201703-0518IMDOI Listing
October 2017
27 Reads

A Foreign Body (Toothbrush) in the Esophagus of a Patient with Hiatal Hernia.

Case Rep Gastroenterol 2017 Jan-Apr;11(1):184-189. Epub 2017 Apr 10.

aClinical Department for Ear Nose and Throat, Split University Hospital Center, Split, Croatia.

Toothbrush ingestion is rare and most commonly seen in patients with psychiatric comorbidities and in young women with a medical history of eating disorders who try to induce emesis. Long ingested objects, such as a toothbrush, cannot pass the gastrointestinal tract spontaneously and require endoscopic removal or even a surgical approach in cases of unsuccessful endoscopic removal or complication development. We present a case of a 71-year-old male with hiatal hernia without psychiatric or neurological comorbidity who accidentally ingested a toothbrush during oral hygiene routine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000464277DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5422728PMC
April 2017
67 Reads

Removal of an Unusual Neglected Foreign Body in Infratemporal Region Using Navigation.

J Craniofac Surg 2017 May;28(3):e219-e221

*Department of Otolaryngology (ENT), MAMC & Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi †Department of Otolaryngology (ENT), PBM Hospital, Bikaner ‡Department of Otolaryngology (ENT), SMS Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.

A 19-year-old male presented with complaint of a bluish mass in the hard palate since 3 months. The patient had a history of trauma 8 years back in the left zygomatic area with a pen. It was lodged in the wound and removed at that time. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001665-201705000-0008
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0000000000003402DOI Listing
May 2017
13 Reads

Presentation, workup, and management of penetrating transorbital and transnasal injuries: A case report and systematic review.

Am J Rhinol Allergy 2017 Mar;31(2):29-34

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Background: A foreign body (FB) penetrating intracranially after passing transorbitally or transnasally is a rare occurrence. However, otolaryngologists are increasingly being asked to participate in the care of these patients for both endoscopic removal of the object and repair of any skull base defects.

Objective: To assess the presentation, workup, and management of transnasal or transorbital penetrating FB injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/ajra.2017.31.4421DOI Listing
March 2017
19 Reads

A stitch in time: unrecognized retained foreign bodies after a needlefish injury.

J Travel Med 2017 Mar;24(2)

School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia.

We present a case report of a traveller injured by a needlefish in the Caribbean. The needlefish leapt from the ocean and struck the traveller's face at high speed, causing a seemingly superficial puncture wound on his nose. Later, it became apparent that multiple fish bones had broken off and lodged in his nasal cavity, very narrowly missing his cribriform plate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jtm/taw092DOI Listing
March 2017
12 Reads

Ear, Nose and Throat Foreign Bodies Removed under General Anaesthesia: A Retrospective Study.

J Clin Diagn Res 2017 Feb 1;11(2):MC01-MC04. Epub 2017 Feb 1.

Assistant Professor, Department of General Medicine and Emergency Medicine, NEIGRIHMS , Shillong, India .

Introduction: For Otorhinolaryngologist, removal of Foreign Bodies (FB) from the ear, nose and throat is one of the common emergency procedures done. Most of the cases especially of the ear and nose can be managed without General Anaesthesia (GA). But in some cases GA may be needed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2017/22078.9373DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5376789PMC
February 2017
30 Reads