14,595 results match your criteria Experimental brain research. Experimentelle Hirnforschung. Experimentation cerebrale[Journal]


Single finger movements in the aging hand: changes in finger independence, muscle activation patterns and tendon displacement in older adults.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Feb 19. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Department of Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

With aging, hand mobility and manual dexterity decline, even under healthy circumstances. To assess how aging affects finger movement control, we compared elderly and young subjects with respect to (1) finger movement independence, (2) neural control of extrinsic finger muscles and (3) finger tendon displacements during single finger flexion. In twelve healthy older (age 68-84) and nine young (age 22-29) subjects, finger kinematics were measured to assess finger movement enslaving and the range of independent finger movement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05487-1DOI Listing
February 2019

Pre-crastination and procrastination effects occur in a reach-to-grasp task.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Feb 19. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Department of Kinesiology and Sport Management, Texas Tech University, Box 43011, Lubbock, TX, 79404, USA.

How do we decide which object to pick up when faced with two alternatives? Imagine one object is near, but needs to be carried a long distance, and the other object is far, but needs to be carried a short distance. You might predict that participants would favour the far object that needs to be carried a short distance. In other words, they would procrastinate and delay picking up an object to minimise physical effort. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05493-3DOI Listing
February 2019

The effects of acute exercise on visuomotor adaptation, learning, and inter-limb transfer.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Feb 18. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Department of Physical Therapy, Brain Behavior Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, 212-2177, Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada.

Pairing an acute bout of lower-limb cycling exercise with skilled motor practice enhances acquisition and learning. However, it is not known whether an acute bout of exercise enhances a specific form of motor learning, namely motor adaptation, and if subsequent inter-limb transfer of this adaptation is enhanced. Seventeen young healthy participants performed a bout of cycling exercise and rest, on separate days, prior to right-arm reaching movements to visual targets under 45° rotated feedback of arm position (acquisition), followed by an immediate test of inter-limb transfer with the untrained left arm. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05491-5DOI Listing
February 2019

Bimodal-divided attention attenuates visually induced inhibition of return with audiovisual targets.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Okayama University, Okayama, 7008530, Japan.

Inhibition of return (IOR) refers to the slower response to a target appearing at a previously attended location in a cue-target paradigm. It has been greatly explored in the visual or auditory modality. This study investigates differences between the IOR of audiovisual targets and the IOR of visual targets under conditions of modality-specific selective attention (Experiment 1) and divided-modalities attention (Experiment 2). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05488-0DOI Listing
February 2019
2.036 Impact Factor

Interlimb transfer and generalisation of learning in the context of persistent failure to accomplish a visuomotor task.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

School of Psychology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK.

Transfer, in which capability acquired in one situation influences performance in another is considered, along with retention, as demonstrative of effectual learning. In this regard, interlimb transfer of functional capacity has commanded particular attention as a means of gauging the generalisation of acquired capability. Both theoretical treatments and prior empirical studies suggest that the successful accomplishment of a physical training regime is required to bring about generalised changes that extend to the untrained limb. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05484-4DOI Listing
February 2019

A margin for error in grasping: hand pre-shaping takes into account task-dependent changes in the probability of errors.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Feb 12. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

School of Psychology, Bangor University, Penrallt Rd., Bangor, Gwynedd, LL57 2AS, UK.

Ideal grasping movements should maintain an appropriate probability of success, while controlling movement-related costs, in the presence of varying visual (and motor) uncertainty. It is often assumed that the probability of errors is managed by adjusting a margin for error in hand opening (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05489-zDOI Listing
February 2019

The influence of microgravity on cerebral blood flow and electrocortical activity.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Institute of Movement and Neurosciences, German Sport University Cologne, Am Sportpark Müngersdorf 6, 50933, Cologne, Germany.

Changes in gravity conditions have previously been reported to influence brain hemodynamics as well as neuronal activity. This paper attempts to identify a possible link between changes in brain blood flow and neuronal activity during microgravity. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity (MCAv) was measured using Doppler ultrasound. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05490-6DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Multiple left-to-right spatial representations of number magnitudes? Evidence from left spatial neglect.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Feb 9. Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Department of Psychology, Rome University "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy.

The SNARC effect reflects the observation that when healthy observers with left-to-right reading habits are asked to compare the magnitude or to judge the parity of numbers, they provide faster reaction times (RT) to small numbers with left-sided responses and faster RTs to large numbers with right-sided responses. In magnitude comparison (MC), right brain damaged patients with left-sided neglect typically show a pathologically enlarged SNARC for large numbers and selective slowing to numbers that are immediately lower than the numerical reference (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05483-5DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Differential control of task and null space variability in response to changes in task difficulty when learning a bimanual steering task.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Feb 9. Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Department of Kinesiology, Michigan State University, 308 W Circle Dr Rm 126, East Lansing, MI, 48823, USA.

The presence of motor redundancy means that movement variability can be split into a 'task-space' component that affects task performance, and a 'null space' component which has no effect on task performance. While the control of task-space variability during learning is essential, because it is directly linked to performance, how the nervous system controls null space variability during learning has not been well understood. One factor that has been hypothesized to govern the change in null space variability with learning is task difficulty, but this has not been directly tested. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05486-2DOI Listing
February 2019

Field dependence-independence differently affects retrospective time estimation and flicker-induced time dilation.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Psychology, "Sapienza" University of Rome, via dei Marsi 78, 00185, Rome, Italy.

Field dependence-independence (FDI) is a stable dimension of individual functioning, transversal to different cognitive domains. While the role of some individual variables in time perception has received considerable attention, it is not clear whether and how FDI influences timing abilities. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that FDI differently affects timing performance depending on whether the task requires cognitive restructuring. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05485-3DOI Listing
February 2019

The programming of sequences of saccades.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, Reading, RG6 6AL, UK.

Saccadic eye movements move the high-resolution fovea to point at regions of interest. Saccades can only be generated serially (i.e. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00221-019-05481-7
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05481-7DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Correction to: Voluntary and electrically-induced muscle fatigue differently affect postural control mechanisms in unipedal stance.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Feb;237(2):325

Département STAPS, Laboratoire Mouvement, Equilibre, Performance et Santé (UPRES EA 4445), Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, ZA Bastillac Sud, 65000, Tarbes, France.

In the metadata of the original publication of the article. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05476-4DOI Listing
February 2019

Willingness towards cognitive engagement: a preliminary study based on a behavioural entropy approach.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Dipartimento di Psicologia, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Roma, Italy.

Faced with a novel task some people enthusiastically embark in it and work with determination, while others soon lose interest and progressively reduce their efforts. Although cognitive neuroscience has explored the behavioural and neural features of apathy, the why's and how's of positive engagement are only starting to be understood. Stemming from the observation that the left hemisphere is commonly associated to a proactive ('do something') disposition, we run a preliminary study exploring the possibility that individual variability in eagerness to engage in cognitive tasks could reflect a preferred left- or right-hemisphere functioning mode. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00221-019-05482-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05482-6DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Gravity modulates behaviour control strategy.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 30. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, UK.

Human behaviour is a trade-off between exploitation of familiar resources and exploration of new ones. In a challenging environment-such as outer space-making the correct decision is vital. On Earth, gravity is always there, and is an important reference for behaviour. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05479-1DOI Listing
January 2019

Shared right-hemispheric representations of sensorimotor goals in dynamic task environments.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, ON, M1C 1A4, Canada.

Functional behaviour affords that we form goals to integrate sensory information about the world around us with suitable motor actions, such as when we plan to grab an object with a hand. However, much research has tested grasping in static scenarios where goals are pursued with repetitive movements, whereas dynamic contexts require goals to be pursued even when changes in the environment require a change in the actions to attain them. To study grasp goals in dynamic environments here, we employed a task where the goal remained the same but the execution of the movement changed; we primed participants to grasp objects either with their right or left hand, and occasionally they had to switch to grasping with both. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05478-2DOI Listing
January 2019

The Uznadze illusion reveals similar effects of relative size on perception and action.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 25. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Università di Parma, Parma, Italy.

Milner and Goodale (the visual brain in action, Oxford University Press Inc., Oxford, 1995) proposed a functional dissociation between vision-for-action and vision-for-perception (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05480-8DOI Listing
January 2019

Spatial and feature-based attention to expressive faces.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 25. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA.

Facial emotion is an important cue for deciding whether an individual is potentially helpful or harmful. However, facial expressions are inherently ambiguous and observers typically employ other cues to categorize emotion expressed on the face, such as race, sex, and context. Here, we explored the effect of increasing or reducing different types of uncertainty associated with a facial expression that is to be categorized. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00221-019-05472-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05472-8DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Ease of hand rotation during active exploration of views of a 3-D object modulates view generalization.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 24. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Psychology, Otemon Gakuin University, Osaka, Japan.

Active exploration of views of 3-D objects by manually controlling a device, such as a trackball, facilitates subsequent object recognition, suggesting that motor simulation contributes to object recognition. Further, biomechanical constraints, such as range of hand rotation, can affect mental rotation. Thus, the ease with which an object can be rotated by hand may modulate the facilitative effect active exploration through manual control has on object recognition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05474-6DOI Listing
January 2019

Multi-task prioritization during the performance of a postural-manual and communication task.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, Lyles-Porter Hall, 715 Clinic Dr., West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA.

Individuals are often required to complete two tasks simultaneously, such as walking while talking. Although the influence of performing a cognitive task during upright standing has been studied, less is known regarding how individuals prioritize the performance of multiple goal-directed tasks. The purpose of this study was to examine how young adults prioritize the performance of two goal-directed tasks while standing: generating speech (communicating) while performing a postural-manual task. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05473-7DOI Listing
January 2019

Non-linear effects of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the primary motor cortex on implicit motor learning.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 19. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Department of Psychology, Bar Ilan University, 5290002, Ramat Gan, Israel.

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of 1 mA for 13 min was reported to create a linear inter-dependency between the intensity and duration of the current and the effects of the stimulation. tDCS on the primary motor cortex (M1) has been shown to have an effect on both motor-evoked potential (MEP) and motor learning. However, recent findings have shown that the known linear effect is invalid in a 2 mA stimulation for 20 min, where cathodal stimulation led to excitability, rather than inhibition, as measured by MEP changes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05477-3DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Effects of vibration on cutaneous silent period.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 18. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Department of Neurology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey.

Suppression of an ongoing muscle contraction following noxious digital stimulation is called cutaneous silent period (CSP) which is under the influence of several physiological factors. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the influence of group Ia afferents on the cutaneous silent period (CSP) by applying 2-min vibration. CSP was obtained from abductor pollicis brevis muscle after stimulating index finger. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-05463-1DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The impact of cognitive load on processing efficiency and performance effectiveness in anxiety: evidence from event-related potentials and pupillary responses.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 17. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of Psychology, Centre for Innovation in Mental Health-Developmental Lab, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.

Anxiety has been associated with poor attentional control, as reflected in lowered performance on experimental measures of executive attention and inhibitory control. Recent conceptualisations of anxiety propose that individuals who report elevated anxiety symptoms worry about performance and will exert greater cognitive effort to complete tasks well, particularly when cognitive demands are high. Across two experiments, we examined the effect of anxiety on task performance and across two load conditions using (1) measures of inhibitory control (behavioural reaction times and eye-movement responses) and (2) task effort with pupillary and electrocortical markers of effort (CNV) and inhibitory control (N2). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-05466-yDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Low-intensity repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over prefrontal cortex in an animal model alters activity in the auditory thalamus but does not affect behavioural measures of tinnitus.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 16. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

School of Human Sciences, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia.

Tinnitus, a phantom auditory percept, is strongly associated with cochlear trauma. The latter leads to central changes in auditory pathways such as increased spontaneous activity and this may be involved in tinnitus generation. As not all people with cochlear trauma develop tinnitus, recent studies argue that non-auditory structures, such as prefrontal cortex (PFC), play an important role in tinnitus development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-05468-wDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Modulation of temporal resolution and speech long-latency auditory-evoked potentials by transcranial direct current stimulation in children and adolescents with dyslexia.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 12. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Department of Epidemiology and Reproductive Health, Reproductive Epidemiology Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran, Iran.

In recent years, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been used as a safe and non-invasive method for children and adolescents with dyslexia. Our aim in this study was to investigate the effect of tDCS on variables of temporal resolution and speech long-latency auditory-evoked potentials with two electrode arrays on superior temporal gyrus (STG). A total of 17 children and adolescents with dyslexia (age 9-12 years) were included in our study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05471-9DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Beyond rambling and trembling: effects of visual feedback on slow postural drift.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Department of Kinesiology, The Pennsylvania State University, Rec.Hall-268N, University Park, PA, 16802, USA.

We explored one of the unusual predictions of the concept of back-coupling within the theoretical scheme of the control of posture and movement with setting referent coordinates for the effectors. This concept implies slow drifts of referent coordinates toward actual coordinates leading to unintentional drift in performance. During standing, such slow drifts may lead to a protective step or even a fall and, therefore, corrections are expected leading to body sway at frequencies under 0. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00221-019-05470-w
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05470-wDOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Enhanced audio-tactile multisensory interaction in a peripersonal task after echolocation.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

U-VIP: Unit for Visually Impaired People, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Genoa, Italy.

Peripersonal space (PPS) is created by a multisensory interaction between different sensory modalities and can be modified by experience. In this article, we investigated whether an auditory training, inside the peripersonal space area, can modify the PPS around the head in sighted participants. The auditory training was based on echolocation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-019-05469-3DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Rapid online corrections for upper limb reaches to perturbed somatosensory targets: evidence for non-visual sensorimotor transformation processes.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 5. Epub 2019 Jan 5.

Centre for Motor Control, University of Toronto, 55 Harbord Street, Toronto, M5S 2W6, Canada.

When performing upper limb reaches, the sensorimotor system can adjust to changes in target location even if the reaching limb is not visible. To accomplish this task, sensory information about the new target location and the current position of the unseen limb are used to program online corrections. Previous researchers have argued that, prior to the initiation of corrections, somatosensory information from the unseen limb must be transformed into a visual reference frame. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5448-3DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Change in effectivity yields recalibration of affordance geometry to preserve functional dynamics.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA.

Mon-Williams and Bingham (Exp Brain Res 211(1):145-160, 2011) developed a geometrical affordance model for reaches-to-grasp, and identified a constant scaling relationship, P, between safety margins (SM) and available apertures (SM) that are determined by the sizes of the objects and the individual hands. Bingham et al. (J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform 40(4):1542-1550, 2014) extended the model by introducing a dynamical component that scales the geometrical relationship to the stability of the reaching-to-grasp. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-05467-xDOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Corticospinal excitability is enhanced while preparing for complex movements.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

School of Health and Exercise Sciences, University of British Columbia -Okanagan, 1147 Research Road, Kelowna, BC, V1V 1V7, Canada.

Movement complexity is known to increase reaction time (RT). More recently, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex has revealed that movement complexity can alter corticospinal excitability. However, the impact of a sequential addition of movement components on corticospinal excitability during the preparatory phase of a simple RT task is unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-05464-0DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Adaptation and spatial generalization to a triaxial visuomotor perturbation in a virtual reality environment.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 3. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

École de kinésiologie et des sciences de l'activité physique, Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, 2100, boul. Édouard-Montpetit, bureau 8225, Montreal, QC, H3T 1J4, Canada.

We explored visuomotor adaptation and spatial generalization of three-dimensional reaching movements performed in a virtual reality environment. We used a multiphase learning paradigm. First, subjects performed reaching movements to six targets without visual feedback (VF) (pre-exposure phase). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-05462-2DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Use of imperceptible wrist vibration to modulate sensorimotor cortical activity.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 3. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Department of Chemistry, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, 28608, USA.

Peripheral sensory stimulation has been used as a method to stimulate the sensorimotor cortex, with applications in neurorehabilitation. To improve delivery modality and usability, a new stimulation method has been developed in which imperceptible random-frequency vibration is applied to the wrist concurrently during hand activity. The objective of this study was to investigate effects of this new sensory stimulation on the sensorimotor cortex. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00221-018-05465-z
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-05465-zDOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads
2.036 Impact Factor

The neural basis of the senses of effort, force and heaviness.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Accident Research Centre, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, 3800, Australia.

Effort, force and heaviness are related terms, having in common that they are all sensations associated with the generation of voluntary muscle contractions. Traditionally they have been thought to originate in the brain, as a result of copies of motor commands relayed to sensory areas. A stumbling block for the central hypothesis has been the lack of proportionality between the fall in muscle force from fatigue or paralysis and the increase in sensation generated while trying to achieve the required force. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5460-7DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Cognitive style modulates semantic interference effects: evidence from field dependency.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Department of Psychology, University of Rome "Sapienza", Via dei Marsi, 78, 00185, Rome, Italy.

The so-called semantic interference effect is a delay in selecting an appropriate target word in a context where semantic neighbours are strongly activated. Semantic interference effect has been described to vary from one individual to another. These differences in the susceptibility to semantic interference may be due to either differences in the ability to engage in lexical-specific selection mechanisms or to differences in the ability to engage more general, top-down inhibition mechanisms which suppress unwanted responses based on task-demands. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5457-2DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Community-dwelling adults with a history of falling report lower perceived postural stability during a foam eyes closed test than non-fallers.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Perceived postural stability has been reported to decrease as sway area increases on firm surfaces. However, changes in perceived stability under increasingly challenging conditions (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5458-1DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

H-reflex modulation preceding changes in soleus EMG activity during balance perturbation.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Faculty of Medicine, School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, Pavillon du Parc, C.P.6128 Succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7, Canada.

When balance is compromised, postural strategies are induced to quickly recover from the perturbation. However, neuronal mechanisms underlying these strategies are not fully understood. Here, we assessed the amplitude of the soleus (SOL) H-reflex during forward and backward tilts of the support surface during standing (n = 15 healthy participants). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5459-0DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Does dance training influence beat sensorimotor synchronization? Differences in finger-tapping sensorimotor synchronization between competitive ballroom dancers and nondancers.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Jan 2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Department of Sport Psychology, School of Sport Science, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Sensorimotor synchronization is the coordination of rhythmic movement with an external beat. Dancers often synchronize each beat of their motion with an external rhythm. Compared with social dancing, competitive ballroom dancing requires a higher level of sensorimotor ability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5410-4DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Correcting for natural visuo-proprioceptive matching errors based on reward as opposed to error feedback does not lead to higher retention.

Exp Brain Res 2018 Dec 17. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.

When asked to move their unseen hand-to-visual targets, people exhibit idiosyncratic but reliable visuo-proprioceptive matching errors. Unsurprisingly, vision and proprioception quickly align when these errors are made apparent by providing visual feedback of the position of the hand. However, retention of this learning is limited, such that the original matching errors soon reappear when visual feedback is removed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5456-3DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Playing Super Mario increases oculomotor inhibition and frontal eye field grey matter in older adults.

Exp Brain Res 2018 Dec 15. Epub 2018 Dec 15.

Centre de Recherche en Neuropsychologie et Cogntion, University of Montreal, Pavillon Marie-Victorin 90, Avenue Vincent d'Indy, Montreal, QC, H2V 2S9, Canada.

Aging is associated with cognitive decline and decreased capacity to inhibit distracting information. Video game training holds promise to increase inhibitory mechanisms in older adults. In the current study, we tested the impact of 3D-platform video game training on performance in an antisaccade task and on related changes in grey matter within the frontal eye fields (FEFs) of older adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5453-6DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Power and phase coherence in sensorimotor mu and temporal lobe alpha components during covert and overt syllable production.

Exp Brain Res 2018 Dec 14. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Department of Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences, Gallaudet University, 800 Florida Ave, Washington, DC, USA.

The sensorimotor dorsal stream is known to activate in both overt and covert speech production. However, overt production produces sensory consequences that are absent during covert production. Thus, the purpose of the current study is to investigate differences in dorsal stream activity between these two production conditions across the time course of utterances. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5447-4DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Self-face and self-body advantages in congenital prosopagnosia: evidence for a common mechanism.

Exp Brain Res 2018 Dec 12. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

NeuroMI-Milan Center for Neuroscience, Milano, Italy.

Prosopagnosia is a disorder leading to difficulties in recognizing faces. However, recent evidence suggests that individuals with congenital prosopagnosia can achieve considerable accuracy when they have to recognize their own faces (self-face advantage). Yet, whether this advantage is face-specific or not is still unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5452-7DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Variable and intermittent grip force control in response to differing load force dynamics.

Exp Brain Res 2018 Dec 12. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Department of Psychology, Center for Cognition, Action, and Perception, University of Cincinnati, Edwards Center 1, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0376, USA.

A recent study (Grover et al. Exp Brain Res 236(10):2531-2544, 2018) found that the grip force applied to maintain grasp of a hand-held object exhibited intermittent coupling to the changing load forces exerted by the object as it was oscillated. In particular, the strength and consistency of grip force response to load force oscillations was tied to overall load force levels and the prominence of load force oscillations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5451-8DOI Listing
December 2018
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Do individual differences in the distribution of activation between synergist muscles reflect individual strategies?

Exp Brain Res 2018 Dec 6. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

Faculty of Sport Sciences, Laboratory "Movement, Interactions, Performance" (EA 4334), University of Nantes, 25 bis boulevard Guy Mollet, 44300, Nantes, France.

Individual differences in the distribution of activation between synergist muscles have been reported during a wide variety of tasks. Whether these differences represent actual individual strategies is unknown. The aims of this study were to: (i) test the between-day reliability of the distribution of activation between synergist muscles, (ii) to determine the robustness of these strategies between tasks, and to (iii) describe the inter-individual variability of activation strategies in a large sample size. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5445-6DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Judging risk magnitude: walking to the left and base jumping to the right.

Exp Brain Res 2018 Dec 11. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.

When thinking about quantifiable domains such as numbers, pitch, and size, they are implicitly mapped on to representational space with small/low/less and large/high/more of the respective domain represented on the left and right sides of representational space, respectively. Recent research has also demonstrated that more abstract domains (colours, language, political party names) are also mapped in the same way. This study investigated a new abstract domain, risk, to examine if this same pattern of effects is apparent (left = low risk/right = high risk) to get a better understanding of how risk magnitudes are processed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5449-2DOI Listing
December 2018
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The effect of light touch on standing sway when the stability of the external touch reference becomes unreliable.

Exp Brain Res 2018 Dec 11. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, 2-64 Corbett Hall, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2G4, Canada.

Lightly touching a stable reference is associated with sway reduction during standing. Unexpected displacement of the touch reference results in a false-positive balance reaction in some participants, but only with the first such disturbance. This study investigated whether light touch reduces standing sway (1) after the touch reference becomes unreliable, and (2) when participants are aware the touch reference is unreliable. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5455-4DOI Listing
December 2018
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Time course of changes in corticospinal excitability induced by motor imagery during action observation combined with peripheral nerve electrical stimulation.

Exp Brain Res 2018 Dec 8. Epub 2018 Dec 8.

Tokyo Bay Rehabilitation Hospital, 4-1-1 Yatsu, Narashino-shi, Chiba, 275-0026, Japan.

While previous studies assessed corticospinal excitability changes during and after motor imagery (MI) or action observation (AO) combined with peripheral nerve electrical stimulation (ES), we examined, for the first time, the time course of corticospinal excitability changes for MI during AO combined with ES (AO-MI + ES) using transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in healthy individuals. Fourteen healthy volunteers participated in the following three sessions on different days: AO-MI alone, ES alone, and AO-MI + ES. In the AO-MI task, participants imagined squeezing and relaxing a ball, along with the respective actions shown in a movie, while passively holding the ball. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5454-5DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Effect of caffeine on long-term potentiation-like effects induced by quadripulse transcranial magnetic stimulation.

Exp Brain Res 2018 Dec 10. Epub 2018 Dec 10.

Department of Neuro-Regeneration, Fukushima Medical University, 1 Hikarigaoka, Fukushima, Fukushima, Japan.

Caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, is known to affect sleep-awake cycles, the stress response, and learning and memory. It has been suggested that caffeine influences synaptic plasticity, but the effects of caffeine on synaptic plasticity in the human brain remain unexplored. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of caffeine on long-term potentiation (LTP)-like effects in the primary motor cortex of healthy humans. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00221-018-5450-9
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5450-9DOI Listing
December 2018
12 Reads

Impact of extremely low-frequency magnetic fields on human postural control.

Exp Brain Res 2018 Dec 5. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Lawson Health Research Institute, St. Joseph Hospital, London, ON, Canada.

Studies have found that extremely low-frequency (ELF, < 300 Hz) magnetic fields (MF) can modulate standing balance; however, the acute balance effects of high flux densities in this frequency range have not been systematically investigated yet. This study explores acute human standing balance responses of 22 participants exposed to magnetic induction at 50 and 100 mTrms (MF), and to 1.5 mA alternating currents (AC). Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00221-018-5442-9
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5442-9DOI Listing
December 2018
15 Reads

Persistence in postural dynamics is dependent on constraints of vision, postural orientation, and the temporal structure of support surface translations.

Exp Brain Res 2018 Dec 1. Epub 2018 Dec 1.

Department of Biomechanics, University of Nebraska at Omaha, BRB#210, Biomechanics Research Building, 6160 University Drive, Omaha, NE, 68182-0860, USA.

Activities of daily living require maintaining upright posture within a variety of environmental constraints. A healthy postural control system can adapt to different environmental constraints. Afferent sensory information is used to determine where the body is in relation to the gravitational vertical and efferent motor commands make corrections with the goal of keeping the center of mass within the base of support. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00221-018-5444-7
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5444-7DOI Listing
December 2018
9 Reads

Improving the functionality, robustness, and adaptability of myoelectric control for dexterous motion restoration.

Exp Brain Res 2019 Feb 30;237(2):291-311. Epub 2018 Nov 30.

State Key Laboratory of Robotics and System, Harbin Institute of Technology, #3039, HIT Science Park, No. 2 Yikuang Street, Nangang District, Harbin, 150081, China.

The development of advanced and effective human-machine interfaces, especially for amputees to control their prostheses, is very high priority and a very active area of research. An intuitive control method should retain an adequate level of functionality for dexterous operation, provide robustness against confounding factors, and supply adaptability for diverse long-term usage, all of which are current problems being tackled by researchers. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art, as well as, the limitations of current myoelectric signal control (MSC) methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5441-xDOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads