15,133 results match your criteria Eating Disorder Anorexia


Abnormal Spontaneous Regional Brain Activity in Young Patients With Anorexia Nervosa.

J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Division of Psychological and Social Medicine and Developmental Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; Translational Developmental Neuroscience Section, Eating Disorder Research and Treatment Center, Faculty of Medicine, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany. Electronic address:

Objective: Functional MRI studies have repeatedly shown alterations in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). These alterations might be driven by baseline signal characteristics such as the (fractional) amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF/ALFF), as well as regional signal consistency [ie. regional homogeneity (ReHo)] within circumscribed brain regions. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08908567193011
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2019.01.011DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Long-term outcome and psychiatric comorbidity of adolescent-onset anorexia nervosa.

Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry 2019 Feb 15:1359104519827629. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

1 Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology, 2017SGR881, Institute of Neurosciences, Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Spain.

Objective:: To assess the outcome of adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) about 20 years after first treatment.

Methods:: Sixty-two women diagnosed with AN during adolescence were invited to participate. Of these 62 patients, 38 agreed to participate and were assessed with a battery of questionnaires and interviews. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1359104519827629DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

To glance on psychiatric comorbidity in adolescent with anorexia nervosa.

Minerva Pediatr 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Faculty of Educational Science, Suor Orsola Benicasa University, Naples, Italy.

Background: Eating disorders display several psychiatric comorbidities. The aim of this study was to describe these comorbidities in a group of adolescent patients with Anorexia Nervosa or ED- NOS (Eating Disorder not otherwise specified); in detail, we have evaluated the comorbidity both with a clinical interview (categorical comorbidities) and with a self-report interview (dimensional comorbidities) in order to compare the two profiles.

Methods: The study was carried out at the child and adolescent psychiatry division (eating disorder service for developmental age) of the University of Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli" (ex Second University of Naples). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0026-4946.19.05202-2DOI Listing
February 2019

Predictors of early response in conjoint and separated models of family-based treatment for adolescent anorexia nervosa.

Eur Eat Disord Rev 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Department of Psychiatry and UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.

Objective: Early response, as indicated by early weight gain, in family-based treatment (FBT) for adolescent anorexia nervosa (AN) predicts remission at end of treatment. However, little is known about what factors contribute to early response. Further, no previous studies have examined early response to separated forms of FBT. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/erv.2668
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/erv.2668DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Binge-eating disorder treatment goes online - feasibility, usability, and treatment outcome of an Internet-based treatment for binge-eating disorder: study protocol for a three-arm randomized controlled trial including an immediate treatment, a waitlist, and a placebo control group.

Trials 2019 Feb 13;20(1):128. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Department of General Psychology and Methodology, University of Basel, Missionsstrasse 62a, 4055, Basel, Switzerland.

Background: Binge-eating disorder (BED) is characterized by recurrent episodes of loss of control over eating and is related to a higher prevalence of other mental disorders and somatic consequences associated with overweight and obesity. In community-based samples, 2-4% of women and 1-3% men are diagnosed with BED. Psychotherapeutic interventions focusing on maintenance factors of disturbed eating behavior have proven to be effective. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13063-019-3192-zDOI Listing
February 2019

Radcliffe ARFID Workgroup: Toward operationalization of research diagnostic criteria and directions for the field.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Objective: Since its introduction to the psychiatric nomenclature in 2013, research on avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) has proliferated highlighting lack of clarity in how ARFID is defined.

Method: In September 2018, a small multi-disciplinary pool of international experts in feeding disorder and eating disorder clinical practice and research convened as the Radcliffe ARFID workgroup to consider operationalization of DSM-5 ARFID diagnostic criteria to guide research in this disorder.

Results: By consensus of the Radcliffe ARFID workgroup, ARFID eating is characterized by food avoidance and/or restriction, involving limited volume and/or variety associated with one or more of the following: weight loss or faltering growth (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23042DOI Listing
February 2019
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Psychiatric and medical correlates of DSM-5 eating disorders in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan;52(1):42-50

Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Objective: To examine psychiatric and somatic correlates of DSM-5 eating disorders (EDs)-anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge-eating disorder (BED)-in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States.

Method: A national sample of 36,309 adult participants in the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions III (NESARC-III) completed structured diagnostic interviews (AUDADIS-5) to determine psychiatric disorders, including EDs, and reported 12-month diagnosis of chronic somatic conditions. Prevalence of lifetime psychiatric disorders and somatic conditions were calculated across the AN, BN, and BED groups and a fourth group without specific ED; multiple logistic regression models compared the likelihood of psychiatric/somatic conditions with each specific ED relative to the no-specific ED group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23004DOI Listing
January 2019

Immunoglobulin G modulation of the melanocortin 4 receptor signaling in obesity and eating disorders.

Transl Psychiatry 2019 Feb 12;9(1):87. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Inserm UMR1073, Nutrition, Gut and Brain Laboratory, 76183, Rouen, France.

Melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) plays a key role in regulation of appetite activated by its main ligand α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) in both central and peripheral targets. α-MSH also binds to circulating immunoglobulins (Igs) but the functional significance of such immune complexes (ICs) in MC4R signaling in normal and pathological conditions of altered appetite has remained unknown. To address this question, we analyzed plasma levels, affinity kinetics, and binding epitopes of α-MSH-reactive IgG extracted from plasma samples of female patients with hyperphagic obesity, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, and healthy controls. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41398-019-0422-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6372612PMC
February 2019

Long-term follow-up study of low-weight avoidant restrictive food intake disorder compared with childhood-onset anorexia nervosa: Psychiatric and occupational outcome in 56 patients.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Psychiatry Skane, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Eating Disorders Centre, Lund, Sweden.

Objective: To compare long term outcome between childhood-onset Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and low-weight Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) in regard to psychiatric diagnoses, social and occupational functioning.

Method: A consecutive series of 56 children originally treated for low-weight restrictive eating disorder (ED) were followed up after a mean of 15.9 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23038DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Decision-Making Deficits Are Associated With Learning Impairments in Female College Students at High Risk for Anorexia Nervosa: Iowa Gambling Task and Prospect Valence Learning Model.

Front Psychiatry 2018 22;9:759. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Department of Psychology, Sungshin Women's University, Seoul, South Korea.

This study investigated deficits in decision-making ability in female college students at high risk for anorexia nervosa (AN) using the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and the prospect valence learning (PVL) model. Based on scores on the Korean version of the Eating Attitude Test-26 (KEAT-26), participants were assigned to either the high risk for AN group ( = 42) or the control group ( = 43). The high risk for AN group exhibited significantly lower total net scores and block net scores on the third, fourth, and fifth blocks of the IGT than the control group did. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00759DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6357925PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Developmental Premorbid Body Mass Index Trajectories of Adolescents With Eating Disorders in a Longitudinal Population Cohort.

J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2019 Feb 13;58(2):191-199. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; the University of Geneva, Switzerland; and the Institute of Child Health, University College London, UK. Electronic address:

Objective: To examine whether childhood body mass index (BMI) trajectories are prospectively associated with later eating disorder (ED) diagnoses.

Method: Using a subsample from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (N = 1,502), random-coefficient growth models were used to compare premorbid BMI trajectories of individuals who later developed anorexia nervosa (n = 243), bulimia nervosa (n = 69), binge-eating disorder (n = 114), and purging disorder (n = 133) and a control group without EDs or ED symptoms (n = 966). BMI was tracked longitudinally from birth to 12. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2018.11.008DOI Listing
February 2019
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Investigating transdiagnostic factors in eating disorders: Does self-esteem moderate the relationship between perfectionism and eating disorder symptoms?

Eur Eat Disord Rev 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.

Objective: According to Fairburns transdiagnostic model of eating disorders (EDs), high levels of perfectionism and low self-esteem are two core traits across EDs. This study investigates the role of self-esteem as a transdiagnostic moderator of the relationship between perfectionism and ED symptoms across EDs.

Method: A large group of patients (n = 732) completed several questionnaires measuring perfectionism, self-esteem, and disordered eating symptomatology, more specifically, drive for thinness (DFT) and body dissatisfaction (BD). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/erv.2666DOI Listing
February 2019
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Parental bonding, childhood maltreatment and eating disorder psychopathology: an investigation of their interactions.

Eat Weight Disord 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Largo Madonna delle Grazie, 80138, Naples, Italy.

Purpose: Childhood trauma and parental bonding have been widely recognized as risk factors for eating disorders (EDs). However, their interplay in determining ED psychopathology has been poorly investigated. Consequently, we have assessed their interaction with core ED psychopathological symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40519-019-00649-0DOI Listing
February 2019
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Adverse Birth Outcomes Associated with Types of Eating Disorders: A Review.

Can J Diet Pract Res 2019 02 7:1-6. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

a School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, Brescia University College, London, ON.

At least 5% of women have an eating disorder (ED) during pregnancy. These EDs affect prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and weight gain during pregnancy, factors associated with birth complications and adverse neonatal outcomes. This review contributes to the literature by examining several adverse birth outcomes associated with EDs and differentiates between past and present EDs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3148/cjdpr-2018-044DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

A Longitudinal Study of Eating Rituals in Patients With Anorexia Nervosa.

Front Psychol 2019 18;10:15. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Department of Eating and Weight Disorders, Villa Garda Hospital, Garda, Italy.

Eating rituals are any problematic behaviors involving food. They are usually observed in patients with anorexia nervosa, but research into these behaviors and their role in treatment outcomes is lacking. We set out to assess the presence of eating rituals in patients with anorexia nervosa treated by means of intensive enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT-E), in addition to their change over time and role as potential predictors of treatment outcome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6345676PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Is bullying and teasing associated with eating disorders? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Regional Department for Eating Disorders, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Objective: Involvement in bullying and teasing has been associated with adverse health outcomes, including eating disorders (EDs). The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to examine the association between bullying/teasing and EDs.

Method: A systematic search was conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23035DOI Listing
February 2019
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Children with avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder and anorexia nervosa in a tertiary care pediatric eating disorder program: A comparative study.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the medical and psychological characteristics of children under the age of 13 years with avoidant restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) and anorexia nervosa (AN) from a Canadian tertiary care pediatric eating disorders program.

Method: Participants included 106 children assessed between 2013 and 2017 using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5). Data were collected through clinical interviews, psychometric questionnaires, and chart review. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23027
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23027DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

The Microbiome and Eating Disorders.

Psychiatr Clin North Am 2019 03 17;42(1):93-103. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, University Hospital, RWTH University Aachen, Neuenhofer Weg 21, Aachen D-52074, Germany. Electronic address:

Growing interest exists in the association of gut bacteria with diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and psychiatric disorders. Gut microbiota influence the fermentation of nutrients, body-weight regulation, gut permeability, hormones, inflammation, immunology, and behavior (gut-brain axis). Regarding anorexia nervosa (AN), altered microbial diversity and taxa abundance were found and associated with depressive, anxious, and eating disorder symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2018.10.004DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Genetics of Eating Disorders: What the Clinician Needs to Know.

Psychiatr Clin North Am 2019 03;42(1):59-73

Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Translational Lab Building Room a3-112 - 3rd Floor, 938 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4, Canada; Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Translational Lab Building Room a3-112 - 3rd Floor, 938 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4, Canada.

Anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge-eating disorder (BED) are heritable conditions that are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of AN have identified specific genetic loci implicated in AN, and genetic correlations have implicated both psychiatric and metabolic factors in its origin. No GWAS have been performed for BN or BED. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0193953X183115
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2018.10.007DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Feeding and Eating Disorders in Children.

Psychiatr Clin North Am 2019 03;42(1):157-167

Department of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Great Ormond Street, London, WC1N 3JH, UK; Population, Policy and Practice Programme, University College London Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, WC1N 1EH, London, UK. Electronic address:

This article provides an update based on recently published literature and expert consensus on the current state of knowledge regarding feeding and eating disorders in children aged 2 to 12 years. It covers the 6 main diagnostic categories-pica, rumination disorder, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder-discussing issues and findings specific to this age group. It highlights the need for ongoing research in a number of key areas, to include improved understanding of etiologic pathways, characterization of presenting disorders, and the development of standardized evidence-based assessment tools and treatment interventions. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0193953X183115
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2018.10.005DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Diagnostic Categories for Eating Disorders: Current Status and What Lies Ahead.

Authors:
B Timothy Walsh

Psychiatr Clin North Am 2019 03 3;42(1):1-10. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition) for 6 feeding and eating disorders were published in 2013 and were notable for officially recognizing binge-eating disorder and for articulating criteria for avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder. The criteria and the rationale for them are briefly described, and current and future challenges are discussed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2018.10.001DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Body image concern and treatment outcomes in adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Eating and Weight Disorders, Villa Garda Hospital, Garda (VR), Italy.

Objective: To ascertain the role of baseline measures of body-image concern (BIC) in changes in body mass index (BMI) centile and psychopathological outcomes associated with intensive enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-E) in adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN).

Method: The BMI centile of 62 adolescent patients with AN was recorded at four time-points over 12 months, and Eating Disorder Examination interview (EDE) and Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) scores, were recorded at admission and discharge from CBT-E. Changes in three BIC components, namely "Preoccupation with shape/weight", "Fear of weight gain" and "Feeling fat", were assessed at admission and discharge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23031DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa-New Evidence-Based Guidelines.

J Clin Med 2019 Jan 29;8(2). Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Freiburg, Hauptstr. 8, Baden-Wuerttemberg, 79104 Freiburg, Germany.

Anorexia nervosa is the most severe eating disorder; it has a protracted course of illness and the highest mortality rate among all psychiatric illnesses. It is characterised by a restriction of energy intake followed by substantial weight loss, which can culminate in cachexia and related medical consequences. Anorexia nervosa is associated with high personal and economic costs for sufferers, their relatives and society. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm8020153DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

A longitudinal, epigenome-wide study of DNA methylation in anorexia nervosa: results in actively ill, partially weight-restored, long-term remitted and non-eating-disordered women

J Psychiatry Neurosci 2019 Jan 29;44(2):1-9. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

From the Eating Disorders Program, Douglas University Institute (Steiger, Kahan, Thaler, Fletcher, Israël, St-Hilaire, Rossi); the Research Centre, Douglas University Institute (Steiger, Kahan, Thaler, Fletcher, Joober, Israël, St-Hilaire, Rossi); the Department of Psychiatry, McGill University (Steiger, Booij, Thaler, Joober, Israël, St-Hilaire); the Department of Psychology, Concordia University (Booij); the Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Centre, University of Montreal (Booij); the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, McGill University (McGregor); the Department of Decision Sciences, HEC Montreal (Labbe); the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, McGill University (Szyf); the School of Human Nutrition, McGill University (Agellon); and the Centre de recherche du Centre Hospitalier, de l’Université de Montréal (CRCHUM) (Gauvin), Montreal, Que., Canada.

Background: This study explored state-related tendencies in DNA methylation in people with anorexia nervosa.

Methods: We measured genome-wide DNA methylation in 75 women with active anorexia nervosa (active), 31 women showing stable remission of anorexia nervosa (remitted) and 41 women with no eating disorder (NED). We also obtained post-intervention methylation data from 52 of the women from the active group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1503/jpn.170242DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Approach bias modification training in bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Section of Eating Disorders, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.

Objective: Bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge-eating disorder (BED) are associated with poorly controlled approach behavior toward food resulting in binge eating. Approach bias modification (ABM) may reduce these automatic action tendencies (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23024DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Transcultural aspects of eating disorders and body image disturbance.

Authors:
Julian M Stern

Nord J Psychiatry 2018 Sep;72(sup1):S23-S26

a Tavistock Centre , London , UK.

Background: Unlike the majority of 'culture-bound syndromes', eating disorders are one of the few mental disorders initially conceptualized as 'culture-bound' to North America/Europe. Social norms vary massively within cultures-class, ethnicity and gender. Over time there have been substantial changes in body shape preferences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08039488.2018.1525642DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Eating disorder recovery is associated with absence of major depressive disorder and substance use disorders at 22-year longitudinal follow-up.

Compr Psychiatry 2019 Jan 11;90:49-51. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, USA.

Background: Psychiatric comorbidity is common in eating disorders (EDs) and associated with poor outcomes, including increased risk for relapse and premature death. Yet little is known about comorbidity following ED recovery.

Methods: We examined two common comorbidities, major depressive disorder (MDD) and substance use disorder (SUD), in adult women with intake diagnoses of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa who participated in a 22-year longitudinal study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2019.01.002DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Ectopic germinoma in the corpus callosum with severe restrictive anorexia: case report and review of literature.

World Neurosurg 2019 Jan 22. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute, Hospital Zambrano Hellion, TecSalud. Tecnologico de Monterrey. San Pedro Garza Garcia, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

Intracranial germ cell tumors are a rare group of neoplasms constituting 1% to 2% of primary intracranial tumors in North America and Europe. Germinomas of the corpus callosum are exceedingly rare, accounting for only 0.7% of all intracranial germ cell tumors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2019.01.026DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Behavioral assessment of activity-based-anorexia: how cognition can become the drive wheel.

Physiol Behav 2019 Jan 22;202:1-7. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Faculty of Psychology, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy; Neurobiology of Learning Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address:

Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a disorder with a dramatic impact on both the individual and society. Besides severe weight loss, excessive physical exercise and cognitive disturbances can be present in patients with AN as primary symptoms of the pathology or as secondary effects induced by physical and metabolic alterations. Mechanistic research in this field has taken advantage of a well characterized animal model, the activity-based anorexia model (ABA). Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00319384183098
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2019.01.016DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Association study of variants in genes FTO, SLC6A4, DRD2, BDNF and GHRL with binge eating disorder (BED) in Portuguese women.

Psychiatry Res 2019 Jan 15;273:309-311. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Research Centre for Anthropology and Health (CIAS), Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, 3000-456 Coimbra, Portugal. Electronic address:

A population based case-control study was conducted in Portuguese women with overweight/obesity to investigate the possible association of variants in genes FTO, SLC6A4, DRD2, BDNF and GHRL with binge eating disorder (BED). The distribution of seven polymorphisms was evaluated in 31 BED patients and 62 controls. No significant associations were found between polymorphisms and BED. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2019.01.047DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Why is premorbid BMI consistently elevated in clinical samples, but not in risk factor samples, of individuals with eating disorders?

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 24;52(2):117-120. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Psychology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Body image disturbance is widely viewed as contributing to the development and maintenance of disordered eating. Yet this perspective is not inconsistent with the possibility that elevated premorbid BMIs also increase the risk of developing eating disorders. Research examining whether actual body size may play a role in eating disorder development reveals a curious pattern of findings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23029DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Preserved white matter microstructure in adolescent patients with atypical anorexia nervosa.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 24;52(2):166-174. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Objective: Patients with atypical anorexia nervosa (AN) are often in the normal-weight range at presentation; however, signs of starvation and medical instability are not rare. White matter (WM) microstructural correlates of atypical AN have not yet been investigated, leaving an important gap in our knowledge regarding the neural pathogenesis of this disorder.

Method: We investigated WM microstructural integrity in 25 drug-naïve adolescent patients with atypical AN and 25 healthy controls, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23012DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Dialectical behavioral therapy skills group as an adjunct to family-based therapy in adolescents with restrictive eating disorders.

Eat Disord 2019 Jan 23:1-13. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

a Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology , Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center , Cincinnati , Ohio , USA.

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is commonly used in the treatment of eating disorders (ED), yet few studies have examined the utility of DBT skills groups as an adjunct to evidence-based therapy for ED. Thus, we sought to examine the preliminary efficacy of a DBT skills group as an adjunct to Family-Based Treatment (FBT) for adolescent restrictive ED. Our preliminary pilot study included 18 adolescent girls ages 13-18 (M = 15. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10640266.2019.1568101DOI Listing
January 2019
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Applying a multidimensional model of craving to disordered eating behaviors: Development of the Food Approach and Avoidance Questionnaire.

Psychol Assess 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Department of Psychology.

Despite revisions to the DSM-5, current diagnostic criteria poorly capture the phenomena of eating disorders. The construct of food craving may help to explain the range of disordered eating and compensatory behaviors, but current measures do not fully capture the construct. Borrowing from the substance use literature and emphasizing both approach and avoidance craving inclinations, the ambivalence model of craving (AMC) provides a useful framework for predicting broad patterns of disordered eating behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pas0000697DOI Listing
January 2019
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Meaning in life is associated with the psychopathology of eating disorders: differences depending on the diagnosis.

Eat Disord 2019 Jan 20:1-15. Epub 2019 Jan 20.

c Universidad Católica de Valencia "San Vicente Mártir", España. Facultad de Psicología , Magisterio y Ciencias de la Educación, Universidad Católica de Valencia "San Vicente Mártir" , Valencia , España.

Previous studies indicated that meaning in life was inversely associated with eating behaviors and a negative attitude toward food, body satisfaction, and borderline symptoms. However, research on the association between meaning in life and eating disorder psychopathology is scarce, and there are no studies on the association between meaning in life and the eating disorder psychopathology depending on the diagnosis. The aim of the present study is to verify whether meaning in life is differentially associated with a broad range of psychopathology symptoms commonly observed in people with ED, depending on the diagnosis, in a sample of 240 ED patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10640266.2018.1560852DOI Listing
January 2019
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Inpatient versus outpatient care, partial hospitalisation and waiting list for people with eating disorders.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2019 Jan 21;1:CD010827. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Translational Health Research Institute, Western Sydney University, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia, 2751.

Background: Clinical guidelines recommend outpatient care for the majority of people with an eating disorder. The optimal use of inpatient treatment or combination of inpatient and partial hospital care is disputed and practice varies widely.

Objectives: To assess the effects of treatment setting (inpatient, partial hospitalisation, or outpatient) on the reduction of symptoms and increase in remission rates in people with:1. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/14651858.CD010827.pub2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD010827.pub2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6353082PMC
January 2019
6 Reads

Attentional engagement with and disengagement from food cues in Anorexia Nervosa.

Behav Res Ther 2019 Jan 10;114:15-24. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Department of Clinical Psychology and Experimental Psychopathology, University of Groningen, the Netherlands.

This study examined differences in food-related Attentional Bias (AB) between patients with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and adolescents without an eating disorder. AB was assessed with an Attentional Response to Distal versus Proximal Emotional Information (ARDPEI) task that was specifically designed to differentiate between attentional engagement with and attentional disengagement from food. We tested if patients with AN would show less attentional engagement and less difficulty to disengage their attention from food cues than individuals without an eating disorder. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2019.01.003DOI Listing
January 2019
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Olanzapine Versus Placebo in Adult Outpatients With Anorexia Nervosa: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 Jan 18:appiajp201818101125. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

From the Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York (Attia, Steinglass, Walsh, Wang); the Department of Biostatistics, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York (Wang, Wu); the Eating Disorders Research Program, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York (Attia, Steinglass, Walsh); the Center for Eating Disorders, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York (Attia); the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medicine (Schreyer, Guarda); the Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh (Wildes, Marcus); the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago (Wildes); the Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders, University of North Carolina (Yilmaz); and the Department of Psychiatry and the Toronto Center for Addiction and Mental Health, University of Toronto (Kaplan).

Objective:: This study evaluated the benefits of olanzapine compared with placebo for adult outpatients with anorexia nervosa.

Methods:: This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of adult outpatients with anorexia nervosa (N=152, 96% of whom were women; the sample's mean body mass index [BMI] was 16.7) was conducted at five sites in North America. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.18101125DOI Listing
January 2019
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Blunted emotion-modulated startle reflex in anorexia nervosa.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 17. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of General Internal Medicine and Psychosomatics, Center for Psychosocial Medicine, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany.

Objective: Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) often show difficulties in the perception, expression, and regulation of emotions and a strong avoidance of aversive feelings. According to psychobiological models, dietary restraint and accompanying weight loss may serve as a maladaptive mechanism of emotion regulation by attenuating aversive emotional states in AN, thereby contributing to the maintenance of the disorder.

Method: Twenty-seven women with AN and 26 age-matched healthy women were shown short film-clips to elicit fear, sadness, amusement, and neutral emotional states. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23022DOI Listing
January 2019
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Self-Esteem Group: Useful Intervention for Inpatients with Anorexia Nervosa?

Brain Sci 2019 Jan 13;9(1). Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK.

Low self-esteem is a common feature in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and has been hypothesised to act as a predisposing, precipitating, and perpetuating factor. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)-based self-esteem group in a naturalistic setting of patients with AN in an inpatient treatment programme. Included in this study were 119 female patients diagnosed with AN, with all participants completing self-report questionnaires before and after the intervention. Read More

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http://www.mdpi.com/2076-3425/9/1/12
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9010012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6356529PMC
January 2019
5 Reads

Desired weight and treatment outcome among adolescents in a novel family-based partial hospitalization program.

Psychiatry Res 2019 Jan 9;273:149-152. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of South Carolina, 261 Calhoun St., Ste. 250, Charleston, SC 29401, USA.

The purpose of the current study was to investigate desired weight percentage and weight difference percentage and their association with treatment outcome in a novel family-based partial hospitalization program. Twenty-six adolescents with anorexia nervosa or subthreshold anorexia nervosa between the ages of 12 and 19 completed the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) at intake and upon completion from a partial hospitalization program in which parents played a large role in the recovery process, consistent with family-based treatment principles. Lower desired weight percentage at baseline was associated with higher scores on the restraint subscale of the EDE at end of treatment. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01651781183202
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2019.01.028DOI Listing
January 2019
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Estrogen administration improves the trajectory of eating disorder pathology in oligo-amenorrheic athletes: A randomized controlled trial.

Psychoneuroendocrinology 2018 Nov 16;102:273-280. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

Neuroendocrine Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Objective: Estrogen replacement prevents worsening body dissatisfaction with weight gain in adolescents with anorexia nervosa. However, the impact of estrogen administration on eating disorder (ED) pathology in normal-weight young women with exercise-induced amenorrhea is unknown. We hypothesized that (1) normal-weight oligo-amenorrheic athletes (OA) would show greater ED pathology than eumenorrheic athletes (EA) and non-athletes (NA), and (2) 12 months of estrogen replacement would improve those symptoms. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03064530183081
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2018.11.013DOI Listing
November 2018
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Transdiagnostic neuroimaging in psychiatry: A review.

Authors:
Serge A Mitelman

Psychiatry Res 2019 Jan 8. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Elmhurst Hospital Center, 79-01 Broadway, Elmhurst, NY 11373, USA. Electronic address:

Transdiagnostic approach has a long history in neuroimaging, predating its recent ascendance as a paradigm for new psychiatric nosology. Various psychiatric disorders have been compared for commonalities and differences in neuroanatomical features and activation patterns, with different aims and rationales. This review covers both structural and functional neuroimaging publications with direct comparison of different psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, autism spectrum disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01651781183208
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2019.01.026DOI Listing
January 2019
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Eating disorders and substance use in adolescents: How substance users differ from nonsubstance users in an outpatient eating disorders treatment clinic.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 14;52(2):175-182. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Division of Child and Youth Psychiatry, Kingston Health Sciences Centre, Hotel Dieu Hospital Site, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: The relationship between eating disorders (EDs) and substance use (SU) has only been briefly described in literature using mainly adult populations. This study examined the prevalence and characteristics of SU among patients of an adolescent ED outpatient treatment program.

Method: A retrospective chart analysis was conducted to determine and subsequently compare medical status, psychosocial factors, treatment course and outcome between patients with and without SU. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23017
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23017DOI Listing
February 2019
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Subtypes of Adaptive and Maladaptive Perfectionism in Anorexia Nervosa: Associations with Eating Disorder and Affective Symptoms.

J Psychopathol Behav Assess 2018 Dec 6;40(4):691-700. Epub 2018 Apr 6.

Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Miriam Hospital/Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA.

Perfectionism is hypothesized to contribute to the etiology of anorexia nervosa (AN). However, there is little research regarding whether individuals with AN can be classified according to maladaptive (e.g. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10862-018-9672-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10862-018-9672-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6326583PMC
December 2018
6 Reads

An investigation of indirect effects of personality features on anorexia nervosa severity through interoceptive dysfunction in individuals with lifetime anorexia nervosa diagnoses.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 12;52(2):200-205. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida.

Objective: This study examined a hypothesized pathway by which interoceptive dysfunction accounted for associations between personality features (harm avoidance, self-directedness, and perfectionism) and anorexia nervosa (AN) severity (indicated by drive for thinness, eating disorder-related preoccupations and rituals, and body mass index).

Method: The study sample (n = 270, mean age = 28.47, 95. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23008
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23008DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Anorexia nervosa and perfectionism: A meta-analysis.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Objective: Despite the multitude of research surrounding anorexia nervosa (AN) and perfectionism, there is yet to be a thorough investigation comparing perfectionism in those diagnosed with AN and other eating disorders, and other psychiatric diagnoses. The current meta-analysis aimed to explore these comparisons.

Method: Following the Preferred Reporting Items or Systematic Reviews Meta Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we identified empirical studies that compared maladaptive and/or adaptive perfectionism scores in those diagnosed with AN and either a non-clinical comparison group, people diagnosed with a non-AN ED, or people diagnosed with another psychological disorder (i. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23009
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23009DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads

Metformin abuse: A novel and dangerous purging behavior in anorexia nervosa.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 10. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Department of Medicine, ACUTE, Denver Health, Denver, Colorado.

Objective: To report a case of severe multisystem illness, near death and permanent kidney failure in a woman with a history of anorexia nervosa-binge purge type due to abuse of prescription metformin, an approved oral diabetes medication obtained surreptitiously via the internet.

Method: Psychiatric and medical records were reviewed from the medical care of this patient. A literature search was also performed on prescription medication abuse as a mode of purging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23010DOI Listing
January 2019
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The improvement in neurocognitive functioning in anorexia nervosa adolescents throughout the integrative model of psychotherapy including cognitive remediation therapy.

BMC Psychiatry 2019 Jan 9;19(1):15. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

The Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, 9 Sobieski, 02-957, Warsaw, Poland.

Background: Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) experience difficulties in neurocognitive functioning in the acute phase of illness which might be related to clinical presentation, but also in the apparently remitted state after weight recovery. Among the most commonly reported persistent deficits is cognitive inflexibility, which can be interpreted as a vulnerability trait or a "neuropsychological scar" reflecting the detrimental effect of prolonged semi-starvation in patients with a long duration of illness. Studies of adolescent samples with a relatively short clinical course may enable avoiding the effect of prolonged illness and help to determine whether neuropsychological deficits are trait or state dependent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12888-018-1984-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6327421PMC
January 2019
4 Reads

Altered global brain network topology as a trait marker in patients with anorexia nervosa.

Psychol Med 2019 Jan 9:1-9. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Division of Psychological and Social Medicine and Developmental Neuroscience,Faculty of Medicine, Technische Universität Dresden,Dresden,Germany.

Background: Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have identified functional connectivity patterns associated with acute undernutrition in anorexia nervosa (AN), but few have investigated recovered patients. Thus, a trait connectivity profile characteristic of the disorder remains elusive. Using state-of-the-art graph-theoretic methods in acute AN, the authors previously found abnormal global brain network architecture, possibly driven by local network alterations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291718004002DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read