644 results match your criteria Epidemiologic Reviews [Journal]


RE: "PREVALENCE OF POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER IN PRISONERS".

Authors:

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):166

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxy007DOI Listing
June 2018
1 Read

Prevalence of Drug Injection, Sexual Activity, Tattooing, and Piercing Among Prison Inmates.

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):58-69

Department of Health and Social Work, Institute of Addiction Research.

Prisoners engage in a range of risk behaviors that can lead to the transmission of viral infections, such as HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. In this review, we summarize the epidemiologic literature from 2007 to 2017 on 4 key risk behaviors for human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus among prisoners globally: drug injection, sexual activity, tattooing, and piercing. Of 9,303 peer-reviewed and 4,150 gray literature publications, 140 and 14, respectively, met inclusion criteria covering 53 countries (28%). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxy002DOI Listing
June 2018
22 Reads

Understanding and Improving the Health of People Who Experience Incarceration: An Overview and Synthesis.

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):4-11

Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne Australia.

The world prison population is growing at a rate that exceeds the rate of population growth. This issue of Epidemiologic Reviews comprises articles in which researchers summarize what is known about some of the key health issues facing people in prison, particularly in relation to human immunodeficiency virus and other blood-borne viral infections. A key recurring theme is that addressing the health needs of people in prison is important to reducing health inequalities at the population level-that prisoner health is public health. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5982728PMC
June 2018
1 Read

Smoking in Correctional Settings Worldwide: Prevalence, Bans, and Interventions.

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):82-95

Program of International Research and Training, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Smoking tobacco contributes to 11.5% of deaths worldwide and, in some countries, more hospitalizations than alcohol and drugs combined. Globally in 2015, 25% of men and 5% of women smoked. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxy005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5982806PMC

Substance Use and Recidivism Outcomes for Prison-Based Drug and Alcohol Interventions.

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):121-133

Lives Lived Well Research Group, School of Psychology, Faculty of Health and Behavioral Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

We conducted a systematic review to examine the substance use and recidivism outcomes of prison-based substance use interventions. We searched public health, criminology, and psychology databases, and conducted forward and backward snowballing methods to identify additional studies. Studies were included if they were published between January 1, 2000 and June 30, 2017; were published in English; and reported substance use and/or recidivism outcomes of prison-based substance use interventions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxy004DOI Listing

HIV and Viral Hepatitis Among Imprisoned Key Populations.

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):12-26

University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Prisons and other closed facilities create opportunities for transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and viral hepatitis during detention and after release. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of peer-reviewed publications (2005-2015) to describe the prevalence of HIV, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus among key populations in prisons worldwide and to compare estimates of infection with those of other prison populations. Most data were reported for people who inject drugs (PWID; n = 72) and for men who have sex with men (MSM; n = 21); few data were reported on sex workers (SW; n = 6), or transgender women (n = 2). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxy003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5982732PMC
June 2018
1 Read

Health Outcomes for Clients of Needle and Syringe Programs in Prisons.

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):96-104

Division of Prison Health, Geneva University Hospitals and University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.

High levels of drug dependence have been observed in the prison population globally, and the sharing of injecting drug equipment in prisons has contributed to higher prevalence of bloodborne diseases in prisoners than in the general population. Few prison needle and syringe programs (PNSPs) exist. We conducted a systematic review to assess evidence regarding health outcomes of PNSPs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx019DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

Active Case Finding for Communicable Diseases in Prison Settings: Increasing Testing Coverage and Uptake Among the Prison Population in the European Union/European Economic Area.

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):105-120

Pallas, Health Research and Consultancy B.V., Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Prison populations are disproportionally affected by communicable diseases when compared with the general community because of a complex mix of socioeconomic determinants and environmental factors. Tailored and adequate health care provision in prisons has the potential to reach vulnerable and underserved groups and address their complex needs. We investigated the available evidence on modalities and effectiveness of active case-finding interventions in prisons by searching PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library for records on prison and active case finding with no language limit. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxy001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5982719PMC
June 2018
6 Reads

Parental Incarceration and Child Health in the United States.

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):146-156

Department of Sociology, School of Social Sciences, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California.

Mass incarceration has profoundly restructured the life courses of not only marginalized adult men for whom this event is now so prevalent but also their families. We examined research published from 2000 to 2017 on the consequences of parental incarceration for child health in the United States. In addition to focusing on specific health outcomes, we also considered broader indicators of child well-being because there has been little research on the association between parental incarceration and objectively measured child health outcomes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx013DOI Listing
June 2018
1 Read

Editorial: Changing of the Guard-A New Editor for Epidemiologic Reviews.

Authors:
Michel A Ibrahim

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):2-3

Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx017DOI Listing
June 2018
1 Read

Prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Prisoners.

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):134-145

Medical Faculty, Universidad Diego Portales, Santiago, Chile.

People involved with criminal justice frequently are exposed to violence and traumatic experiences. This may lead to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however, no review, to our knowledge, has synthetized findings in this setting. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate prevalence rates of PTSD in prison populations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5982805PMC
June 2018
9 Reads

The Health of America's Aging Prison Population.

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):157-165

Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

Older incarcerated individuals comprise the fastest growing demographic in the US prison system. Unhealthy lifestyles among incarcerated individuals and inadequate health care lead to earlier onset and more rapid progression of many chronic conditions that are prevalent among community-living older adults. There are limited peer-reviewed epidemiologic data in this area; however, there is growing interest in identifying strategies for housing aging incarcerated individuals, delivering appropriate health care in prisons, and coordinating after-release health care. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5982810PMC
June 2018
2 Reads

Substance Use During Imprisonment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):70-81

Department of Psychiatry, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Substance use disorders are among the most common health problems of people involved with the criminal justice system. Scaling up addiction services in prisons is a global public health and human rights challenge, especially in poorly resourced countries. We systematically reviewed the prevalence of substance use in prison populations in low- and middle-income countries. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5982797PMC
June 2018
2 Reads

Dynamic Models of Infectious Disease Transmission in Prisons and the General Population.

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):40-57

Center for Infectious Disease Modeling and Analysis, Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.

Incarcerated populations experience elevated burdens of infectious diseases, which are exacerbated by limited access to prevention measures. Dynamic models are used to assess the spread and control of diseases within correctional facilities and repercussions on the general population. Our systematic review of dynamic models of infectious diseases within correctional settings identified 34 studies published between 1996 and 2017. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5982711PMC
June 2018
1 Read

Epidemiology of HIV, Sexually Transmitted Infections, Viral Hepatitis, and Tuberculosis Among Incarcerated Transgender People: A Case of Limited Data.

Epidemiol Rev 2018 06;40(1):27-39

Center for Public Health and Human Rights, Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

Transgender people experience a disproportionate burden of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and incarceration. Discrimination, victimization, poverty, and poor mental health drive vulnerability to HIV and related infections, as well as risk of arrest, detention, and incarceration. In this paper, we systematically review published data on HIV, sexually transmitted infections, viral hepatitis, and tuberculosis among incarcerated transgender people; describe potential structural determinants of HIV risk and transmission; identify gaps in the literature; and make recommendations for research and interventions to address this neglected population. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://academic.oup.com/epirev/article/40/1/27/4937889
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5982724PMC
June 2018
6 Reads

RE: "DISASTERS: INTRODUCTION AND STATE OF THE ART".

Authors:

Epidemiol Rev 2017 01;39(1):170

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx010DOI Listing
January 2017
3 Reads

Cancer in Transgender People: Evidence and Methodological Considerations.

Epidemiol Rev 2017 01;39(1):93-107

Transgender people comprise a diverse group of individuals whose gender identity or expression differs from that originally assigned to them at birth. Some, but not all, transgender people elect to undergo medical gender affirmation, which may include therapy with cross-sex hormones and/or surgical change of the genitalia and other sex characteristics. As cross-sex hormones administered for the purposes of gender affirmation may be delivered at high doses and over a period of decades, the carcinogenicity of hormonal therapy in transgender people is an area of considerable concern. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxw003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5868281PMC
January 2017
9 Reads

Vitamin D and Cancer Risk and Mortality: State of the Science, Gaps, and Challenges.

Epidemiol Rev 2017 01;39(1):28-48

There has been substantial enthusiasm recently regarding the potential role of vitamin D in the primary and secondary prevention of cancer. Laboratory studies demonstrate a range of anticarcinogenic effects for vitamin D compounds, but human studies have yielded little consistent evidence supporting a protective association. Higher circulating levels of vitamin D (i. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5858034PMC
January 2017
22 Reads

A Global Cancer Surveillance Framework Within Noncommunicable Disease Surveillance: Making the Case for Population-Based Cancer Registries.

Epidemiol Rev 2017 01;39(1):161-169

The growing burden of cancer among several major noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) requires national implementation of tailored public health surveillance. For many emerging economies where emphasis has traditionally been placed on the surveillance of communicable diseases, it is critical to understand the specificities of NCD surveillance and, within it, of cancer surveillance. We propose a general framework for cancer surveillance that permits monitoring the core components of cancer control. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx003DOI Listing
January 2017
9 Reads

Implementing Evidence-Based Palliative Care Programs and Policy for Cancer Patients: Epidemiologic and Policy Implications of the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

Epidemiol Rev 2017 01;39(1):123-131

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recently convened an Ad Hoc Palliative Care Expert Panel to update a 2012 provisional clinical opinion by conducting a systematic review of clinical trials in palliative care in oncology. The key takeaways from the updated ASCO clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are that more people should be referred to interdisciplinary palliative care teams and that more palliative care specialists and palliative care-trained oncologists are needed to meet this demand. The following summary statement is based on multiple randomized clinical trials: "Inpatients and outpatients with advanced cancer should receive dedicated palliative care services, early in the disease course, concurrent with active treatment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxw002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5858032PMC
January 2017
4 Reads

The Population Burden of Cancer: Research Driven by the Catchment Area of a Cancer Center.

Epidemiol Rev 2017 01;39(1):108-122

Cancer centers, particularly those supported by the National Cancer Institute, are charged with reducing the cancer burden in their catchment area. However, methods to define both the catchment area and the cancer burden are diverse and range in complexity often based on data availability, staff resources, or confusion about what is required. This article presents a review of the current literature identifying 4 studies that have defined various aspects of the cancer burden in a defined geographical area and highlights examples of how some cancer centers and other health institutions have defined their catchment area and characterized the cancer burden within it. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx001DOI Listing
January 2017
5 Reads

Reducing Cancer Burden in the Population: An Overview of Epidemiologic Evidence to Support Policies, Systems, and Environmental Changes.

Epidemiol Rev 2017 01;39(1):1-10

"Reducing Cancer Burden in the Population: Epidemiologic Evidence to Support Policies, Systems, and Environmental Changes" is a compilation of 11 reviews addressing aspects of primary prevention of cancer (early life factors, vitamin D, and periodontal disease and the oral microbiome); primary and secondary prevention (in the transgender population); surveillance following secondary prevention (personalizing follow-up of patients diagnosed with an adenoma based on colorectal cancer risk); tertiary prevention (physical activity as an adjuvant to cancer treatment, measurement of patient-reported physical functioning in cancer treatment trials, and implementation of palliative care recommendations); and all 3 (changing epidemiology of oral cancers). Authors discuss policies, systems, and environment (PSE) changes that may be supported by epidemiologic evidence, for example, how existing public health and clinical policies and guidelines targeting noncancer outcomes may indirectly reduce cancer burden and how some cancer control policies could be refined to enhance effectiveness. Authors also discuss where systems and environment changes are necessary to ensure routine implementation of up-to-date, evidence-based policies and guidelines. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5868280PMC
January 2017
3 Reads

Patient-Reported Physical Function Measures in Cancer Clinical Trials.

Epidemiol Rev 2017 01;39(1):59-70

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly used to monitor treatment-related symptoms and physical function decrements in cancer clinical trials. As more patients enter survivorship, it is important to capture PRO physical function throughout trials to help restore pretreatment levels of function. We completed a systematic review of PRO physical function measures used in cancer clinical trials and evaluated their psychometric properties on the basis of guidelines from the US Food and Drug Administration. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5858035PMC
January 2017
5 Reads

The Impact of Exercise on Cancer Mortality, Recurrence, and Treatment-Related Adverse Effects.

Epidemiol Rev 2017 01;39(1):71-92

The combination of an increasing number of new cancer cases and improving survival rates has led to a large and rapidly growing population with unique health-care requirements. Exercise has been proposed as a strategy to help address the issues faced by cancer patients. Supported by a growing body of research, major health organizations commonly identify the importance of incorporating exercise in cancer care and advise patients to be physically active. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx007DOI Listing
January 2017
16 Reads

Periodontal Disease, Tooth Loss, and Cancer Risk.

Epidemiol Rev 2017 01;39(1):49-58

Periodontal disease, which includes gingivitis and periodontitis, is highly prevalent in adults and disease severity increases with age. The relationship between periodontal disease and oral cancer has been examined for several decades, but there is increasing interest in the link between periodontal disease and overall cancer risk, with systemic inflammation serving as the main focus for biological plausibility. Numerous case-control studies have addressed the role of oral health in head and neck cancer, and several cohort studies have examined associations with other types of cancers over the past decade. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5868279PMC
January 2017
7 Reads

Early Life Exposures and Adult Cancer Risk.

Epidemiol Rev 2017 01;39(1):11-27

Very little is known about the influence of early life exposures on adult cancer risk. The purpose of this narrative review was to summarize the epidemiologic evidence relating early life tobacco use, obesity, diet, and physical activity to adult cancer risk; describe relevant theoretical frameworks and methodological strategies for studying early life exposures; and discuss policies and research initiatives focused on early life. Our findings suggest that in utero exposures may indirectly influence cancer risk by modifying biological pathways associated with carcinogenesis; however, more research is needed to firmly establish these associations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5858036PMC
January 2017
22 Reads

Evaluation of the Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Personalized Surveillance After Colorectal Adenomatous Polypectomy.

Epidemiol Rev 2017 01;39(1):148-160

Lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer is 5%, and 5-year survival at early stage is 92%. Individuals with precancerous lesions removed at primary screening are typically recommended surveillance colonoscopy. Because greater benefits are anticipated for those with higher risk of colorectal cancer, scope for risk-specific surveillance recommendations exists. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://academic.oup.com/epirev/article/39/1/148/3574073
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxx002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5858033PMC
January 2017
4 Reads

The Health System and Policy Implications of Changing Epidemiology for Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers in the United States From 1995 to 2016.

Epidemiol Rev 2017 01;39(1):132-147

Oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers are typically grouped under the general term, "oral cancer." Yet, the incidence of oropharyngeal cancers is increasing in the United States, while the incidence of oral cavity cancers has declined. These 2 distinct but conflated groups of oral cancers are attributed to different risk factors. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxw001DOI Listing
January 2017
23 Reads

What Do We Know About the Association Between Firearm Legislation and Firearm-Related Injuries?

Epidemiol Rev 2016 10;38(1):140-57. Epub 2016 Feb 10.

Firearms account for a substantial proportion of external causes of death, injury, and disability across the world. Legislation to regulate firearms has often been passed with the intent of reducing problems related to their use. However, lack of clarity around which interventions are effective remains a major challenge for policy development. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxv012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6283012PMC
December 2016
17 Reads

Clinician Attitudes, Screening Practices, and Interventions to Reduce Firearm-Related Injury.

Epidemiol Rev 2016 8;38(1):87-110. Epub 2016 Feb 8.

Firearm injury is a leading cause of injury-related morbidity and mortality in the United States. We sought to systematically identify and summarize existing literature on clinical firearm injury prevention screening and interventions. We conducted a systematic search of PubMed, Web of Science, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycInfo, and ClinicalTrials. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxv005DOI Listing
December 2016
9 Reads

The Relationship Between Controlled Substances and Violence.

Epidemiol Rev 2016 11;38(1):5-31. Epub 2016 Feb 11.

A causal relationship between controlled substances and firearm violence has been widely assumed in the United States, and federal law prohibits individuals who are "unlawful users of or addicted to any controlled substance" from purchasing or possessing firearms (68 FR 3750. 2003. Codified at 27 CFR §478. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxv008DOI Listing
December 2016
7 Reads

Alcohol Use and Firearm Violence.

Epidemiol Rev 2016 24;38(1):32-45. Epub 2016 Jan 24.

Although the misuse of firearms is necessary to the occurrence of firearm violence, there are other contributing factors beyond simply firearms themselves that might also be modified to prevent firearm violence. Alcohol is one such key modifiable factor. To explore this, we undertook a 40-year (1975-2014) systematic literature review with meta-analysis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxv010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4762248PMC
December 2016
6 Reads

Effectiveness of Interventions to Promote Safe Firearm Storage.

Epidemiol Rev 2016 13;38(1):111-24. Epub 2016 Jan 13.

Despite supportive evidence for an association between safe firearm storage and lower risk of firearm injury, the effectiveness of interventions that promote such practices remains unclear. Guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist, we conducted a systematic review of randomized and quasi-experimental controlled studies of safe firearm storage interventions using a prespecified search of 9 electronic databases with no restrictions on language, year, or location from inception through May 27, 2015. Study selection and data extraction were independently performed by 2 investigators. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxv006DOI Listing
December 2016
7 Reads

Association Between Substance Use and Gun-Related Behaviors.

Epidemiol Rev 2016 13;38(1):46-61. Epub 2016 Jan 13.

Gun-related violence is a public health concern. This study synthesizes findings on associations between substance use and gun-related behaviors. Searches through PubMed, Embase, and PsycINFO located 66 studies published in English between 1992 and 2014. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxv013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4762249PMC
December 2016
3 Reads
2 Citations
6.670 Impact Factor

Risks and Targeted Interventions: Firearms in Intimate Partner Violence.

Epidemiol Rev 2016 5;38(1):125-39. Epub 2016 Jan 5.

The use of firearms in intimate partner violence (IPV) is widely recognized as an important public health threat. However, what we know about the risks of firearm access on IPV outcomes is limited. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review to determine the state of knowledge on 1) the risks of firearm access and use in IPV and 2) the effectiveness of interventions designed specifically to reduce firearm violence in intimate relationships. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxv007DOI Listing
December 2016
4 Reads

The Transmission of Gun and Other Weapon-Involved Violence Within Social Networks.

Epidemiol Rev 2016 5;38(1):70-86. Epub 2016 Jan 5.

Fatal and nonfatal injuries resulting from gun violence remain a persistent problem in the United States. The available research suggests that gun violence diffuses among people and across places through social relationships. Understanding the relationship between gun violence within social networks and individual gun violence risk is critical in preventing the spread of gun violence within populations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxv009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4762247PMC
December 2016
32 Reads

Epidemiologic approaches to veterans' health.

Epidemiol Rev 2015 22;37:1-6. Epub 2015 Jan 22.

The present issue of Epidemiologic Reviews is dedicated to better understanding the health of men and women who have served in the military. There are 13 articles that discuss a range of physical and mental health concerns among both military personnel who are currently serving and those who served in the past. The corresponding research provides insight into issues that are directly relevant and of keen interest to clinicians and investigators. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxu013DOI Listing
November 2015
7 Reads

Aggressive and violent behavior among military personnel deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan: prevalence and link with deployment and combat exposure.

Epidemiol Rev 2015 22;37:196-212. Epub 2015 Jan 22.

A systematic review and meta-analyses were conducted on studies of the prevalence of aggressive and violent behavior, as well as of violent offenses and convictions, among military personnel following deployment to Iraq and/or Afghanistan; the relationship with deployment and combat exposure; and the role that mental health problems, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), have on the pathway between deployment and combat to violence. Seventeen studies published between January 1, 2001, and February 12, 2014, in the United States and the United Kingdom met the inclusion criteria. Despite methodological differences across studies, aggressive behavior was found to be prevalent among serving and formerly serving personnel, with pooled estimates of 10% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1, 20) for physical assault and 29% (95% CI: 25, 36) for all types of physical aggression in the last month, and worthy of further exploration. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://academic.oup.com/epirev/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/e
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxu006DOI Listing
November 2015
5 Reads

Alcohol and drug misuse, abuse, and dependence in women veterans.

Epidemiol Rev 2015 21;37:23-37. Epub 2015 Jan 21.

We conducted a systematic literature review on substance misuse, abuse, and dependence in women veterans, including National Guard/reserve members. We identified 837 articles published between 1980 and 2013. Of 56 included studies, 32 reported rates of alcohol misuse, binge drinking, or other unhealthy alcohol use not meeting diagnostic criteria for abuse or dependence, and 33 reported rates of drug misuse or diagnosed alcohol or drug use disorders. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxu010DOI Listing
November 2015
11 Reads

Hearing impairment and tinnitus: prevalence, risk factors, and outcomes in US service members and veterans deployed to the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

Epidemiol Rev 2015 19;37:71-85. Epub 2015 Jan 19.

Hearing loss and tinnitus are the 2 most prevalent service-connected disabilities among veterans in the United States. Veterans of Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn have been exposed to multiple hazards associated with these conditions, such as blasts/explosions, ototoxic chemicals, and most notably high levels of noise. We conducted a systematic literature review of evidence on 1) prevalence of, 2) risk and protective factors for, and 3) functional and quality-of-life outcomes of hearing impairment and tinnitus in US Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn veterans and military personnel. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://academic.oup.com/epirev/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/e
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxu005DOI Listing
November 2015
7 Reads

Prevalence of mental health disorders among justice-involved veterans.

Epidemiol Rev 2015 19;37:163-76. Epub 2015 Jan 19.

Justice-involved veterans are a special population with unique mental health needs compared with other veterans or justice-involved adults. Prevalence estimates of mental health concerns of justice-involved veterans across 18 samples of these veterans (1987-2013), including both incarcerated and community samples, were identified through a systematic literature search of published studies supplemented by Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Justice Programs data. Despite heterogeneity across samples and measures used, the review highlights several prominent mental health concerns among veterans. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxu003DOI Listing
November 2015
14 Reads

Prevalence and treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection in the US Department of Veterans Affairs.

Epidemiol Rev 2015 19;37:131-43. Epub 2015 Jan 19.

Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most common blood-borne pathogen in the United States. HCV disproportionately affects Veterans Affairs (VA) health-care users: 174,302 HCV-infected veterans were in VA care in 2013, making the VA the world's largest HCV care provider. This systematic review identified 546 articles related to HCV in the VA. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://academic.oup.com/epirev/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/e
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxu002DOI Listing
November 2015
6 Reads

Mental health among reserve component military service members and veterans.

Epidemiol Rev 2015 16;37:7-22. Epub 2015 Jan 16.

Since 2001, the US military has increasingly relied on National Guard and reserve component forces to meet operational demands. Differences in preparation and military engagement experiences between active component and reserve component forces have long suggested that the psychiatric consequences of military engagement differ by component. We conducted a systematic review of prevalence and new onset of psychiatric disorders among reserve component forces and a meta-analysis of prevalence estimates comparing reserve component and active component forces, and we documented stage-sequential drivers of psychiatric burden among reserve component forces. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxu007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4325668PMC
November 2015
16 Reads
12 Citations
6.670 Impact Factor

Risk factors for homelessness among US veterans.

Epidemiol Rev 2015 16;37:177-95. Epub 2015 Jan 16.

Homelessness among US veterans has been a focus of research for over 3 decades. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, this is the first systematic review to summarize research on risk factors for homelessness among US veterans and to evaluate the evidence for these risk factors. Thirty-one studies published from 1987 to 2014 were divided into 3 categories: more rigorous studies, less rigorous studies, and studies comparing homeless veterans with homeless nonveterans. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxu004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521393PMC
November 2015
54 Reads

Associations between cigarette smoking and pain among veterans.

Epidemiol Rev 2015 16;37:86-102. Epub 2015 Jan 16.

Individuals with chronic pain often report using cigarettes to cope, and smoking and chronic pain appear prevalent among US veterans. Pain may be a barrier to cigarette cessation and abstinence in this population. Because of physiological effects, smoking cigarettes may also interfere with pain management. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxu008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4325669PMC
November 2015
2 Reads
3 Citations
6.670 Impact Factor

Post-traumatic stress disorder, physical activity, and eating behaviors.

Epidemiol Rev 2015 16;37:103-15. Epub 2015 Jan 16.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a prevalent and costly psychiatric disorder, is associated with high rates of obesity and cardiometabolic diseases. Many studies have examined PTSD and risky behaviors (e.g. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/epirev/mxu011DOI Listing
November 2015
3 Reads