129 results match your criteria Facial Nerve Intratemporal Tumors


Expansile Traumatic Neuroma of the Intratemporal Facial Nerve.

J Neurol Surg Rep 2019 Jan 1;80(1):e10-e13. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States.

 To present a rare case of traumatic facial neuroma involving the geniculate ganglion and review relevant literature.  Thirty-year-old man.  Microsurgical resection via combined mastoid-middle fossa approach with great auricular nerve interpositional graft. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0039-1685212DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6443534PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

Facial nerve hemangioma in the middle ear.

Einstein (Sao Paulo) 2018 Nov 29;16(4):eRC4509. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual "Francisco Morato de Oliveira, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Facial nerve hemangioma is a rare and benign vascular tumor, and accounts for 0.7% of intratemporal tumors. We report the second case described in the literature of a facial nerve hemangioma in its tympanic segment. Read More

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https://journal.einstein.br/pt-br/article/hemangioma-de-nerv
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http://dx.doi.org/10.31744/einstein_journal/2018RC4509DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6276807PMC
November 2018
16 Reads

Large Intratemporal Facial Nerve Schwannoma without Facial Palsy: Surgical Strategy of Tumor Removal and Functional Reconstruction.

Authors:
Sertac Yetiser

J Neurol Surg A Cent Eur Neurosurg 2018 Nov 8;79(6):528-532. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Department of ORL & HNS, Anadolu Saglik Merkezi, Gebze, Turkey.

Background:  Three patients with large intratemporal facial schwannomas underwent tumor removal and facial nerve reconstruction with hypoglossal anastomosis. The surgical strategy for the cases was tailored to the location of the mass and its extension along the facial nerve.

Aim:  To provide data on the different clinical aspects of facial nerve schwannoma, the appropriate planning for management, and the predictive outcomes of facial function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0038-1645868DOI Listing
November 2018
3 Reads

Facial nerve schwannomas: A case series with an analysis of imaging findings.

Neurol India 2018 Jan-Feb;66(1):139-143

Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Yuzhong District, Chongqing, China.

Facial nerve schwannomas (FNSs) are rare benign tumors arising from the Schwann cells of the sheath of the facial nerve. These tumors may arise anywhere along the course of the facial nerve. Owing to their rarity and nonspecific clinical and radiological presentations, the preoperative diagnosis of FNSs is exceedingly difficult. Read More

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http://www.neurologyindia.com/text.asp?2018/66/1/139/222870
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0028-3886.222870DOI Listing
January 2018
10 Reads

Intratemporal Facial Nerve Schwannoma in a 5 Year Old Girl: A Therapeutic Dilemma.

Isr Med Assoc J 2016 Nov;18(11):701-702

Department of Otolaryngology, Head.

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November 2016
7 Reads

Dosimetric Analysis of Neural and Vascular Structures in Skull Base Tumors Treated with Stereotactic Radiosurgery.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2017 05 14;156(5):857-862. Epub 2017 Feb 14.

1 University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Irvine, California, USA.

Objective To examine the relationship between the prescribed target dose and the dose to healthy neurovascular structures in patients with vestibular schwannomas treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting SRS center from 2011 to 2013. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0194599817691452DOI Listing
May 2017
16 Reads

Facial Nerve Meningioma: A Cause of Pediatric Facial Weakness.

Otol Neurotol 2017 03;38(3):e8-e12

*Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic †Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Phoenix Children's Hospital ‡Department of Neurosurgery, Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona.

Objective: To present an unusual case of a temporal bone meningioma with intrafascicular spread throughout the temporal facial nerve from cerebellopontine angle (CPA) to stylomastoid foramen.

Patient: Four-year-old female with progressive facial weakness and normal hearing.

Main Outcome Measure: Clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings of temporal bone meningiomas. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00129492-201703000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000001293DOI Listing
March 2017
15 Reads

Radical intracapsular microenucleation technique for exclusively intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma: Long-term follow-up review.

J Craniomaxillofac Surg 2016 Dec 29;44(12):1963-1969. Epub 2016 Sep 29.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck Oncology, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Stomatology (Head: Chenping Zhang), Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 639 Zhizaoju Road, Shanghai 200011, PR China. Electronic address:

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and long-term outcome of radical intracapsular microenucleation technique for the treatment of exclusively intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma (IFNS).

Materials And Methods: From 1996 to 2015, IFNSs closely adherent to the facial nerve without intratemporal involvement were selected for this study. IFNSs were subdivided into an intracapsular microenucleation group and a resection with reconstruction group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2016.09.012DOI Listing
December 2016
7 Reads
2.600 Impact Factor

Hemifacial Spasm Secondary to Parotid Pleomorphic Adenoma With Stylomastoid Foramen Extension.

Otol Neurotol 2017 01;38(1):129-132

*Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota †Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.

Objective: To report hemifacial spasm (HFS) as a rare presenting symptom of a benign parotid neoplasm involving the stylomastoid foramen.

Methods: Case report with literature review.

Results: An 18-year-old woman presented with a 1-year history of a progressively enlarging right infra-auricular mass with new onset ipsilateral severe HFS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000001256DOI Listing
January 2017
15 Reads

Neoplastic causes of nonacute facial paralysis: A review of 221 cases.

Ear Nose Throat J 2016 Sep;95(9):390-404

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Loyola University Medical Center, 2160 S. First Ave., Maywood, IL 60153, USA.

We conducted a retrospective review to assess the clinical presentation of patients with tumor-related nonacute complete peripheral facial weakness or an incomplete partial facial paresis and to provide an algorithm for the evaluation and management of these patients. Our study population was made up of 221 patients-131 females and 90 males, aged 14 to 79 years (mean: 49.7)-who had been referred to the Facial Nerve Disorders Clinic at our tertiary care academic medical center over a 23-year period with a documented neoplastic cause of facial paralysis. Read More

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http://search.proquest.com/openview/1ea6f8e7d3e111ade61860e7
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September 2016
34 Reads

Neurofibroma around the Ear Canal: Report of Three Cases.

J Int Adv Otol 2016 Aug 3;12(2):194-198. Epub 2016 Aug 3.

Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Gülhane Military Medicine Academy, Ankara, Turkey.

Facial nerve neurofibromas are an uncommon entity, particularly in the intraparotid region. Three cases are presented herein, including the first reported case of both an intratemporal and intraparotid facial nerve malignant neurofibroma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first medical publication to describe a neurofibroma involving both the intratemporal and intraparotid regions. Read More

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http://www.advancedotology.org/sayilar/92/buyuk/194-198.pdf
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5152/iao.2016.1858DOI Listing
August 2016
27 Reads

Facial Nerve Schwannoma of Parotid Gland: Difficulties in Diagnosis and Management.

Case Rep Otolaryngol 2016 20;2016:3939685. Epub 2016 Jan 20.

Otolaryngology Department, Bülent Ecevit University Faculty of Medicine, 67600 Zonguldak, Turkey.

Facial nerve schwannomas (FNS) are encapsulated benign tumors arising from Schwann cells of seventh cranial nerve. Most of the facial nerve schwannomas are localized in intratemporal region; only 9% of cases involve a portion of the extratemporal segment. Preoperative diagnosis is often unclear; diagnosis is often made intraoperatively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3939685DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4745412PMC
February 2016
46 Reads

Intratemporal facial nerve schwannoma: clinical presentation and management.

Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2016 Nov 16;273(11):3497-3504. Epub 2015 Dec 16.

Department of Otology, Auditory Implants and Skull Base Surgery, AP-HP, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, 50/52 Bd Vincent Auriol, 75013, Paris, France.

Facial nerve schwannoma is the most common facial nerve tumor, but its therapeutic strategy remains debated. The aim of this study is to analyze the facial nerve function and the hearing outcomes after surgery or wait-and-scan policy in a facial nerve schwannoma series. A monocentric retrospective review of medical charts of patients followed for an intratemporal facial nerve schwannoma between 1988 and 2013 was performed. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00405-015-3850-z
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-015-3850-zDOI Listing
November 2016
26 Reads

Occult Temporal Bone Facial Nerve Involvement by Parotid Malignancies with Perineural Spread.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2015 Sep 30;153(3):385-91. Epub 2015 Jun 30.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Objective: To characterize disease presentation and outcomes following surgical treatment of parotid malignancies with occult temporal bone facial nerve (FN) involvement.

Study Design: Case series with chart review.

Setting: Tertiary academic referral center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0194599815591160DOI Listing
September 2015
22 Reads

Intraparotid schwannoma: A rare case report.

Int J Appl Basic Med Res 2015 May-Aug;5(2):154-6

Department of ENT, GMERS, Medical College and Hospital, Dharpur, Patan, Gujarat, India.

Pleomorphic adenomas are the most common tumors which present as parotid masses. Shwannoma (peripheral nerve sheath tumor) is a rare entity in this region. Very few schwannomas originate from the facial nerve and in the majority of these cases the tumor involves its intratemporal part. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2229-516X.157176DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4456895PMC
June 2015
27 Reads

Stripping surgery in intratemporal facial nerve schwannomas with poor facial nerve function.

Am J Otolaryngol 2015 May-Jun;36(3):338-41. Epub 2014 Dec 9.

Department of Obstetrics, Jinan Maternity and Child Care Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Province, P.R. China. Electronic address:

Unlabelled: To report stripping surgery in intratemporal facial nerve schwannomas (FNS) with poor facial nerve function.

Methods: We attempted stripping surgery to completely remove intratemporal FNS with nerve intact in 17 patients, and succeeded in 12 cases. Clinical features of the tumors and the surgical approach were discussed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2014.12.003DOI Listing
February 2016
4 Reads

Clinical characteristics and outcomes of intratemporal facial nerve neurofibromas.

Am J Otolaryngol 2015 Jul-Aug;36(4):565-7. Epub 2015 Jan 8.

Department of Otolaryngology, Navy General Hospital, Beijing, P.R.C. Electronic address:

Unlabelled: This study aimed to present clinical features and outcomes of 10 patients with intratemporal facial nerve neurofibromas.

Methods: The ten patients underwent complete tumor removal, and nerve grafting was performed on 3 cases whose nerve integrity was sacrificed. They were followed up after surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2015.01.001DOI Listing
March 2016
4 Reads

Facial nerve hemangioma of the geniculate ganglion: an endoscopic surgical approach.

Auris Nasus Larynx 2014 Dec 11;41(6):576-81. Epub 2014 Sep 11.

Otolaryngology Department, University Hospital of Modena, Via del Pozzo 71, 41100 Modena, Italy.

Facial nerve hemangiomas are rare benign tumors arising from the venous plexus surrounding the facial nerve. Surgical management of these tumors is controversial. The goal of surgery is complete tumor removal with restoration of facial nerve function and preservation of hearing, wherever possible. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anl.2014.06.004DOI Listing
December 2014
10 Reads

Radiation exposure of normal temporal bone structures during stereotactically guided gamma knife surgery for vestibular schwannomas.

J Neurosurg 2013 Dec;119 Suppl:800-6

Object: The dosimetry of radiation exposure of healthy inner, middle, and external ear structures that leads to hearing loss, tinnitus, facial weakness, dizziness, vertigo, and imbalance after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for vestibular schwannomas (VSs) is unknown. The authors quantified the dose of radiation received by these structures after GKS for VS to assess the likelihood that these doses contributed to postradiosurgery complications.

Methods: A retrospective study was performed using a prospectively acquired database of a consecutive series of 54 patients with VS who were treated with GKS during a 3. Read More

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December 2013
10 Reads

Intratemporal traumatic neuromas of the facial nerve: evidence for multiple etiologies.

Otol Neurotol 2014 Feb;35(2):e69-72

*Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, and †Department of Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, U.S.A.

Objective: To describe 2 patients with traumatic neuromas of the intratemporal facial nerve in the absence of trauma.

Study Design: Retrospective case review.

Setting: Tertiary care referral center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000000136DOI Listing
February 2014
6 Reads

Surgical experience of nine cases with intratemporal facial hemangiomas and a brief literature review.

Acta Otolaryngol 2013 Oct 4;133(10):1117-20. Epub 2013 Jul 4.

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The Ninth Medical College of Peking University, Peking University , Beijing.

Conclusions: It was practicable to remove hemangiomas at the labyrinth region and distal internal auditory canal with complete or serviceable hearing preservation by the transmastoid approach. The majority of cases where the nerve integrity was preserved achieved acceptable recovery of facial nerve function during the first few years according to our study. Long-term outcomes of nerve graft were acceptable, while short-term outcomes were unsatisfactory based on the literature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2013.803152DOI Listing
October 2013
10 Reads

Surgical experience of intratemporal facial nerve neurofibromas.

Acta Otolaryngol 2013 Aug 29;133(8):893-6. Epub 2013 Apr 29.

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The Ninth Medical College of Peking University, Peking University, Beijing, China.

Conclusions: The first presentation of intratemporal facial neurofibromas was variable, with facial palsy most common. The tumors often involve two or more segments of facial nerve. Outcomes of the tumors were closely related to nerve integrity, preoperative facial nerve function level, and follow-up period. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/00016489.2013.78
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2013.782508DOI Listing
August 2013
26 Reads

Are the current treatment strategies for facial nerve schwannoma appropriate also for complex cases?

Audiol Neurootol 2013 3;18(3):184-91. Epub 2013 Apr 3.

Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Otolaryngology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Parma, Italy.

Objectives: To describe the decision-making strategies for complex facial nerve schwannomas (FNSs).

Materials And Methods: Charts belonging to 103 consecutive patients with facial nerve tumors managed between 1990 and 2011 were examined retrospectively to identify complex FNSs. To be classified as complex, at least one of the following criteria had to be met: (1) FNS with large intraparotid tumor component and preoperative good facial nerve function (3 cases); (2) multiple-segment FNSs with extension to both the cerebellopontine angle and the middle cranial fossa in patients with preoperative good hearing (5 cases); (3) fast-growing FNS with preoperative good facial nerve function (4 cases), and (4) large FNS compressing the temporal lobe with preoperative normal facial nerve function (1 case). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000349990DOI Listing
December 2013
14 Reads

Management options for intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma.

Acta Otolaryngol 2012 Nov 25;132(11):1232-8. Epub 2012 Jul 25.

Department of Otolaryngology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.

Conclusion: Limited intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma (IFNS) and IFNS with intratemporal involvement should be managed separately because of their different characteristics. Limited IFNS with House-Brackman (HB) grade ≤ II should undergo tumor removal only if it can be resected easily off the nerve. For IFNS with intratemporal involvement and a HB grade ≤ II, a conservative treatment (i. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/00016489.2012.69
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2012.694472DOI Listing
November 2012
10 Reads

Infranuclear facial palsy: importance of imaging the geniculate fossa.

Otol Neurotol 2012 Oct;33(8):1430-8

Department of Radiology and Imaging, Grant Medical Foundation, KEM Hospital, Pune, India.

Objective: To highlight the importance of imaging the geniculate fossa in patients with solitary infranuclear facial palsy.

Study Design: Prospective.

Setting: Tertiary referral center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0b013e31825d6429DOI Listing
October 2012
25 Reads

The intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma: a diagnostic and management conundrum.

Am J Otolaryngol 2012 Sep-Oct;33(5):497-504. Epub 2011 Dec 19.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Objectives: The aims of the study were (1) to review the management strategy and clinical outcomes of all intraparotid facial nerve (FN) schwannomas (PFNSs) treated at a single tertiary academic center from 1975 to 2010 and (2) to summarize all previously reported cases of PFNS in the international literature.

Study Design: A retrospective cohort study and literature review.

Methods: Fifteen patients were diagnosed and treated at the authors' institution from 1975 to 2010. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S019607091100288
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2011.11.002DOI Listing
January 2013
13 Reads

Intraparotid facial nerve neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis type 1.

J Craniofac Surg 2011 May;22(3):1118-9

Otorhinolaryngology Department, Bayrampasa State Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Benign tumors of the nerve sheath are of 2 types: schwannoma and neurofibroma. Neurofibromas are most commonly found with neurofibromatosis type 1 and characterized by incorporation of the nerve fibers within their matrix. Both benign and malignant tumors can affect the facial nerve. Read More

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https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001665-201105000-000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0b013e3182108f22DOI Listing
May 2011
23 Reads

Unilateral rhinorrhea after translabyrinthine surgery due to parasympathetic hypersensitive syndrome: differentiation from cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

Otol Neurotol 2010 Sep;31(7):1160-2

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Lariboisiere Hospital, Paris, France.

Introduction: Unilateral rhinorrhea after translabyrinthine surgery for vestibular or facial schwannoma usually suggests cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage and requires specific measures, including revision surgery.

Objective: To draw attention to the possibility of postoperative unilateral rhinorrhea with concomitant hyperlacrimation and hypersialorrhea without a CSF origin and reflecting more a neuroplastic phenomenon.

Study Design: Retrospective study in a tertiary care center university clinic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0b013e3181ec1d7dDOI Listing
September 2010
20 Reads

Useful surgical techniques for facial nerve preservation in tumorous intra-temporal lesions.

Auris Nasus Larynx 2010 Feb 17;37(1):33-41. Epub 2009 May 17.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Republic of Korea.

The management of the facial nerve in tumorous temporal lesions is particularly challenging due to its complex anatomic location and potential postoperative complications, including permanent facial paralysis. The most important concern regarding surgical treatment of a tumorous temporal lesion is the inevitable facial paralysis caused by nerve injury during the tumor removal, especially in patients with minimal to no preoperative facial nerve dysfunction. We describe successful four cases in which various surgical techniques were developed for the preservation of the facial nerve in treatment of intratemporal tumorous lesions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anl.2009.04.003DOI Listing
February 2010
7 Reads

Epidemiological evidence for an association between use of wireless phones and tumor diseases.

Pathophysiology 2009 Aug 5;16(2-3):113-22. Epub 2009 Mar 5.

Department of Oncology, University Hospital, SE-701 85 Orebro, Sweden.

During recent years there has been increasing public concern on potential cancer risks from microwave emissions from wireless phones. We evaluated the scientific evidence for long-term mobile phone use and the association with certain tumors in case-control studies, mostly from the Hardell group in Sweden and the Interphone study group. Regarding brain tumors the meta-analysis yielded for glioma odds ratio (OR)=1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pathophys.2009.01.003DOI Listing
August 2009
9 Reads

Facial schwannoma of the parotid gland in a child.

Kulak Burun Bogaz Ihtis Derg 2008 May-Jun;18(3):175-8

Department of Otolaryngology, Medicine Faculty of Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey.

Schwannomas may rarely arise from the facial nerve and most commonly occur in the intratemporal part of the nerve. Extratemporal facial nerve schwannomas are extremely rare. Intraparotid schwannomas usually develop in adults and only one pediatric case has hitherto been reported. Read More

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May 2010
21 Reads

Intratemporal facial nerve neuroma involving geniculate ganglion and tympanic segment.

Otol Neurotol 2008 Jan;29(1):100-1

Department of Otolaryngology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

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January 2008
6 Reads

Facial schwannoma: results of a large case series and review.

J Laryngol Otol 2008 Nov 7;122(11):1139-50. Epub 2008 Jan 7.

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Objectives And Hypothesis: To report a series of 53 cases of facial schwannoma, to review the current literature, addressing contentious issues, and to present a management algorithm.

Study Design: Retrospective case review combined with review of current literature.

Materials And Methods: A review of the case notes of 53 patients with intracranial and intratemporal facial schwannoma, from two tertiary referral centres, was undertaken. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022215107000667DOI Listing
November 2008
33 Reads

Skull base surgery for removal of temporal bone tumors.

Acta Otolaryngol Suppl 2007 Oct(558):4-14

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Yongon-Dong, Chongno-Gu, Seoul, South Korea.

Conclusion: When selecting the appropriate surgical approach the pathological type of tumor, the physiological status as well as the functional aspects should be considered. Understanding the strengths and weaknesses of each surgical technique and knowledge of the particular tumor biology facilitates selection of the most appropriate surgical approach and a successful outcome.

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to review cases that underwent skull base surgery for a variety of tumors that involved the temporal bone. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03655230701624806DOI Listing
October 2007
12 Reads

Intratemporal Grafting of the Facial Nerve following Lateral Skull Base Tumor Resection.

Skull Base 2007 May;17(3):181-6

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois.

Unlabelled: Intratemporal skull base tumors may invade the facial nerve in the horizontal (tympanic) or descending (vertical) segments, while parotid malignancies typically infiltrate the facial nerve at the stylomastoid foramen. This article will describe our results following intratemporal facial nerve grafting in 44 patients.

Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of 44 patients requiring intratemporal facial nerve repair following lateral skull base tumor resection at our tertiary care, academic medical center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2007-977464DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1888740PMC
May 2007
7 Reads

Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the parotid gland presenting as temporal bone neoplasm: a case report.

B-ENT 2007 ;3(3):153-6

Ankara Numune Educational and Research Hospital, 4th ENT Clinic, Ankara, Turkey.

Problem: Temporal bone tumours are rare head and neck cancers that may involve both the parotid and the neck. In cases with concomitant temporal bone and parotid tissue involvement, tumour origin determination can be challenging. A tumour with parotid and temporal bone involvement is usually of temporal origin. Read More

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February 2008
5 Reads

[Analysis of prognostic factors in microsurgery of intratemporal facial nerve schwannoma].

Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi 2007 Jan;42(1):30-2

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Eye Ear Nose & Throat Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031, China.

Objective: To discuss prognostic factors in microsurgery of intratemporal facial nerve schwannoma.

Methods: Clinical and follow-up materials from 13 cases of facial nerve schwannoma were analyzed retrospectively. Spearman rank-order correlation and nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test from SPSS 10. Read More

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January 2007
5 Reads

[Side-to-end hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis with intratemporal facial nerve translocation. Long-term results and indications in 15 cases over 10 years].

Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord) 2006 ;127(1-2):97-102

CHU de Bordeaux, Hôpital Pellegrin, Clinique ORL, Place A. Raba Léon, 33076 Bordeaux, France.

Objectives: To describe functional results concerning facial and lingual mobility after side-to end hypoglossal facial nerve anastomosis.

Material And Methods: 15 patients were operated on between 1993 and 2002 (11 cases of facial nerve injury during vestibular schwannoma surgery, and 4 cases of brainstem stroke). Were assessed at a minimum of 18 months postop tonus and facial voluntary movements recovery (modified House Brackmann (HB) grading), lingual mobility (amyotrophy and self-evaluation questionnaire), and patients' overall satisfaction (questionnaire). Read More

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September 2006
10 Reads

[Diagnosis and management of facial nerve neuromas].

Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi 2006 Apr;41(4):262-5

Department of Otology and Skull Base Surgery, Eye Ear Nose & Throat Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

Objective: To provide the experience for early diagnosis and management of facial nerve neuromas, and to discuss the clinic and imaging feature of facial nerve schwannoma and facial nerve fibroma in 22 cases.

Methods: Twenty cases facial nerve schwannoma and two cases of facial nerve neurofibroma were diagnosed and reviewed retrospectively. Surgical removal were performed through the middle cranial fossa in 2 cases, through intratemporal approach in 8 cases, through intraparotid approach in 2 cases, and combined intra-temporal with out-temporal approaches in 10 cases. Read More

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April 2006
12 Reads

Intratemporal facial neurofibroma.

Otol Neurotol 2006 Oct;27(7):1045-6

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.mao.0000224078.39731.93DOI Listing
October 2006
10 Reads

The many faces of facial nerve schwannoma.

AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 2006 Mar;27(3):694-9

Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84132-1140, USA.

Background And Purpose: The imaging appearance of facial nerve schwannomas (FNSs) has been described as an enhancing tubular mass (using T1-enhanced MR) within an enlarged facial nerve canal (using CT). The purpose of this study is to identify how often the FNS imaging findings conform to this description and determine whether there are underlying anatomic explanations for the discrepant imaging appearances identified.

Materials And Methods: The clinical, pathologic, and radiologic records of 24 FNS in 23 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Read More

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March 2006
14 Reads

Side-to-end hypoglossal-facial anastomosis via transposition of the intratemporal facial nerve.

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2006 Jun 23;148(6):653-7; discussion 657. Epub 2006 Feb 23.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Cervicofacial Surgery, Maribor University Hospital, Maribor, Slovenia.

The technique of facial nerve repair with side-to-end hypoglossal-facial anastomosis is presented and evaluated in five patients who were operated on for facial nerve paralysis after acoustic schwannoma surgery, or had cranial base trauma. The end-to-end hypoglossal-facial anastomosis is accompanied by hemilingual paralysis, with difficulty in swallowing, chewing and speaking. In this new technique, the facial nerve is mobilised in the temporal bone, transected at the second genu and transposed to the hypoglossal nerve where a tensionless side-to-end anastomosis is performed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00701-006-0736-2DOI Listing
June 2006
13 Reads

[Intrapretosal schwannomas of facial nerve].

Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp 2005 Nov;56(9):434-7

Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Sanatorio Allende, Córdoba, Argentina.

The aim of this study was to determine the factors that are important to the diagnosis and treatment of facial neuroma. The most common tumors of the peripheral nerves are the neurinomas; about 50% of them are found in the head and neck region. Among them, the most frequent is the VIII nerve tumor, while the facial neuroma is extremely rare. Read More

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November 2005
12 Reads

Facial palsy from temporal bone lesions.

Ann Acad Med Singapore 2005 May;34(4):322-9

Department of Radiology, Changi General Hospital, Singapore.

Introduction: Facial nerve palsy results in the loss of facial expression and is most commonly caused by a benign self-limiting inflammatory condition, known as Bell's palsy. However, there are other conditions which may result in injury of the seventh cranial nerve and the radiologist should be familiar with their imaging appearances.

Materials And Methods: The relevant anatomy of the facial nerve and pathology which may affect the intratemporal portion of the nerve is described. Read More

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May 2005
31 Reads

Microsurgical repair of the facial nerve.

Zentralbl Neurochir 2005 May;66(2):63-9

Department of Neurological Sciences, Section of Neurosurgery, "Federico II" University, Naples, Italy.

Objective: To report a series of 18 patients who underwent microsurgical repair of the facial nerve using different techniques and to discuss the indications and results of facial reinnervation procedures.

Methods: Eighteen patients with post-surgical facial palsy underwent facial reinnervation using different techniques.'These included classic hypoglossal-facial anastomosis in 13 cases, one-stage hemihypoglossal-intratemporal facial nerve anastomosis and translabyrinthine removal of residual intra-canalar acoustic schwannoma in 3, hemihypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis in one, and neurotization of facial muscles through a nerve graft in one. Read More

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http://www.thieme-connect.de/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2004-836226
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2004-836226DOI Listing
May 2005
10 Reads

Intratemporal facial nerve schwannoma: a management dilemma.

Otol Neurotol 2005 Jan;26(1):121-6

Department of Otolaryngology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Science Center, and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: To report the findings in patients with facial nerve schwannoma in whom surgery was elected at onset versus patients treated expectantly.

Study Design: Retrospective case review.

Setting: Tertiary referral center. Read More

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January 2005
12 Reads

Facial nerve schwannomas: different manifestations and outcomes.

Surg Neurol 2004 Sep;62(3):245-52; discussion 452

Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.

Background: The purpose of this study was to provide data on the different clinical presentations of facial nerve schwannoma, the appropriate planning for the management of schwannoma of various origins, and the predictive outcomes of surgical management.

Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary referral hospital. We reviewed 8 consecutive cases of facial nerve schwannoma diagnosed and managed between 1993 and 2001. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.surneu.2003.09.034DOI Listing
September 2004
14 Reads

Large intraosseous hemangioma of the temporal bone in a child.

Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 2004 May;113(5):394-8

Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Georg-August-Universität, Göttingen, Germany.

Hemangiomas of the temporal bone are extremely uncommon tumors, predominantly arising in the area of the geniculate ganglion and the internal auditory canal and affecting mainly middle-aged adults. We present a 6-year-old boy who had suffered from recurrent infections of the left ear associated with a slight conductive hearing loss, but without facial nerve dysfunction. Using high-resolution computed tomography and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, we detected an unusually large 32 x 32 x 24-mm mass of the left temporal bone occupying the entire mastoid. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/000348940411300510DOI Listing
May 2004
18 Reads

One-stage removal of residual intracanalicular acoustic neuroma and hemihypoglossal-intratemporal facial nerve anastomosis: technical note.

Neurosurgery 2003 Dec;53(6):1444-7; discussion 1447-8

Department of Neurological Sciences, Division of Neurosurgery, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.

Objective And Importance: Incomplete removal of residual intracanalicular tumor and injury to the facial nerve are the main problems associated with surgery of large acoustic neuromas via the retromastoid suboccipital approach. In patients with residual or recurrent intracanalicular neuromas, the translabyrinthine approach is the preferred surgical route, allowing complete tumor removal; it may eventually also be used for exposure of the intratemporal portion of the facial nerve for a hemihypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis when a postoperative facial palsy exists This one-stage procedure has not been described previously.

Clinical Presentation: Three patients with postoperative facial palsy and residual intracanalicular tumor after surgical removal of a large acoustic neuroma via the retromastoid suboccipital approach underwent reoperation via the translabyrinthine approach and one-stage removal of the residual tumor and hemihypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. Read More

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http://pdfs.journals.lww.com/neurosurgery/2003/12000/One_sta
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December 2003
22 Reads

An intratemporal facial nerve neuroma: a case report.

Kulak Burun Bogaz Ihtis Derg 2003 Apr;10(4):159-62

Department of Otolaryngology, Medicine Faculty of Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey.

A forty-one-year-old man presented with right-sided progressive facial nerve paralysis of one year duration. Computed tomography of the temporal bone showed a soft tissue mass in relation with the tympanic segment of the facial nerve with destructive changes in the facial recess region. Magnetic resonance images before and after gadolinium injection revealed a contrast-enhancing mass lesion in the tympanic cavity. Read More

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April 2003
9 Reads