2,008 results match your criteria Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America[Journal]


Erratum.

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Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):xv

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.10.001DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Ear, Nose, and Throat Emergencies.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):xiii-xiv

Clinical Emergency Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 1975 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.10.002DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Ears, Nose, and Throat Emergencies.

Authors:
Amal Mattu

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):xi-xii

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.10.003DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Infections of the Neck.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):95-107

Department of Emergency Medicine, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, 11234 Anderson Street MC A-108, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA. Electronic address:

Infection of the neck is a relatively common emergency department complaint. If not diagnosed and managed promptly, it may quickly progress to a life-threatening infection. These infections can result in true airway emergencies that may require fiberoptic or surgical airways. Read More

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February 2019
10 Reads

Dental Emergencies.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):81-93

Department of Emergency Medicine, Norwalk Hospital, 34 Maple Street, Norwalk, CT 06850, USA.

Dental emergencies present frequently to the emergency department and urgent care centers. Trauma to the teeth includes fractures, luxations, and avulsions, which can be reduced in most cases. Avulsed primary teeth should never be replaced. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.008DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

Infections of the Oropharynx.

Authors:
Matthew R Klein

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):69-80

Department of Emergency Medicine, Northwestern University, 211 East Ontario - Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. Electronic address:

This article reviews the presentation, diagnosis, and management of common and "can't miss" infections of the oropharynx, including streptococcal pharyngitis, infectious mononucleosis, peritonsillar abscess, retropharyngeal abscess, and epiglottitis. Read More

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February 2019
4 Reads

Soft Tissue Disorders of the Mouth.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):55-68

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO, USA. Electronic address:

Soft tissue disorders of the mouth encompass a wide expanse of pathophysiology. This article focuses on the identification, etiology, management, and complications of common infectious processes (candidiasis, dental caries, and herpes labialis), inflammatory lesions (sialolithiasis, oral lichen planus, and aphthous ulcer), and benign entities (bony tori and mucocele). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.006DOI Listing
February 2019
13 Reads

Sinusitis Update.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):41-54

Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of International EM Stony Brook University (SUNY), 101 Nicholls Road, HSC Level 4, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA.

Rhinosinusitis affects many pediatric patients as well as 1 in 6 adults in any given year, resulting in ambulatory care, pediatric, and emergency department visits. Uncomplicated rhinosinusitis requires no imaging or testing and does not require antibiotic treatment. Using strict clinical diagnostic criteria may minimize unnecessary antibiotics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.007DOI Listing
February 2019
15 Reads

Epistaxis.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):29-39

Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Utah, 30 North 1900 East, Room 1C26, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA.

Most anterior epistaxis originates primarily from the Kiesselbach plexus, whereas posterior epistaxis is less common and originates from branches of the sphenopalatine artery. Risk factors include local trauma, foreign body insertion, substance abuse, neoplasms, inherited bleeding diatheses, or acquired coagulopathies. Assessment of airway, breathing, and circulation precedes identification of bleeding source, pain control, and achieving hemostasis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.005DOI Listing
February 2019
8 Reads

The Diagnosis and Management of Facial Bone Fractures.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):137-151

Department of Emergency Medicine, Northwestern Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 259 East Erie, Suite 1300, Chicago, IL 60611, USA; Department of Medicine, Northwestern Medicine, Northwestern University Feinber School of Medicine, 259 East Erie Street, Suite 1300, Chicago, IL 60611, USA; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Northwestern Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 259 East Erie Street, Suite 1300, Chicago, IL 60611, USA; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 259 East Erie Street, Suite 1300, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. Electronic address:

Appropriate medical care for a patient with a facial fracture can not only optimize aesthetic outcomes but also prevent the potential morbidity and mortality of delayed treatment. In this article, we focus on the clinical presentations, physical examination findings, diagnostic imaging, consultations, and follow-up that patients with facial fractures need related to their emergency department management. Specifically, we address the nuances of evaluating frontal, orbital, nasal, maxillofacial, and mandibular fractures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.012DOI Listing
February 2019
13 Reads

Traumatic Injuries of the Ear, Nose and Throat.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):131-136

Emergency Medicine, Alameda Health System, Highland Hospital, 1411 East 31st, Oakland, CA 94602, USA. Electronic address:

This article reviews the presentation, diagnosis, and management of common traumatic injuries of the ear, nose, and throat, including laryngeal trauma, auricular and septal hematomas, and tympanic membrane rupture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.011DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Foreign Bodies of the Ear, Nose and Throat.

Authors:
Leslie C Oyama

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):121-130

Department of Emergency Medicine, UC San Diego, 200 West Arbor Drive, MC 8676, San Diego, CA 92103-8676, USA. Electronic address:

Foreign bodies to the ear, nose, and throat often can be managed in the emergency department, particularly if the patient offers a history consistent with foreign body and is calm and compliant with the examination and removal attempts. Tips for success include analgesia, adequate visualization, immobilization of the patient's head, dexterity and experience level of the provider, and minimizing attempts at removal. It is critical to recognize the risks involved with certain retained objects (button batteries or sharp objects) and when to call a consultant to help facilitate safe, successful removal of objects to the ear, nose, and throat. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.009DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

Peripheral Vertigo.

Authors:
Rodney Omron

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):11-28

Department of Emergency Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical School, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 733 North Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Electronic address:

This article summarizes the systematic assessment of the dizzy patient who presents with peripheral vertigo. It demonstrates the steps and tests necessary using the Triage-Timing-Trigger-Test (Triage + TiTraTe) method to accurately diagnose the underlying most probable cause while ruling out life-threatening causes. Using video support and just-in-time infographics, it demonstrates the Dix-Hallpike, Semont, Epley, and HINTS maneuvers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.004DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Tracheostomy Emergencies.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):109-119

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.

Tracheostomy is a common procedure for long-term airway management. Although the overall complication rate is greater than 50%, the incidence of serious complications is low. These serious complications can, however, lead to significant morbidity and mortality and it is incumbent on the emergency provider to be prepared to deal with such tracheostomy-related emergencies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.09.010DOI Listing
February 2019
14 Reads

Infections of the Ear.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2019 Feb;37(1):1-9

Department of Emergency Medicine, Kaiser Permanente, 4647 Zion Avenue, San Diego, CA 92120, USA. Electronic address:

Infections of the ear are a common presentation to an acute care environment. In this article, the authors aim to summarize the most common presentations, and diagnostic and treatment options for typical infections of the ear. This article is geared toward the emergency physician, urgent care provider, and primary care provider who will likely be the initial evaluating and treating provider to assist them in determining what treatment modalities can be managed in a clinic and what needs to be referred for admission or specialty consultation. Read More

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February 2019
6 Reads

Here to Stay: Infectious Diseases in Emergency Medicine.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov;36(4):xvii-xviii

Department of Emergency Medicine, Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, 1001 Potrero Avenue, Suite 6A, San Francisco, CA 94110-1377, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.08.001DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

Infectious Disease Emergencies.

Authors:
Amal Mattu

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov;36(4):xv-xvi

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.08.002DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Infection Prevention for the Emergency Department: Out of Reach or Standard of Care?

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):873-887. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Infection Prevention, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Mailstop 90-75-593, 4590 Children's Place, St Louis, MO 63108, USA.

The emergency department (ED) presents unique challenges to infection control and prevention. Hand hygiene, transmission-based precautions, environmental cleaning, high-level disinfection and sterilization of reusable medical devices, and prevention of health care-associated infections (catheter-associated urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, central line-associated bloodstream infection) are key priorities in ED infection prevention. Effective and sustainable infection prevention strategies tailored to the ED are necessary and achievable. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6203442PMC
November 2018
31 Reads

Antimicrobial Stewardship in the Emergency Department.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):853-872. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California Davis, 4150 V Street, Suite 2100, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA.

The emergency department (ED) is the hub of the US health care system. Acute infectious diseases are frequently encountered in the ED setting, making this a critical setting for antimicrobial stewardship efforts. Systems level and behavioral stewardship interventions have demonstrated success in the ED setting but successful implementation depends on institutional support and the presence of a physician champion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.012DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

Infectious Diseases After Hydrologic Disasters.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):835-851. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA.

Hydrologic disasters, including hurricanes, tsunamis, and severe flooding, have been associated with infectious diseases, particularly among vulnerable and displaced populations in resource-poor settings. Skin and soft tissue infections, gastrointestinal infections, respiratory infections, zoonotic infections, and vector-borne diseases each present unique threats to human health in this setting. Increased emergency physician awareness of these infectious diseases and their diagnosis and management helps optimize medical care for survivors after a hydrologic disaster and safeguard the health of disaster responders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.07.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6195322PMC
November 2018
4 Reads

Biothreat Agents and Emerging Infectious Disease in the Emergency Department.

Authors:
Amesh A Adalja

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):823-834. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 601 E. Pratt Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, USA. Electronic address:

The challenges faced by the emergency physician with recognizing and treating category A biothreat agents and emerging infectious disease are summarized and reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.011DOI Listing
November 2018
3 Reads

Approach to Transplant Infectious Diseases in the Emergency Department.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):811-822. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, 4523 Clayton Avenue, Campus Box 8072, St Louis, MO 63110, USA; Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, 4523 Clayton Avenue, Campus Box 8051, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address:

The emergency department (ED) is an increasingly important site of care for patients who have undergone solid organ transplantation or hematopoietic cell transplantation. It is paramount for emergency physicians to recognize infections early on, obtain appropriate diagnostic testing, initiate empirical antimicrobial therapy, and consider specialty consultation and inpatient admission when caring for these patients. This review provides emergency physicians with an approach to the assessment of transplant patients' underlying risk for infection, formulation of a broad differential diagnosis, and initial management of transplant infectious disease emergencies in the ED. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6237280PMC
November 2018
3 Reads

Infectious Disease Emergencies in Oncology Patients.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):795-810. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, 1 Riverside Circle, 4th Floor, Roanoke, VA 24014, USA. Electronic address:

Oncology patients are a unique patient population in the emergency department (ED). Malignancy and associated surgical, chemotherapeutic, or radiation therapies put them at an increased risk for infection. The most ominous development is neutropenic fever, which happens often and may not present with signs or symptoms other than fever. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.009DOI Listing
November 2018
7 Reads

Management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus in the Emergency Department.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):777-794. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, Sixth Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.

Over the past 30 years, significant advances have transformed the landscape of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care in the emergency department. Diagnosis and management of HIV has improved, resulting in a decline in the incidence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining infections. Advances in pharmacology have led to fewer serious medication toxicities and more tolerable regimens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.008DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Management of Patients with Sexually Transmitted Infections in the Emergency Department.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):767-776. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Division of Infectious Disease, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 8051, 4523 Clayton Avenue, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address:

Sexually transmitted infections (STI) are very common infections in the United States. Most patients with STIs are evaluated and treated in primary care settings; however, many also present to the Emergency Department (ED) for initial care. Management of STIs in the ED includes appropriate testing and treatment per CDC Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.007DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

Musculoskeletal Infections in the Emergency Department.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):751-766. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, 4523 Clayton Avenue, Campus Box 8072, St Louis, MO 63110, USA; Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, 4523 Clayton Avenue, Campus Box 8051, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address:

Bone and joint infections are potentially limb-threatening or even life-threatening diseases. Emergency physicians must consider infection when evaluating musculoskeletal complaints, as misdiagnosis can have significant consequences. Patients with bone and joint infections can have heterogeneous presentations with nonspecific signs and symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6214631PMC
November 2018
4 Reads

Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in the Emergency Department.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov;36(4):723-750

Department of Emergency Medicine, Highland Hospital, 1411 East 31st Street, Oakland, CA 94602, USA. Electronic address:

This article covers the diagnosis and treatment of skin and soft tissue infections commonly encountered in the emergency department: impetigo, cutaneous abscesses, purulent cellulitis, nonpurulent cellulitis, and necrotizing skin and soft tissue infections. Most purulent infections in the United States are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. For abscesses, we emphasize the importance of incision and drainage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.005DOI Listing
November 2018
5 Reads

Emergency Department Approach to the Patient with Suspected Central Nervous System Infection.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov;36(4):711-722

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

Central nervous system (CNS) infections require early recognition and aggressive management to improve patient survival and prevent long-term neurologic sequelae. Although early detection and treatment are important in many infectious syndromes, CNS infections pose unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The nonspecific signs and symptoms at presentation, lack of characteristic infectious changes in laboratory and imaging diagnostics, and closed anatomic and immunologically sequestered space each present challenges to the emergency physician. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.004DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

The Emergency Department Diagnosis and Management of Urinary Tract Infection.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):685-710. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Department of Emergency Medicine, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common infection seen in the emergency department. The spectrum of UTI includes simple versus complicated infection and lower versus upper UTI. No one history or examination finding is definitive for diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.003DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 6;36(4):665-683. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Alameda Health System - Highland Hospital, 1411 East 31st Street, Oakland, CA 94602, USA. Electronic address:

Community-acquired pneumonia is one of the most common infections seen in emergency department patients. There is a wide spectrum of disease severity and viral pathogens are common. After a careful history and physical examination, chest radiographs may be the only diagnostic test required. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.07.001DOI Listing
November 2018
22 Reads

Infective Endocarditis.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov;36(4):645-663

Alameda Health System, 1411 East 31st Street, Highland Hospital, Oakland, CA 94602, USA. Electronic address:

Infective endocarditis (IE) is an uncommon infection of cardiac valves associated with bacteremia. It increasingly affects elderly patients with chronic disease and artificial cardiac devices. The presentation, however, remains subtle and varied, with nonspecific symptoms ranging from those resembling a mild viral infection to septic shock and multiorgan failure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.06.002DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

The Heme-Onc Tidal Wave: Are You Prepared?

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug;36(3):xv-xvi

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.05.001DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

Hematologic and Oncologic Emergencies.

Authors:
Amal Mattu

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug;36(3):xiii-xiv

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.05.002DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

The Oncologic Emergency Medicine Fellowship.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug 12;36(3):637-643. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Department of Emergency Medicine, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe boulevard, Unit 1468, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

The United States cancer population is growing and is projected to grow further. The current cancer population has a high rate of emergency department admission. Further training about oncologic emergencies may be needed and would ideally strive to care for the whole patient, including sequelae of the malignancy, progressive disease, symptom control, adverse effects of treatment, and palliative care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.04.013DOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads

The Cancer Emergency Department-The Ohio State University James Cancer Center Experience.

Authors:
Luca R Delatore

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug;36(3):631-636

Department of Emergency Medicine, Emergency Services, Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University, 760 Prior Hall, 410 West 10th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Electronic address:

In 2015, The James Cancer Hospital's Emergency Department (ED) opened at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center's ED. Careful planning was undertaken to assure that the needs of patients with cancer would be addressed. Strong relationships between experts in hematology, oncology, and emergency medicine were built to maximize the positive impact. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.04.012DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

Emergency Medicine Evaluation and Management of Anemia.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug 12;36(3):609-630. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Department of Emergency Medicine, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.

Anemia is a common condition and is diagnosed on laboratory assessment. It is defined by abnormally low hemoglobin concentration or decreased red blood cells. Several classification systems exist. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.04.009DOI Listing
August 2018
19 Reads

Rapid Fire: Acute Blast Crisis/Hyperviscosity Syndrome.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug 11;36(3):603-608. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University, 760 Prior Hall, 376 West 10th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

Emergency providers are likely to encounter patients with acute and chronic leukemias. In some cases, the first presentation to the emergency department may be for symptoms related to blast crisis and leukostasis. Making a timely diagnosis and consulting a hematologist can be life saving. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.04.005DOI Listing
August 2018
6 Reads

Anticoagulation Reversal.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug;36(3):585-601

Emergency Medicine Residency, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, 410 W. 10th Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA.

Today a variety of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents are available on the market. Given the propensity for bleeding among patients prescribed these medications, the emergency medicine physician must be equipped with a working knowledge of hemostasis, and anticoagulant and antiplatelet reversal. This article reviews strategies to address bleeding complications occurring secondary to warfarin, low-molecular-weight heparin, and direct oral anticoagulant therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.04.014DOI Listing
August 2018
9 Reads

Rapid Fire: Superior Vena Cava Syndrome.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug 12;36(3):577-584. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Emergency Medicine Residency, Norman Regional Health Systems, GME Office, 901 North Porter, Norman, OK 73071, USA.

Superior vena cava syndrome occurs from obstruction of the superior vena cava. The most common cause is malignancy. Small cell lung cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma are the most frequent culprits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.04.011DOI Listing
August 2018
10 Reads

Rapid Fire: Sickle Cell Disease.

Authors:
Michael Porter

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug;36(3):567-576

Department of Emergency Medicine, Norman Regional Hospital, Norman, OK, USA. Electronic address:

Emergency providers are likely to encounter sickle cell disease-related emergencies. The pathophysiology of emergent complaints are usually related to either an acute anemia or a vasoocclusive crisis. Differentiating between the two is the first step in the workup. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.04.002DOI Listing
August 2018
20 Reads

Rapid Fire: Pericardial Effusion and Tamponade.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug 11;36(3):557-565. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

One of the most common causes of pericardial effusion in the Western world is malignancy. Emergency physicians must maintain vigilance in suspecting pericardial effusion and tamponade in patients with known or suspected malignancy who present with tachycardia, dyspnea, and hypotension. Diagnosis can be expedited by key physical examination, electrocardiogram, and sonographic findings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.04.004DOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads

Rapid Fire: Hypercalcemia.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug 11;36(3):549-555. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Emergency Medicine Residency, Norman Regional Hospital, 901 North Porter, Norman, OK 73071, USA.

Hypercalcemia is commonly encountered in the clinical setting and requires identification by the clinician to avoid disastrous patient outcomes. The 2 most common causes are malignancy and hyperparathyroidism. The underlying cause for hypercalcemia may be readily known at presentation or may require further investigation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.04.008DOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads

Rapid Fire: Central Nervous System Emergencies.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug 12;36(3):537-548. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA; Department of Internal Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.

Neurologic complications are unfortunately common in oncology patients, with many presenting to the emergency department for diagnosis and management. This case-based review provides a brief overview of the key points in pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of 2 oncologic central nervous system emergencies: malignant spinal cord compression and intracranial mass. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.04.010DOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads

Pediatric Oncologic Emergencies.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug 11;36(3):527-535. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue Box 655, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.

Pediatric patients with cancer, although rarely, do present to emergency departments for first-time diagnosis, as well as for complications of treatment. The presenting symptoms can be vague, so emergency physicians must maintain a high index of suspicion and be aware of guidelines to help direct appropriate care after an initial diagnosis. It is also necessary to know the complications of treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.04.007DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

Rapid Fire: Tumor Lysis Syndrome.

Authors:
Sarah B Dubbs

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug;36(3):517-525

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a life-threatening oncologic emergency, characterized by a constellation of hyperkalemia, hyperuricemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hypocalcemia. The spectrum ranges from patients who are asymptomatic to those who go into cardiac arrest and die. Prompt recognition and initiation of treatment by emergency physicians are key, especially in the early stages of the syndrome. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S07338627183002
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.04.003DOI Listing
August 2018
17 Reads

Rapid Fire: Infectious Disease Emergencies in Patients with Cancer.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug 11;36(3):493-516. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Division of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, 4523 Clayton Avenue, Campus Box 8072, St Louis, MO 63110, USA; Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, 4523 Clayton Avenue, Campus Box 8051, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address:

Patients with cancer can be immunocompromised because of their underlying malignancy as well as the medical therapies with which they are treated. Infections frequently present atypically and can be challenging to diagnose. The spectrum of infectious diseases encountered in patients receiving chemotherapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and immunotherapy is broad depending on the depth of immunosuppression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.04.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6060634PMC
August 2018
4 Reads

The Latest Cancer Agents and Their Complications.

Authors:
Sarah B Dubbs

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 Aug 11;36(3):485-492. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 110 South Paca Street, 6th Floor, Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

The latest cancer agents, collectively known as cancer immunotherapy, have tremendously increased the armamentarium against cancer. Their targeted mechanisms seem ideal, but they do come with complications. As these therapies become more widespread, emergency physicians everywhere must be aware of the immune-related adverse events that can occur, and be ready to identify and coordinate treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.04.006DOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads

Pediatric Emergencies: The Common and the Critical.

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 May;36(2):xvii-xviii

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Avenue, PO Box 5057, Tucson, AZ 85724-5057, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.02.001DOI Listing
May 2018
5 Reads

Pediatric Emergencies.

Authors:
Amal Mattu

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 May;36(2):xv-xvi

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2018.02.002DOI Listing
May 2018
5 Reads

Pediatric Thoracic Trauma: Recognition and Management.

Authors:
Stacy L Reynolds

Emerg Med Clin North Am 2018 May 10;36(2):473-483. Epub 2018 Feb 10.

Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Carolinas Medical Center, 1000 Blythe Boulevard, 3rd Floor Medical Education Building, Charlotte, NC 28203, USA. Electronic address:

Thoracic injuries account for less than one-tenth of all pediatric trauma-related injuries but comprise 14% of pediatric trauma-related deaths. Thoracic trauma includes injuries to the lungs, heart, aorta and great vessels, esophagus, tracheobronchial tree, and structures of the chest wall. Children have unique anatomic features that change the patterns of observed injury compared with adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emc.2017.12.013DOI Listing
May 2018
4 Reads