4,689 results match your criteria Ecology[Journal]


Exotic plant species are locally adapted but not to high UV-B radiation: a reciprocal multi-species experiment.

Ecology 2019 Feb 15:e02665. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Kiel University, Institute for Ecosystem Research / Geobotany, Olshausenstr. 75, 24118, Kiel, Germany.

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation intensities differ among global regions, with significantly higher levels in the southern hemisphere. UV-B may act as an environmental filter during plant invasions, which might particularly apply to plant species from Europe introduced to New Zealand. Just like for any other abiotic or biotic filter, successful invaders can cope with novel environmental conditions via plastic responses and/or through rapid adaptation by natural selection in the exotic range. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2665DOI Listing
February 2019

Negative frequency-dependent growth underlies the stable coexistence of two cosmopolitan aquatic plants.

Ecology 2019 Feb 15:e02657. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame 100, Galvin Life Science Center, Notre Dame, IN, 46556, USA.

Identifying and quantifying the mechanisms influencing species coexistence remains a major challenge for the study of community ecology. These mechanisms, which stem from species' differential responses to competition and their environments, promote coexistence if they give each species a growth advantage when rare. Yet despite the widespread assumption that co-occurring species stably coexist, there have been few empirical demonstrations in support of this claim. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2657DOI Listing
February 2019

Variability in the expansion of trees and shrubs in boreal Alaska.

Ecology 2019 Feb 15:e02660. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Montana, 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT, 59812, USA.

The expansion of shrubs and trees across high-latitude ecosystems is one of the most dramatic ecological manifestations of climate change. Most of the work quantifying these changes has been done in small areas and over relatively recent time scales. These land cover transitions are highly spatially variable, and we have limited understanding of the factors underlying this variation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2660DOI Listing
February 2019

Matching habitat choice and plasticity contribute to phenotype-environment covariation in a stream salamander.

Ecology 2019 Feb 15:e02661. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, 59812, USA.

Populations optimize the match of phenotype to environment by localized natural selection, adaptive phenotypic plasticity, and habitat choice. Habitat choice may also be achieved by several mechanisms, including matching habitat choice, where individuals distribute themselves based on self-assessment of the phenotype-environment match. Matching habitat choice is a relatively untested concept, but one that could advance our understanding of the interplay of movement ecology and intraspecific phenotypic variation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2661DOI Listing
February 2019

Investigating old-growth ponderosa pine physiology using tree-rings, δ C, δ O, and a process-based model.

Ecology 2019 Feb 12:e02656. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA.

In dealing with predicted changes in environmental conditions outside those experienced today, forest managers and researchers rely on process-based models to inform physiological processes and predict future forest growth responses. The carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of tree-ring cellulose (δ C , δ O ) reveal long-term, integrated physiological responses to environmental conditions. We incorporated a submodel of δ O into the widely used Physiological Principles in Predicting Growth (3-PG) model for the first time, to complement a recently added δ C submodel. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2656DOI Listing
February 2019

Multiple abiotic and biotic pathways shape biomass demographic processes in temperate forests.

Ecology 2019 Feb 11:e02650. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Centre for Biodiversity Theory and Modelling, Theoretical and Experimental Ecology Station, CNRS and Paul Sabatier University, 09200, Moulis, France.

Forests play a key role in regulating the global carbon cycle, and yet the abiotic and biotic conditions that drive the demographic processes which underpin forest carbon dynamics remain poorly understood in natural ecosystems. To address this knowledge gap, we used repeat forest inventory data from 92,285 trees across four large permanent plots (4-25 ha in size) in temperate mixed forests in northeast China to ask the following questions: 1) How do soil conditions and stand age drive biomass demographic processes?; 2) How do vegetation quality (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2650DOI Listing
February 2019
4.656 Impact Factor

The effect of buffer strip width and selective logging on streamside plant communities.

BMC Ecol 2019 Feb 9;19(1). Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014, Jyväskylä, Finland.

Background: Riparian forests surrounding streams host high biodiversity values, but are threatened by clear-cut logging. Narrow buffer strips of about 15 m are commonly left between the stream and the clear-cut, but studies suggest that the buffer width should be at least 30 m to protect riparian plant communities. Moreover, selective logging is often allowed on the buffer strips in order to increase economic gain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0225-0DOI Listing
February 2019
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Three decades of degradation lead to diminished impacts of severe hurricanes on Caribbean reefs.

Authors:
Peter J Edmunds

Ecology 2019 Feb 9:e02587. Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Department of Biology, California State University, Northridge, California, 91330-8303, USA.

Major tropical storms are destructive phenomena with large effects on the community dynamics of multiple biomes. On coral reefs, their impacts have been described for decades, leading to the expectation that future storms should have effects similar to those recorded in the past. This expectation relies on the assumption that storm intensities will remain unchanged, and the impacted coral reef communities are similar to those of the recent past; neither assumption is correct. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2587DOI Listing
February 2019

Toward more robust plant-soil feedback research: Comment.

Ecology 2019 Feb 7:e02590. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

School of Biological Sciences, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley (Perth), Western Australia, 6009, Australia.

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecy.2590
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2590DOI Listing
February 2019
8 Reads

Ecological plasticity and commercial impact of invasive marbled crayfish populations in Madagascar.

BMC Ecol 2019 Feb 6;19(1). Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Division of Epigenetics, DKFZ-ZMBH Alliance, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 580, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: The marbled crayfish (Procambarus virginalis) is a monoclonal, parthenogenetically reproducing freshwater crayfish species that has formed multiple stable populations worldwide. Madagascar hosts a particularly large and rapidly expanding colony of marbled crayfish in a unique environment characterized by a very high degree of ecological diversity.

Results: Here we provide a detailed characterization of five marbled crayfish populations in Madagascar and their habitats. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0224-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6366054PMC
February 2019
1 Read

A distributed experiment demonstrates widespread sodium limitation in grassland food webs.

Ecology 2019 Feb 6:e02600. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Geographical Ecology Group, Department of Biology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, 73019, USA.

Sodium (Na) has a unique role in food webs as a nutrient primarily limiting for plant consumers, but not other trophic levels. Environmental Na levels vary with proximity to coasts, local geomorphology, climate, and with anthropogenic inputs (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2600DOI Listing
February 2019
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Not even wrong: The spurious measurement of biodiversity's effects on ecosystem functioning.

Ecology 2019 Feb 4:e02645. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Marine Science Center, Northeastern University, 430 Nahant Rd, Nahant, MA, 01908.

Understanding how biodiversity influences ecosystem functioning is one of the central goals of modern ecology. The early and often acrimonious debates about the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning were largely resolved following the advent of a statistical partitioning scheme that decomposed the net effect of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning into a "selection" effect and a "complementarity" effect. Here we show that both the biodiversity effect and its statistical decomposition into selection and complementarity are fundamentally flawed because these methods use a naïve null expectation based on neutrality, likely leading to an overestimate of the net biodiversity effect, and because they fail to account for the nonlinear abundance-ecosystem functioning relationships widely observed in nature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2645DOI Listing
February 2019

Nutrient acquisition strategies augment growth in tropical N fixing trees in nutrient poor soil and under elevated CO.

Ecology 2019 Feb 3:e02646. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, W.A. Franke College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, 59812, USA.

Tropical forests play a dominant role in the global carbon (C) cycle, and models predict increases in tropical net primary productivity (NPP) and C storage in response to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO ) concentrations. The extent to which increasing CO will enhance NPP depends in part on the availability of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) to support growth. Some tropical trees can potentially overcome nutrient limitation by acquiring N via symbiotic dinitrogen (N ) fixation, which may provide a benefit in acquiring P via investment in N-rich phosphatase enzymes or arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2646DOI Listing
February 2019

Will like replace like? Linking thermal performance to ecological function across predator and herbivore populations.

Ecology 2019 Feb 3:e02643. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, 370 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT, 06511, USA.

The inability of species to adapt to changing climate may cause ecological communities to disassemble and lose ecological functioning. However, theory suggests that communities may be resilient whenever populations within species exhibit variation in thermal plasticity or adaptation whereby thermally tolerant populations replace thermally sensitive ones. But will they maintain the functional roles of the populations being replaced? This study evaluated whether "like replaces like" functionally by measuring how four populations of a grasshopper herbivore and its co-occurring spider predator cope with environmental warming. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2643DOI Listing
February 2019

Behavior-specific habitat selection by African lions may promote their persistence in a human-dominated landscape.

Ecology 2019 Feb 3:e02644. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

Center for Integrated Spatial Research, Environmental Studies Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, California, 95064, USA.

Co-occurrence with humans presents substantial risks for large carnivores, yet human-dominated landscapes are increasingly crucial to carnivore conservation as human land use continues to encroach on wildlife habitat. Flexibility in large carnivore behavior may be a primary factor mediating coexistence with people, allowing carnivores to calibrate their activity and habitat use to the perceived level of human risk. However, our understanding of how large carnivores adjust the timing and location of behaviors in response to variations in human activity across the landscape remains limited, impacting our ability to identify important habitat for populations outside of protected areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2644DOI Listing
February 2019

Seed limitation in an Amazonian floodplain forest.

Ecology 2019 Feb 3:e02642. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

Proyecto Castaña, Puerto Maldonado, Madre de Dios, Perú.

We monitored a close-spaced grid of 289 seed traps in 1.44 ha for 8.4 years in an Amazonian floodplain forest. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecy.2642
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2642DOI Listing
February 2019
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A comparative evaluation of five common pairwise tests of species association.

Ecology 2019 Feb 3:e02640. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

Dept. of Biological Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Researchers have long viewed patterns of species association as key to understanding the processes that structure communities. Community-level tests of species association have received the most attention; however, pairwise species associations may offer greater opportunity for linking patterns to specific mechanisms. Although several tests of pairwise association have been developed, there remain gaps in our understanding of their performance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2640DOI Listing
February 2019

Biogeochemical recuperation of lowland tropical forest during succession.

Ecology 2019 Feb 3:e02641. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, USA, 59812.

High rates of land conversion and land use change have vastly increased the proportion of secondary forest in the lowland tropics relative to mature forest. As secondary forests recover following abandonment, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) must be present in sufficient quantities to sustain high rates of net primary production and to replenish the nutrients lost during land use prior to secondary forest establishment. Biogeochemical theory and results from individual studies suggest that N can recuperate during secondary forest recovery, especially relative to P. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecy.2641
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2641DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Asynchrony in individual and subpopulation fecundity stabilizes reproductive output of an alpine plant population.

Ecology 2019 Feb 2:e02639. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Environmental Studies Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado, USA.

Population-wide outcomes such as abundance, reproductive output, or mean survival can be stabilized by non-synchronous variation in the performance of individuals or subpopulations. Such "portfolio effects" have been increasingly documented at the scale of subpopulations and are thought to play an important role in generating stability of population phenomena in the face of environmental variation. However, few studies quantify the strength and origin of portfolio effects at the finer scale of individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2639DOI Listing
February 2019

Ecological consequences of anomalies in atmospheric moisture and snowpack.

Ecology 2019 Feb 1:e02638. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

National Park Service, North Cascades National Park Service Complex, 810 State Route 20 Sedro Woolley, WA, 98284, USA.

Although increased frequency of extreme-weather events is one of the most-secure predictions associated with contemporary climate change, effects of such events on distribution and abundance of climate-sensitive species remain poorly understood. Montane ecosystems may be especially sensitive to extreme weather because of complex abiotic and biotic interactions that propagate from climate-driven reductions in snowpack. Snowpack not only protects subnivean biotas from extreme cold, but also influences forage availability through timing of melt-off and water availability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2638DOI Listing
February 2019

The relationship between oxidative stress, reproduction, and survival in a bdelloid rotifer.

BMC Ecol 2019 Feb 1;19(1). Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA, 01854, USA.

Background: A proposed mediator of trade-offs between survival and reproduction is oxidative stress resistance. Investments in reproduction are associated with increased oxidative stress that reduces lifespan. We used the bdelloid rotifer Adineta vaga to examine baseline patterns of survival, reproduction, and measures of oxidative stress, as well as how these patterns change in the face of treatments known to induce oxidative stress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0223-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6359782PMC
February 2019

ATLANTIC EPIPHYTES: a data set of vascular and non-vascular epiphyte plants and lichens from the Atlantic Forest.

Authors:
Flavio Nunes Ramos Sara Ribeiro Mortara Nathalia Monalisa-Francisco João Pedro Costa Elias Luiz Menini Neto Leandro Freitas Rodrigo Kersten André Márcio Amorim Fernando Bittencourt Matos André Felippe Nunes-Freitas Suzana Alcantara Marcia Helena Nagahama Alexandre Renata Jimenez de Almeida-Scabbia Odair José Garcia de Almeida Fernanda Eliane Alves Rogério Marcos de Oliveira Alves Francine Seehaber Alvim Antônio Carlos Silva de Andrade Simone de Andrade Lidyanne Yuriko Saleme Aona Andréa Cardoso Araujo Kelianne Carolina Targino de Araújo Vanessa Ariati Julia Camara Assis Cecília Oliveira de Azevedo Bruno Ferreira Barbosa Daniel Elias Ferreira Barbosa Fernando Dos Reis Barbosa Fabio de Barros Geicilaine Alves Basilio Fernando Antonio Bataghin Fernanda Bered Juliana Santos Bianchi Christopher Thomas Blum Carlos Renato Boelter Annete Bonnet Pedro Henrique Santin Brancalion Tiago Bӧer Breier Caio de Toledo Brion Cristiano Roberto Buzatto Andressa Cabral Tiago João Cadorin Eder Caglioni Luciana Canêz Pedro Henrique Cardoso Fábia Silva de Carvalho Renan Gonçalves Carvalho Eduardo Luis Martins Catharino Sergio Javier Ceballos Monise Terra Cerezini Ricardo Gomes César Cesar Cestari Cleber Juliano Neves Chaves Vanilde Citadini-Zanette Luiz Francisco Mello Coelho João Vicente Coffani-Nunes Renato Colares Gabriel Dalla Colletta Nadjara de Medeiros Corrêa Andrea Ferreira da Costa Grênivel Mota da Costa Laís Mara Santana Costa Natália Gabriela Souza Costa Dayvid Rodrigues Couto Caroline Cristofolini Ana Carolina Rodrigues da Cruz Leopoldo Angelo Del Neri Mercedes di Pasquo Aline Dos Santos Dias Letícia do Carmo Dutra Dias Ricardo Dislich Marília Cristina Duarte Juliano Ricardo Fabricante Fernando Henrique Antoniolli Farache Ana Paula Gelli de Faria Claudenice Faxina Mariana Terrola Martins Ferreira Erich Fischer Carlos Roberto Fonseca Talita Fontoura Talitha Mayumi Francisco Samyra Gomes Furtado Mauro Galetti Mário Luís Garbin André Luís de Gasper Márcia Goetze Janaína Gomes-da-Silva Mateus Felipe Araujo Gonçalves Diego Rafael Gonzaga Ana Carolina Granero E Silva André de Camargo Guaraldo Ernestino de Souza Gomes Guarino Aline Votri Guislon Luigy Bitencourt Hudson Jomar Gomes Jardim Patricia Jungbluth Selma Dos Santos Kaeser Igor Musauer Kessous Natália Mossmann Koch Yoshiko Saito Kuniyoshi Paulo Henrique Labiak Maria Esther Lapate Ana Carolina Laurenti Santos Roberta Luísa Barbosa Leal Felipe Silveira Leite Paula Leitman Ana Paula Liboni Dieter Liebsch Débora Vanessa Lingner Julio Antonio Lombardi Eve Lucas Jhonny Dos Reis Luzzi Patricia Mai Luiz Felipe Mania Waldir Mantovani Angelica Guidoni Maragni Marcia Cristina Mendes Marques Gonzalo Marquez Cristiane Martins Laura do Nascimento Martins Pedro Luiz Sanglard Silva Martins Frederico Fregolente Faracco Mazziero Camila de Aguiar Melo Maria Margarida Fiuza de Melo Alex Fernando Mendes Letícia Mesacasa Leonor Patricia Cerdeira Morellato Vanessa de Souza Moreno Adelcio Muller Mariana Moreira da Silva Murakami Edinete Cecconello Camila Nardy Michelle Helena Nervo Beatriz Neves Matheus Guimarães Cardoso Nogueira Fabiana Regina Nonato Ary Teixeira de Oliveira-Filho César Pedro Lopes de Oliveira Gerhard Ernst Overbeck Gabriel Mendes Marcusso Mateus Luís Barradas Paciencia Patricia Padilha Peterson Teodoro Padilha Ana Clara Alves Pereira Luciana Carvalho Pereira Rodrigo Augusto Santinelo Pereira Jimmy Pincheira-Ulbrich José Salatiel Rodrigues Pires Marco Aurélio Pizo Kátia Cavalcanti Pôrto Ludmila Rattis Joice Rodrigues de Mendonça Reis Simone Gonçalves Dos Reis Thereza Christina da Rocha-Pessôa Carlos Frederico Duarte Rocha Fernando Souza Rocha Alba Regina Pereira Rodrigues Ricardo Ribeiro Rodrigues Juliana Marcia Rogalski Roberta Luiza Rosanelli Andrés Rossado Davi Rodrigo Rossatto Débora Cristina Rother Carlos Ramon Ruiz-Miranda Felipe Zamborlini Saiter Mauricio Bonesso Sampaio Lucas Deziderio Santana Juliana Silveira Dos Santos Ricardo Sartorello Marlies Sazima Juliane Luzía Schmitt Geniane Schneider Bruna Grosch Schroeder Lucia Sevegnani Vasconcelos Oliveira Silva Júnior Fernando Rodrigues da Silva Maria Juliana da Silva Mércia Patrícia Pereira Silva Rafaela Guimarães Silva Sandro Menezes Silva Rodrigo Bustos Singer Geovane Siqueira Luis Eduardo Soares Hildeberto Caldas de Sousa Adriano Spielmann Vinicius Rodrigues Tonetti Maria Teresa Zugliani Toniato Paulo Sérgio Bordoni Ulguim Cássio van den Berg Eduardo van den Berg Isabela Galarda Varassin Izabela Bitencourt Veloso da Silva Alexander Christian Vibrans Jorge Luiz Waechter Erick Willy Weissenberg Paulo Günter Windisch Marina Wolowski Agustina Yañez Vania Nobuko Yoshikawa Luciano Ramos Zandoná Camila Martini Zanella Elisabete Maria Zanin Daniela Cristina Zappi Valesca Bononi Zipparro João Paulo Fernandes Zorzanelli Milton Cezar Ribeiro

Ecology 2019 Feb;100(2):e02541

Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho" (UNESP), CP. 199, Rio Claro, São Paulo, 13506-900, Brazil.

Epiphytes are hyper-diverse and one of the frequently undervalued life forms in plant surveys and biodiversity inventories. Epiphytes of the Atlantic Forest, one of the most endangered ecosystems in the world, have high endemism and radiated recently in the Pliocene. We aimed to (1) compile an extensive Atlantic Forest data set on vascular, non-vascular plants (including hemiepiphytes), and lichen epiphyte species occurrence and abundance; (2) describe the epiphyte distribution in the Atlantic Forest, in order to indicate future sampling efforts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2541DOI Listing
February 2019
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The potential role of intrinsic processes in generating abrupt and quasi-synchronous tree declines during the Holocene.

Ecology 2019 Feb;100(2):e02579

Department of Integrative Biology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 53706, USA.

Multiple abrupt and sometimes near-synchronous declines in tree populations have been detected in the temperate forests of eastern North America and Europe during the Holocene. Traditional approaches to understanding these declines focus on searching for climatic or other broad-scale extrinsic drivers. These approaches include multi-proxy studies that match reconstructed changes in tree abundance to reconstructed changes in precipitation or temperature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2579DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Erratum.

Authors:

Ecology 2019 Feb;100(2):e02620

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2620DOI Listing
February 2019

Density-dependent feedbacks, hysteresis, and demography of overgrazing sea urchins.

Ecology 2019 Feb;100(2):e02577

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, 7001, Australia.

Sea urchin grazing can result in regime shift from productive kelp beds to sea urchin barren grounds that represent an alternative and stable reef state. Here we examine the stability of urchin barrens by defining the demographics of the Australian urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma during regime shift to, and maintenance of, barrens. Inverse-logistic modeling of calibrated in situ annual growth increments for five urchin populations, two from kelp beds and three from barrens, demonstrate slowing of urchin growth as availability and consumption of standing and/or drift kelp declines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2577DOI Listing
February 2019

A meta-analysis shows that seaweeds surpass plants, setting life-on-Earth's limit for biomass packing.

BMC Ecol 2019 Jan 31;19(1). Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcântara Gomes, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua São Francisco Xavier 524, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 20550-900, Brazil.

Background: As plants, algae and some sessile invertebrates may grow in nearly monospecific assemblies, their collective biomass increases and if they compete hard enough some die, freeing up space. The concurrent increase in biomass and decrease in density is called self-thinning, and its trajectory over time or maximum values represent a boundary condition. For a single stand developing over time the boundary defines the carrying capacity of the environment but the most extreme trajectories emulate the efficiency of species in packing biomass into space. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0218-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6357480PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Seasonal patterns in species diversity across biomes.

Ecology 2019 Jan 30:e02627. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Center for Biodiversity Theory and Modelling Moulis, 09200, France.

A conspicuous Season-Diversity Relationship (SDR) can be seen in seasonal environments, often with a defined peak in active species diversity in the growing season. We ask is this a general pattern and are other patterns are possible? In addition, we ask what is the ultimate cause of this pattern and can we understand it using existing ecological theory? To accomplish this task, we assembled a global database on changes in species diversity through time in seasonal environments for different taxa and habitats and also conducted a modeling study in an attempt to replicate observed patterns. Our global database includes terrestrial and aquatic habitats, temperate, tropical, and polar environments, and taxa from disparate groups including vertebrates, insects, and plankton. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2627DOI Listing
January 2019

Successional dynamics of nitrogen fixation and forest growth in regenerating Costa Rican rainforests.

Ecology 2019 Jan 30:e02637. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Columbia University, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology., 10th Fl Schermerhorn Ext. 1200 Amsterdam Ave, New York, NY, 10027.

Regenerating tropical forests have an immense capacity to capture carbon and harbor biodiversity. The recuperation of the nitrogen cycle following disturbance can fuel biomass regeneration, but few studies have evaluated the successional dynamics of nitrogen and nitrogen inputs in tropical forests. We assessed symbiotic and asymbiotic nitrogen fixation, soil inorganic nitrogen concentrations, and tree growth in a well-studied series of 5 tropical forest plots ranging from 19 years in age to old-growth forests. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2637DOI Listing
January 2019

Landscape context explains ecosystem multifunctionality in restored grasslands better than plant diversity.

Ecology 2019 Jan 29:e02634. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Plant Biology and Program in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology and Behavior, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.

There is strong evidence for a positive relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning at local spatial scales. However, it remains poorly understood how different aspects of biodiversity relate to multiple ecosystem functions (multifunctionality) across heterogeneous landscapes, and how the magnitude of biodiversity, dominant species, and environmental effects on functioning compare. We compared relationships between plant phylogenetic, functional, and taxonomic diversity and ecosystem multifunctionality across 29 restored grasslands. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2634DOI Listing
January 2019

Dominant tree species drive beta diversity patterns in Western Amazonia.

Ecology 2019 Jan 29:e02636. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

International Center for Tropical Botany, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA.

The forests of Western Amazonia are among the most diverse tree communities on Earth, yet this exceptional diversity is distributed highly unevenly within- and among communities. In particular, a small number of dominant species account for the majority of individuals while the large majority of species are locally and regionally extremely scarce. By definition, dominant species contribute little to local species richness (alpha diversity), yet the importance of dominant species in structuring patterns of spatial floristic turnover (beta diversity) has not been investigated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2636DOI Listing
January 2019
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Regulation of the functional structure of aquatic communities across spatial scales in a major river network.

Ecology 2019 Jan 29:e02633. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Switzerland, CH-8057.

Moving beyond species count data is an essential step to better understand the effects of environmental perturbations on biodiversity and ecosystem functions, and to eventually better predict the strength and direction of those effects. Here, coupling an integrative path analysis approach with data from an extensive countrywide monitoring program, we tested the main spatial, environmental and anthropogenic drivers of change in the functional structure of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities along the entire Swiss Rhine river catchment. Functional structure was largely driven by inherent altitudinal variation influencing and cascading to regional scaled factors such as land use change and position in the riverine network, which, in turn, transformed local habitat structure variables. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2633DOI Listing
January 2019

Predator water balance alters intraguild predation in a streamside food web.

Ecology 2019 Jan 29:e02635. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

Previous work suggests that animal water balance can influence trophic interactions, with predators increasing their consumption of water-laden prey to meet water demands. But it is unclear how the need for water interacts with the need for energy to drive trophic interactions under shifting conditions. Using manipulative field experiments, we show that water balance influences the effects of top predators on prey with contrasting ratios of water and energy, altering the frequency of intraguild predation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2635DOI Listing
January 2019

Phase- and season-dependent changes in social behaviour in cyclic vole populations.

BMC Ecol 2019 Jan 25;19(1). Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Faculty of Applied Ecology, Agricultural Science and Biotechnology, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, 2480, Koppang, Norway.

Background: Social behaviour has been linked to hypotheses explaining multiannual population cycles of small rodents. In this paper we aimed to test empirically that the degree of space sharing among adult breeding female voles is higher during the increase phase than in the crash phase, and that the degree of sociality is positively related to population growth rate as suggested by Lambin and Krebs (Oikos 61:126-132, 1991) and Andreassen et al. (Oikos 122:507-515, 2013). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0222-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6347810PMC
January 2019

A model for the biomass-density dynamics of seagrasses developed and calibrated on global data.

BMC Ecol 2019 Jan 25;19(1). Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Departamento de Ecologia, Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcântara Gomes, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua São Francisco Xavier 524, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 20559-900, Brazil.

Background: Seagrasses are foundation species in estuarine and lagoon systems, providing a wide array of services for the ecosystem and the human population. Understanding the dynamics of their stands is essential in order to better assess natural and anthropogenic impacts. It is usually considered that healthy seagrasses aim to maximize their stand biomass (g DW m) which may be constrained by resource availability i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0221-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6346591PMC
January 2019

Using transect sampling to determine the distribution of some key non-timber forest products across habitat types near Boumba-Bek National Park, South-east Cameroon.

BMC Ecol 2019 Jan 22;19(1). Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD), P.O. Box: 230, Bertoua, Cameroon.

Background: Understanding the variation in distribution and abundance of non-timber forest products (NTFP) species is a crucial step in achieving their conservation and sustainable use. At the northern periphery of the Boumba-Bek National Park in Southeast Cameroon, little is known about which habitat type contain the highest abundance of NTFP species. In this study, we assessed habitat diversity and variation in the abundance of eight priority NTFP species comprising: Afrostyrax lepidophyllus, Baillonella toxisperma, Irvingia gabonensis, Panda oleosa, Pentaclethra macrophylla, Ricinodendron heudelotii, Scorodophloeus zenkeri and Tetrapleura tetraptera. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0219-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6343285PMC
January 2019
5 Reads

Secondary metabolites from nectar and pollen: a resource for ecological and evolutionary studies.

Ecology 2019 Jan 22:e02621. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 3AE, United Kingdom.

Floral chemistry mediates plant interactions with herbivores, pathogens, and pollinators. The chemistry of floral nectar and pollen-the primary food rewards for pollinators-can affect both plant reproduction and pollinator health. Although the existence and functional significance of nectar and pollen secondary metabolites has long been known, comprehensive quantitative characterizations of secondary chemistry exist for only a few species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2621DOI Listing
January 2019

Key colonist pools and habitat filters mediate the composition of fiddler crab-associated bacterial communities.

Ecology 2019 Jan 17:e02628. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA.

The diversity and composition of local communities depends strongly on the pool of species that have been able to colonize that community from elsewhere. Typically this is thought to depend on a larger regional species pool that is subject to local environmental constraints that act as 'filters'. Often however, colonists arrive from multiple sources that differ in habitat conditions and have therefore already experienced distinct 'pre-filtering'. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecy.2628
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2628DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Consumer trophic positions respond variably to seasonally fluctuating environments.

Ecology 2019 Feb 18;100(2):e02570. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada.

The effects of environmental seasonality on food web structure have been notoriously understudied in empirical ecology. Here, we focus on seasonal changes in one key attribute of a food web, consumer trophic position. We ask whether fishes inhabiting tropical river-floodplain ecosystems behave as seasonal omnivores, by shifting their trophic positions in relation to the annual flood pulse, or whether they feed at the same trophic position all year, as much empirical work implicitly assumes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2570DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Experiments reveal limited top-down control of key herbivores in southern California kelp forests.

Ecology 2019 Jan 16:e02625. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Coastal and Marine Institute& Department of Biology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA.

Predator responses to gradients in prey density have important implications for population regulation and are a potential structuring force for subtidal marine communities, particularly on rocky reefs where herbivorous sea urchins can drive community state shifts. On rocky reefs in southern California where predatory sea otters have been extirpated, top-down control of sea urchins by alternative predators has been hypothesized but rarely tested experimentally. In laboratory feeding assays, predatory spiny lobsters (Panulirus interruptus) demonstrated a saturating functional response to urchin prey, whereby urchin proportional mortality was inversely density-dependent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2625DOI Listing
January 2019
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Feast not famine: Nitrogen pools recover rapidly in 25-yr old postfire lodgepole pine.

Ecology 2019 Jan 16:e02626. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 80523.

The extent of young postfire conifer forests is growing throughout western North America as the frequency and size of high-severity fires increase, making it important to understand ecosystem structure and function in early seral forests. Understanding nitrogen (N) dynamics during postfire stand development is especially important because northern conifers are often N limited. We re-sampled lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2626DOI Listing
January 2019
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Eggs of the copepod Acartia tonsa Dana require hypoxic conditions to tolerate prolonged embryonic development arrest.

BMC Ecol 2019 Jan 15;19(1). Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark.

Background: Copepods make up the largest zooplankton biomass in coastal areas and estuaries and are pivotal for the normal development of fish larva of countless species. During spring in neritic boreal waters, the copepod pelagic biomass increases rapidly from near absence during winter. In the calanoid species Acartia tonsa, a small fraction of eggs are dormant regardless of external conditions and this has been hypothesized to be crucial for sediment egg banks and for the rapid biomass increase during spring. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0217-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6332675PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Ecological and life history traits are associated with Ross River virus infection among sylvatic mammals in Australia.

Authors:
Michael G Walsh

BMC Ecol 2019 Jan 15;19(1). Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Background: Ross River virus (RRV) is Australia's most important arbovirus given its annual burden of disease and the relatively large number of Australians at risk for infection. This mosquito-borne arbovirus is also a zoonosis, making its epidemiology and infection ecology complex and cryptic. Our grasp of enzootic, epizootic, and zoonotic RRV transmission dynamics is imprecise largely due to a poor understanding of the role of wild mammalian hosts in the RRV system. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0220-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6334474PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

High-resolution characterization of the abiotic environment and disturbance regimes on the Great Barrier Reef, 1985-2017.

Ecology 2019 Feb 15;100(2):e02574. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, 4811, Australia.

This data compilation synthesizes 36 static environmental and spatial variables, and temporally explicit modeled estimates of three major disturbances to coral cover on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR): (1) coral bleaching, (2) tropical cyclones, and (3) outbreaks of the coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster cf. solaris. Data are provided on a standardized grid (0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2574DOI Listing
February 2019
9 Reads

Ecological drift and competitive interactions predict unique patterns in temporal fluctuations of population size.

Ecology 2019 Jan 15:e02623. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Dept of Biology, Univ. of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA.

Recent studies have highlighted the importance of higher-order competitive interactions in stabilizing population dynamics in multi-species communities. But how does the structure of competitive hierarchies affect population dynamics and extinction processes? We tackled this important question by using spatially explicit simulations of ecological drift (10 species in a homogeneous landscape of 64 patches) in which birth rates were influenced by interspecific competition. Specifically, we examined how transitive (linear pecking orders) and intransitive (pecking orders with loops) competitive hierarchies affected extinction rates and population dynamics in simulated communities through time. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecy.2623
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2623DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Joint species movement modeling: how do traits influence movements?

Ecology 2019 Jan 15:e02622. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Grupo de Ecología Cuantitativa, INIBIOMA-CRUB, CONICET. Av. Pioneros, 2350 - S.C. de Bariloche, Río Negro, Argentina.

Joint species distribution modeling has enabled researchers to move from species-level to community-level analyses, leading to statistically more efficient and ecologically more informative use of data. Here, we propose joint species movement modeling (JSMM) as an analogous approach that enables inferring both species- and community-level movement parameters from multi-species movement data. The species-level movement parameters are modeled as a function of species traits and phylogenetic relationships, allowing one to ask how species traits influence movements, and whether phylogenetically related species are similar in their movement behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2622DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Increasing water availability and facilitation weaken biodiversity-biomass relationships in shrublands.

Ecology 2019 Jan 15:e02624. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Institute of Ecology, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences and Key Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, Peking University, Beijing, China.

Positive biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) relationships are commonly found in experimental and observational studies, but how they vary in different environmental contexts and under the influence of coexisting life forms is still controversial. Investigating these variations is important for making predictions regarding the dynamics of plant communities and carbon pools under global change. We conducted this study across 433 shrubland sites in northern China. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2624DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

A global growth form database for 143,616 vascular plant species.

Ecology 2019 Jan 13:e02614. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Ecology and Evolution Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, AUSTRALIA.

For the majority of plant species in the world, we know little about their functional ecology, not even one of the most basic traits - the species' growth habit. To fill the gap in availability of compiled plant growth form data, we have assembled, to our knowledge, the largest global database on growth form as a plant trait. From 163 data sources we have, with extensive error checking and data synthesis, assembled a growth form database for 143,616 vascular plant species, from 445 different plant families. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecy.2614
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2614DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Plant interactions shape pollination networks via nonadditive effects.

Ecology 2019 Jan 13:e02619. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, Zurich, 8057, Switzerland.

Plants grow in communities where they interact with other plants and with other living organisms such as pollinators. On the one hand, studies of plant-plant interactions rarely consider how plants interact with other trophic levels such as pollinators. On the other, studies of plant-animal interactions rarely deal with interactions within trophic levels such as plant-plant competition and facilitation. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecy.2619
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2619DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads

Effects of salinity on microbialite-associated production in Great Salt Lake, Utah.

Ecology 2019 Jan 13:e02611. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT.

Microbialites, organosedimentary carbonate structures, cover approximately 20% of the basin floor in the south arm of Great Salt Lake, which ranges from ~12-15% salinity. Photosynthetic microbial mats associated with these benthic mounds contribute biomass that supports secondary production in the ecosystem, including that of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana. However, the effects of predicted increases in the salinity of the lake on the productivity and composition of these mats and on A. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecy.2611
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2611DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Individual and temporal variation in pathogen load predicts long-term impacts of an emerging infectious disease.

Ecology 2019 Jan 13:e02613. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Environmental Futures Research Institute, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, 4111, Australia.

Emerging infectious diseases increasingly threaten wildlife populations. Most studies focus on managing short-term epidemic properties, such as controlling early outbreaks. Predicting long-term endemic characteristics with limited retrospective data is more challenging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2613DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read