19 results match your criteria Food Quality and Preference [Journal]

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Perceptual and Affective Responses to Sampled Capsaicin Differ by Reported Intake.

Food Qual Prefer 2017 Jan 9;55:26-34. Epub 2016 Aug 9.

Sensory Evaluation Center, Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

The present study was conducted to a) generate suprathresold dose-response functions for multiple qualities evoked by capsaicin across a wide range of concentrations, and b) revisit how intensity ratings and liking may differ as a function of self reported intake. Individuals rated eight samples of capsaicin for perceived burn and bitterness, as well as disliking/liking. Measures of reported preference for chili peppers, chili intake frequency, prior experience and personality measures were also assessed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2016.08.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5383096PMC
January 2017
7 Reads

Whey protein mouth drying influenced by thermal denaturation.

Food Qual Prefer 2017 Mar;56(Pt B):233-240

Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, Berks RG6 6AD, United Kingdom.

Whey proteins are becoming an increasingly popular functional food ingredient. There are, however, sensory properties associated with whey protein beverages that may hinder the consumption of quantities sufficient to gain the desired nutritional benefits. One such property is mouth drying. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2016.03.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5310118PMC
March 2017
6 Reads

Mixed Messages: Ambiguous Penalty Information in Modified Restaurant Menu Items.

Food Qual Prefer 2016 Sep 6;52:232-236. Epub 2016 May 6.

Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.

Restaurant menu items from six national or regional brands were modified to reduce fat, saturated fat, sodium and total calories. Twenty-four items were tested with a current recipe, and two modifications (small and moderate reductions) for 72 total products. Approximately 100 consumers tested each product for acceptability as well as for desired levels of tastes/flavor, amounts of key ingredients and texture/consistency using just-about-right (JAR) scales. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2016.05.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5098499PMC
September 2016
7 Reads

Type of milk typically consumed, and stated preference, but not health consciousness affect revealed preferences for fat in milk.

Food Qual Prefer 2016 Apr;49:92-99

Sensory Evaluation Center, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA; Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

Fat is an important source of both pleasure and calories in the diet. Dairy products are a major source of fat in the diet, and understanding preferences for fat in fluid milk can potentially inform efforts to change fat consumption patterns or optimize consumer products. Here, patterns of preference for fat in milk were determined in the laboratory among 100 free living adults using rejection thresholds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2015.12.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4702257PMC
April 2016
8 Reads

Perception of chemesthetic stimuli in groups who differ by food involvement and culinary experience.

Food Qual Prefer 2015 Dec;46:142-150

Sensory Evaluation Center, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA ; Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

In the English language, there is generally a limited lexicon when referring to the sensations elicited by chemesthetic stimuli like capsaicin, allyl isothiocyanate, and eugenol, the orally irritating compounds found in chiles, wasabi, and cloves, respectively. Elsewhere, experts and novices have been shown to use language differently, with experts using more precise language. Here, we compare perceptual maps and word usage across three cohorts: experts with formal culinary education, naïve individuals with high Food Involvement Scale (FIS) scores, and naïve individuals with low FIS scores. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2015.07.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4620574PMC
December 2015
6 Reads

Check-All-That-Apply (CATA), Sorting, and Polarized Sensory Positioning (PSP) with Astringent Stimuli.

Food Qual Prefer 2015 Oct;45:41-49

Sensory Evaluation Center, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA ; Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

Multiple rapid sensory profiling techniques have been developed as more efficient alternatives to traditional sensory descriptive analysis. Here, we compare the results of three rapid sensory profiling techniques - check-all-that-apply (CATA), sorting, and polarized sensory positioning (PSP) - using a diverse range of astringent stimuli. These rapid methods differ in their theoretical basis, implementation, and data analyses, and the relative advantages and limitations are largely unexplored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2015.05.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4475849PMC
October 2015
6 Reads

Maximizing overall liking results in a superior product to minimizing deviations from ideal ratings: an optimization case study with coffee-flavored milk.

Food Qual Prefer 2015 Jun;42:27-36

Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.

In just-about-right (JAR) scaling and ideal scaling, attribute delta (i.e., "Too Little" or "Too Much") reflects a subject's dissatisfaction level for an attribute relative to their hypothetical ideal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2015.01.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4438862PMC
June 2015
8 Reads

Gender differences in the influence of personality traits on spicy food liking and intake.

Food Qual Prefer 2015 Jun;42:12-19

Sensory Evaluation Center, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA ; Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

It has been proposed, and only minimally explored, that personality factors may play a role in determining an individual's sensitivity to and preference for capsaicin containing foods. We explored these relationships further here. Participants rated a number of foods and sensations on a generalized liking scale in a laboratory setting; after leaving the laboratory, they filled out an online personality survey, which included Arnett's Inventory of Sensation Seeking (AISS) and the Sensitivity to Punishment-Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2015.01.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4316214PMC
June 2015
14 Reads

Predictors of children's food selection: The role of children's perceptions of the health and taste of foods.

Food Qual Prefer 2015 Mar;40 Pt A:106-109

Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina Wilmington, USA.

Food selection, decisions about which foods to eat, is a ubiquitous part of our everyday lives. The aim of this research was to investigate the role of taste versus health perceptions in 4- and 6-year-old children's food selection. In this study, children and young adults were asked to rate the health and presumed taste of foods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2014.09.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4266276PMC
March 2015
8 Reads

Just-About-Right and ideal scaling provide similar insights into the influence of sensory attributes on liking.

Food Qual Prefer 2014 Oct;37:71-78

Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

Just-about-right (JAR) scaling is criticized for measuring attribute intensity and acceptability simultaneously. Using JAR scaling, an attribute is evaluated for its appropriateness relative to one's hypothetical ideal level that is pre-defined at the middle of a continuum. Alternatively, ideal scaling measures these two constructs separately. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2014.04.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4104712PMC
October 2014
9 Reads

Interpreting consumer preferences: physicohedonic and psychohedonic models yield different information in a coffee-flavored dairy beverage.

Food Qual Prefer 2014 Sep;36:27-32

Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

Designed experiments provide product developers feedback on the relationship between formulation and consumer acceptability. While actionable, this approach typically assumes a simple psychophysical relationship between ingredient concentration and perceived intensity. This assumption may not be valid, especially in cases where perceptual interactions occur. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2014.03.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4094130PMC
September 2014
10 Reads

Do polymorphisms in chemosensory genes matter for human ingestive behavior?

Food Qual Prefer 2013 Dec;30(2):202-216

Sensory Evaluation Center, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 United States ; Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 United States.

In the last decade, basic research in chemoreceptor genetics and neurobiology have revolutionized our understanding of individual differences in chemosensation. From an evolutionary perspective, chemosensory variations appear to have arisen in response to different living environments, generally in the avoidance of toxins and to better detect vital food sources. Today, it is often assumed that these differences may drive variable food preferences and choices, with downstream effects on health and wellness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2013.05.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3714112PMC
December 2013
7 Reads

Personality factors predict spicy food liking and intake.

Food Qual Prefer 2013 Apr 4;28(1):213-221. Epub 2012 Oct 4.

Sensory Evaluation Center, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA ; Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

A number of factors likely affect the liking of capsaicin-containing foods such as social influences, repeated exposure to capsaicin, physiological differences in chemosensation, and personality. For example, it is well known that repeated exposure to capsaicin and chilies can result in chronic desensitization. Here, we explore the relationship between multiple personality variables - body awareness/consciousness, sensation seeking, and sensitivity to punishment, and sensitivity to reward - and the liking and consumption of capsaicin-containing foods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2012.09.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3607321PMC
April 2013
10 Reads

Direct comparison of the generalized Visual Analog Scale (gVAS) and general Labeled Magnitude Scale (gLMS).

Food Qual Prefer 2013 Apr 10;28(1):36-44. Epub 2012 Aug 10.

Sensory Evaluation Center, The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania ; Department of Food Science College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania.

Hundreds of studies have used the generalized Labeled Magnitude Scale (gLMS) to collect intensity data. Recent work on generalized affective scales like the Labeled Affective Magnitude (LAM) scale and Labeled Hedonic Scale (LHS) suggest a substantial proportion of participants fail to use the entire range of generalized scales, marking only at the adjective labels. This categorical behavior (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2012.07.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3501107PMC
April 2013
9 Reads

Rejection Thresholds in Chocolate Milk: Evidence for Segmentation.

Food Qual Prefer 2012 Oct 21;26(1):128-133. Epub 2012 Apr 21.

Sensory Evaluation Center, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

Bitterness is generally considered a negative attribute in food, yet many individuals enjoy some bitterness in products like coffee or chocolate. In chocolate, bitterness arises from naturally occurring alkaloids and phenolics found in cacao. Fermentation and roasting help develop typical chocolate flavor and reduce the intense bitterness of raw cacao by modifying these bitter compounds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2012.04.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384682PMC
October 2012
7 Reads

Lingual tactile acuity and food texture preferences among children and their mothers.

Food Qual Prefer 2012 Oct 2;26(1):58-66. Epub 2012 Apr 2.

Monell Chemical Senses Center, 3500 Market St., Philadelphia, PA, USA 19104.

Despite anecdotal reports of children being more sensitive to texture than adults, and of texture being one of the main drivers of food aversions, there is a paucity of scientific knowledge on the influence of texture perception on food choice in children. The primary goals of this study were to assess the use of a modified letter-identification task to study lingual tactile acuity, one aspect of oral sensitivity, in children and to examine age-related differences in sensitivity. The secondary goal was to explore whether lingual tactile acuity and age relate to various measures of food choice and preference. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2012.03.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3375994PMC
October 2012
9 Reads

Effects of Nasal Occlusion and Oral Contact on Perception of Metallic Taste from Metal Salts.

Food Qual Prefer 2009 Mar 9;20(2):133-137. Epub 2008 Aug 9.

Department of Food Science, New York State College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.

Iron and copper salts have complex olfactory and gustatory properties including a metallic flavor component that is decreased by nasal occlusion. To examine the sensory properties of ferrous sulfate and copper sulfate, a trained descriptive panel evaluated these compounds at equal molarity and perceived equal intensity with and without nasal occlusion. Ferrous sulfate exhibited a metallic taste and metallic aftertaste and copper sulfate exhibited a more pronounced metallic aftertaste. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2008.08.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5026321PMC
March 2009
8 Reads

Individual differences in the conceptualization of food across eating contexts.

Food Qual Prefer 2008 Jan;19(1):62-70

Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Martha Van Rensselaer Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA. Email: , telephone: (607) 898-9595, fax: (607) 255-0178.

Individual differences in food-related knowledge structures were explored by applying schema theory to examine the categories 42 adults used to classify foods across four eating contexts. Food card-sort labels were organized into 12 categories, category salience for each person was evaluated, and cluster analysis was used to identify clusters of participants according to the salience of their categories. Clusters were further evaluated for complexity and consistency of category use across contexts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2007.06.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2254555PMC
January 2008
8 Reads

Development of food preferences: Lessons learned from longitudinal and experimental studies.

Authors:
Julie A Mennella

Food Qual Prefer 2006 Oct;17(7-8):635-637

Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104-3308, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodqual.2006.01.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2716720PMC
October 2006
6 Reads
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