117 results match your criteria Elbow and Forearm Overuse Injuries


Simultaneous Compression of the Median and Ulnar Nerve at the Elbow: A Retrospective Study.

J Hand Surg Asian Pac Vol 2018 Jun;23(2):198-204

* 5th Orthopaedic Department, Hand and Upper Extremity Service, Asklepieion Voulas General Hospital, Athens, Greece.

Background: Simultaneous compression of the median and ulnar nerve at the elbow region has not been sufficiently highlighted in the literature. The purposes of the present study are to report our experience regarding this entity, to elucidate the clinical features, and to describe the operative technique and findings as well as the results of simultaneous decompression performed through the same medial incision.

Methods: We performed a retrospective study of thirteen elbows in thirteen patients -nine men and four women- with simultaneous compression of the median and ulnar nerve at the elbow region between 2000 and 2011. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1142/S2424835518500200DOI Listing
June 2018
6 Reads

Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome in Athletes.

J Hand Surg Am 2017 Nov;42(11):917-923

Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA; Department of Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery, Newton-Wellesley Hospital, Newton, MA; Hand Surgery Research and Education Foundation, Newton, MA. Electronic address:

Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) refers to exercise-induced, reversible increases in pressure within well-defined inelastic fascial compartments leading to compromised tissue perfusion followed by functional loss, ischemic pain, and neurologic symptoms. Symptoms typically resolve when the activity ceases and there are usually no permanent sequelae. In the upper extremity, this condition most commonly affects athletes during sports requiring repetitive and vigorous gripping, such as rowers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2017.09.009DOI Listing
November 2017
13 Reads

Ulnar neuropathy and medial elbow pain in women's fastpitch softball pitchers: a report of 6 cases.

J Shoulder Elbow Surg 2017 Dec 28;26(12):2220-2225. Epub 2017 Sep 28.

West Tennessee Bone and Joint Clinic, Jackson, TN, USA.

Background: Elite-level women's fastpitch softball players place substantial biomechanical strains on the elbow that can result in medial elbow pain and ulnar neuropathic symptoms. There is scant literature reporting the expected outcomes of the treatment of these injuries. This study examined the results of treatment in a series of these patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2017.08.013DOI Listing
December 2017
19 Reads

Ulnar Nerve Cross-Sectional Area for the Diagnosis of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis of Ultrasonographic Measurements.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2018 04 6;99(4):743-757. Epub 2017 Sep 6.

Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Hacettepe University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey.

Objective: To examine the performance of sonographic cross-sectional area (CSA) measurements in the diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome (CuTS).

Data Sources: Electronic databases, comprising PubMed and EMBASE, were searched for the pertinent literature before July 1, 2017.

Study Selection: Fourteen trials comparing the ulnar nerve CSA measurements between participants with and without CuTS were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2017.08.467DOI Listing
April 2018
29 Reads

Anatomy of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve and its significance in ulnar nerve surgery: An anatomical study.

J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg 2017 Nov 28;70(11):1582-1588. Epub 2017 Jun 28.

Division of Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 29/4, 8036 Graz, Austria.

Background: During cubital tunnel surgery, the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve (MACN) may be injured, causing painful scars, neuromas, hypaesthesia or hyperalgesia. As the literature on the anatomy of crossing branches in this area is contradictory, this study aimed to re-examine the anatomy of the MACN in this region.

Methods: Forty upper limbs were dissected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjps.2017.06.025DOI Listing
November 2017
5 Reads

Intermuscular aponeuroses between the flexor muscles of the forearm and their relationships with the ulnar nerve.

Surg Radiol Anat 2016 Dec 12;38(10):1183-1189. Epub 2016 May 12.

Department of Anatomy, Catholic Institute for Applied Anatomy, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, 06591, Korea.

Introduction: The aim of this study was to clarify the morphological characteristics of the intermuscular aponeurosis between the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS; IMAS), and that between the FCU and flexor digitorum profundus (FDP; IMAP), and their topographic relationships with the ulnar nerve.

Materials And Methods: Fifty limbs of 38 adult cadavers were studied.

Results: The IMAS extended along the deep surface of the FCU adjoining the FDS, having the appearance of a ladder, giving off "steps" that decreased in width from superficial to deep around the middle of the forearm. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00276-016-1695-9DOI Listing
December 2016
2 Reads

Sonographic Measurements Can Be Misleading for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Acta Reumatol Port 2016 Jan-Mar;41(1):40-4

Objectives: To compare the nerve cross sectional areas (CSA) of patients with RA without any sign of peripheral neuropathy to healthy controls.

Methods: Clinical, electrophysiological and sonographic assessments were done by three blinded researchers. The patients who had an electrodiagnostic or clinical of peripheral neuropathy were excluded from the study. Read More

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October 2017
3 Reads

Surface Electromyography of the Forearm Musculature During the Windmill Softball Pitch.

Orthop J Sports Med 2015 Jan 22;3(1):2325967114566796. Epub 2015 Jan 22.

Mercy St Vincent Medical Center, Toledo, Ohio, USA.

Background: Previous studies investigating the windmill softball pitch have focused primarily on shoulder musculature and function, collecting limited data on elbow and forearm musculature. Little information is available in the literature regarding the forearm. This study documents forearm muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity that has not been previously published. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2325967114566796DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4555585PMC
January 2015
8 Reads

Anteriorly positioned ulnar nerve at the elbow: a rare anatomical event: case report.

J Hand Surg Am 2015 May 24;40(5):984-6. Epub 2015 Mar 24.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC. Electronic address:

Two patients with an anteriorly positioned ulnar nerve at the elbow, identified during cubital tunnel release, are presented. Upon encountering an empty cubital tunnel, additional dissection found the ulnar nerve to course posterior to and to penetrate through the intermuscular septum 3 to 5 cm proximal to the medial epicondyle. It then ran anterior to the pronator-flexor mass before entering the forearm between the ulnar and the humeral heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2015.02.006DOI Listing
May 2015
5 Reads

Mechanistic experimental pain assessment in computer users with and without chronic musculoskeletal pain.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2014 Dec 6;15:412. Epub 2014 Dec 6.

Center for Sensory-Motor Interaction (SMI), Department of Health Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7D, 9220 Aalborg, Denmark.

Background: Musculoskeletal pain from the upper extremity and shoulder region is commonly reported by computer users. However, the functional status of central pain mechanisms, i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2474-15-412DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4265505PMC
December 2014
5 Reads

Treatment of medial epicondylar tendinopathy in athletes.

Sports Med Arthrosc Rev 2014 Sep;22(3):164-8

*Menlo Medical Clinic, Menlo Park, CA †Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA ‡Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, St Elisabeth Hospital Tilburg, Tilburg, The Netherlands.

Medial epicondylar tendinopathy, also known as golfer's elbow, is less common than lateral elbow tendinopathy. Overhead throwing athletes and those participating in sports that require repeated forearm pronation and wrist flexion are most commonly affected by this disorder. This problem predominates in amateur as opposed to professional athletes and is also seen more commonly in patients over 40 years of age. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JSA.0000000000000031DOI Listing
September 2014
23 Reads

Ultrasonography of palm to elbow segment of median nerve in different degrees of diabetic polyneuropathy.

Clin Neurophysiol 2014 Apr 5;125(4):844-848. Epub 2013 Nov 5.

Bundang Cha Medical Center, South Korea.

Objective: To identify the relationship between the ultrasonographic cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve and electrophysiologic findings in diabetic patients.

Methods: Sixty diabetic patients, 30 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and 30 healthy volunteers participated. The participants were divided into 4 groups: Control Group; Group I, diabetic patients without diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN); Group II, diabetic patients with DPN; and Group III, patients with CTS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2013.10.041DOI Listing
April 2014
7 Reads

Effects of forearm and palm supports on the upper extremity during computer mouse use.

Appl Ergon 2014 May 18;45(3):564-70. Epub 2013 Sep 18.

Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Physical Therapy, Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, 6 Robinson Hall, 360 Huntington Ave., Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

The use of forearm and palm supports has been associated with lower neck and shoulder muscle activity as well as reduced musculoskeletal discomfort during keyboard use, however, few studies have investigated their effect during computer mouse use. Eight men and eight women completed several computer mousing tasks in six arm support conditions: Forearm Support, Flat Palm Support, Raised Palm Support, Forearm + Flat Palm Support, Forearm + Raised Palm Support, and No Support. Concurrently, an infrared three-dimensional motion analysis system measured postures, six-degree-of-freedom force-torque sensors measured applied forces & torques, and surface electromyography measured muscle activity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2013.07.016DOI Listing
May 2014
7 Reads

[Update in Current Care guidelines: repetitive strain injuries of the hand and forearm].

Duodecim 2013 ;129(13):1340-1

Repetitive strain injuriesof the upper extremities refer to pain in the forearm, wrist and hand, caused by excessive strain. Diagnoses include tenosynovitis, epicondylitis and carpal tunnel syndrome. Treatment is aimed at alleviating pain, restoring normal physical functioning and maintain ability to work. Read More

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August 2013
12 Reads

Self-reported physical exposure association with medial and lateral epicondylitis incidence in a large longitudinal study.

Occup Environ Med 2013 Sep 3;70(9):670-3. Epub 2013 Jul 3.

Division of General Medical Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA.

Introduction: Although previous studies have related occupational exposure and epicondylitis, the evidence is moderate and mostly based on cross-sectional studies. Suspected physical exposures were tested over a 3-year period in a large longitudinal cohort study of workers in the USA.

Method: In a population-based study including a variety of industries, 1107 newly employed workers were examined; only workers without elbow symptoms at baseline were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2012-101341DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4059355PMC
September 2013
9 Reads

Biomechanical characteristics of osteochondral defects of the humeral capitellum.

Am J Sports Med 2013 Aug 7;41(8):1909-14. Epub 2013 Jun 7.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka Medical College, 2-7, Daigaku-machi, Takatsuki, Osaka, Japan.

Background: The repetitive, excessive compression forces in the radiocapitellar joint caused by elbow valgus stresses during throwing motions can result in osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the humeral capitellum in adolescent athletes.

Purpose: To assess the effect of elbow valgus torque on contact pressure in the radiocapitellar joint and that of central and lateral capitellar osteochondral defects on radiocapitellar joint contact pressure, elbow valgus laxity, and ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) strain.

Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546513490652DOI Listing
August 2013
8 Reads

Participatory ergonomic intervention versus strength training on chronic pain and work disability in slaughterhouse workers: study protocol for a single-blind, randomized controlled trial.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2013 Feb 21;14:67. Epub 2013 Feb 21.

National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkalle 105, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background: The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in the shoulder, arm and hand is high among slaughterhouse workers, allegedly due to the highly repetitive and forceful exposure of these body regions during work. Work disability is a common consequence of these pains. Lowering the physical exposure through ergonomics intervention is the traditional strategy to reduce the workload. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2474-14-67DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3606231PMC
February 2013
7 Reads

[Cubital tunnel syndrome and the scratch test to determine the surgical procedure].

Acta Ortop Mex 2012 Nov-Dec;26(6):375-8

Background: Neuropathy due to ulnar nerve compression at the elbow level is the second most frequent neuropathy. The scratch collapse test is useful to diagnose compression neuropathies. This test helps us rank compression sites and decide the type of treatment to use. Read More

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July 2014
4 Reads

Laxity of the ulnar nerve during elbow flexion and extension.

J Hand Surg Am 2012 Jun 1;37(6):1163-7. Epub 2012 May 1.

University of Toronto Hand Program, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Purpose: To evaluate the dynamic anatomy of the ulnar nerve at the elbow.

Methods: We studied 11 fresh cadavers. We placed metal clips on the ulnar nerve at three locations: at the medial epicondyle (point A), 3 cm proximal to the epicondyle (point B), and 14 cm proximal to the epicondyle (point C). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2012.03.016DOI Listing
June 2012
14 Reads

A new median motor test: comparison with conventional motor studies in carpal tunnel syndrome.

J Clin Neurophysiol 2012 Feb;29(1):84-8

Department of Neurophysiology, University General Hospital, Albacete, Spain.

Introduction: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most commonly operated of entrapment peripheral neuropathies, and its surgical outcome largely depends on the underlying mechanism involved. Early identification of CTS is essential because it is associated with a better prognosis.

Aim: To identify CTS at an earlier stage and hence improve the potential future outcome, the authors propose incorporating a new method of using the second lumbricalis (2L-MC) to register the nerve conduction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WNP.0b013e3182466defDOI Listing
February 2012
2 Reads

Chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the forearm in a major league baseball pitcher.

Am J Sports Med 2011 Oct 11;39(10):2242-4. Epub 2011 Aug 11.

Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic, Los Angeles, CA 90045, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546511417171DOI Listing
October 2011
5 Reads

Neglected reverse Essex-Lopresti injury with ulnar nerve compression.

Chin J Traumatol 2011 Apr;14(2):111-3

Department of Orthopaedics, UCMS and GTB Hospital, Delhi 110095, India.

A 45 year old woman was diagnosed as having anteromedial radial head dislocation and distal radius fracture five months after her injury on right forearm. The radial head dislocation led to ulnar nerve compression. She had severe restriction of her elbow movements. Read More

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April 2011
7 Reads

Comparison of shoulder internal rotation test with the elbow flexion test in the diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome.

J Hand Surg Am 2011 May 23;36(5):782-7. Epub 2011 Feb 23.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kawasaki Municipal Kawasaki Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa, Japan.

Purpose: To compare the shoulder internal rotation test-a new, provocative test-with the elbow flexion test in the diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome (CubTS).

Methods: Twenty-five patients with CubTS were examined before and after surgery with 10 seconds each of the elbow flexion and shoulder internal rotation tests. Fifty-four asymptomatic individuals and 14 neuropathy patients with a diagnosis other than CubTS were also examined as control cases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2010.12.019DOI Listing
May 2011
7 Reads

Survey of body part symptoms among workers in a car tyre service centre.

J Hum Ergol (Tokyo) 2010 Jun;39(1):53-6

Department of Manufacturing & Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering & Manufacturing, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM).

The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of body part symptoms and sources of injury/discomfort among workers in a car tyre service centre. Questionnaire survey and interview session were used to identify the level of body discomfort areas and sources of injury or discomfort. From questionnaire survey findings, 12 of respondents have body discomfort in the neck (66. Read More

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June 2010
3 Reads

Computer work and musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and upper extremity: a systematic review.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2010 Apr 29;11:79. Epub 2010 Apr 29.

National Institute of Occupational Health, PO Box 8149 Dep, N-0033 Oslo, Norway.

Background: This review examines the evidence for an association between computer work and neck and upper extremity disorders (except carpal tunnel syndrome).

Methods: A systematic critical review of studies of computer work and musculoskeletal disorders verified by a physical examination was performed.

Results: A total of 22 studies (26 articles) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2474-11-79DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2874766PMC
April 2010
3 Reads

Upper extremity injuries in golf.

Phys Sportsmed 2009 Apr;37(1):92-6

Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Belleville, IL 62220, USA.

Golf is an asymmetric sport with unique patterns of injury depending upon the skill level. Higher handicap players typically experience injuries that result from swing mechanics, whereas lower handicap and professional players have overuse as the major cause of their injuries. The majority of shoulder injuries affecting golfers occur in the nondominant shoulder. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3810/PSM.2009.04.1687
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3810/psm.2009.04.1687DOI Listing
April 2009
7 Reads

Correlation between the lengths of the upper limb and cubital tunnel: potential use in patients with proximal ulnar nerve entrapment.

Surg Radiol Anat 2010 Mar 27;32(3):239-42. Epub 2009 Nov 27.

Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Children's Hospital, 1600 7th Avenue South ACC 400, Birmingham, AL 35233, USA.

Introduction: We hypothesized that a correlation may exist between the length of the upper limb and the length of the cubital tunnel, which transmits the ulnar nerve from the arm to the forearm. If true, this association might aid in predicting individuals at greater risk of developing ulnar nerve compression at this site.

Materials And Methods: A total of 46 cadaveric upper limbs were dissected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00276-009-0599-3DOI Listing
March 2010
9 Reads

Overuse and traumatic injuries of the elbow.

Magn Reson Imaging Clin N Am 2009 Nov;17(4):617-38, v

Department of Radiology, Royal North Shore Hospital, University of Sydney, Reserve Road, St. Leonards, Sydney NSW 2065, Australia.

MR imaging is a useful modality for evaluating athletes presenting with elbow pain. Osteochondral injuries and ligamentous injuries are well seen on MR imaging. Ligamentous injuries may be associated with clinical instability syndromes, the secondary signs of which may be evident on MR images. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mric.2009.06.004DOI Listing
November 2009
3 Reads

Peripheral and central changes combine to induce motor behavioral deficits in a moderate repetition task.

Exp Neurol 2009 Dec 15;220(2):234-45. Epub 2009 Aug 15.

UMR 6149 Neurobiologie Intégrative et Adaptative, CNRS-Aix-Marseille Université, Pôle 3C, Case B, 3 Place Victor Hugo, 13331, Marseille Cedex 03, France.

Repetitive motion disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome and focal hand dystonia, can be associated with tasks that require prolonged, repetitive behaviors. Previous studies using animal models of repetitive motion have correlated cortical neuroplastic changes or peripheral tissue inflammation with fine motor performance. However, the possibility that both peripheral and central mechanisms coexist with altered motor performance has not been studied. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.expneurol.2009.08.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2783426PMC
December 2009
5 Reads

Regional anatomic structures of the elbow that may potentially compress the ulnar nerve.

J Shoulder Elbow Surg 2009 Jul-Aug;18(4):627-31. Epub 2009 May 29.

Department of Neurosurgery, Duzce University, Duzce Medical Faculty, Duzce, Turkey.

Hypothesis: Traumatic injuries to the ulnar nerve at the elbow are a frequent problem as it is vulnerable to stretching and compression with motion of the upper limb. The aim of the present study was to explore the course of the ulnar nerve at the elbow and forearm and to determine possible anatomical structures that may cause compression of this structure.

Materials And Methods: We examined 12 upper limbs from cadavers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2009.03.004DOI Listing
August 2009
6 Reads

Pinch force and forearm-muscle load during routine colonoscopy: a pilot study.

Gastrointest Endosc 2009 Jan;69(1):142-6

San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California 94121, USA.

Background And Objective: Overuse injuries of the hand, wrist, forearm, and shoulder are common among endoscopists and may be from repetitive pinching and gripping forces or awkward posturing. In this pilot study, we evaluated distal upper-extremity musculoskeletal load during colonoscopy (1) to confirm the feasibility of performing ergonomic measurements in endoscopists and (2) to identify tasks that may contribute to overuse injuries.

Design And Subjects: Three experienced gastroenterologists were evaluated during 3 colonoscopies each. Read More

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http://ergo.berkeley.edu/docs/2009%20Shergill%20GIE%201.pdf
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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S001651070802618
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2008.09.030DOI Listing
January 2009
6 Reads

The real role of forearm mixed nerve conduction velocity in the assessment of proximal forearm conduction slowing in carpal tunnel syndrome.

J Clin Neurophysiol 2008 Dec;25(6):373-7

Section of Neurology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.

The decrease of forearm median motor conduction velocity (CV) in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common electrodiagnostic finding in clinical practice and is possibly secondary to either conduction block at wrist or retrograde conduction slowing (RCS). This study is attempted to confirm the existence of RCS and to explore why this controversy occurs for a long time. Eighty CTS patients and controls were recruited. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WNP.0b013e31818e7930DOI Listing
December 2008
2 Reads

The role of forearm mixed nerve conduction study in the evaluation of proximal conduction slowing in carpal tunnel syndrome.

Clin Neurophysiol 2008 Dec 30;119(12):2800-3. Epub 2008 Oct 30.

Section of Neurology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, No. 160, Chung-Kang Road, Section 3, Taichung 40705, Taiwan.

Objective: A decrease of forearm median motor conduction velocity (CV) is a common electrophysiological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), ascribed to two possible mechanisms: either conduction block or slowing of the fastest myelinating fibers in the carpal tunnel, or retrograde axonal atrophy (RAA) with retrograde conduction slowing (RCS). We hope to utilize both direct and derived forearm median mixed nerve conduction studies to clarify the mechanism of the decrease of forearm median motor CV in CTS.

Methods: Seventy-five CTS patients and 75 age-matched control subjects received conventional motor and sensory nerve conduction studies of median and ulnar nerves and forearm median mixed nerve conduction techniques. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2008.09.014DOI Listing
December 2008
8 Reads

[Ulnar neuropathy in a poultry worker].

Ugeskr Laeger 2008 Sep;170(40):3131-2

Arbejdsmedicinsk Klinik, Arhus Sygehus, DK-8000 Arhus C.

Three months after he was employed as a poultry worker, a 48-year-old man developed involuntary jerks of his right first, fourth, and fifth fingers, paraesthesiae, weakness, and eventually wasting of the first dorsal interosseous muscle. His job entailed repetitive lifting of boxes weighing 10-25 kg with flexion of the elbow, pronation of the forearm, and ulnar deviation of the wrist. A nerve conduction study indicated ulnar neuropathy just distal to the elbow. Read More

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September 2008
3 Reads

Activation of forearm muscles for wrist extension in patients affected by lateral epicondylitis.

Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2007 ;2007:4858-61

Dept. Automatic Control, Biom. Eng. Research Center (CREB), Technical University of Catalonia, UPC, Barcelona, Spain.

Work related upper extremity disorders are associated with cumulative trauma resulting from the continuous use of forearm muscles rather than from a specific incident. The aim of this work is to compare wrist extensor muscles activation between patients with lateral epicondylitis and healthy subjects. Differences can be used in the design of rehabilitation or injury prevention programs according to biomechanical deficits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2007.4353428DOI Listing
April 2008
3 Reads

Opinion: pseudoscientific explanations of arm pain.

J Surg Orthop Adv 2007 ;16(3):105-10

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, ACC 525, 15 Parkman St., Boston, MA 02114, USA.

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December 2007
2 Reads

Endoscopic decompression of the ulnar nerve at the elbow.

J Hand Surg Am 2007 Oct;32(8):1171-6

Department of Plastic Surgery and Burns, Clinical Centre Ljubljana, Zaloska 7, 1525 Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Purpose: The ideal operative treatment for cubital tunnel syndrome, the second most common form of peripheral compression neuropathy, remains controversial. We therefore reviewed our series of endoscopically assisted ulnar nerve decompression at the elbow to determine the effectiveness of the procedure, which was intended to minimize perioperative morbidity and scar discomfort.

Methods: In 36 patients (ages 22-76 years) with clinical McGowan grade I (4 patients), II (21 patients), and III (11 patients) and electrophysiologic signs of cubital tunnel syndrome (35 primary, 1 recurrent), 20 cm of the ulnar nerve was released through a 3. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2007.07.004DOI Listing
October 2007
11 Reads

Study of the ulnar nerve compromise at the wrist of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

Electromyogr Clin Neurophysiol 2007 May-Jun;47(3):183-6

Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

Introduction: That the ulnar nerve compromise occurs concomitant with the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has been cited by previous studies. It seems that the previously mentioned incidence is much higher than what we observe in our electrodiagnosis studies.

Material And Method: A prospective study was designed to evaluate the incidence of ulnar nerve compromise in patients with electrodiagnostic evidence of CTS according to age and sex, and also to determine the site of ulnar nerve involvement. Read More

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August 2007
2 Reads

The effect of tennis racket grip size on forearm muscle firing patterns.

Am J Sports Med 2006 Dec 21;34(12):1977-83. Epub 2006 Jul 21.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90033, USA.

Background: Inappropriately sized tennis racket grip is often cited in the popular media as a risk factor for overuse injuries about the forearm and elbow. Currently, a hand measurement technique developed by Nirschl is commonly used by tennis racket manufacturing companies as the method for determining a player's "recommended" grip size.

Hypothesis: Quarter-inch changes from that recommended by Nirschl in tennis racket grip size will have no significant effect on forearm muscle firing patterns. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546506290185DOI Listing
December 2006
7 Reads

The role of imaging of work-related upper extremity disorders.

Authors:
Robert G Hassett

Clin Occup Environ Med 2006 ;5(2):285-98, vii

Concentra Health Services, 15800 Midway Road, Addison, TX 75001, USA.

Work-related upper extremity disorders can pose a diagnostic and management challenge because the nontraumatic disorders that are often believed to be caused by repetitive work activities can and do occur without any apparent provoking activity and can be caused or associated with many systemic medical conditions. One mainstay in the assessment of hand and arm disorders remains imaging. Imaging capabilities have made incredible advances with the advent of MRI, CT, ultrasound, bone scan, and numerous technologies that enable clinicians to view fine details of anatomy and pathology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coem.2005.11.015DOI Listing
June 2006
2 Reads

Nerve conduction study of ulnar nerve in volleyball players.

Scand J Med Sci Sports 2006 Jun;16(3):197-200

School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Kocaeli University, Kocaeli, Turkey.

Ulnar neuropathy at the elbow is a common disorder seen in the throwing athlete. The purpose of our study was to determine whether asymptomatic physically active volleyball players and non-actives demonstrate distinct differences in nerve conduction of the ulnar nerve at the elbow. Nerve conduction studies were performed on both arms of 24 male volleyball players and 24 male non-actives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0838.2005.00475.xDOI Listing
June 2006
5 Reads

Subtotal medial epicondylectomy as a surgical option for treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome.

Tech Hand Up Extrem Surg 2005 Mar;9(1):52-9

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, Irvine Irvine, CA 92868, USA.

Ulnar nerve compression at the elbow is commonly accepted as the second most frequent compressive peripheral neuropathy. The unique anatomic location of the ulnar nerve directly posterior to the medial epicondyle at the elbow places it at risk for injury. With normal motion of the elbow, the ulnar nerve is subjected to compression, traction, and frictional forces. Read More

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March 2005
4 Reads

[Neurophysiological and clinical aspect of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome].

Authors:
V Martić P Perić

Acta Chir Iugosl 2004 ;51(4):87-91

Klinika za neurologiju, Vojnomedicinska akademija.

In the group of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), besides paresthesias in their fingers, we can see paresthesias in forearm; pain in elbow, sholder and neck, which is a reason for complicated diagnosis of it. This kind of complexnost of differential diagnosis pain in hand, is a reason for complet and strict diagnostic procedure. There are 30 patients with clinical and neurophysological findings for CTS in this paper who made provocative tests. Read More

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September 2005
2 Reads

Effect of body mass index on ulnar nerve conduction velocity, ulnar neuropathy at the elbow, and carpal tunnel syndrome.

Muscle Nerve 2005 Sep;32(3):360-3

Department of Neurology, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC 20307, USA.

Both high and low body mass index (BMI) have been reported as risk factors for ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE), and a high BMI as a risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). To determine whether the extremes of BMI are risk factors for UNE or CTS, and whether BMI affects calculation of median and ulnar motor nerve conduction velocity (NCV), we retrospectively analyzed the electrodiagnostic records of control patients, UNE patients, and CTS patients. The BMI was calculated for 50 patients with a sole diagnosis of UNE and compared to the BMI of 50 patients with CTS and 50 control subjects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mus.20345DOI Listing
September 2005
5 Reads

Risk factors for persistent elbow, forearm and hand pain among computer workers.

Scand J Work Environ Health 2005 Apr;31(2):122-31

Department of Occupational Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup, Nordre Ringvej, Glostrup, Denmark.

Objectives: This study examined the influence of work-related and personal factors on the prognosis of "severe" elbow, forearm, and wrist-hand pain among computer users.

Methods: In a 1-year follow-up study of 6943 computer users, 673 (10%) participants reported "quite a lot" or more trouble due to elbow, forearm, or wrist-hand pain during the 12 months preceding the baseline questionnaire. Pain status (recovery versus persistence) at follow-up was examined in relation to computer work aspects and ergonomic, psychosocial, and personal factors by questionnaire. Read More

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April 2005
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Dupuytren's disease secondary to acute injury, infection or operation distal to the elbow in the ipsilateral upper limb--a historical review.

J Hand Surg Br 2005 May;30(2):148-56

Hand Surgery Department, St. Andrew's Centre for Plastic Surgery, Broomfield Hospital, Chelmsford, Essex, UK.

The aggregated total of 385 cases of Dupuytren's disease arising after acute or specific injury, operation or infection of the forearm, wrist or hand between 1614 and 2003 are documented, including a personal series of 52 cases. The history of this relationship is recorded and the medico legal implications of the association are discussed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsb.2004.08.002DOI Listing
May 2005
2 Reads

The position of crossing branches of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve during cubital tunnel surgery in humans.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2004 Sep;114(3):692-6

Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.

The posterior branch of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve courses in proximity to the cubital tunnel and is particularly prone to injury during ulnar nerve release at the elbow. Inadvertent injury to medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve branches during surgery can result in the formation of painful neuromas that can be misdiagnosed as recurrent disease. It is important to understand the relevant anatomy of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve branches during cubital tunnel surgery to avoid significant postoperative morbidity. Read More

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September 2004
24 Reads

Shoulder posture and median nerve sliding.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2004 Jul 28;5:23. Epub 2004 Jul 28.

Department of Physiology, University College London, UK.

Background: Patients with upper limb pain often have a slumped sitting position and poor shoulder posture. Pain could be due to poor posture causing mechanical changes (stretch; local pressure) that in turn affect the function of major limb nerves (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2474-5-23DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC503391PMC
July 2004
5 Reads

Cubital tunnel release with two limited incisions: a cadaver study.

Surg Radiol Anat 2004 Aug 10;26(4):259-62. Epub 2004 Jun 10.

Manus Hand-Group Clinic, Nişantaşi 80200, Istanbul, Turkey.

Cubital tunnel syndrome is the second most common compressive neuropathy in the upper extremity. Treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome consists of releasing the compression on the ulnar nerve with conservative or surgical methods. Nerve decompression is an alternative simple and less invasive procedure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00276-004-0246-yDOI Listing
August 2004
2 Reads

Which motor nerve conduction study is best in ulnar neuropathy at the elbow?

Muscle Nerve 2004 Apr;29(4):585-90

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Harborview Medical Center, Box 359740, 325 Ninth Avenue, Seattle, Washington 98104, USA.

There is debate regarding how best to utilize ulnar motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) to identify ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE). We used receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves to compare absolute across-elbow MNCV with MNCV difference between elbow and forearm segments (VDIF) when recording from abductor digiti minimi (ADM) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles. Also, we determined how their utility was impacted by low amplitudes of compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mus.10513DOI Listing
April 2004
5 Reads