13,863 results match your criteria Environmental Health Perspectives [Journal]


Linking Bisphenol S to Adverse Outcome Pathways Using a Combined Text Mining and Systems Biology Approach.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Apr;127(4):47005

1 University Paris Descartes , ComUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France.

Background: Available toxicity data can be optimally interpreted if they are integrated using computational approaches such as systems biology modeling. Such approaches are particularly warranted in cases where regulatory decisions have to be made rapidly.

Objectives: The study aims at developing and applying a new integrative computational strategy to identify associations between bisphenol S (BPS), a substitute for bisphenol A (BPA), and components of adverse outcome pathways (AOPs). Read More

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https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/EHP4200
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP4200DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Environmental Health Indicators for China: Data Resources for Chinese Environmental Public Health Tracking.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Apr;127(4):44501

1 National Institute of Environmental Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention , Beijing, China.

Many developed countries use environmental public health tracking to gain a better understanding of the link between environmental hazards and public health. To respond to complicated environmental health issues, the National Institute of Environmental Health (NIEH), Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC), has begun to build a Chinese Environmental Public Health Tracking (CEPHT) system. On behalf of the CEPHT, authors provide insight into the CEPHT's development, current status, and future plans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP4319DOI Listing

Climate Change, Human Health, and Social Stability: Addressing Interlinkages.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Apr;127(4):45002

1 Center for Health and the Global Environment, Schools of Medicine and Public Health, University of Washington Seattle , Washington, USA.

Background: Abundant historical evidence demonstrates how environmental changes can affect social stability and, in turn, human health. A rapidly growing body of literature, largely from political science and economics, is examining the potential for and consequences associated with social instability related to current climate change. However, comparatively little of this research incorporates the effects on human health or the role of health systems in influencing the magnitude and types of instability that could occur. Read More

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https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/EHP4534
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP4534DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Associations between High Temperature, Heavy Rainfall, and Diarrhea among Young Children in Rural Tamil Nadu, India: A Prospective Cohort Study.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Apr;127(4):47004

1 School of Public Health, University of California , Berkeley, California, USA.

Background: The effects of weather on diarrhea could influence the health impacts of climate change. Children have the highest diarrhea incidence, especially in India, where many lack safe water and sanitation.

Objectives: In a prospective cohort of 1,284 children under 5 y of age from 900 households across 25 villages in rural Tamil Nadu, India, we examined whether high temperature and heavy rainfall was associated with increased all-cause diarrhea and water contamination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3711DOI Listing

The Association between Mandated Preseason Heat Acclimatization Guidelines and Exertional Heat Illness during Preseason High School American Football Practices.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Apr;127(4):47003

6 Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Background: The risk of heat-related illness and death may continue to increase in many locations as a consequence of climate change, but information on the effectiveness of policies to protect populations from the adverse effects of excessive heat is limited. In 2009, the National Athletic Trainers' Association Inter-Association Task Force (NATA-IATF) released guidelines to reduce exertional heat illness (EHI) among U.S. Read More

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https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/EHP4163
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP4163DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

The Carcinogenome Project: In Vitro Gene Expression Profiling of Chemical Perturbations to Predict Long-Term Carcinogenicity.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Apr;127(4):47002

1 Computational Biomedicine, Boston University School of Medicine , Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Background: Most chemicals in commerce have not been evaluated for their carcinogenic potential. The de facto gold-standard approach to carcinogen testing adopts the 2-y rodent bioassay, a time-consuming and costly procedure. High-throughput in vitro assays are a promising alternative for addressing the limitations in carcinogen screening. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3986DOI Listing

Environmental Health Sciences in a Translational Research Framework: More than Benches and Bedsides.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Apr;127(4):45001

2 Department of Community and Environmental Health, Boise State University , Boise, Idaho, USA.

Background: Environmental health scientists may find it challenging to fit the structure of the questions addressed in their discipline into the prevailing paradigm for translational research.

Objective: We aim to frame the translational science paradigm to address the stages of scientific discovery, knowledge acquisition, policy development, and evaluation in a manner relevant to the environmental health sciences. Our intention is to characterize differences between environmental health sciences and clinical medicine, and to orient this effort towards public health goals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP4067DOI Listing

The Usual (and Some Not-So-Usual) Suspects: A New Chemical Screening Method.

Authors:
Rachel Cernansky

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Apr;127(4):44001

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP4357DOI Listing

Environmental Chemicals and Autism: A Scoping Review of the Human and Animal Research.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Apr;127(4):46001

1 The Endocrine Disruption Exchange , Eckert, Colorado, USA.

Background: Estimates of autism prevalence have increased dramatically over the past two decades. Evidence suggests environmental factors may contribute to the etiology of the disorder.

Objectives: This scoping review aimed to identify and categorize primary research and reviews on the association between prenatal and early postnatal exposure to environmental chemicals and the development of autism in epidemiological studies and rodent models of autism. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP4386DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Nonanimal Models for Acute Toxicity Evaluations: Applying Data-Driven Profiling and Read-Across.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Apr;127(4):47001

1 Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Rutgers University , Camden, New Jersey, USA.

Background: Low-cost, high-throughput in vitro bioassays have potential as alternatives to animal models for toxicity testing. However, incorporating in vitro bioassays into chemical toxicity evaluations such as read-across requires significant data curation and analysis based on knowledge of relevant toxicity mechanisms, lowering the enthusiasm of using the massive amount of unstructured public data.

Objective: We aimed to develop a computational method to automatically extract useful bioassay data from a public repository (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3614DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

The Role of Dietary Phytoestrogens and the Nuclear Receptor [Formula: see text] in Adipogenesis: An in Vitro Study.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Mar;127(3):37007

3 Receptor Biology Section, Laboratory of Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services , Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.

Background: Phytoestrogens, naturally occurring plant chemicals, have long been thought to confer beneficial effects on human cardiovascular and metabolic health. However, recent epidemiological studies, have yielded conflicting outcomes, in which phytoestrogen consumption was both positively and negatively correlated with adiposity. Interestingly, several dietary phytoestrogens are known to stimulate or inhibit the activity of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma ([Formula: see text]), a key physiological regulator of adipogenesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3444DOI Listing

Adverse Maternal, Fetal, and Postnatal Effects of Hexafluoropropylene Oxide Dimer Acid (GenX) from Oral Gestational Exposure in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Mar;127(3):37008

1 Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development (ORD), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) , Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.

Background: Hexafluoropropylene oxide dimer acid [(HFPO-DA), GenX] is a member of the per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) chemical class, and elevated levels of HFPO-DA have been detected in surface water, air, and treated drinking water in the United States and Europe.

Objectives: We aimed to characterize the potential maternal and postnatal toxicities of oral HFPO-DA in rats during sexual differentiation. Given that some PFAS activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), we sought to assess whether HFPO-DA affects androgen-dependent development or interferes with estrogen, androgen, or glucocorticoid receptor activity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP4372DOI Listing

Cardiopulmonary Effects of Fine Particulate Matter Exposure among Older Adults, during Wildfire and Non-Wildfire Periods, in the United States 2008-2010.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Mar;127(3):37006

1 National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency , Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.

Background: The effects of exposure to fine particulate matter ([Formula: see text]) during wildland fires are not well understood in comparison with [Formula: see text] exposures from other sources.

Objectives: We examined the cardiopulmonary effects of short-term exposure to [Formula: see text] on smoke days in the United States to evaluate whether health effects are consistent with those during non-smoke days.

Methods: We examined cardiopulmonary hospitalizations among adults [Formula: see text] y of age, in U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3860DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Attention Worthy: Prenatal Phthalate Exposure and Subsequent ADHD Diagnosis.

Authors:
Julia R Barrett

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Mar;127(3):34001

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3815DOI Listing

Legitimizing Values in Regulatory Science.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Mar;127(3):35001

2 Data Science Initiative, University of California , Davis, California, USA.

Background: Over the last several decades, scientists and social groups have frequently raised concerns about politicization or political interference in regulatory science. Public actors (environmentalists and industry advocates, politically aligned public figures, scientists and political commentators, in the United States as well as in other countries) across major political-regulatory controversies have expressed concerns about the inappropriate politicization of science. Although we share concerns about the politicization of science, they are frequently framed in terms of an ideal of value-free science, according to which political and economic values have no legitimate role to play in science. Read More

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https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/EHP3317
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3317DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Impact of Long-Term Exposure to Wind Turbine Noise on Redemption of Sleep Medication and Antidepressants: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Mar;127(3):37005

1 Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center , Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background: Noise from wind turbines (WTs) is associated with annoyance and, potentially, sleep disturbances.

Objectives: Our objective was to investigate whether long-term WT noise (WTN) exposure is associated with the redemption of prescriptions for sleep medication and antidepressants.

Methods: For all Danish dwellings within a radius of [Formula: see text] heights and for 25% of randomly selected dwellings within a radius of [Formula: see text] heights, we estimated nighttime outdoor and low-frequency (LF) indoor WTN, using information on WT type and simulated hourly wind. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3909DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Long-Term Exposure to Wind Turbine Noise and Risk for Myocardial Infarction and Stroke: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Mar;127(3):37004

1 Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center , Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background: Noise from wind turbines (WTs) is reported as more annoying than traffic noise at similar levels, raising concerns as to whether WT noise (WTN) increases risk for cardiovascular disease, as observed for traffic noise.

Objectives: We aimed to investigate whether long-term exposure to WTN increases risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke.

Methods: We identified all Danish dwellings within a radius 20 times the height of the closest WT and 25% of the dwellings within [Formula: see text] the height of the closest WT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3340DOI Listing
March 2019
10 Reads

Early-Life Cadmium Exposure and Bone-Related Biomarkers: A Longitudinal Study in Children.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Mar;127(3):37003

1 Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet , Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Chronic cadmium exposure has been associated with osteotoxicity in adults, but little is known concerning its effects on early growth, which has been shown to be impaired by cadmium.

Objectives: Our objective was to assess the impact of early-life cadmium exposure on bone-related biomarkers and anthropometry at 9 y of age.

Methods: For 504 children in a mother-child cohort in Bangladesh, cadmium exposure was assessed by concentrations in urine (U-Cd, long-term exposure) and erythrocytes (Ery-Cd, ongoing exposure) at 9 and 4. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3655DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Climate Change and Physical Activity: Estimated Impacts of Ambient Temperatures on Bikeshare Usage in New York City.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Mar;127(3):37002

1 Environmental Health Sciences Department, Columbia University , New York, New York, USA.

Background: Physical activity is one of the best disease prevention strategies, and it is influenced by environmental factors such as temperature.

Objectives: We aimed to illuminate the relation between ambient temperature and bikeshare usage and to project how climate change-induced increasing ambient temperatures may influence active transportation in New York City.

Methods: The analysis leverages Citi Bike® bikeshare data to estimate participation in outdoor bicycling in New York City. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP4039DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Evidence for Urban-Rural Disparity in Temperature-Mortality Relationships in Zhejiang Province, China.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Mar;127(3):37001

4 Center for Global Change and Earth Observations, Michigan State University , East Lansing, Michigan, USA.

Background: Temperature-related mortality risks have mostly been studied in urban areas, with limited evidence for urban-rural differences in the temperature impacts on health outcomes.

Objectives: We investigated whether temperature-mortality relationships vary between urban and rural counties in China.

Methods: We collected daily data on 1 km gridded temperature and mortality in 89 counties of Zhejiang Province, China, for 2009 and 2015. Read More

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https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/EHP3556
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3556DOI Listing
March 2019
8 Reads

The Role of Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ) in Mono(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate (MEHP)-Mediated Cytotrophoblast Differentiation.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Feb;127(2):27003

UMR-S1139, Faculté de Pharmacie de Paris, Institut national de la santé et de la recherché médicale (Inserm, National Institute of Health & Medical Research), Paris, France.

Background: Phthalates are environmental contaminants commonly used as plasticizers in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) products. Recently, exposure to phthalates has been associated with preterm birth, low birth weight, and pregnancy loss. There is limited information about the possible mechanisms linking maternal phthalate exposure and placental development, but one such mechanism may be mediated by peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3730DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Let the "A" in WASH Stand for Air: Integrating Research and Interventions to Improve Household Air Pollution (HAP) and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WaSH) in Low-Income Settings.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Feb;127(2):25001

Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California, USA.

Background: Research often suffers from overspecialization, a practice nurtured in academia and reinforced by funders. Indeed, investigators in household air pollution (HAP) and water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH), working in poor parts of the world, rarely interact despite having similar training and using similar methods to evaluate interventions in the same vulnerable populations. Disappointing results from recent trials of improved cookstoves and traditional approaches to WaSH suggest the need for alternative approaches. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP4752DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Exposure to Residential Greenness as a Predictor of Cause-Specific Mortality and Stroke Incidence in the Rome Longitudinal Study.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Feb;127(2):27002

Department of Epidemiology-Regional Health Service, ASL Roma 1, Rome, Italy.

Background: Living in areas with higher levels of surrounding greenness and access to urban green areas have been associated with beneficial health outcomes. Some studies suggested a beneficial influence on mortality, but the evidence is still controversial.

Objectives: We used longitudinal data from a large cohort to estimate associations of two measures of residential greenness exposure with cause-specific mortality and stroke incidence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP2854DOI Listing
February 2019

Guiding Communities Affected by PFASs: Tools for Tackling Contaminated Drinking Water.

Authors:
Nate Seltenrich

Environ Health Perspect 2019 02;127(2):24003

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP4170DOI Listing
February 2019

Radon Risk: A Global Estimate of Radon's Contribution to Lung Cancer.

Authors:
Nate Seltenrich

Environ Health Perspect 2019 02;127(2):24001

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP4169DOI Listing
February 2019

Greenness and Depression Incidence among Older Women.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Feb;127(2):27001

Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Background: Recent evidence suggests that higher levels of residential greenness may contribute to better mental health. Despite this, few studies have considered its impact on depression, and most are cross-sectional.

Objective: The objective of this study was to examine surrounding residential greenness and depression risk prospectively in the Nurses' Health Study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP1229DOI Listing
February 2019

Statistical Methodology in Studies of Prenatal Exposure to Mixtures of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: A Review of Existing Approaches and New Alternatives.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 Feb;127(2):26001

School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Background: Prenatal exposures to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) during critical developmental windows have been implicated in the etiologies of a wide array of adverse perinatal and pediatric outcomes. Epidemiological studies have concentrated on the health effects of individual chemicals, despite the understanding that EDCs act together via common mechanisms, that pregnant women are exposed to multiple EDCs simultaneously, and that substantial toxicological evidence of adverse developmental effects has been documented. There is a move toward multipollutant models in environmental epidemiology; however, there is no current consensus on appropriate statistical methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP2207DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Associations between Coarse Particulate Matter Air Pollution and Cause-Specific Mortality: A Nationwide Analysis in 272 Chinese Cities.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 01;127(1):17008

National Center for Chronic Noncommunicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.

Background: Coarse particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 and [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]) air pollution is a severe environmental problem in developing countries, but its challenges to public health were rarely evaluated.

Objective: We aimed to investigate the associations between day-to-day changes in [Formula: see text] and cause-specific mortality in China. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP2711DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Organophosphate Pesticide Metabolite Concentrations in Urine during Pregnancy and Offspring Nonverbal IQ at Age 6 Years.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 01;127(1):17007

Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Health and Human Services, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

Background: Susceptibility to organophosphate (OP) pesticide neurotoxicity may be greatest during the prenatal period; however, previous studies have produced mixed findings concerning OP pesticide exposure and child cognition.

Objectives: Our objective was to determine whether maternal urinary concentrations of OP pesticide metabolites are inversely associated with child nonverbal IQ at 6 y of age and to examine potential effect measure modification by the gene.

Methods: Data came from 708 mother–child pairs participating in the Generation R Study. Read More

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https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/EHP3024
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3024DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

Associations of Fetal Growth Outcomes with Measures of the Combined Xenoestrogenic Activity of Maternal Serum Perfluorinated Alkyl Acids in Danish Pregnant Women.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 01;127(1):17006

Centre for Arctic Health and Molecular Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.

Background: Higher concentrations of single perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) have been associated with lower birth weight (BW), but few studies have examined the combined effects of PFAA mixtures. PFAAs have been reported to induce estrogen receptor (ER) transactivity, and estrogens may influence human fetal growth. We hypothesize that mixtures of PFAAs may affect human fetal growth by disrupting the ER. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP1884DOI Listing
January 2019

Face Mask Use and Persistence of Livestock-associated Nasal Carriage among Industrial Hog Operation Workers and Household Contacts, USA.

Environ Health Perspect 2018 12;126(12):127005

Department of Environmental Health and Engineering, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Background: Industrial hog operation (IHO) workers may persistently carry antibiotic-resistant, livestock-associated in their nasal cavities. It is unclear whether IHO work activities can alter IHO workers' and their household members' exposure to these bacteria.

Objective: Our objective was to investigate the relationship of IHO work activities with persistence of antibiotic-resistant, livestock-associated S. Read More

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https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/EHP3453
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3453DOI Listing
December 2018
9 Reads

Use of a Mouse Model of Experimentally Induced Endometriosis to Evaluate and Compare the Effects of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol AF Exposure.

Environ Health Perspect 2018 12;126(12):127004

Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

Background: Endometriosis is a gynecological disease affecting 1 in 10 women of reproductive age. Endometriosis incidence has risen; however, whether this rise is due to disease awareness or environmental contamination is not known.

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if bisphenol A (BPA) or bisphenol AF (BPAF) potentiate the development of endometriosis and if hormonal status alters how toxicant exposure affects disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3802DOI Listing
December 2018

Native American Perspectives on Health and Traditional Ecological Knowledge.

Environ Health Perspect 2018 12;126(12):125002

Natural Resources Institute, University of Manitoba, Manitoba, Canada.

Background: Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) is a conceptual framework that highlights Indigenous knowledge (IK) systems. Although scientific literature has noted the relevance of TEK for environmental research since the 1980s, little attention has been given to how Native American (NA) scholars engage with it to shape tribal-based research on health, nor how non-Native scholars can coordinate their approaches with TEK. This coordination is of particular importance for environmental health sciences (EHS) research exploring interdisciplinary approaches and the integration of environmental and human health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP1944DOI Listing
December 2018
15 Reads

Metabolic Phenotype of Wild-Type and -Knockout C57BL/6J Mice Exposed to Inorganic Arsenic: The Role of Dietary Fat and Folate Intake.

Environ Health Perspect 2018 12;126(12):127003

Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Background: Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a diabetogen. Interindividual differences in iAs metabolism have been linked to susceptibility to diabetes in iAs-exposed populations. Dietary folate intake has been shown to influence iAs metabolism, but to our knowledge its role in iAs-associated diabetes has not been studied. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3951DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Critical Windows for Associations between Manganese Exposure during Pregnancy and Size at Birth: A Longitudinal Cohort Study in Wuhan, China.

Environ Health Perspect 2018 12;126(12):127006

Key Laboratory of Environment and Health (HUST), Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, and State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubation), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.

Background: Prenatal overexposure to manganese (Mn), an essential micronutrient, is related to impaired fetal growth and development. Fetuses appear to be highly sensitive to Mn during short periods of gestation. However, little is known about the critical windows of susceptibility to Mn for humans. Read More

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https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/EHP3423
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3423DOI Listing
December 2018
16 Reads

Estimating the Effects of PM on Life Expectancy Using Causal Modeling Methods.

Environ Health Perspect 2018 12;126(12):127002

Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Background: Many cohort studies have reported associations between PM and the hazard of dying, but few have used formal causal modeling methods, estimated marginal effects, or directly modeled the loss of life expectancy.

Objective: Our goal was to directly estimate the effect of PM on the distribution of life span using causal modeling techniques.

Methods: We derived nonparametric estimates of the distribution of life expectancy as a function of PM using data from 16,965,154 Medicare beneficiaries in the Northeastern and mid-Atlantic region states (129,341,959 person-years of follow-up and 6,334,905 deaths). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3130DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Future Wildfires and Flooding: Estimates of Increased Likelihood across the United States.

Authors:
Nate Seltenrich

Environ Health Perspect 2018 12;126(12):124001

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3935DOI Listing
December 2018

Exposure to Secondhand Smoke and Arrhythmogenic Cardiac Alternans in a Mouse Model.

Environ Health Perspect 2018 12;126(12):127001

Department of Pharmacology, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA.

Background: Epidemiological evidence suggests that a majority of deaths attributed to secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure are cardiovascular related. However, to our knowledge, the impact of SHS on cardiac electrophysiology, [Formula: see text] handling, and arrhythmia risk has not been studied.

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of an environmentally relevant concentration of SHS on cardiac electrophysiology and indicators of arrhythmia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3664DOI Listing
December 2018
22 Reads
7.977 Impact Factor

High Pesticide Exposure Events and Olfactory Impairment among U.S. Farmers.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 01;127(1):17005

Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.

Background: Olfactory impairment (OI) is common among older adults and independently predicts all-cause mortality and the risk of several major neurodegenerative diseases. Pesticide exposure may impair olfaction, but empirical evidence is lacking.

Objective: We aimed to examine high pesticide exposure events (HPEEs) in relation to self-reported OI in participants in the Agricultural Health Study (AHS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3713DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

A Chemical Category-Based Prioritization Approach for Selecting 75 Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) for Tiered Toxicity and Toxicokinetic Testing.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 01;127(1):14501

National Center for Computational Toxicology, Office of Research and Development (ORD), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are a group of fluorinated substances of interest to researchers, regulators, and the public due to their widespread presence in the environment. A few PFASs have comparatively extensive amounts of human epidemiological, exposure, and experimental animal toxicity data (e.g. Read More

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https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/EHP4555
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP4555DOI Listing
January 2019
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7.977 Impact Factor

Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl Substances during Fetal Life and Pubertal Development in Boys and Girls from the Danish National Birth Cohort.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 01;127(1):17004

Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.

Background: It remains unsettled whether prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) affects human reproductive health through potential endocrine disruption.

Objectives: We aimed to explore the associations between prenatal exposure to several PFASs and various aspects of pubertal development in boys and girls.

Methods: We studied two samples ([Formula: see text] and 445) from the Puberty Cohort, nested within the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC), measuring PFAS in maternal plasma from early gestation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3567DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Longitudinal, Seasonal, and Occupational Trends of Multiple Pesticides in House Dust.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 01;127(1):17003

Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Background: Children are especially vulnerable to pesticide exposure and can suffer lasting health effects. Because children of farmworkers are exposed to a variety of pesticides throughout development, it is important to explore temporal patterns of coexposures.

Objectives: The objectives of this study were to characterize the pesticide co-exposures, determine how they change over time, and assess differences between farmworker and nonfarmworker households. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3644DOI Listing
January 2019
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Prenatal Exposure to Select Phthalates and Phenols and Associations with Fetal and Placental Weight among Male Births in the EDEN Cohort (France).

Environ Health Perspect 2019 01;127(1):17002

Team of Environmental Epidemiology applied to Reproduction and Respiratory Health, Institute for Advanced Biosciences (IAB), Inserm U1209, Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) Unité de recherche (UMR) 5309, Université Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, France.

Background: The placenta performs crucial physiological functions to ensure normal fetal development. Few epidemiological studies investigated placental weight sensitivity to phthalates and phenols.

Objective: Our goal was to explore whether maternal exposure to select phthalates and phenols is associated with changes in placental weight at birth and in placental–to–birth weight ratio (PFR). Read More

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https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/EHP3523
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3523DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Geographic, Demographic, and Temporal Variations in the Association between Heat Exposure and Hospitalization in Brazil: A Nationwide Study between 2000 and 2015.

Environ Health Perspect 2019 01;127(1):17001

Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.

Background: Limited evidence is available regarding the association between heat exposure and morbidity in Brazil and how the effect of heat exposure on health outcomes may change over time.

Objectives: This study sought to quantify the geographic, demographic and temporal variations in the heat–hospitalization association in Brazil from 2000–2015.

Methods: Data on hospitalization and meteorological conditions were collected from 1,814 cities during the 2000–2015 hot seasons. Read More

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https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/10.1289/EHP3889
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP3889DOI Listing
January 2019
10 Reads