2,025 results match your criteria Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America[Journal]


Obstetric and Gynecologic Emergencies.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May;37(2):xvii-xviii

UCLA Emergency Medicine, 924 Westwood Boulevard, Suite 300, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.02.002DOI Listing

Obstetric and Gynecological Emergencies.

Authors:
Amal Mattu

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May;37(2):xv-xvi

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.02.003DOI Listing

Erratum.

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Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May;37(2):xiii

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.02.001DOI Listing

Resuscitation of the Pregnant Patient.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May 8;37(2):351-363. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Department of Critical Care Medicine, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Georgetown University School of Medicine, 110 Irving Street Northwest, Suite 4B-42, Washington, DC 20010, USA. Electronic address:

Many health care providers lack familiarity with maternal physiologic changes and the distinctive underlying etiology of cardiac arrest in pregnancy. Knowledge of what changes are expected in pregnancy and an understanding of how to adapt clinical practice is essential for the care of the pregnant woman in the emergency department. Amniotic fluid embolism should be recognized as a rare cause of cardiac arrest in pregnancy, characterized by the triad of cardiovascular collapse, hypoxic respiratory failure, and coagulopathy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.01.011DOI Listing
May 2019
2 Reads

Cardiovascular Emergencies in Pregnancy.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May 8;37(2):339-350. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Department of Emergency Medicine, MedStar Southern Maryland Hospital Center, 7503 Surratts Road, Clinton, MD 20735, USA.

Cardiovascular disease has overtaken all other causes of maternal death in the United States. The physiologic changes of pregnancy place a significant amount of stress on the cardiovascular system and put pregnant women at risk for potentially catastrophic complications, such as pulmonary embolism, aortic or coronary artery dissection, myocardial infarction, and peripartum cardiomyopathy. The diagnosis of these conditions is challenging because the symptoms can mimic those experienced in normal pregnancies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.01.010DOI Listing
May 2019
3 Reads

Trauma in Pregnancy.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May 8;37(2):317-338. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Alameda Health Systems, 490 Grand Avenue, Oakland, CA 94610, USA. Electronic address:

Although trauma in pregnancy is rare, it is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality to pregnant women and fetus. Pathophysiology of trauma is generally time sensitive, and this is still true in pregnant patients, with the additional challenge of rare presentation and balancing the management of two patients concurrently. Successful resuscitation requires understanding the physiologic changes to the woman throughout the course of pregnancy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.01.009DOI Listing
May 2019
3 Reads

Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May;37(2):301-316

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, Suite 200; 6th Floor, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA; Department of Internal Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, Suite 200; 6th Floor, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.

The 4 categories of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia-eclampsia, and chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia. These disorders are among the leading causes of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Proper diagnosis in the emergency department is crucial in order to initiate appropriate treatment to reduce the potential harm to the mother and the fetus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.01.008DOI Listing
May 2019
2 Reads

Postdelivery Emergencies.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May;37(2):287-300

UCLA Ronald Reagan-Olive View Emergency Medicine Residency, UCLA Medical Center, 924 Westwood Boulevard, Suite 300, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

This article covers a high-risk time in a woman's life, the period just after delivery of her baby. There are large variations in complication rates across various groups in the United States. Many women seek care in the emergency department for routine and more serious postpartum pathologies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.01.014DOI Listing
May 2019
2 Reads

Late Pregnancy and Postpartum Emergencies.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May;37(2):277-286

UCLA Ronald Reagan-Olive View Emergency Medicine Residency, Ronald Reagan Medical Center, 924 Westwood Boulevard, Suite 300, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

The period just after delivery is a high-risk period for women with associated morbidity and even mortality. There are large variations in complication rates across various groups in the United States. This article covers complications commonly encountered in the emergency department in late pregnancy and the early postpartum period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.01.013DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Precipitous Labor and Emergency Department Delivery.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May;37(2):265-276

Department of Emergency Medicine, MedStar Georgetown University, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, 3800 Reservoir Road, Washington, DC 20007, USA.

A precipitous delivery can be among the most stressful events an emergency physician encounters. The physician must assess 2 patients (mother and fetus) and be prepared to manage a variety of complications that may arise during delivery. A majority of precipitous deliveries result in good outcomes for both mother and baby, but emergency physicians must be prepared to manage feared complications, such as tight nuchal cords, shoulder dystocia, and breech presentation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.01.007DOI Listing
May 2019
2 Reads

Vaginal Bleeding in Late Pregnancy.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May 8;37(2):251-264. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, 1 Riverside Circle, 4th Floor Admin, Roanoke, VA 24016, USA.

Bleeding in late-term pregnancy can present as an innocuous start to parturition or a catastrophic maternal-fetal hemorrhage masked by the physiologic adaptations of pregnancy. The emergency management of late-term bleeding can be challenging, especially when providing stabilizing care in a limited-resource environment. Early recognition of life-threatening vaginal bleeding, potential causes, and emergency management of maternal-fetal distress is reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.01.006DOI Listing
May 2019
3 Reads

Complications of Assisted Reproductive Technology.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May;37(2):239-249

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University in St. Louis, 660 South Euclid, Mailbox 8064-37-905, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA.

Although only accounting for a small percentage of infants born in the United States each year, assisted reproductive technology (ART) has become a more common means of conception since the first in vitro fertilization baby was born in 1978. An understanding of the ART process, medications, and complications is becoming essential for emergency medicine practice. Much of the surveillance data focuses on ART complications that are likely to be less relevant in the acute care setting, but ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, ectopic pregnancy, and ovarian torsion are 3 diagnoses with high potential morbidity and mortality that emergency physicians should not miss. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.01.005DOI Listing
May 2019
4 Reads

Complications in Early Pregnancy.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May;37(2):219-237

Department of Emergency Medicine, Canton-Potsdam Hospital, 50 Leroy Street, Potsdam, NY 13676, USA. Electronic address:

Early in pregnancy women frequently experience nausea, vomiting, and vaginal bleeding. Nausea and vomiting can be mild, managed by dietary modifications and medications, or severe, requiring intravenous fluids and medications. Care should be used when selecting medications for nausea to avoid additional side effects or potential harm to the developing fetus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.01.004DOI Listing
May 2019
4 Reads

Acute Pelvic Pain.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May;37(2):207-218

Medstar Georgetown University Hospital, 3800 Reservoir Road Northwest, Washington, DC 20007, USA.

Acute pelvic pain has gynecologic and nongynecologic causes, and distinguishing between them can be difficult in the emergency department. Ovarian cysts, adnexal torsion, and pelvic inflammatory disease are conditions that emergency physicians must be able to identify. Pelvic pathologic condition can be readily assessed with ultrasound but has significant limitations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.01.012DOI Listing
May 2019
2 Reads

Genital Complaints at the Extremes of Age.

Authors:
Sara Manning

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May;37(2):193-205

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

Variations in estrogen levels across a woman's lifetime lead to important changes in genital physiology and pathophysiology. Low estrogen states like menopause and the prepubertal period share important physiologic changes, including more friable, dry, and inelastic mucosa that is prone to irritation, injury, and infection. These and other factors lead to unique gynecologic pathologic conditions encountered at the extremes of age. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07338627193000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.01.003DOI Listing
May 2019
6 Reads

Sexually Transmitted Diseases in the Emergency Department.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May;37(2):165-192

Prisma Health, University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, 701 Grove Road, Greenville, SC 29605, USA. Electronic address:

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) continue to be underrecognized leading to devastating health and economic consequences. Emergency clinicians play an important role in diagnosing and managing STDs and in improving health care outcomes for both the patient and their partners. In addition, antibiotic resistance and emerging infections continue to challenge providers in clinical practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.01.001DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

The Patient with Non-Pregnancy-Associated Vaginal Bleeding.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 May;37(2):153-164

UCLA-OV Emergency Medicine, UCLA Department of Emergency Medicine, 924 Westwood Boulevard, Suite 300, Los Angeles, CA 90024, USA.

Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) unrelated to pregnancy affects 20% to 30% of women at some point in life and is a common emergency department (ED) and urgent care (UC) presentation. AUB is a complex condition with extensive terminology, broad differential diagnosis, and numerous treatment options, yet few published evidence-based guidelines. In the ED or UC setting most affected patients are often more frustrated than acutely ill. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2019.01.002DOI Listing
May 2019
2 Reads

Erratum.

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Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):xv

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.10.001DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Ear, Nose, and Throat Emergencies.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):xiii-xiv

Clinical Emergency Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 1975 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.10.002DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Ears, Nose, and Throat Emergencies.

Authors:
Amal Mattu

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):xi-xii

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.10.003DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Infections of the Neck.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):95-107

Department of Emergency Medicine, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, 11234 Anderson Street MC A-108, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA. Electronic address:

Infection of the neck is a relatively common emergency department complaint. If not diagnosed and managed promptly, it may quickly progress to a life-threatening infection. These infections can result in true airway emergencies that may require fiberoptic or surgical airways. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.003DOI Listing
February 2019
14 Reads

Dental Emergencies.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):81-93

Department of Emergency Medicine, Norwalk Hospital, 34 Maple Street, Norwalk, CT 06850, USA.

Dental emergencies present frequently to the emergency department and urgent care centers. Trauma to the teeth includes fractures, luxations, and avulsions, which can be reduced in most cases. Avulsed primary teeth should never be replaced. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.008DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

Infections of the Oropharynx.

Authors:
Matthew R Klein

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):69-80

Department of Emergency Medicine, Northwestern University, 211 East Ontario - Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. Electronic address:

This article reviews the presentation, diagnosis, and management of common and "can't miss" infections of the oropharynx, including streptococcal pharyngitis, infectious mononucleosis, peritonsillar abscess, retropharyngeal abscess, and epiglottitis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.002DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

Soft Tissue Disorders of the Mouth.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):55-68

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO, USA. Electronic address:

Soft tissue disorders of the mouth encompass a wide expanse of pathophysiology. This article focuses on the identification, etiology, management, and complications of common infectious processes (candidiasis, dental caries, and herpes labialis), inflammatory lesions (sialolithiasis, oral lichen planus, and aphthous ulcer), and benign entities (bony tori and mucocele). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.006DOI Listing
February 2019
15 Reads

Sinusitis Update.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):41-54

Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of International EM Stony Brook University (SUNY), 101 Nicholls Road, HSC Level 4, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA.

Rhinosinusitis affects many pediatric patients as well as 1 in 6 adults in any given year, resulting in ambulatory care, pediatric, and emergency department visits. Uncomplicated rhinosinusitis requires no imaging or testing and does not require antibiotic treatment. Using strict clinical diagnostic criteria may minimize unnecessary antibiotics. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07338627183009
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.007DOI Listing
February 2019
23 Reads

Epistaxis.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):29-39

Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Utah, 30 North 1900 East, Room 1C26, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA.

Most anterior epistaxis originates primarily from the Kiesselbach plexus, whereas posterior epistaxis is less common and originates from branches of the sphenopalatine artery. Risk factors include local trauma, foreign body insertion, substance abuse, neoplasms, inherited bleeding diatheses, or acquired coagulopathies. Assessment of airway, breathing, and circulation precedes identification of bleeding source, pain control, and achieving hemostasis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.005DOI Listing
February 2019
8 Reads

The Diagnosis and Management of Facial Bone Fractures.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):137-151

Department of Emergency Medicine, Northwestern Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 259 East Erie, Suite 1300, Chicago, IL 60611, USA; Department of Medicine, Northwestern Medicine, Northwestern University Feinber School of Medicine, 259 East Erie Street, Suite 1300, Chicago, IL 60611, USA; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Northwestern Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 259 East Erie Street, Suite 1300, Chicago, IL 60611, USA; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 259 East Erie Street, Suite 1300, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. Electronic address:

Appropriate medical care for a patient with a facial fracture can not only optimize aesthetic outcomes but also prevent the potential morbidity and mortality of delayed treatment. In this article, we focus on the clinical presentations, physical examination findings, diagnostic imaging, consultations, and follow-up that patients with facial fractures need related to their emergency department management. Specifically, we address the nuances of evaluating frontal, orbital, nasal, maxillofacial, and mandibular fractures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.012DOI Listing
February 2019
19 Reads

Traumatic Injuries of the Ear, Nose and Throat.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):131-136

Emergency Medicine, Alameda Health System, Highland Hospital, 1411 East 31st, Oakland, CA 94602, USA. Electronic address:

This article reviews the presentation, diagnosis, and management of common traumatic injuries of the ear, nose, and throat, including laryngeal trauma, auricular and septal hematomas, and tympanic membrane rupture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.011DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

Foreign Bodies of the Ear, Nose and Throat.

Authors:
Leslie C Oyama

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):121-130

Department of Emergency Medicine, UC San Diego, 200 West Arbor Drive, MC 8676, San Diego, CA 92103-8676, USA. Electronic address:

Foreign bodies to the ear, nose, and throat often can be managed in the emergency department, particularly if the patient offers a history consistent with foreign body and is calm and compliant with the examination and removal attempts. Tips for success include analgesia, adequate visualization, immobilization of the patient's head, dexterity and experience level of the provider, and minimizing attempts at removal. It is critical to recognize the risks involved with certain retained objects (button batteries or sharp objects) and when to call a consultant to help facilitate safe, successful removal of objects to the ear, nose, and throat. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.009DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

Peripheral Vertigo.

Authors:
Rodney Omron

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):11-28

Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical School, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 North Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Electronic address:

This article summarizes the systematic assessment of the dizzy patient who presents with peripheral vertigo. It demonstrates the steps and tests necessary using the Triage-Timing-Trigger-Test (Triage + TiTraTe) method to accurately diagnose the underlying most probable cause while ruling out life-threatening causes. Using video support and just-in-time infographics, it demonstrates the Dix-Hallpike, Semont, Epley, and HINTS maneuvers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.004DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Tracheostomy Emergencies.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):109-119

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.

Tracheostomy is a common procedure for long-term airway management. Although the overall complication rate is greater than 50%, the incidence of serious complications is low. These serious complications can, however, lead to significant morbidity and mortality and it is incumbent on the emergency provider to be prepared to deal with such tracheostomy-related emergencies. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07338627183009
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.010DOI Listing
February 2019
19 Reads

Infections of the Ear.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):1-9

Department of Emergency Medicine, Kaiser Permanente, 4647 Zion Avenue, San Diego, CA 92120, USA. Electronic address:

Infections of the ear are a common presentation to an acute care environment. In this article, the authors aim to summarize the most common presentations, and diagnostic and treatment options for typical infections of the ear. This article is geared toward the emergency physician, urgent care provider, and primary care provider who will likely be the initial evaluating and treating provider to assist them in determining what treatment modalities can be managed in a clinic and what needs to be referred for admission or specialty consultation. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07338627183008
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.001DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

Here to Stay: Infectious Diseases in Emergency Medicine.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov;36(4):xvii-xviii

Department of Emergency Medicine, Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, 1001 Potrero Avenue, Suite 6A, San Francisco, CA 94110-1377, USA. Electronic address:

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07338627183007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.08.001DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

Infectious Disease Emergencies.

Authors:
Amal Mattu

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov;36(4):xv-xvi

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07338627183007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.08.002DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Infection Prevention for the Emergency Department: Out of Reach or Standard of Care?

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):873-887. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Infection Prevention, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Mailstop 90-75-593, 4590 Children's Place, St Louis, MO 63108, USA.

The emergency department (ED) presents unique challenges to infection control and prevention. Hand hygiene, transmission-based precautions, environmental cleaning, high-level disinfection and sterilization of reusable medical devices, and prevention of health care-associated infections (catheter-associated urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, central line-associated bloodstream infection) are key priorities in ED infection prevention. Effective and sustainable infection prevention strategies tailored to the ED are necessary and achievable. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07338627183006
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6203442PMC
November 2018
40 Reads

Antimicrobial Stewardship in the Emergency Department.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):853-872. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California Davis, 4150 V Street, Suite 2100, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA.

The emergency department (ED) is the hub of the US health care system. Acute infectious diseases are frequently encountered in the ED setting, making this a critical setting for antimicrobial stewardship efforts. Systems level and behavioral stewardship interventions have demonstrated success in the ED setting but successful implementation depends on institutional support and the presence of a physician champion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.012DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

Infectious Diseases After Hydrologic Disasters.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):835-851. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA.

Hydrologic disasters, including hurricanes, tsunamis, and severe flooding, have been associated with infectious diseases, particularly among vulnerable and displaced populations in resource-poor settings. Skin and soft tissue infections, gastrointestinal infections, respiratory infections, zoonotic infections, and vector-borne diseases each present unique threats to human health in this setting. Increased emergency physician awareness of these infectious diseases and their diagnosis and management helps optimize medical care for survivors after a hydrologic disaster and safeguard the health of disaster responders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.07.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6195322PMC
November 2018
4 Reads

Biothreat Agents and Emerging Infectious Disease in the Emergency Department.

Authors:
Amesh A Adalja

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):823-834. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 601 E. Pratt Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, USA. Electronic address:

The challenges faced by the emergency physician with recognizing and treating category A biothreat agents and emerging infectious disease are summarized and reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.011DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Approach to Transplant Infectious Diseases in the Emergency Department.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):811-822. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, 4523 Clayton Avenue, Campus Box 8072, St Louis, MO 63110, USA; Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, 4523 Clayton Avenue, Campus Box 8051, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address:

The emergency department (ED) is an increasingly important site of care for patients who have undergone solid organ transplantation or hematopoietic cell transplantation. It is paramount for emergency physicians to recognize infections early on, obtain appropriate diagnostic testing, initiate empirical antimicrobial therapy, and consider specialty consultation and inpatient admission when caring for these patients. This review provides emergency physicians with an approach to the assessment of transplant patients' underlying risk for infection, formulation of a broad differential diagnosis, and initial management of transplant infectious disease emergencies in the ED. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6237280PMC
November 2018
3 Reads

Infectious Disease Emergencies in Oncology Patients.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):795-810. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, 1 Riverside Circle, 4th Floor, Roanoke, VA 24014, USA. Electronic address:

Oncology patients are a unique patient population in the emergency department (ED). Malignancy and associated surgical, chemotherapeutic, or radiation therapies put them at an increased risk for infection. The most ominous development is neutropenic fever, which happens often and may not present with signs or symptoms other than fever. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.009DOI Listing
November 2018
7 Reads

Management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus in the Emergency Department.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):777-794. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, Sixth Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.

Over the past 30 years, significant advances have transformed the landscape of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care in the emergency department. Diagnosis and management of HIV has improved, resulting in a decline in the incidence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining infections. Advances in pharmacology have led to fewer serious medication toxicities and more tolerable regimens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.008DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Management of Patients with Sexually Transmitted Infections in the Emergency Department.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):767-776. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Division of Infectious Disease, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 8051, 4523 Clayton Avenue, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address:

Sexually transmitted infections (STI) are very common infections in the United States. Most patients with STIs are evaluated and treated in primary care settings; however, many also present to the Emergency Department (ED) for initial care. Management of STIs in the ED includes appropriate testing and treatment per CDC Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07338627183005
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.007DOI Listing
November 2018
7 Reads

Musculoskeletal Infections in the Emergency Department.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):751-766. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, 4523 Clayton Avenue, Campus Box 8072, St Louis, MO 63110, USA; Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, 4523 Clayton Avenue, Campus Box 8051, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address:

Bone and joint infections are potentially limb-threatening or even life-threatening diseases. Emergency physicians must consider infection when evaluating musculoskeletal complaints, as misdiagnosis can have significant consequences. Patients with bone and joint infections can have heterogeneous presentations with nonspecific signs and symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6214631PMC
November 2018
5 Reads

Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in the Emergency Department.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov;36(4):723-750

Department of Emergency Medicine, Highland Hospital, 1411 East 31st Street, Oakland, CA 94602, USA. Electronic address:

This article covers the diagnosis and treatment of skin and soft tissue infections commonly encountered in the emergency department: impetigo, cutaneous abscesses, purulent cellulitis, nonpurulent cellulitis, and necrotizing skin and soft tissue infections. Most purulent infections in the United States are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. For abscesses, we emphasize the importance of incision and drainage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.005DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

Emergency Department Approach to the Patient with Suspected Central Nervous System Infection.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov;36(4):711-722

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

Central nervous system (CNS) infections require early recognition and aggressive management to improve patient survival and prevent long-term neurologic sequelae. Although early detection and treatment are important in many infectious syndromes, CNS infections pose unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The nonspecific signs and symptoms at presentation, lack of characteristic infectious changes in laboratory and imaging diagnostics, and closed anatomic and immunologically sequestered space each present challenges to the emergency physician. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.004DOI Listing
November 2018
7 Reads

The Emergency Department Diagnosis and Management of Urinary Tract Infection.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):685-710. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Department of Emergency Medicine, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common infection seen in the emergency department. The spectrum of UTI includes simple versus complicated infection and lower versus upper UTI. No one history or examination finding is definitive for diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.003DOI Listing
November 2018
5 Reads

Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):665-683. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Alameda Health System - Highland Hospital, 1411 East 31st Street, Oakland, CA 94602, USA. Electronic address:

Community-acquired pneumonia is one of the most common infections seen in emergency department patients. There is a wide spectrum of disease severity and viral pathogens are common. After a careful history and physical examination, chest radiographs may be the only diagnostic test required. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07338627183006
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.07.001DOI Listing
November 2018
23 Reads

Infective Endocarditis.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov;36(4):645-663

Alameda Health System, 1411 East 31st Street, Highland Hospital, Oakland, CA 94602, USA. Electronic address:

Infective endocarditis (IE) is an uncommon infection of cardiac valves associated with bacteremia. It increasingly affects elderly patients with chronic disease and artificial cardiac devices. The presentation, however, remains subtle and varied, with nonspecific symptoms ranging from those resembling a mild viral infection to septic shock and multiorgan failure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.002DOI Listing
November 2018
16 Reads

The Heme-Onc Tidal Wave: Are You Prepared?

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug;36(3):xv-xvi

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.05.001DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

Hematologic and Oncologic Emergencies.

Authors:
Amal Mattu

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug;36(3):xiii-xiv

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.05.002DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads