67 results match your criteria Food Policy [Journal]


Women's Empowerment in Agriculture and Dietary Quality Across the Life Course: Evidence from Bangladesh.

Food Policy 2018 Dec 2;81:21-36. Epub 2018 Nov 2.

International Food Policy Research Institute.

Using nationally-representative survey data from rural Bangladesh, we examine the relationship between women's empowerment in agriculture and indicators of individual dietary quality. Our findings suggest that women's empowerment is associated with better dietary quality of individuals within the household, but the strength of this association varies across the life course. Women's empowerment is correlated with more diverse diets of children under five, but empowerment measures are not consistently associated with increases in nutrient intake for this age group. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2018.09.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6363349PMC
December 2018

Farm family effects of adopting improved and hybrid sorghum seed in the Sudan Savanna of West Africa.

Food Policy 2018 Jan;74:162-171

Honorary Fellow, Department of Agronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA.

Uptake of improved sorghum varieties in the Sudan Savanna of West Africa has been limited, despite the economic importance of the crop and long-term investments in sorghum improvement. One reason why is that attaining substantial yield advantages has been difficult in this harsh, heterogeneous growing environment. Release in Mali of the first sorghum hybrids in Sub-Saharan Africa that have been developed primarily from local germplasm has the potential to change this situation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2018.01.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5815090PMC
January 2018
2 Reads

Designing a food tax to impact food-related non-communicable diseases: the case of Chile.

Food Policy 2017 Aug 8;71:86-100. Epub 2017 Aug 8.

Carolina Population Center and Dept of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina.

The global shift towards diets high in sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and energy dense ultra-processed foods is linked to higher prevalence of obesity, diabetes and most other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), causing significant health costs. Chile has the highest SSB consumption in the world, very high junk food intake and very rapid increases in these poor components of the diet plus obesity prevalence. This study's purpose is to compare the effect of different tax schemes for SSBs and ultra-processed foods on nutrient availability, utilizing price-elasticities, which are estimated from a Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System model, using the 2011-2012 Income and Expenditure survey. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2017.08.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5783649PMC
August 2017
1 Read

Soft drink prices, sales, body mass index and diabetes: Evidence from a panel of low-, middle- and high-income countries.

Food Policy 2017 Dec;73:88-94

Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York YO10 5DD, UK.

We take advantage of four different cross-country datasets containing data on 78 countries for the period 1999-2014, in order to assess the relationship of carbonated soft drinks' sales, as well as their prices, with body mass index (BMI), overweight, obesity and diabetes. Using an ecological study design and multivariate regression longitudinal estimation approaches, we find that carbonated soft drink sales were significantly positively related to BMI, overweight and obesity - but only in the low and lower-middle income countries. This finding was robust to a number of sensitivity and falsification checks. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2017.09.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5727680PMC
December 2017
7 Reads

How can we better capture food away from Home? Lessons from India's linking person-level meal and household-level food data.

Food Policy 2017 Oct;72:81-93

Department of Development Studies, International Institute of Population Sciences (IIPS), Mumbai 88, India.

Despite acknowledged shortcomings, household consumption and expenditure surveys (HCES) are increasingly being used to proxy food consumption because they are relatively more available and affordable than surveys using more precise dietary assessment methods. One of the most common, significant sources of HCES measurement error is their under-estimation of food away from home (FAFH). In 2011, India's National Survey Sample Organization introduced revisions in its HCES questionnaire that included replacing "cooked meals"-the single item in the food consumption module designed to capture FAFH at the household level-with five more detailed and explicitly FAFH sub-categories. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2017.08.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5656091PMC
October 2017
3 Reads

Review: Food loss and waste in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Food Policy 2017 Jul;70:1-12

Cornell SC Johnson College of Business, Cornell University, 301G Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.

The research, development practitioner, and donor community has begun to focus on food loss and waste - often referred to as post-harvest losses (PHL) - in Sub-Saharan Africa. This article reviews the current state of the literature on PHL mitigation. First, we identify explicitly the varied objectives underlying efforts to reduce PHL levels. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2017.03.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5555439PMC
July 2017
11 Reads

Non-farm entrepreneurship in rural sub-Saharan Africa: New empirical evidence.

Food Policy 2017 Feb;67:175-191

School of Business and Economics, Maastricht University and Maastricht School of Management, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

We report on the prevalence and patterns of non-farm enterprises in six sub-Saharan African countries, and study their performance in terms of labor productivity, survival and exit, using the World Bank's Living Standards Measurement Study - Integrated Surveys on Agriculture (LSMS-ISA). Rural households operate enterprises due to both push and pull factors and tend to do so predominantly in easy-to-enter activities, such as sales and trade, rather than in activities that require higher starting costs, such as transport services, or educational investment, such as professional services. Labor productivity differs widely: rural and female-headed enterprises, those located further away from population centers, and businesses that operate intermittently have lower levels of labor productivity compared to urban and male-owned enterprises, or enterprises that operate throughout the year. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.09.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384454PMC
February 2017
4 Reads

Are African households (not) leaving agriculture? Patterns of households' income sources in rural Sub-Saharan Africa.

Food Policy 2017 Feb;67:153-174

World Bank, United States.

This paper uses comparable income aggregates from 41 national household surveys from 22 countries to explore the patterns of income generation among rural households in Sub-Saharan Africa, and to compare household income strategies in Sub-Saharan Africa with those in other regions. The paper seeks to understand how geography drives these strategies, focusing on the role of agricultural potential and distance to urban areas. Specialization in on-farm activities continues to be the norm in rural Africa, practiced by 52 percent of households (as opposed to 21 percent of households in other regions). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.09.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384437PMC
February 2017
5 Reads

Labor productivity and employment gaps in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Food Policy 2017 Feb;67:133-152

Department of Agricultural & Applied Economics, University of Georgia, United States.

Drawing on a new set of nationally representative, internationally comparable household surveys, this paper provides an overview of key features of structural transformation - labor allocation and labor productivity - in four African economies. New, micro-based measures of sector labor allocation and cross-sector productivity differentials describe the incentives households face when allocating their labor. These measures are similar to national accounts-based measures that are typically used to characterize structural change. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.09.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384442PMC
February 2017
4 Reads

Food price seasonality in Africa: Measurement and extent.

Food Policy 2017 Feb;67:119-132

Geneva, Switzerland.

Everyone knows about seasonality. But what exactly do we know? This study systematically measures seasonal price gaps at 193 markets for 13 food commodities in seven African countries. It shows that the commonly used dummy variable or moving average deviation methods to estimate the seasonal gap can yield substantial upward bias. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.09.016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384441PMC
February 2017
2 Reads

Agricultural commercialization and nutrition revisited: Empirical evidence from three African countries.

Food Policy 2017 Feb;67:106-118

University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Italy.

The transition from subsistence to commercial agriculture is key for economic growth. But what are the consequences for nutritional outcomes? The evidence to date has been scant and inconclusive. This study contributes to the debate by revisiting two prevailing wisdoms: (a) market participation by African smallholders remains low; and (b) the impact of commercialization on nutritional outcomes is generally positive. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.09.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384450PMC
February 2017
3 Reads

Agricultural input credit in Sub-Saharan Africa: Telling myth from facts.

Food Policy 2017 Feb;67:93-105

Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.

Recent evidence shows that many Sub-Saharan African farmers use modern inputs, but there is limited information on how these inputs are financed. We use recent nationally representative data from four countries to explore input financing and the role of credit therein. A number of our results contradict "conventional wisdom" found in the literature. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.09.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384443PMC
February 2017
4 Reads

Smallholders' land access in Sub-Saharan Africa: A new landscape?

Food Policy 2017 Feb;67:78-92

University of International Business and Economics, Beijing, China.

While scholars long recognized the importance of land markets as a key driver of rural non-farm development and transformation in rural areas, evidence on the extent of their operation and the nature of participants remains limited. We use household data from 6 countries to show that there is great potential for such markets to increase productivity and equalize factor ratios. While rental markets transfer land to land-poor and labor-rich producers, their operation and thus impact may be constrained by policy restrictions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.09.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384435PMC
February 2017
9 Reads

Agricultural factor markets in Sub-Saharan Africa: An updated view with formal tests for market failure.

Food Policy 2017 Feb;67:64-77

Cornell University, Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, United States.

This paper uses the recently collected Living Standard Measurement Study-Integrated Surveys on Agriculture Initiative data sets from five countries in Sub-Saharan Africa to provide a comprehensive overview of factor market participation by agrarian households and to formally test for failures in rural markets. Under complete and competitive markets, households can solve their consumption and production problems separately, so that household factor endowments do not predict input demand. This paper implements a simple, theoretically grounded test of this separation hypothesis, which can be interpreted as a reduced form test of market failure. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.09.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384445PMC
February 2017
2 Reads

How much of the labor in African agriculture is provided by women?

Food Policy 2017 Feb;67:52-63

Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS), Survey Unit, Development Data Group, The World Bank, Italy.

The contribution of women to labor in African agriculture is regularly quoted in the range of 60-80%. Using individual, plot-level labor input data from nationally representative household surveys across six Sub-Saharan African countries, this study estimates the average female labor share in crop production at 40%. It is slightly above 50% in Malawi, Tanzania, and Uganda, and substantially lower in Nigeria (37%), Ethiopia (29%), and Niger (24%). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.09.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384444PMC
February 2017
6 Reads

Is increasing inorganic fertilizer use for maize production in SSA a profitable proposition? Evidence from Nigeria.

Food Policy 2017 Feb;67:41-51

Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.

Inorganic fertilizer use across Sub-Saharan Africa is generally considered to be low. Yet, the notion that fertilizer use is too low is predicated on the assumption that it is profitable to use rates higher than currently observed. There is, however, limited empirical evidence to support this. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.09.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384440PMC
February 2017
2 Reads

Agricultural intensification: The status in six African countries.

Food Policy 2017 Feb;67:26-40

World Bank and University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Economics and Finance, Italy.

Boserup and Ruthenberg (BR) provided the framework to analyze the impact of population growth and market access on the intensification of farming systems. Prior evidence in Africa is consistent with the framework. Over the past two decades, rapid population growth has put farming systems under stress, while rapid urbanization and economic growth have provided new market opportunities. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.09.021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384439PMC
February 2017
4 Reads

Ten striking facts about agricultural input use in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Food Policy 2017 Feb;67:12-25

Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University, 210B Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.

Conventional wisdom holds that Sub-Saharan African farmers use few modern inputs despite the fact that most poverty-reducing agricultural growth in the region is expected to come largely from expanded use of inputs that embody improved technologies, particularly improved seed, fertilizers and other agro-chemicals, machinery, and irrigation. Yet following several years of high food prices, concerted policy efforts to intensify fertilizer and hybrid seed use, and increased public and private investment in agriculture, how low is modern input use in Africa really? This article revisits Africa's agricultural input landscape, exploiting the unique, recently collected, nationally representative, agriculturally intensive, and cross-country comparable Living Standard Measurement Study-Integrated Surveys on Agriculture (LSMS-ISA) covering six countries in the region (Ethiopia, Malawi, Niger, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Uganda). Using data from over 22,000 households and 62,000 agricultural plots, we offer ten potentially surprising facts about modern input use in Africa today. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.09.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384438PMC
February 2017
4 Reads

Agriculture in Africa - Telling myths from facts: A synthesis.

Food Policy 2017 Feb;67:1-11

Jobs Group, World Bank Group, USA.

Stylized facts drive research agendas and policy debates. Yet robust stylized facts are hard to come by, and when available, often outdated. The 12 papers in this Special Issue revisit conventional wisdom on African agriculture and its farmers' livelihoods using nationally representative surveys from the Living Standards Measurement Study-Integrated Surveys on Agriculture Initiative in six African countries. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2017.02.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384436PMC
February 2017
4 Reads

Welfare impacts of improved chickpea adoption: A pathway for rural development in Ethiopia?

Food Policy 2017 Jan;66:50-61

Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois, United States; International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Zimbabwe.

We analyse the impact of improved chickpea adoption on welfare in Ethiopia using three rounds of panel data. First, we estimate the determinants of improved chickpea adoption using a double hurdle model. We apply a control function approach with correlated random effects to control for possible endogeneity resulting from access to improved seed and technology transfer activities. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.11.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5268341PMC
January 2017
4 Reads

Facing famine: Somali experiences in the famine of 2011.

Food Policy 2016 Dec;65:63-73

Feinstein International Center, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, 114 Curtis Street, Somerville, MA 02144, USA.

In 2011-12, Somalia experienced the worst famine of the twenty- first century. Since then, research on the famine has focused almost exclusively on the external response, the reasons for the delay in the international response, and the implications for international humanitarian action in the context of the "global war on terror." This paper focuses on the internal, Somali response to the famine. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.11.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5176329PMC
December 2016
4 Reads

Returns to food and agricultural R&D investments in Sub-Saharan Africa, 1975-2014.

Food Policy 2016 Dec;65:1-8

Department of Agricultural Economics, Extension and Rural Development, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa.

Research-enabled growth in agricultural productivity is pivotal to sub-Saharan Africa's overall economic growth prospects. Yet, investments in research and development (R&D) targeted to many national food and agricultural economies throughout Africa are fragile and faltering. To gain insight into what could be driving this trend, this article updates, summarizes and reassesses the published evidence on the returns to African agricultural R&D. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.09.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5176338PMC
December 2016
3 Reads

Universal food security program and nutritional intake: Evidence from the hunger prone KBK districts in Odisha.

Authors:
Andaleeb Rahman

Food Policy 2016 Aug;63:73-86

Indian Institute for Human Settlements (IIHS), Bangalore, India.

This article provides evidence on the role of consumer food subsidies in improving nutritional intake and diet quality by evaluating the expansion of the government food assistance program coverage in the hunger prone state of Odisha in India. In 8 districts of Odisha, popularly known as the Kalahandi-Balangir-Koraput (KBK) region which is notable for extreme poverty and starvation deaths, the government did away with the targeted food assistance program in 2008 and made the scheme universal. Using a Difference-in-Difference methodology over two repeated cross sectional household surveys, this article finds that the shift from targeted to a universal food security program in the KBK region of Odisha has led to an improvement in the household nutritional intake and diet quality. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.07.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5009630PMC
August 2016
2 Reads

Impact of agricultural interventions on the nutritional status in South Asia: A review.

Food Policy 2016 Jul;62:28-40

Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Gen. Vaidya Marg, Goregaon (East), Mumbai, India.

Nearly half of the malnourished population of the world lives in South Asia, and agriculture is the main source of livelihood of the people in this region. Many review exercises have analysed the available evidences to understand the ways in which agriculture can be leveraged to enhance nutritional status; however, very few of them have employed a systematic approach ensuring internal and external validity. The present paper seeks to fill this gap for strengthening the policy recommendations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.05.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4952527PMC
July 2016
8 Reads

Milking the data: Measuring milk off-take in extensive livestock systems. Experimental evidence from Niger.

Food Policy 2016 Feb;59:174-186

Géosciences Environnement, Toulouse, CNRS, France.

Milk is an important source of cash and nutrients for many households in developing countries. Yet, our understanding of the role of dairy production in livelihoods and nutritional outcomes is hindered by the lack of decent quality household survey data. Data on milk off-take for human consumption are difficult to collect in household surveys for a number of reasons which make accurate recall challenging for the respondent (continuous production and seasonality among others), introducing possibly severe biases in the computation of full household incomes and farm sales, as well as in the estimation of the contribution of livestock (specifically dairy) production to agricultural value added and the livelihoods of rural households. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2016.01.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4784724PMC
February 2016
10 Reads

Reducing the land use of EU pork production: where there's swill, there's a way.

Food Policy 2016 Jan;58:35-48

Conservation Science Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK.

Livestock production occupies approximately 75% of agricultural land, consumes 35% of the world's grain, and produces 14.5% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. With demand for meat and dairy products forecast to increase 60% by 2050, there is a pressing need to reduce the footprint of livestock farming. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2015.11.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4750877PMC
January 2016
6 Reads

Food and nutrition labelling in Thailand: a long march from subsistence producers to international traders.

Food Policy 2015 Oct;56:59-66

National Centre of Epidemiology and Population Health, Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, 62 Mills Road, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia.

This paper reviews the evolution of Thai food and nutrition label policies and Thailand's international role relating to food product safety and standards. The historical record has been interpreted to identify future trends and challenges related to food labelling. These challenges are arising in Thailand and many similar emerging economies. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03069192150009
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2015.07.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4608433PMC
October 2015
7 Reads

Front of Pack Labels Enhance Attention to Nutrition Information in Novel & Commercial Brands.

Food Policy 2015 Oct;56:76-86

Michigan State University.

Objectives: 1) To assess whether Front-of-Pack (FOP) nutrition labels garner attention more readily than more complete, mandated nutrition information (the Nutrition Facts Panel (NFP), required in the US), and 2) To determine whether label design characteristics, specifically, color coding and/or coding with facial icons, increase attention to the FOP label.

Methods: In two experiments, we tracked the allocation of attention while participants (n=125) viewed novel and commercial packages with varied FOP designs using a change detection methodology.

Results: We found empirical evidence that FOP labels are attended more often, and earlier, than the currently mandated NFP, and that this benefit is due both to its placement on the front of the package and to the design characteristics of the FOP. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2015.08.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4582437PMC
October 2015
9 Reads

The food retail revolution in China and its association with diet and health.

Food Policy 2015 Aug;55:92-100

Department of Nutrition and Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

The processed food sector in low- and middle-income countries has grown rapidly. Little is understood about its effect on obesity. Using data from 14,976 participants aged two and older in the 2011 China Health and Nutrition Survey, this paper examines patterns of processed food consumption and their impacts on obesity while considering the endogeneity of those who purchase processed foods. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2015.07.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4513366PMC
August 2015
12 Reads

Nutrition, Agriculture and the Global Food System in Low and Middle Income Countries.

Authors:
Barry M Popkin

Food Policy 2014 Aug;47:91-96

The entire food value chain and diet of low and middle income countries (LMICs) are rapidly shifting. Many of the issues addressed by the nutrition community ignore some of the major underlying shifts in purchases of consumer packaged foods and beverages. At the same time, the drivers of the food system at the farm level might be changing. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03069192140007
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2014.05.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4053196PMC
August 2014
2 Reads

The rising disparity in the price of healthful foods: 2004-2008.

Food Policy 2010 Dec;35(6):514-520

Center for Public Health Nutrition and the Nutritional Sciences Program, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle WA, 98195.

Nutrient dense foods that are associated with better health outcomes tend to cost more per kilocalorie (kcal) than do refined grains, sweets and fats. The price disparity between healthful and less healthful foods appears to be growing. This study demonstrates a new method for linking longitudinal retail price data with objective, nutrient-based ratings of the nutritional quality of foods and beverages. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodpol.2010.06.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4234177PMC
December 2010
7 Reads

Poverty, population and environmental degradation in China.

Food Policy 1997 Jun;22(3):229-51

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 1997
2 Reads

Emerging issues confronting the renewable natural resources sector in sub-Saharan Africa.

Authors:
A Marter A Gordon

Food Policy 1996 May;21(2):229-41

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1996
2 Reads

Human rights in nutrition and nutrition in human rights.

Authors:
C A Florencio

Food Policy 1996 Mar;21(1):5-10

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 1996
2 Reads

The food-first bias and nutrition policy: lessons from Ethiopia.

Food Policy 1995 Aug;20(4):279-98

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 1995
2 Reads

Macroeconomic adjustment, food availability and nutrition status in Nigeria. A look at the 1990s.

Authors:
S O Igbedioh

Food Policy 1990 Dec;15(6):518-24

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 1990
2 Reads

Food consumption in Mexico: demographic and economic effects.

Food Policy 1989 May;14(2):167-79

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1989
2 Reads

AIDS and food production in East and Central Africa: a research outline.

Authors:
T Barnett P Blaikie

Food Policy 1989 Feb;14(1):2-6

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 1989
3 Reads

Impact evaluation of child nutrition programmes.

Authors:
J Hoorweg

Food Policy 1988 May;13(2):199-207

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1988
2 Reads

Rejoinder: nutrition planning is alive and well, thank you.

Authors:
A Berg

Food Policy 1987 Nov;12(4):365-75

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 1987
2 Reads

Multisectoral nutrition planning: a post-mortem.

Authors:
J O Field

Food Policy 1987 Feb;12(1):15-28

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 1987
3 Reads

Food aid: pitfalls and potential.

Authors:
F Stewart

Food Policy 1986 Nov;11(4):311-22

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 1986
2 Reads

The food crisis and environmental conservation in Africa.

Authors:
D Stiles R Brennan

Food Policy 1986 Nov;11(4):298-310

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 1986
3 Reads

The new political economy of food and agricultural development.

Food Policy 1986 Nov;11(4):289-97

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 1986
3 Reads

The state of food and agriculture in Islamic countries.

Authors:
J A Mollett

Food Policy 1986 Nov;11(4):278-84

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 1986
3 Reads

Towards a food and nutrition policy for Australia, an environmentalist view.

Authors:
F G Fisher

Food Policy 1986 Nov;11(4):274-8

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 1986
3 Reads

Women and food aid: a developmental perspective.

Authors:
J Katona-apte

Food Policy 1986 Aug;11(3):216-22

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 1986
3 Reads

After the famine: food aid policy and management issues in sub-Saharan Africa.

Authors:
T W Stephens

Food Policy 1986 Aug;11(3):193-6

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 1986
3 Reads

Food and environmental policies in Africa.

Food Policy 1986 Aug;11(3):190-2

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 1986
2 Reads