51 results match your criteria European Respiratory Disease [Journal]


Airway responsiveness in young black and white women.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1993 Jul;148(1):98-102

Pulmonary Division, Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI 02906.

The prevalence and severity of asthma appears to be greater in blacks than in whites. To determine if racial differences in airway responsiveness may explain these findings, methacholine challenge tests from 62 black and 238 white women 20 to 35 yr of age were evaluated. Subjects served as controls for a case-control study of the relation of airway responsiveness and preterm labor. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm/148.1.98DOI Listing
July 1993
7 Reads

Race and gender differences in respiratory illness prevalence and their relationship to environmental exposures in children 7 to 14 years of age.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1993 Jul;148(1):10-8

Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Channing Laboratory, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.

Race and gender differences in respiratory illness prevalence rates were assessed in a cohort of 8,322 white children and 1,056 black children 7 to 14 yr of age from four U.S. cities. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm/148.1.10DOI Listing
July 1993
5 Reads

The pulmonary response of white and black adults to six concentrations of ozone.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1993 Apr;147(4):804-10

Clinical Research Branch, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7315.

Many early studies of respiratory responsiveness to ozone (O3) were done on healthy, young, white males. The purpose of this study was to determine whether gender or race differences in O3 response exist among white and black, males and females, and to develop concentration-response curves for each of the gender-race groups. Three hundred seventy-two subjects (n > 90 in each gender-race group), ages 18 to 35 yr, were exposed once for 2. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm/147.4.804DOI Listing
April 1993
6 Reads

Delta F508 mutation of cystic fibrosis gene is not found in chronic bronchitis with severe obstruction in Japan.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1992 Sep;146(3):781-3

First Department of Internal Medicine, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.

Diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) in Japan is a chronic bronchitis observed in nonsmoking adults, with severe obstruction and poor prognosis. DPB shares pathologic and clinical characteristics with mild adult cystic fibrosis (CF), except that CF is frequent in whites (Europeans and Americans of European descent) but not in Japanese. Recently, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was identified, and a 3-base pair deletion (delta F508) was confirmed as a major mutation responsible for CF. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/ajrccm/146.3.781
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm/146.3.781DOI Listing
September 1992
8 Reads

Familial pulmonary hypertension: immunogenetic findings in four Caucasian kindreds.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1992 Apr;145(4 Pt 1):787-92

Division of Rheumatology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York 10032.

A postulated association between primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) and autoimmune diseases prompted this study. To see if autoantibodies and an association with the major histocompatibility locus (MHC) accompany the familial form of pulmonary hypertension (PHT), we determined human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-class I (A,B,C) and HLA-class II (DR,DQ) typing serologically, serum immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes, and antinuclear (ANA)-autoantibodies in three families in which more than one member had PPH (FPPH) and in a fourth family with PPH and PHT associated with congenital heart disease. The three FPPH families had 15 PPH + members, eight (in whom the alleles were determined or could be inferred) typed for HLA-DRw52 and seven for HLA-DR3,DRw52,DQw2. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm/145.4_Pt_1.787DOI Listing
April 1992
5 Reads

Compliance of the respiratory system in infants born at high altitude.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1990 Jul;142(1):43-8

Department of Physiology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Populations living at high altitude are known to have a number of distinctive physiologic traits, including an increase in lung volume and compliance. We asked whether the factors that result in the increased compliance of high altitude natives were sufficiently expressed in utero that an increase in respiratory system compliance (Crs) could be detected at birth. Measurements were performed at about 1 day after birth on 34 infants born in La Paz, Bolivia (3,600 m, Pb about 495 mm Hg) and 36 born in Santa Cruz (400 m, Pb about 735 mm Hg). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm/142.1.43DOI Listing
July 1990
5 Reads

Single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity prediction equations from a Mediterranean population.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1990 Apr;141(4 Pt 1):1026-32

Department of Medicine, Hospital Clinic, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain.

Because of unanswered questions about prediction equations for the single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) and as part of a larger collaborative project, standardized DLCO measurements were carried out in a selected sample of 361 healthy nonsmoking volunteers (194 men and 167 women) living in the Barcelona metropolitan area (Spain). Except for the test FIO2 (0.18), the study essentially followed the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Community for Coal and Steel (ECCS) recommendations for standardizing the methodology of measuring DLCO. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm/141.4_Pt_1.1026DOI Listing
April 1990
5 Reads

Extrapulmonary tuberculosis in the United States.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1990 Feb;141(2):347-51

Division of Tuberculosis Control, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333.

From 1963 to 1986, the number of reported cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in the United States declined an average of 5.0% annually, and the number of cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis declined an average of 0.9% annually over the same period. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm/141.2.347DOI Listing
February 1990
9 Reads

International comparisons in COPD mortality.

Authors:
T J Thom

Am Rev Respir Dis 1989 Sep;140(3 Pt 2):S27-34

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD.

In 31 developed countries, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and allied conditions comprise a major cause of death, but they cause less than 10% of all deaths, even in older persons. COPD mortality is highest in the Eastern European countries and Ireland, Scotland, and England/Wales, and is lowest in southern Europe, Japan, and Israel. That these differences are large and real is a likelihood but not a certainty, due to problems in comparability of cause-of-death statistics. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm/140.3_Pt_2.S27DOI Listing
September 1989
10 Reads

The effects of cigarette smoking on T cell subsets. A population-based survey of healthy caucasians.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1989 Jun;139(6):1446-51

Environmental Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland.

To investigate the influence of cigarette smoking on mononuclear cell subsets, we determined T cell, B cell, monocyte, and HLA-DR+ subsets in a population-based, stratified, random sample of healthy Caucasians using monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry. The study population consisted of 282 subjects 20 to 69 yr of age, including 108 smokers and 174 nonsmokers. Multivariate analysis techniques were used to assess the influence of cigarette smoking status after controlling for the effects of age and gender. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm/139.6.1446DOI Listing
June 1989
5 Reads

Reference values for FEV1 in Japanese-American men from 45 to 68 years of age.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1988 Dec;138(6):1393-7

Honolulu Heart Program, Hawaii 96817.

Pulmonary function is known to vary by racial group, yet no standards have been published for Asian-Americans. The Honolulu Heart Program, a prospective epidemiologic study of cardiovascular disease, provided an opportunity to examine pulmonary function, specifically, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), in Japanese-American men 45 to 68 yr of age. Of a cohort of 6,346 men, 1,490 were identified as healthy asymptomatic nonsmokers. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm/138.6.1393DOI Listing
December 1988
4 Reads

International comparison of the prevalence of asthma symptoms and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1988 Sep;138(3):524-9

Department of Paediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Potential explanations for the higher rates of asthma mortality and hospital admissions in New Zealand (NZ) include greater prevalence of asthma. To evaluate this further, a large community survey has been undertaken. Rates of respiratory symptoms and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) for children in Auckland, NZ have been compared to those for children in two locations in New South Wales (NSW), Australia: Wagga Wagga (inland) and Belmont (coastal). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm/138.3.524DOI Listing
September 1988
5 Reads

Lung volumes in Polynesian children.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1987 Dec;136(6):1360-5

Department of Paediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Polynesian (Maori and Pacific Island) children account for approximately one quarter of the children in New Zealand, but good data for lung function in this group are not available. In this review, we report lung volume measurements in 571 healthy children 5 to 13 yr of age: 270 Polynesians (139 boys and 131 girls) and 301 Europeans (177 boys and 124 girls). All measurements were made in a body plethysmograph. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/ajrccm/136.6.1360
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm/136.6.1360DOI Listing
December 1987
7 Reads

Distribution of forced expiratory volume in one second and forced vital capacity in healthy, white, adult never-smokers in six U.S. cities.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1985 Apr;131(4):511-20

As part of a longitudinal study of the respiratory health effects of air pollution, we measured the lung function of 2,454 white adults 25 to 74 yr of age who had never smoked and who reported no respiratory symptoms. These measurements were analyzed to develop a simple model for the cross-sectional dependence of pulmonary function on height, sex, and age. Both forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) can be effectively standardized for body size by dividing each pulmonary function measurement by the square of the standing height (HT2). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1985.131.4.511DOI Listing
April 1985
7 Reads

Lung cancer risk and vitamin A consumption in New Mexico.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1985 Feb;131(2):198-202

The association between dietary intake of vitamin A and lung cancer risk was examined in a population-based, case-control study of 447 patients and 759 control subjects in New Mexico. A food frequency interview was used to measure usual consumption of total vitamin A retinol, preformed vitamin A, and carotene. With all respondents combined, the odds ratios for lung cancer increased as intakes of total vitamin A and carotene declined but did not vary with intake of preformed vitamin A. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1985.131.2.198DOI Listing
February 1985
6 Reads

A longitudinal study of spirometry in young black and young white children.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1984 Dec;130(6):1100-7

Spirometry was performed longitudinally over a period of 8 yr on 72 children (29 black females, 26 black males, 9 white females, and 8 white males) starting as early as 3 yr of age. Weighted straight-line regressions of 6 maximal expiratory flow-volume parameters--forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the FVC (FEF25-75), and maximal expiratory flows after 50 and 75% of the FVC had been exhaled (Vmax50 and Vmax75, respectively) - on height were computed and were found to describe adequately the data over a height range of 100 to 150 cm. Statistical comparisons of regression lines revealed significant differences for FVC and FEV1 when white females were compared with white males, white females with black females, and white males with black males, but not for black females with black males. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1984.130.6.1100DOI Listing
December 1984
4 Reads

Sarcoidosis: epidemiology and prognosis. A 15-year European study.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1984 Jul;130(1):29-32

A 15-year study of patients with sarcoidosis is presented. In most patients, the disease was discovered at a general health screening examination. The mean total incidence among persons 15 yr of age or older was 19 per 100,000 per year (21. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1984.130.1.29DOI Listing
July 1984
6 Reads

Pneumoconiosis in Georgia kaolin workers.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1983 Feb;127(2):215-20

Middle Georgia kaolin workers (n = 459) were surveyed for the presence of pneumoconiosis by chest radiograph and for respiratory symptoms by questionnaire. Pulmonary function was measured in all workers by spirometry. The overall prevalence of pneumoconiosis in this population was 9. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1983.127.2.215DOI Listing
February 1983
7 Reads

Respiratory disease in a New Mexico population sample of Hispanic and non-Hispanic whites.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1982 Feb;125(2):152-7

To characterize the epidemiologic features of respiratory diseases among Hispanics, we conducted a prevalence survey in Bernalillo County, New Mexico. The ATS-DLD-78 respiratory symptoms questionnaire was completed by 633 Hispanics and 1,038 Anglos (non-Hispanic whites) with an overall response rate of 72%. The prevalence of major respiratory diseases differed between the groups. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1982.125.2.152DOI Listing
February 1982
4 Reads

Abnormal cilia in Polynesians with bronchiectasis.

Authors:
S Wakefield D Waite

Am Rev Respir Dis 1980 Jun;121(6):1003-10

Bronchial or nasal ciliated epithelium from 13 patients with bronchiectasis (12 Polynesians and 1 European) was examined by electron microscopy. All cilia examined lacked dynein arams. In 2 patients, this was the only abnormality observed, but in the others, various ciliary abnormalities were present, including cilia with missing tubules, extra tubules, and misplaced tubules, as well as compound cilia, intracytoplasmic cilia, vesiculated cilia, and cilia with long winglike folds. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1980.121.6.1003DOI Listing
June 1980
7 Reads

Lung function in children with sickle cell anemia.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1979 Jul;120(1):210-4

Lung volumes and expiratory flows were measured in 12 children with sickle cell anemia and 12 height-matched black control subjects. Diffusing capacity of the lung for CO, pulmonary capillary blood volume, the membrane component of diffusing capacity, arterial blood gases on breathing room air and 100 per cent O2 were measured in the subjects with sickle cell anemia. The lung volumes and expiratory flows of subjects with sickle cell anemia were no different from those of the control subjects. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1979.120.1.210DOI Listing
July 1979
13 Reads

Racism in coccidioidomycosis?

Authors:
M Huppert

Am Rev Respir Dis 1978 Oct;118(4):797-8

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1978.118.4.797DOI Listing
October 1978
9 Reads

Lung function among black and white children.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1976 Nov;114(5):955-9

Racial differences in ventilatory lung function were evaluated in a community study of 393 children (158 blacks, 235 whites). Mean forced vital capacity was 18 per cent larger in nonsmoking white males than in nonsmoking black males, and 11 per cent larger in nonsmoking white females than in nonsmoking black females. Similar differences were observed for the 1-sec forced expiratory volume and for the maximal expiratory flow at 50 per cent of the vital capacity. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1976.114.5.955DOI Listing
November 1976
3 Reads

Use of the productive cough test to confirm presence of respiratory symptoms in school-age children.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1975 Sep;112(3):461-3

We assessed the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and loose cough in 622 school-age children from an urban town in Connecticut. A higher prevalence of chronic symptoms was reported by black children, but the prevalence of recent symptoms and of loose cough in black children was similar to that in white children. The relationship between prevalence of recent symptoms and loose cough suggests that the observed racial differences in prevalence of chronic symptoms were unlikely to be due to racial differences in responses to a respiratory symptom questionnaire. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1975.112.3.461DOI Listing
September 1975
3 Reads

The philadelphia pulmonary neoplasm research project. Thwarting factors in periodic screening for lung cancer.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1975 Mar;111(3):289-97

This report describes the problems of the Philadelphia Pulmonary Neoplasms Research Project, begun in 1951, when 6,027 male volunteers 45 years of age and older were enrolled in a study designed to screen them every 6 months for 10 years with questionnaires and chest photofluorograms. These volunteers tended to be slightly younger and to include fewer nonwhites that the corresponding Philadelphia population. The volunteers included more smokers than older American urban men in general, but among smokers the distribution by smoking habits was similar. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1975.111.3.289DOI Listing
March 1975
9 Reads

Normal lung weights in a white population.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1974 Oct;110(4):478-83

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1974.110.4.478DOI Listing
October 1974
6 Reads

The focality of urban tuberculosis. A look at Boston and its South End.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1973 Sep;108(3):553-8

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1973.108.3.553DOI Listing
September 1973
5 Reads

Anatomic sites, age attributes, and rates of sarcoidosis in U. S. veterans.

Authors:
A Z Keller

Am Rev Respir Dis 1973 Apr;107(4):615-20

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1973.107.4.615DOI Listing
April 1973
4 Reads

Tuberculin tine tests on medical wards.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1972 Feb;105(2):299-301

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1972.105.2.299DOI Listing
February 1972
9 Reads

Pulmonary function studies in healthy Chinese adults in Singapore.

Authors:
J L da Costa

Am Rev Respir Dis 1971 Jul;104(1):128-31

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1971.104.1.128DOI Listing
July 1971
6 Reads

BCG vaccination and sarcoidosis.

Authors:
H L Israel

Am Rev Respir Dis 1970 Mar;101(3):466

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1970.101.3.466bDOI Listing
March 1970
7 Reads

Tuberculosis infection in a metropolitan city: an epidemiologic review.

Authors:
S C Stein

Am Rev Respir Dis 1969 Feb;99(2):298

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1969.99.2.298DOI Listing
February 1969
5 Reads

Bronchogenic carcinoma and giant bullous disease.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1968 Jun;97(6):1062-70

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1968.97.6P1.1062DOI Listing
June 1968
5 Reads

Clinical spirometry in normal Bantu.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1968 Apr;97(4):585-97

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1968.97.4.585DOI Listing
April 1968
8 Reads

Carcinoma of the lung in a tuberculosis hospital population.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1967 Sep;96(3):451-9

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1967.96.3.451DOI Listing
September 1967
5 Reads

Hilar adenopathy in tuberculosis.

Am Rev Respir Dis 1967 Sep;96(3):439-50

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1967.96.3.439DOI Listing
September 1967
5 Reads

Tuberculous meningitis at Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital 1959 to 1963.

Authors:
A R Hinman

Am Rev Respir Dis 1967 Apr;95(4):670-3

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/arrd.1967.95.4.670DOI Listing
April 1967
4 Reads