1,332 results match your criteria Environmental Health [Journal]


Estimating policy-relevant health effects of ambient heat exposures using spatially contiguous reanalysis data.

Environ Health 2019 Apr 18;18(1):35. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Universities Space Research Association, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, USA.

Background: Regional National Weather Service (NWS) heat advisory criteria in New York State (NYS) were based on frequency of heat events estimated by sparse monitoring data. These may not accurately reflect temperatures at which specific health risks occur in large geographic regions. The objectives of the study were to use spatially resolved temperature data to characterize health risks related to summertime heat exposure and estimate the temperatures at which excessive risk of heat-related adverse health occurs in NYS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0467-5DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Particulate air pollution on cardiovascular mortality in the tropics: impact on the elderly.

Environ Health 2019 Apr 18;18(1):34. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Public Health Group, Ministry of Health, Singapore, Singapore.

Background: Air pollution has a significant health impact. Most data originate from temperate regions. We aim to study the health impact of air pollution, particularly among the elderly, in a tropical region. Read More

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https://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12940-
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0476-4DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Letter to the editor re: the CDC blood lead reference value for children.

Environ Health 2019 04 11;18(1):32. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Department of Environmental Medicine, Box EHSC, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, 14642, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0472-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6458603PMC
April 2019
3 Reads

Para-occupational exposure to pesticides, PON1 polymorphisms and hypothyroxinemia during the first half of pregnancy in women living in a Mexican floricultural area.

Environ Health 2019 04 11;18(1):33. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Av. Universidad 655, Col. Sta. María Ahuacatitlán, 62100, Cuernavaca, Morelos, CP, Mexico.

Background: Adequate maternal thyroxine (T4) concentrations during the first half of pregnancy are fundamental to the embryo's or fetus' neural development. Organophosphate pesticides (OP) can act as thyroid disruptors and genetic polymorphisms for paraoxonase 1 (PON1), an enzyme that detoxifies OP, could be involved in individual's susceptibility to them. We assessed the association between para-occupational exposure to pesticides, including OP, during pregnancy and maternal hypothyroxinemia, as well as the potential genetic susceptibility conferred by PON1 polymorphisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0470-xDOI Listing

Methods to account for uncertainties in exposure assessment in studies of environmental exposures.

Environ Health 2019 04 8;18(1):31. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, 550 16th Street, 2nd floor, Box 0560, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.

Background: Accurate exposure estimation in environmental epidemiological studies is crucial for health risk assessment. Failure to account for uncertainties in exposure estimation could lead to biased results in exposure-response analyses. Assessment of the effects of uncertainties in exposure estimation on risk estimates received a lot of attention in radiation epidemiology and in several studies of diet and air pollution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0468-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6454753PMC
April 2019
2 Reads

Screening of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL)-associated SNPs and the assessment of its genetic susceptibility.

Environ Health 2019 04 4;18(1):30. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Respiratory, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Zhejiang, Hangzhou, 310058, People's Republic of China.

Background: The aim of this study was to screen for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL)-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and to construct genetic risk prediction models for NIHL in a Chinese population.

Methods: Four hundred seventy-six subjects with NIHL and 476 matched controls were recruited from a cross-sectional survey on NIHL in China. A total of 83 candidate SNPs were genotyped using nanofluidic dynamic arrays on a Fluidigm platform. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0471-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6449917PMC
April 2019
4 Reads
3.372 Impact Factor

Response to Juberg et al.

Environ Health 2019 04 3;18(1):29. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0466-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6446298PMC
April 2019
1 Read

A repeated measures study of phenol, paraben and Triclocarban urinary biomarkers and circulating maternal hormones during gestation in the Puerto Rico PROTECT cohort.

Environ Health 2019 04 2;18(1):28. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Room 1835 SPH I, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2029, USA.

Introduction: Prenatal exposure to some phenols and parabens has been associated with adverse birth outcomes. Hormones may play an intermediate role between phenols and adverse outcomes. We examined the associations of phenol and paraben exposures with maternal reproductive and thyroid hormones in 602 pregnant women in Puerto Rico. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0459-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444601PMC
April 2019
2 Reads

Bootstrap approach to validate the performance of models for predicting mortality risk temperature in Portuguese Metropolitan Areas.

Environ Health 2019 03 29;18(1):25. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, Department of Physics, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal.

Background: There has been increasing interest in assessing the impacts of extreme temperatures on mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system. This is further relevant for future climate scenarios where marked changes in climate are expected. This paper presents a solid method do identify the relationship between extreme temperatures and mortality risk by using as predictors simulated temperature data for cold and hot conditions in two urban areas in Portugal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0462-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6440075PMC

Fluoride exposure and pubertal development in children living in Mexico City.

Environ Health 2019 03 29;18(1):26. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Background: Previous animal and ecological studies have provided evidence for an earlier sexual maturation in females in relation to fluoride exposure; however, no epidemiological studies have examined the association between fluoride exposure and pubertal development in both boys and girls using individual-level biomarkers of fluoride. Capitalizing on an ongoing Mexican birth cohort study, we examined the association between concurrent urinary fluoride levels and physical markers of pubertal development in children.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 157 boys and 176 girls at age 10-17 years living in Mexico City. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0465-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6439980PMC

Head and neck cancer and occupational exposure to leather dust: results from the ICARE study, a French case-control study.

Environ Health 2019 03 29;18(1):27. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Université de Rennes, Inserm, EHESP, Irset (Institut de Recherche en Santé, Environnement et Travail)-UMR_S 1085, Pointe-à-Pitre, France.

Background: Leather dust is an established carcinogen of the sinonasal cavities; however, evidence is lacking regarding its association with other head and neck cancers (HNC). To date, few studies have been conducted on the association between occupational leather dust exposure and the risk of oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancers. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the risk of HNC and occupational exposure to leather dust. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0469-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6440008PMC

Bayesian network-based framework for exposure-response study design and interpretation.

Environ Health 2019 03 22;18(1):23. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

School of Computing and Information Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Conventional environmental-health risk-assessment methods are often limited in their ability to account for uncertainty in contaminant exposure, chemical toxicity and resulting human health risk. Exposure levels and toxicity are both subject to significant measurement errors, and many predicted risks are well below those distinguishable from background incident rates in target populations. To address these issues methods are needed to characterize uncertainties in observations and inferences, including the ability to interpret the influence of improved measurements and larger datasets. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0461-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6431017PMC

Urinary mycoestrogens and age and height at menarche in New Jersey girls.

Environ Health 2019 03 22;18(1):24. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany St., New Brunswick, NJ, 08901, USA.

Background: Despite evidence of the endocrine disrupting properties of zearalenone (ZEN) and alpha-zearalanol (zeranol, α-ZAL), they have been minimally studied in human populations. In previous cross-sectional analyses, we demonstrated that 9-10 years old girls with detectable urinary ZEN were of shorter stature and less likely to have reached the onset of breast development than girls with undetectable urinary ZEN. The aim of this study was to examine baseline concentrations of ZEN, (α-ZAL), and their phase-1 metabolites in relation to subsequent growth and timing of menarche using 10 years of longitudinal data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0464-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6431018PMC
March 2019
3.372 Impact Factor

Exposure to prenatal secondhand smoke and early neurodevelopment: Mothers and Children's Environmental Health (MOCEH) study.

Environ Health 2019 03 20;18(1):22. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Background: The association between exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) during pregnancy and a child's neurodevelopment has not been established yet. We explored the association between prenatal exposure to SHS and neurodevelopment at 24 months of age considering genetic polymorphism and breastfeeding in 720 mothers and their offspring enrolled in the Korean multicenter birth cohort study (Mothers and Children Environmental Health, MOCEH).

Methods: We quantified urine cotinine concentrations in mothers once from 12th to 20th gestational weeks and excluded those whose urine cotinine levels exceeded 42. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0463-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6425627PMC
March 2019
3.372 Impact Factor

Urinary concentrations of phthalate biomarkers and weight change among postmenopausal women: a prospective cohort study.

Environ Health 2019 03 12;18(1):20. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 411 Arnold House, 715 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA, 01003, USA.

Background: Some phthalates are endocrine disrupting chemicals used as plasticizers in consumer products, and have been associated with obesity in cross-sectional studies, yet prospective evaluations of weight change are lacking. Our objective was to evaluate associations between phthalate biomarker concentrations and weight and weight change among postmenopausal women.

Methods: We performed cross-sectional (N = 997) and longitudinal analyses (N = 660) among postmenopausal Women's Health Initiative participants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0458-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6417117PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Thyroid cancer risks among medical radiation workers in South Korea, 1996-2015.

Environ Health 2019 03 11;18(1):19. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Environmental Health Center, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea.

Background: Thyroid cancer rates, especially among children, are known to be increased by radiation exposure. However, little is known about the impact of chronic low-dose radiation exposure on thyroid cancer risk in adulthood. This study examined radiation effects on thyroid cancer rates as well as an overall evaluation of thyroid cancer risk among medical radiation workers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0460-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6413450PMC
March 2019
1 Read

The Ramazzini Institute 13-week pilot study glyphosate-based herbicides administered at human-equivalent dose to Sprague Dawley rats: effects on development and endocrine system.

Environ Health 2019 03 12;18(1):15. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Cesare Maltoni Cancer Research Center (CMCRC), Ramazzini Institute (RI), Via Saliceto, 3, 40010, Bentivoglio, Bologna, Italy.

Background: Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are broad-spectrum herbicides that act on the shikimate pathway in bacteria, fungi, and plants. The possible effects of GBHs on human health are the subject of an intense public debate for both its potential carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects, including potential effects on the endocrine system The present pilot study examine whether exposure to GBHs at the dose of glyphosate considered to be "safe" (the US Acceptable Daily Intake - ADI - of 1.75 mg/kg bw/day), starting from in utero life, affect the development and endocrine system across different life stages in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0453-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6413565PMC

The CDC blood lead reference value for children: time for a change.

Environ Health 2019 02 28;18(1):16. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.

The purpose of this article is to consider alternate uses of the blood lead reference value for children. There are two possible approaches. Historically the reference value has been used to guide clinical and public interventions for individual children. Read More

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https://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12940-
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0457-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6396537PMC
February 2019
3 Reads

Prenatal arsenic exposure alters the placental expression of multiple epigenetic regulators in a sex-dependent manner.

Environ Health 2019 02 28;18(1):18. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Molecular Oncology Program, DeWitt Daughtry Family Department of Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 33136, USA.

Background: Prenatal exposure to arsenic has been linked to a range of adverse health conditions in later life. Such fetal origins of disease are frequently the result of environmental effects on the epigenome, leading to long-term alterations in gene expression. Several studies have demonstrated effects of prenatal arsenic exposure on DNA methylation; however the impact of arsenic on the generation and decoding of post-translational histone modifications (PTHMs) is less well characterized, and has not been studied in the context of prenatal human exposures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0455-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6396530PMC
February 2019
1 Read
3.372 Impact Factor

Polyunsaturated fatty acids and child neurodevelopment among a population exposed to DDT: a cohort study.

Environ Health 2019 02 28;18(1):17. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Centro de Investigación en Salud Poblacional, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Av. Universidad 655, Col. Sta. María Ahuacatitlán, 62100, Cuernavaca Morelos, CP, Mexico.

Background: Child neurodevelopment has been positively linked to maternal intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) during pregnancy; however, it is unknown if that relationship persists among populations exposed to environmental neurotoxicants.

Objective: The aim of this work was to assess whether maternal dietary intake of PUFAs during pregnancy is positively associated with child neurodevelopment, whose mothers were environmentally exposed to 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT).

Methods: A prospective cohort study with 276 mother-child pairs was performed in Mexico. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0456-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6396452PMC
February 2019

A hybrid expert approach for retrospective assessment of occupational exposures in a population-based case-control study of cancer.

Environ Health 2019 02 15;18(1):14. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Centre de recherche du CHUM, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Background: While the expert-based occupational exposure assessment approach has been considered the reference method for retrospective population-based studies, its implementation in large study samples has become prohibitive. To facilitate its application and improve upon it we developed, in the context of a Montreal population-based study of prostate cancer (PROtEuS), a hybrid approach combining job-exposure profiles (JEPs) summarizing expert evaluations from previous studies and expert review. We aim to describe the hybrid expert method and its impacts on the exposures assigned in PROtEuS compared to those from a previous study coded using the traditional expert method. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0451-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6377721PMC
February 2019

Measurement error in a multi-level analysis of air pollution and health: a simulation study.

Environ Health 2019 02 14;18(1):13. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.

Background: Spatio-temporal models are increasingly being used to predict exposure to ambient outdoor air pollution at high spatial resolution for inclusion in epidemiological analyses of air pollution and health. Measurement error in these predictions can nevertheless have impacts on health effect estimation. Using statistical simulation we aim to investigate the effects of such error within a multi-level model analysis of long and short-term pollutant exposure and health. Read More

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https://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12940-
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0432-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6376751PMC
February 2019
4 Reads

Persistent mental and physical health impact of exposure to the September 11, 2001 World Trade Center terrorist attacks.

Environ Health 2019 02 12;18(1):12. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

World Trade Center Health Registry, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, NY, USA.

Background: Asthma, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression have each been linked to exposure to the September 11, 2001 World Trade Center (WTC) terrorist attacks (9/11). We described the prevalence and patterns of these conditions and associated health-related quality of life (HRQOL) fifteen years after the attacks.

Methods: We studied 36,897 participants in the WTC Health Registry, a cohort of exposed rescue/recovery workers and community members, who completed baseline (2003-2004) and follow-up (2015-16) questionnaires. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0449-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6373081PMC
February 2019
9 Reads

Tampon use, environmental chemicals and oxidative stress in the BioCycle study.

Environ Health 2019 02 11;18(1):11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA.

Background: Tampons are used by up to 86% of US women and are a rarely considered potential source of pesticide and metal exposure. Tampons may be of particular concern given the likely higher absorption that occurs in the vagina. Our objective was to examine the potential associations between tampon use and metal concentrations, and biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress among healthy women. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0452-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6371574PMC
February 2019

Mediating role of arsenic in the relationship between diet and pregnancy outcomes: prospective birth cohort in Bangladesh.

Environ Health 2019 02 6;18(1):10. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.

Background: Epidemiological evidence suggests that arsenic (As) exposure during pregnancy may reduce infant birth weight. One significant source of As exposure is diet; thus, As may indirectly affect infant growth by mediating the effect of maternal diet on birth weight (BW). This study evaluated the potential mediating effect of As in the relationship between maternal diet and BW, gestational age (GA), and gestational weight gain (GWG). Read More

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https://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12940-
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0450-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6364468PMC
February 2019
9 Reads

A global perspective on coal-fired power plants and burden of lung cancer.

Environ Health 2019 01 28;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Building 1, Room 1401, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.

Background: Exposure to ambient particulate matter generated from coal-fired power plants induces long-term health consequences. However, epidemiologic studies have not yet focused on attributing these health burdens specifically to energy consumption, impeding targeted intervention policies. We hypothesize that the generating capacity of coal-fired power plants may be associated with lung cancer incidence at the national level. Read More

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https://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12940-
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0448-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6350330PMC
January 2019
6 Reads

Development and performance evaluation of a GIS-based metric to assess exposure to airborne pollutant emissions from industrial sources.

Environ Health 2019 01 25;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Département Cancer & Environnement, Centre Léon Bérard, 69008, Lyon, France.

Background: Dioxins are environmental and persistent organic carcinogens with endocrine disrupting properties. A positive association with several cancers, including risk of breast cancer has been suggested.

Objectives: This study aimed to develop and assess performances of an exposure metric based on a Geographic Information System (GIS) through comparison with a validated dispersion model to estimate historical industrial dioxin exposure for its use in a case-control study nested within a prospective cohort. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0446-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6347831PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Environmental justice and drinking water quality: are there socioeconomic disparities in nitrate levels in U.S. drinking water?

Environ Health 2019 01 17;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Silent Spring Institute, 320 Nevada Street, Suite 302, Newton, MA, 02460, USA.

Background: Low-income and minority communities often face disproportionately high pollutant exposures. The lead crisis in Flint, Michigan, has sparked concern about broader socioeconomic disparities in exposures to drinking water contaminants. Nitrate is commonly found in drinking water, especially in agricultural regions, and epidemiological evidence suggests elevated risk of cancer and birth defects at levels below U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0442-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6335696PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Prenatal exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic field and its impact on fetal growth.

Environ Health 2019 01 11;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Key Laboratory of Reproduction Regulation of NPFPC, SIPPR, IRD, Fudan University, 779 Old Hu Min Road, Shanghai, 200237, China.

Objective: Studies on the effect of prenatal exposure to magnetic field (MF) on fetal growth is inconclusive and subject to some methodological limitations, particularly in measurement of MF exposure. The present study aimed to examine the association between maternal extremely low frequency MF (ELF-MF) exposure during pregnancy and fetal growth in offspring.

Methods: A total of 128 pregnant women were recruited at their 3rd trimester and asked to wear an EMDEX Lite meter for 24 h to capture daily ELF-MF exposure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-019-0447-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6329146PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Trends in neonicotinoid pesticide residues in food and water in the United States, 1999-2015.

Environ Health 2019 01 11;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health, University of Maryland School of Public Health, 2234 L SPH, 255 Valley Drive, College Park, MD, 20742, USA.

Background: Neonicotinoids are a class of systemic insecticides widely used on food crops globally. These pesticides may be found in "off-target" food items and persist in the environment. Despite the potential for extensive human exposure, there are limited studies regarding the prevalence of neonicotinoid residues in foods sold and consumed in the United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0441-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6330495PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Non-uniform radiation-induced biological responses at the tissue level involved in the health risk of environmental radiation: a radiobiological hypothesis.

Environ Health 2018 12 29;17(1):93. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast, BT9 7AE, UK.

Background: The conventional concept of radiation protection is based on epidemiological studies of radiation that support a positive correlation between dose and response. However, there is a remarkable difference in biological responses at the tissue level, depending on whether radiation is delivered as a uniform or non-uniform spatiotemporal distribution due to tissue sparing effects (TSE). From the point of view of radiation micro-dosimetry, environmental radiation is delivered as a non-uniform distribution, and radiation-induced biological responses at the tissue level, such as TSE, would be implicated in individual risk following exposure to environmental radiation. Read More

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https://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12940-
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0444-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6329136PMC
December 2018
13 Reads

Prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances and the risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

Environ Health 2019 01 9;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Ministry of Education-Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 1665 Kong Jiang Road, Shanghai, 200092, China.

Background: Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have been reported to disrupt endocrine system and reproduction. However, epidemiological evidence on the association between PFAS and preeclampsia is inconsistent. We aimed to investigate the association between prenatal PFAS exposure and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) in humans. Read More

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https://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12940-
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0445-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6327470PMC
January 2019
14 Reads

Very low-level prenatal mercury exposure and behaviors in children: the HOME Study.

Environ Health 2019 01 9;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.

Background: Mercury is toxic to the developing brain, but the lowest concentration associated with the development of behavior problems is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between very low-level mercury exposure during fetal development and behavior problems in children.

Methods: We used data from 389 mothers and children in a prospective pregnancy and birth cohort study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0443-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325670PMC
January 2019
1 Read

The evidence of human exposure to glyphosate: a review.

Environ Health 2019 01 7;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Institute for Translational Epidemiology and Department of Population Health Science and Policy, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1133, New York, NY, 10029, USA.

Background: Despite the growing and widespread use of glyphosate, a broad-spectrum herbicide and desiccant, very few studies have evaluated the extent and amount of human exposure.

Objective: We review documented levels of human exposure among workers in occupational settings and the general population.

Methods: We conducted a review of scientific publications on glyphosate levels in humans; 19 studies were identified, of which five investigated occupational exposure to glyphosate, 11 documented the exposure in general populations, and three reported on both. Read More

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https://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12940-
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0435-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322310PMC
January 2019
23 Reads
3.372 Impact Factor

Air pollution in the week prior to delivery and preterm birth in 24 Canadian cities: a time to event analysis.

Environ Health 2019 01 3;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Health Analysis Division, Statistics Canada, 100 Tunney's Pasture Driveway, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0T6, Canada.

Background: Numerous studies have examined the association between air pollution and preterm birth (< 37 weeks gestation) but findings have been inconsistent. These associations may be more difficult to detect than associations with other adverse birth outcomes because of the different duration of exposure in preterm vs. term births, and the existence of seasonal cycles in incidence of preterm birth. Read More

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https://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12940-
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0440-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6318965PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Mortality among workers exposed to asbestos at the shipyard of Genoa, Italy: a 55 years follow-up.

Environ Health 2018 12 29;17(1):94. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Clinical Epidemiology, Ospedale Policlinico San Martino-IRCCS, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico per l'Oncologia, Genoa, Italy.

Background: Exposure to asbestos remains a global issue due to its massive use in the twentieth century and its long environmental persistence. Exposure to asbestos still occurs during dismantling of ships and vessels, buildings renovation, mining operations, and is reported in developing countries. Current estimate report exposure of hundreds of million people in occupational settings in countries where its use remains unregulated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0439-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6310930PMC
December 2018
5 Reads

The global environmental injustice of fast fashion.

Environ Health 2018 12 27;17(1):92. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1196, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO, 63130, USA.

Fast fashion, inexpensive and widely available of-the-moment garments, has changed the way people buy and dispose of clothing. By selling large quantities of clothing at cheap prices, fast fashion has emerged as a dominant business model, causing garment consumption to skyrocket. While this transition is sometimes heralded as the "democratization" of fashion in which the latest styles are available to all classes of consumers, the human and environmental health risks associated with inexpensive clothing are hidden throughout the lifecycle of each garment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0433-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6307129PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Maternal urinary 2-hydroxynaphthalene and birth outcomes in Taiyuan, China.

Environ Health 2018 12 20;17(1):91. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Shanxi Medical University, Xinjiannan Road 56, Taiyuan, 030001, China.

Background: Naphthalene is the simplest polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). It is easily emitted into the atmosphere, posing a significant risk to human health. However, limited studies have described the impact of naphthalene exposure on birth outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0436-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6302466PMC
December 2018
3 Reads

Association between mesothelioma and non-occupational asbestos exposure: systematic review and meta-analysis.

Environ Health 2018 12 19;17(1):90. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Informatics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.

Background: The risk of mesothelioma has been shown to be associated with exposure to asbestos fibers. Most of the existing literature focuses on occupational exposure; however, non-occupational asbestos exposure has also been identified as an important risk factor.

Objective: To estimate the association between mesothelioma and non-occupational asbestos exposure, and evaluate control recruitment and exposure measurement methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0431-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6300000PMC
December 2018
4 Reads

Epidemiological association between multiple chemical sensitivity and birth by caesarean section: a nationwide case-control study.

Environ Health 2018 12 14;17(1):89. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Clinical Research Center for Allergy and Rheumatology, National Hospital Organization Sagamihara National Hospital, 18-1 Sakuradai, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-0392, Japan.

Introduction: Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is characterized by recurrent nonspecific symptoms that are attributed to exposure to trace levels of environmental agents. Although the clinical symptoms of MCS have been described in several studies, the risk factors for this condition remain unclear. Our aim was to clarify the risk factors for MCS and the association between MCS and birth by caesarean section. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0438-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6295056PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Responses of healthy young males to fine-particle exposure are modified by exercise habits: a panel study.

Environ Health 2018 12 13;17(1):88. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

State Key Joint Laboratory for Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China.

Background: Aerobic exercise benefits health but increases inhalation of fine particles (PM) in ambient air. Acute cardiopulmonary responses to PM exposure in individuals with different exercise habits, especially in areas with severe air pollution, are not well understood.

Methods: To examine acute cardiopulmonary responses to PM exposure modified by exercise habits, a panel of 20 healthy non-smoking male subjects, recruited in Beijing, China, completed seven visits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0437-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6293663PMC
December 2018
7 Reads

The pulmonary and autonomic effects of high-intensity and low-intensity exercise in diesel exhaust.

Environ Health 2018 12 13;17(1):87. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Background: Exposure to air pollution impairs aspects of pulmonary and autonomic function and causes pulmonary inflammation. However, how exercising in air pollution affects these indices is poorly understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of low-intensity and high-intensity cycling with diesel exhaust (DE) exposure on pulmonary function, heart rate variability (HRV), fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), norepinephrine and symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0434-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6292001PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Associations of greenness, greyness and air pollution exposure with children's health: a cross-sectional study in Southern Italy.

Environ Health 2018 12 5;17(1):86. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

National Research Council, Institute of Biomedicine and Molecular Immunology, via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146, Palermo, Italy.

Background: Due to the complex interplay among different urban-related exposures, a comprehensive approach is advisable to estimate the health effects. We simultaneously assessed the effect of "green", "grey" and air pollution exposure on respiratory/allergic conditions and general symptoms in schoolchildren.

Methods: This study involved 219 schoolchildren (8-10 years) of the Municipality of Palermo, Italy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0430-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6282291PMC
December 2018
9 Reads

Prenatal exposure to phthalates and autism spectrum disorder in the MARBLES study.

Environ Health 2018 12 5;17(1):85. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis, California, USA.

Background: Evidence from experimental and observational studies suggests that prenatal phthalate exposures may be associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We examined whether prenatal phthalate exposures were associated with an increased risk of ASD.

Methods: We quantified 14 metabolites of eight phthalates in 636 multiple maternal urine samples collected during 2nd and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy from 201 mother-child pairs in MARBLES (Markers of Autism Risk in Babies - Learning Early Signs), a high-risk ASD longitudinal cohort. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0428-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6280477PMC
December 2018
9 Reads

Analysing the link between public transport use and airborne transmission: mobility and contagion in the London underground.

Environ Health 2018 12 4;17(1):84. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

Background: The transmission of infectious diseases is dependent on the amount and nature of contacts between infectious and healthy individuals. Confined and crowded environments that people visit in their day-to-day life (such as town squares, business districts, transport hubs, etc) can act as hot-spots for spreading disease. In this study we explore the link between the use of public transport and the spread of airborne infections in urban environments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0427-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6280530PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Breast cancer risk and serum levels of per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances: a case-control study nested in the California Teachers Study.

Environ Health 2018 11 27;17(1):83. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.

Background: Per- and poly- fluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are a large family of synthetic chemicals, some of which are mammary toxicants and endocrine disruptors. Their potential as breast carcinogens is unclear. Our objective was to evaluate the risk of breast cancer associated with serum PFAS concentrations in a nested case-control study within the California Teachers Study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0426-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6260688PMC
November 2018
3 Reads
3.372 Impact Factor

Effects of ambient carbon monoxide on daily hospitalizations for cardiovascular disease: a time-stratified case-crossover study of 460,938 cases in Beijing, China from 2013 to 2017.

Environ Health 2018 11 26;17(1):82. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

Background: Evidence focused on exposure to ambient carbon monoxide (CO) and the risk of hospitalizations for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is lacking in developing countries. This study aimed to examine the effect of CO exposure on hospitalizations for CVD in Beijing, China.

Methods: A total of 460,938 hospitalizations for cardiovascular diseases were obtained from electronic hospitalization summary reports from 2013 to 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0429-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6258455PMC
November 2018
4 Reads
3.372 Impact Factor

Occupational health: a world of false promises.

Environ Health 2018 11 21;17(1):81. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

Occupational and Environmental Health Research Group, Stirling, UK.

The response of the World Health Organization (WHO) to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in 2015 demonstrated that the global health system is unprepared to address what should be its primary mission, control of disease epidemics while protecting health workers. Critics blamed WHO politics and its rigid culture for the poor response to the epidemic. We find that United Nations agencies, WHO and the International Labor Organization (ILO), are faced with the global problem of inadequate worker protections and a growing crisis in occupational health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0422-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6249896PMC
November 2018
14 Reads

Changing places to study short-term effects of air pollution on cardiovascular health: a panel study.

Environ Health 2018 11 19;17(1):80. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Environment and Health Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, O&N I, PB 706, 3000, Leuven, Belgium.

Background: Short-term exposure to ambient air pollution triggers acute cardiovascular events. Here, we evaluate the association of exposure to ambient air pollution with two intermediate cardiovascular endpoints: blood pressure and carotid stiffness.

Methods: In a one-year panel study, we included 20 healthy volunteers (10 male-female couples aged 59-75 years) with air pollution and health parameters measured every two months at their region of residence (Leuven, Belgium) and twice during two ten-day periods in two locations, one with higher (Milan, Italy) and one with lower (Vindeln, Sweden) air pollution levels (220 observations). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12940-018-0425-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6245927PMC
November 2018
22 Reads