62 results match your criteria Expert Review of Ophthalmology [Journal]


Systematic Review of Community-Engaged Research in Ophthalmology.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2017 19;12(3):233-241. Epub 2017 Apr 19.

Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan.

Introduction: Community-engaged research (CEnR) allows researchers and community organizations to partner together to improve health outcomes and to decrease health disparities. While prevalent in other fields of medicine, it is rarely used in ophthalmology.

Areas Covered: A comprehensive search of Ovid MEDLINE, NLM Pubmed, Ovid Embase, Scopus and the Cochrane Library for the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) "Community-based participatory research" and text word variations including in addition to yielded 451 unique references. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17469899.2017.1311787DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5759339PMC
April 2017
3 Reads
1 Citation

Implication of the neurotrophin receptor p75 in vascular diseases: beyond the eye.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2017 21;12(2):149-158. Epub 2016 Dec 21.

Program in Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA.

Introduction: The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75) is a member of TNF-α receptor superfamily that bind all neurotrophins, mainly regulating their pro-apoptotic actions. Ischemia is a common pathology in different cardiovascular diseases affecting multiple organs, however the contribution of p75 remains not fully addressed. The aim of this work is to review the current evidence through published literature studying the impact of p75 receptor in ischemic vascular diseases. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17469899.2017.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17469899.2017.1269602DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5624543PMC
December 2016
8 Reads

Dysthyroid optic neuropathy: update on pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2017 27;12(2):111-121. Epub 2017 Jan 27.

Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195.

Introduction: Dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON) is a severe manifestation of thyroid eye disease (TED) that can result in permanent vision loss. Management is complex, multidisciplinary, and involves medical and/or surgical therapies. This review describes current concepts in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of DON. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17469899.2017.1276444DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5535799PMC
January 2017
8 Reads

Role of BDNF/TrkB pathway in the visual system: Therapeutic implications for glaucoma.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2017 23;12(1):69-81. Epub 2016 Nov 23.

Medical College of Georgia, Department of Ophthalmology at Augusta University, Augusta University Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy, James and Jean Culver Vision Discovery Institute. Address: Medical College of Georgia, Department of Ophthalmology at Augusta University, 1120 15th Street, Augusta, GA 30912, USA,.

Introduction: Neuroprotective therapeutics are needed to treat glaucoma, an optic neuropathy that results in death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs).

Areas Covered: The BDNF/TrkB pathway is important for RGC survival. Temporal and spatial alterations in the BDNF/TrkB pathway occur in development and in response to acute optic nerve injury and to glaucoma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17469899.2017.1259566DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5524151PMC
November 2016
3 Reads

Diagnosis and Medical Management of Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2017 5;12(1):11-19. Epub 2016 Dec 5.

Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA.

Introduction: Topical chemotherapy has gained popularity among clinicians for the treatment of ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN). The principal topical chemotherapy agents used in the management of OSSN are interferon-α2b, 5-fluorouracil, and mitomycin C. High-resolution optical coherence tomography (HR-OCT) is a non-invasive technique that can differentiate OSSN from other ocular surface lesions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17469899.2017.1263567DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5293314PMC
December 2016
5 Reads

versus CRISPR therapies for retinal dystrophy.

Authors:
Benjamin Bakondi

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2016 2;11(6):397-400. Epub 2016 Nov 2.

Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Two therapeutic paths have been proposed to treat inherited retinal dystrophy using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). One strategy is to genetically correct patient cells for autologous transplant, whereas the second is to modify cells by delivering CRISPR effectors to the retina. The feasibility of both editing strategies has been demonstrated within three years of CRISPR's adaptation to mammalian systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17469899.2016.1251316DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5289756PMC
November 2016
3 Reads

Challenges of corneal infections.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2016 30;11(4):285-297. Epub 2016 Jun 30.

Introduction: Ocular infections remain an important cause of blindness worldwide and represent a challenging public health concern. In this regard, microbial keratitis due to fungal, bacterial, or viral infection can result in significant vision loss secondary to corneal scarring or surface irregularity. Left untreated corneal perforation and endophthalmitis can result, leading to loss of the eye. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17469899.2016.1203254DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5224590PMC
June 2016
4 Reads

Microinvasive Glaucoma Surgery: An Evidence-Based Assessment.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2017 12;12(4):331-343. Epub 2017 Jun 12.

University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, 419 W Redwood Street, Suite 420, Baltimore, MD 21201.

Introduction: The advent of Microinvasive Glaucoma Surgery (MIGS) offers a novel approach in the treatment of glaucoma with the number of procedures developing at an exciting pace.

Areas Covered: MIGS procedures aim to lower intraocular pressure (IOP) via four mechanisms: (1) increasing trabecular outflow, (2) increasing outflow via suprachoroidal shunts, (3) reducing aqueous production, and (4) subconjunctival filtration. A comprehensive search for published studies for each Microinvasive Glaucoma Surgery (MIGS) device or procedure was undertaken using the electronic database PubMed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17469899.2017.1335597DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6049090PMC
June 2017
2 Reads

Systematic Review of Educational Interventions to Improve Glaucoma Medication Adherence: an update in 2015.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2016;11(1):5-20. Epub 2016 Jan 22.

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Purpose: To evaluate the current state of the research on educational interventions whose aim is to improve glaucoma medication adherence.

Methods: A systematic review of Pubmed, Embase and CINAHL was conducted to identify research studies evaluating educational interventions to improve glaucoma medication adherence. Studies were included if the intervention was described, the outcomes assessed glaucoma medication adherence, and the focus of the research was on adults with glaucoma. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/17469899.2016.11
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2016.1134318DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4847749PMC
January 2016
10 Reads

Controversies and advances in the management of congenital ptosis.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2015 Jan 12;10(1):59-63. Epub 2014 Dec 12.

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Neurosciences, University of Minnesota, MMC 493, 420 Delaware St, SE, Minneapolis, MN, USA; Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

The management issues associated with pediatric ptosis begin with determining the etiology of the ptosis, and considering how the eyelid position affects the child's visual and psychosocial development. These ultimately determine if and when surgical management should be undertaken. Surgical challenges include the lack of intraoperative feedback regarding the dynamic eyelid height and contour under general anesthesia. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/17469899.2015.99
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2015.991389DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4743587PMC
January 2015
4 Reads

Neuro-ophthalmology of type 1 Chiari malformation.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2015;10(4):351-357. Epub 2015 Jun 23.

Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.

Chiari malformation is a congenital deformity leading to herniation of cerebellar tonsils. Headache is a typical symptom of this condition, but patients with Chiari malformation often present with double vision and vertigo. Examination of eye movements in such patients often reveals nystagmus and strabismus. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/17469899.2015.10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2015.1057505DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4733655PMC
June 2015
5 Reads

Congenital aniridia: etiology, manifestations and management.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2016 9;11(2):135-144. Epub 2016 Mar 9.

Children's Eye Center of UPMC, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15213, USA.

Congenital aniridia manifests as total or partial absence of the iris caused most commonly by mutations in PAX6, FOXC1, PITX2, and CYP1B1. Recently two new genes, and , have also been implicated in isolated studies. We discuss the genotype-phenotype correlations for the main implicated genes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2016.1152182DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6086384PMC

What rates of glaucoma progression are clinically significant?

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2016 13;11(3):227-234. Epub 2016 May 13.

Clinically important rates of glaucoma progression (worsening) are ones that put a patient at risk of future functional impairment or reduction of vision-related quality of life. Rates of progression can be evaluated through measuring structural or functional changes of the optic nerve. Most treated eyes do not progress at rates that will lead to future visual impairment, but there are a significant proportion (3-17%) of eyes, that are at risk of impairment even under clinical care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17469899.2016.1180246DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5898440PMC
May 2016
2 Reads

What can photophobia tell us about dry eye?

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2016 23;11(5):321-324. Epub 2016 Aug 23.

Miami Veterans Administration Medical Center, 1201 NW 16th St, Miami, FL 33125.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17469899.2016.1222905DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5571866PMC
August 2016
5 Reads

Structural and Functional Evaluations for the Early Detection of Glaucoma.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2016 14;11(5):367-376. Epub 2016 Sep 14.

Department of Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

The early detection of glaucoma is imperative in order to preserve functional vision. Structural and functional methods are utilized to detect and monitor glaucomatous damage and the vision loss it causes. The relationship between these detection measures is complex and differs between individuals, especially in early glaucoma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17469899.2016.1229599DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5464747PMC
September 2016
16 Reads

Rationale for therapeutic targeting insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and bone marrow-derived fibrocytes in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy.

Authors:
Terry J Smith

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2016 24;11(2):77-79. Epub 2016 Mar 24.

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48105.

Development of medical therapy for thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy has lagged behind that for many other autoimmune diseases, in large part because its pathogenesis has not been understood. Recent insights into the nature of the main target of the disease, orbital connective tissues, have led to a greater understanding of how and why this ocular manifestation of Graves' disease might occur. Emerging from this work are the identities of potential drug targets. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2016.1164598DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5464408PMC
March 2016
6 Reads

Update on the prevention and treatment of endophthalmitis.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2014 Oct 23;9(5):425-430. Epub 2014 Aug 23.

Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 900 Northwest 17 Street, Miami, FL 33136. (305) 326-6118. FAX (305) 326-6471.

Endophthalmitis remains a rare but serious cause of visual loss. Over time, changes have been noted in endophthalmitis in terms of predominant causes, infecting organisms, and antibiotic susceptibilities. There is controversy regarding the use of intracameral prophylactic antimicrobials during cataract surgery. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/17469899.2014.95
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2014.951331DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4655603PMC
October 2014
4 Reads

Retinal Gene Therapy: Current Progress and Future Prospects.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2015 Jun 10;10(3):281-299. Epub 2015 Apr 10.

Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, 97239, USA.

Clinical trials treating inherited retinal dystrophy caused by mutations had put retinal gene therapy at the forefront of gene therapy. Both successes and limitations in these clinical trials have fueled developments in gene vectors, which continue to further advance the field. These novel gene vectors aim to more safely and efficiently transduce retinal cells, expand the gene packaging capacity of AAV, and utilize new strategies to correct the varying mechanisms of dysfunction found with inherited retinal dystrophies. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/17469899.2015.10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2015.1035711DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4655604PMC
June 2015
10 Reads

Gaps in Glaucoma care: A systematic review of monoscopic disc photos to screen for glaucoma.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2014 Dec;9(6):467-474

University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI ; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/17469899.2014.96
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2014.967218DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4470491PMC
December 2014
4 Reads

The Current State of Vaccine Development for Ocular HSV-1 Infection.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2015 Apr;10(2):113-126

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center ; Ophthalmology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

HSV-1 continues to be the leading cause of infectious corneal blindness. Clinical trials for vaccines against genital HSV infection have been ongoing for more than three decades. Despite this, no approved vaccine exists, and no formal clinical trials have evaluated the impact of HSV vaccines on eye health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2015.1004315DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4431768PMC
April 2015
3 Reads

Developing novel anti-fibrotic therapeutics to modulate post-surgical wound healing in glaucoma: big potential for small molecules.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2015 Feb;10(1):65-76

National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and University College London (UCL) Institute of Ophthalmology, 11-43 Bath Street, London EC1V 9EL, UK.

Ocular fibrosis leads to significant visual impairment and blindness in millions of people worldwide, and is one of the largest areas of unmet need in clinical ophthalmology. The antimetabolites, mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil, are the current gold standards used primarily to prevent fibrosis after glaucoma surgery, but have potentially blinding complications like tissue damage, breakdown and infection. This review thus focuses on the development of new classes of small molecule therapeutics to prevent post-surgical fibrosis in the eye, especially in the context of glaucoma filtration surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2015.983475DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4364560PMC
February 2015
7 Reads

Corrective Techniques and Future Directions for Treatment of Residual Refractive Error Following Cataract Surgery.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2014 Dec;9(6):529-537

Ophthalmology Department, University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, San Juan, PR 00936

Postoperative residual refractive error following cataract surgery is not an uncommon occurrence for a large proportion of modern-day patients. Residual refractive errors can be broadly classified into 3 main categories: myopic, hyperopic, and astigmatic. The degree to which a residual refractive error adversely affects a patient is dependent on the magnitude of the error, as well as the specific type of intraocular lens the patient possesses. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/17469899.2014.96
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2014.966817DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4317710PMC
December 2014
8 Reads

Management of conjunctival malignant melanoma: a review and update.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2014 Jun;9(3):185-204

Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA.

Conjunctival malignant melanoma is a pigmented lesion of the ocular surface. It is an uncommon but potentially devastating tumor that may invade the local tissues of the eye, spread systemically through lymphatic drainage and hematogenous spread, and recur in spite of treatment. Despite its severity, the rarity of available cases has limited the evidence for diagnosis and management. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/17469899.2014.92
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2014.921119DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4285629PMC
June 2014
8 Reads

Sensory nerve regeneration after epithelium wounding in normal and diabetic cornea.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2015 26;10(4):383-392. Epub 2015 Jun 26.

Department of Ophthalmology/Kresge Eye Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA.

The cornea is the most densely innervated mammalian tissue. The sensory nerves are responsible for sensations of dryness, temperature, touch, and pain, and play important roles in the blink reflex, wound healing, and tear production. Many ocular and systemic diseases can adversely affect corneal sensory nerve and consequently impair their function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2015.1049157DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5403143PMC
June 2015
9 Reads

Understanding the true burden of dry eye disease.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2015;10(5):403-405. Epub 2015 Jun 26.

Miami Veterans Administration Medical Center, 1201 NW 16th St, Miami, FL 33125; Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Pain Management, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL.

The term "dry eye" has evolved over the past 2 decades to include both symptoms (visual complaints and dysesthesias) and signs (aqueous and evaporative deficiency) of disease. Dry eye is common in older individuals and a source of morbidity. Confusion arises, however, on what combination of symptoms and signs constitute "dry eye" and how to best individualize treatment in patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2015.1061431DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5001564PMC
June 2015
5 Reads

Evaluating glaucoma damage: emerging imaging technologies.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2015;10(2):183-195. Epub 2015 Feb 9.

Department of Ophthalmology, UPMC Eye Center, Eye and Ear Institute, Ophthalmology and Visual Science Research Center, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Department of Bioengineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, PA, USA.

The use of ocular imaging tools to estimate structural and functional damage in glaucoma has become a common clinical practice and a substantial focus of vision research. The evolution of the imaging technologies through increased scanning speed, penetration depth, image registration and development of multimodal devices has the potential to detect the pathology more reliably and in earlier stages. This review is focused on new ocular imaging modalities used for glaucoma diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2015.1012500DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4830491PMC
February 2015
11 Reads

Cytokines are both villains and potential therapeutic targets in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy: From bench to bedside.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2014 Jun;9(3):227-234

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48105.

The pathophysiology underlying Graves' disease and its ocular manifestation, thyroid associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) is incompletely understood. Characterization of the mononuclear cells driving the disease and the cytokines they produce has led to significant advances in our understanding of TAO. This in turn has resulted in the identification of potentially attractive drug targets. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/17469899.2014.91
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2014.917960DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4275044PMC
June 2014
6 Reads

Nerve growth factor in diabetic retinopathy: beyond neurons.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2014 Apr;9(2):99-107

Program in Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA and Culver Vision Discovery Institute, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USA and Charlie Norwood Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Augusta, GA, USA.

Diabetic retinopathy (DR), a major ocular complication of diabetes, is a leading cause of blindness in US working age adults with limited treatments. Neurotrophins (NTs), a family of proteins essential for growth, differentiation and survival of retinal neurons, have emerged as potential players in the pathogenesis of DR. NTs can signal through their corresponding tropomyosin kinase related receptor to mediate cell survival or through the p75 neurotrophin receptor with the co-receptor, sortilin, to mediate cell death. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/17469899.2014.903157DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4096131PMC
April 2014
29 Reads

Genetic risk, ethnic variations and pharmacogenetic biomarkers in age-related macular degeneration and polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2013 Apr;8(2):127-140

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048 ; Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048.

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/eop.13.3
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.13.3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4029770PMC
April 2013
9 Reads

Modeling retinal degenerative diseases with human iPS-derived cells: current status and future implications.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2013 Jun;8(3):213-216

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, McPherson Eye Research Institute, Waisman Center Stem Cell Research Program, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Waisman Center, Room T609, 1500 Highland Ave, Madison, WI 53705, USA.

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/eop.13.14
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.13.14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3770479PMC
June 2013
8 Reads

Targeting Neovascularization in Ischemic Retinopathy: Recent Advances.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2013 Jun;8(3):267-286

Ophthalmology and Vision Discovery Institute, Medical College of Georgia, GRU ; Cellular Biology and Anatomy, Medical College of Georgia, GRU.

Pathological retinal neovascularization (RNV) is a common micro-vascular complication in several retinal diseases including retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and central vein occlusion. The current therapeutic modalities of RNV are invasive and although they may slow or halt the progression of the disease they are unlikely to restore normal acuity. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop treatment modalities, which are less invasive and therefore associated with fewer procedural complications and systemic side effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.13.17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4295791PMC
June 2013
8 Reads
6 Citations

Scaffolds and stem cells: delivery of cell transplants for retinal degenerations.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2012 Oct;7(5):459-470

Bascom Palmer Eye Institute and Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, 1501 NW 10th Avenue, BRB 826, FL 33136, USA.

Retinal degenerations and optic neuropathies often lead to death of photoreceptors or retinal ganglion cells, respectively. Stem cell therapies are showing promise for these diseases in preclinical models and are beginning to transition into human trials, but cell delivery and integration remain major challenges. Focusing on photoreceptor- and progenitor-directed approaches, in this article, the authors review how advances in tissue engineering and cell scaffold design are enhancing cell therapies for retinal degeneration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.12.56DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3622368PMC
October 2012
3 Reads

The genetics of Fuchs' corneal dystrophy.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2012 Aug;7(4):363-375

The Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Fuchs' corneal dystrophy (FCD) is a common late-onset genetic disorder of the corneal endothelium. It causes loss of endothelial cell density and excrescences in the Descemet membrane, eventually progressing to corneal edema, necessitating corneal transplantation. The genetic basis of FCD is complex and heterogeneous, demonstrating variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.12.39DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3622272PMC
August 2012
3 Reads

Saccadic oscillations - membrane, model, and medicine.

Authors:
Aasef G Shaikh

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2012 Oct;7(5):481-486

Department of Neurology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.

Saccadic oscillations are continuous back-to-back saccades that cause excessive image motion across fovea and threaten clear vision. Acquired processes, related to immune or metabolic mechanisms, are common culprits. Saccadic oscillations are also seen in degenerative cerebellar disease or as a part of a familial syndrome of saccadic oscillations and limb tremor. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.12.55DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4336148PMC
October 2012
2 Reads

Comparisons of actin filament disruptors and Rho kinase inhibitors as potential antiglaucoma medications.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2012 Apr;7(2):177-187

Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53792, USA.

Dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in the trabecular meshwork play a crucial role in the regulation of trabecular outflow resistance. The actin filament disruptors and Rho kinase inhibitors affect the dynamics of the actomyosin system by either disrupting the actin filaments or inhibiting the Rho kinase-activated cellular contractility. Both approaches induce similar morphological changes and resistance decreases in the trabecular outflow pathway, and thus both have potential as antiglaucoma medications. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1586/eop.12.12
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.12.12DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3378243PMC
April 2012
4 Reads

Secondary neuroprotective effects of hypotensive drugs and potential mechanisms of action.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2012 Apr;7(2):161-175

The Vanderbilt Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, 11435 MRB IV, 2215B Garland Avenue, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.

Primary open-angle glaucoma, a long-term degenerative ocular neuropathy, remains a significant cause of vision impairment worldwide. While many risk factors have been correlated with increased risk for primary open-angle glaucoma, intraocular pressure (IOP) remains the only modifiable risk factor and primary therapeutic target. Pharmacologic therapies are administered topically; these include α(2)-agonists, β-antagonists, prostaglandin analogs and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.12.13DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3379897PMC
April 2012
5 Reads

Post-LASIK dry eye.

Authors:
Roni M Shtein

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2011 Oct;6(5):575-582

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Kellogg Eye Center, 1000 Wall Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA, Tel.: +1 734 763 5506.

Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) is a frequently performed corneal refractive surgery with excellent refractive outcomes. The most common complication of LASIK is dry eyes, with virtually all patients developing some degree of dryness in the immediate postoperative period. Identifying preoperative dry eyes, and conscientious attention and treatment in the perioperative time period, can lead to enhanced patient satisfaction and more accurate visual outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.11.56DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3235707PMC
October 2011
4 Reads

Role of macrophages in uveal melanoma.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2011 Aug;6(4):405-407

Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University, BT428, 1365 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Tumor-associated macrophages have been related to a worse prognosis for survival in several tumors, among them uveal melanoma. In particular for proangiogenic and anti-inflammatory M2-type macrophages, a contributory role to tumor growth has been described. This study demonstrated that most tumor-associated macrophages in uveal melanoma exhibited the M2-phenotype. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.11.45DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3190177PMC
August 2011
3 Reads

RNA Granules and Cataract.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2011 Oct;6(5):497-500

Department of Biological Sciences and Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 USA, ; ,

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.11.53DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3705770PMC
October 2011
5 Reads

Statins for prevention of diabetic-related blindness: a new treatment option?

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2011 Jun;6(3):269-272

Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA and Vision Discovery Institute, Georgia Health Science University, Augusta, GA, USA and Faculty of Pharmacy, Suez Canal University, Egypt.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.11.36DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3175606PMC
June 2011
3 Reads

Stem cell therapy for glaucoma: possibilities and practicalities.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2011 Apr;6(2):165-174

Cambridge Centre for Brain Repair, University of Cambridge ED Adrian Building Forvie Site, Robinson Way, Cambridge, CB2 OPY, UK.

Glaucoma is a progressive, neurodegenerative, optic neuropathy in which currently available therapies cannot always prevent, and do not reverse, vision loss. Stem cell transplantation may provide a promising new avenue for treating many presently incurable degenerative conditions, including glaucoma. This article will explore the various ways in which transplantation of stem or progenitor cells may be applied for the treatment of glaucoma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.11.3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3114633PMC
April 2011
7 Reads

Severe bacterial endophthalmitis: towards improving clinical outcomes.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2010 Oct;5(5):689-698

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA.

Endophthalmitis is an infection and inflammation of the interior of the eye that can result in significant vision loss. This infection occurs as a result of the seeding of organisms into the interior of the eye following surgery (postoperative), trauma (post-traumatic) or an infection in another site in the body (endogenous). The general rate of endophthalmitis has remained steady over the past several years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.10.52DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3092298PMC
October 2010
3 Reads

Ocular adnexal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a review of epidemiology and risk factors.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2011 Apr;6(2):181-193

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, NY, USA ; Cancer Research Center, State University of New York at Albany, NY, USA.

Ocular adnexal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), the most common form of ophthalmic NHL, has a unique incidence pattern showing a steady and rapid increase in the past few decades, nearly equal rates among both genders, and predominance among Asians/Pacific Islanders. No major cause for ocular adnexal NHL has been identified, although infectious agents, immune disorders and genetic/epigenetic factors have all been implicated in its etiology. Identifying putative risk factors and biologic mechanisms leading to carcinogenesis in ocular adnexal NHL may enable implementation of effective preventive and/or therapeutic approaches for this malignancy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.11.15DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3749740PMC
April 2011
4 Reads

Update on amniotic membrane transplantation.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2010 Oct;5(5):645-661

Ocular Surface Center, 7000 SW, 97 Avenue, Suite 213, Miami, FL 33173, USA.

Cryopreserved amniotic membrane modulates adult wound healing by promoting epithelialization while suppressing stromal inflammation, angiogenesis and scarring. Such clinical efficacies of amniotic membrane transplantation have been reported in several hundred publications for a wide spectrum of ophthalmic indications. The success of the aforementioned therapeutic actions prompts investigators to use amniotic membrane as a surrogate niche to achieve ex vivo expansion of ocular surface epithelial progenitor cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.10.63DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3061461PMC
October 2010
7 Reads

Pharmaceutical intervention for myopia control.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2010 Dec;5(6):759-787

School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-2020, USA.

Myopia is the result of a mismatch between the optical power and the length of the eye, with the latter being too long. Driving the research in this field is the need to develop myopia treatments that can limit axial elongation. When axial elongation is excessive, as in high myopia, there is an increased risk of visual impairment and blindness due to ensuing pathologies such as retinal detachments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.10.67DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3023964PMC
December 2010
6 Reads

Descriptive epidemiology of ophthalmic and ocular adnexal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2011 ;6(2):175-180

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, NY, USA ; New York State Cancer Registry, New York State Department of Health, NY, USA.

In this article, we provide an update on incidence rates of ophthalmic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), in the context of other NHL, in the USA. We also provide population-based estimates of incidence and survival for ocular adnexal NHL, the most common form of ophthalmic NHL, for which descriptive patterns have not been previously reported. Ophthalmic and ocular adnexal NHL have unique incidence patterns, including equal rates among both genders, predominance among Asians/Pacific Islanders, and steady and rapid increases in the past few decades. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3864672PMC
January 2011
4 Reads

Biomarkers of primary open-angle glaucoma.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2010 Dec;5(6):731-742

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1855 West Taylor, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.

Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a primary neuronal disease of the optic nerve without a definable cause, and is often associated with increased intraocular pressure. Worldwide, POAG is the second leading cause of blindness; there are 45 million people today with POAG and bilateral blindness is present in 4.5 million of these. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/EOP.10.73DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4590996PMC
December 2010
13 Reads

Optimum oxygen therapy to prevent retinopathy of prematurity.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2010 Oct;5(5):583-585

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.10.60DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4155506PMC
October 2010
4 Reads

Fuchs' corneal dystrophy.

Expert Rev Ophthalmol 2010 Apr;5(2):147-159

Cataract, Cornea and External Disease Service, Wilmer Eye Institute, 600 North Wolfe Street, 317 Maumenee Building, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

Fuchs' corneal dystrophy (FCD) is a progressive, hereditary disease of the cornea first described a century ago by the Austrian ophthalmologist Ernst Fuchs. Patients often present in the fifth to sixth decade of life with blurry morning vision that increases in duration as the disease progresses. Primarily a condition of the posterior cornea, characteristic features include the formation of focal excrescences of Descemet membrane termed 'guttae', loss of endothelial cell density and end-stage disease manifested by corneal edema and the formation of epithelial bullae. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1586/eop.10.8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2897712PMC
April 2010
3 Reads