97 results match your criteria Early Childhood Research Quarterly [Journal]


Thresholds of Resilience and Within- and Cross-Domain Academic Achievement among Children in Poverty.

Early Child Res Q 2019 1st Quarter;46:87-96. Epub 2018 May 16.

The University of Texas at Austin.

Growing up in poverty increases the likelihood of maladaptive development. Yet, some children are able to overcome the adversity of poverty and demonstrate resilience. Currently, there is limited agreement among researchers about how to operationalize resilience, both in terms of who should be the comparison group against whom at-risk children are compared and in terms of what developmental domains of resilience are most predictive of later positive development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2018.04.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6364857PMC

Self-regulation and the Development of Literacy and Language Achievement from Preschool through Second Grade.

Early Child Res Q 2019 1st Quarter;46:240-251. Epub 2018 Apr 4.

University of Michigan.

Previous research has established that higher levels of behavioral self-regulation are associated with higher levels of language and literacy. In this study, we take a more developmental perspective by considering how trajectories of self-regulation development (early, intermediate, late) predict the way literacy and language skills develop from preschool through second grade. Children (n = 351) were assessed twice per year for up to four years on indicators of decoding, reading comprehension, phonological awareness, and vocabulary. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2018.02.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6328261PMC
April 2018
1 Read

Effects of Geometric Toy Design on Parent-Child Interactions and Spatial Language.

Early Child Res Q 2019 1st Quarter;46:126-141. Epub 2018 May 18.

Temple University.

Geometric forms have formal definitions. While knowing shape names is considered important for school-readiness, many children do not understand the defining features of shapes until well into elementary school (Satlow & Newcombe, 1998). One reason is likely that they do not encounter enough variety in the shapes they see (citation removed). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2018.03.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6289199PMC
May 2018
2 Reads

Growth in inhibitory control among low-income, ethnic-minority preschoolers: A group-based modeling approach.

Early Child Res Q 2018 1st Quarter;42:247-255. Epub 2017 Oct 23.

The University of Georgia, Department of Human Development and Family Science, 202 Family Science Center II (House D), 405 Sanford Drive, Athens, GA, 30602, United States.

The emergence of self-regulation skills such as inhibitory control in children is an important developmental process associated with adjustment across multiple domains. Individual differences in inhibitory control are associated with family socioeconomic status but have not been studied in relation to variations in risk found within a low-income (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2017.10.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5961734PMC
October 2017
1 Read

Longitudinal associations between self-regulation and the academic and behavioral adjustment of young children born preterm.

Early Child Res Q 2018 1st Quarter;42:193-204. Epub 2017 Oct 15.

Department of Human Development and Family Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison when this research was completed.

Much of the research to date about the structure of self-regulation in early childhood has been conducted with low medical risk samples, with the general conclusion that self-regulation can be separated into overlapping executive function and effortful control factors that differentially predict child outcomes. We examined the factor structure of 36-month self-regulation among children born prematurely ( = 168) and the extent to which self-regulation predicted maternal ratings of children's socioemotional and academic competence when they were six years of age. Statistical analyses revealed a single self-regulation factor for this high neonatal risk sample, and this self-regulation factor mediated associations between early sociodemographic risk and mothers' ratings of academic competence and externalizing problems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2017.09.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5796547PMC
October 2017
5 Reads

Using the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised in High Stakes Contexts: Does Evidence Warrant the Practice?

Early Child Res Q 2018 1st Quarter;42:158-169. Epub 2017 Oct 10.

NORC at the University of Chicago.

Increasingly, states establish different thresholds on the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ECERS-R), and use these thresholds to inform high-stakes decisions. However, the validity of the ECERS-R for these purposes is not well established. The objective of this study is to identify thresholds on the ECERS-R that are associated with preschool-aged children's social and cognitive development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2017.10.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5788317PMC
October 2017
11 Reads

Rural Families' Use of Multiple Child Care Arrangements from 6 to 58 Months and Children's Kindergarten Behavioral and Academic Outcomes.

Early Child Res Q 2017 4th Quarter;41:161-173. Epub 2017 Aug 4.

School of Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Non-parental child care prior to kindergarten is a normative experience for the majority of children in the United States, with children commonly experiencing multiple arrangements, or more than one concurrent child care arrangement. The experience of multiple arrangements has predominantly been shown to be negatively related to young children's health and behavioral outcomes. The present study examined the use of multiple concurrent arrangements for children in the Family Life Project, a representative sample of families living in six high-poverty rural counties. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2017.05.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5739330PMC
August 2017
6 Reads

Impacts of a Literacy-Focused Preschool Curriculum on the Early Literacy Skills of Language-Minority Children.

Early Child Res Q 2017 3rd Quarter;40:13-24. Epub 2017 Mar 11.

Department of Psychology, University of Southern California.

Spanish-speaking language-minority (LM) children are at an elevated risk of struggling academically and display signs of that risk during early childhood. Therefore, high-quality research is needed to identify instructional techniques that promote the school readiness of Spanish-speaking LM children. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention that utilized an experimental curriculum and two professional development models for the development of English and Spanish early literacy skills among LM children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2017.02.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5621762PMC
March 2017
6 Reads

The Selection of Preschool for Immigrant and Native-born Latino Families in the United States.

Authors:
Arya Ansari

Early Child Res Q 2017 4th Quarter;41:149-160

University of Virginia.

With the national push to expand preschool education, there has been growing interest in understanding why Latino families are enrolled in preschool at lower rates than non-Latino families. This study applied the accommodations model by Meyers and Jordan (2006) to the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort ( = 5,850) to provide a more nuanced understanding of the preschool selection of U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2017.07.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5599152PMC
September 2017
3 Reads

Elementary Students' Effortful Control and Academic Achievement: The Mediating Role of Teacher-Student Relationship Quality.

Early Child Res Q 2017 3rd Quarter;40:98-109. Epub 2017 Mar 22.

T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University.

This study evaluated the association between effortful control in kindergarten and academic achievement one year later ( = 301), and whether teacher-student closeness and conflict in kindergarten mediated the association. Parents, teachers, and observers reported on children's effortful control, and teachers reported on their perceived levels of closeness and conflict with students. Students completed the passage comprehension and applied problems subtests of the Woodcock-Johnson tests of achievement, as well as a behavioral measure of effortful control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2016.10.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5495479PMC
March 2017
12 Reads

Positively Biased Processing of Mother's Emotions Predicts Children's Social and Emotional Functioning.

Early Child Res Q 2017 1st Quarter;38:1-9. Epub 2016 Oct 6.

Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 5010, Atlanta, GA, 30302, USA; Department of Psychology, Emory University, 36 Eagle Row, PAIS Building, Room 467, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Risk for internalizing problems and social skills deficits likely emerges in early childhood when emotion processing and social competencies are developing. Positively biased processing of social information is typical during early childhood and may be protective against poorer psychosocial outcomes. We tested the hypothesis that young children with relatively less positively biased attention to, interpretations of, and attributions for their mother's emotions would exhibit poorer prosocial skills and more internalizing problems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2016.08.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5365080PMC
October 2016
5 Reads

The role of household chaos in understanding relations between early poverty and children's academic achievement.

Early Child Res Q 2016 4th Quarter;37:16-25

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, 517 South Greensboro Street CB# 8040, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040, United States.

The following prospective longitudinal study used an epidemiological sample ( = 1,236) to consider the potential mediating role of early cumulative household chaos (6-58 months) on associations between early family income poverty (6 months) and children's academic achievement in kindergarten. Two dimensions of household chaos, disorganization and instability, were examined as mediators. Results revealed that, in the presence of household disorganization (but not instability) and relevant covariates, income poverty was no longer directly related to academic achievement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2016.02.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4909052PMC
June 2016
19 Reads

Do thin, overweight and obese children have poorer development than their healthy-weight peers at the start of school? Findings from a South Australian data linkage study.

Early Child Res Q 2016 Mar;35:85-94

School of Public Health, University of Adelaide, Mail drop DX 650550, Adelaide 5005, Australia.

Little is known about the holistic development of children who are not healthy-weight when they start school, despite one fifth of preschool-aged children in high income countries being overweight or obese. Further to this, there is a paucity of research examining low body mass index (BMI) in contemporary high-income populations, although evidence from the developing world demonstrates a range of negative consequences in childhood and beyond. We investigated the development of 4-6 year old children who were thin, healthy-weight, overweight, or obese (as defined by BMI z-scores) across the five domains of the Australian Early Development Census (AEDC): Physical Health and Wellbeing, Social Competence, Emotional Maturity, Language and Cognitive Skills, and Communication Skills and General Knowledge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.10.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4850238PMC
March 2016
13 Reads

Which Preschool Mathematics Competencies Are Most Predictive of Fifth Grade Achievement?

Early Child Res Q 2016 3rd Quarter;36:550-560

University of Denver, 1999 East Evans Avenue, Denver, CO 80208, United States.

In an effort to promote best practices regarding mathematics teaching and learning at the preschool level, national advisory panels and organizations have emphasized the importance of children's emergent counting and related competencies, such as the ability to verbally count, maintain one-to-one correspondence, count with cardinality, subitize, and count forward or backward from a given number. However, little research has investigated whether the kind of mathematical knowledge promoted by the various standards documents actually predict later mathematics achievement. The present study uses longitudinal data from a primarily low-income and minority sample of children to examine the extent to which preschool mathematical competencies, specifically basic and advanced counting, predict fifth grade mathematics achievement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2016.02.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4819335PMC
April 2016
28 Reads

Classroom Quality at Pre-kindergarten and Kindergarten and Children's Social Skills and Behavior Problems.

Early Child Res Q 2016 3rd Quarter;36:212-222

Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Focusing on the continuity in the quality of classroom environments as children transition from preschool into elementary school, this study examined the associations between classroom quality in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten and children's social skills and behavior problems in kindergarten and first grade. Participants included 1175 ethnically-diverse children (43% African American) living in low-wealth rural communities of the US. Results indicated that children who experienced higher levels of emotional and organizational classroom quality in both pre-kindergarten and kindergarten demonstrated better social skills and fewer behavior problems in both kindergarten and first grade comparing to children who did not experience higher classroom quality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2016.01.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4774198PMC
March 2016
41 Reads

Effects of a Responsiveness-Focused Intervention in Family Child Care Homes on Children's Executive Function.

Early Child Res Q 2016 1st Quarter;34:128-139

Children's Learning Institute, University of Texas Health Science Center, 7000 Fannin Street, 23 floor, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Caregiver responsiveness has been theorized and found to support children's early executive function (EF) development. This study examined the effects of an intervention that targeted family child care provider responsiveness on children's EF. Family child care providers were randomly assigned to one of two intervention groups or a control group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.10.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4770831PMC
March 2016
6 Reads

Child Care Enrollment Decisions Among Dual Language Learner Families: The Role of Spanish Language Instruction in the Child Care Setting.

Early Child Res Q 2016 3rd Quarter;36:223-232

University of California, Irvine.

Data from the Head Start Impact Study ( = 1,141) and the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey, 2009 Cohort ( = 825) were used to describe child care enrollment decisions among Spanish-speaking Dual Language Learner (DLL) families. In particular, logistic regression models tested which child, family, and institutional characteristics predicted enrollment in early care and education (ECE) settings that used Spanish for instruction versus enrollment in settings that did not use Spanish. Results showed that whether the child's first language was exclusively Spanish and whether other DLL families previously attended the ECE arrangement strongly predicted whether that child enrolled. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2016.01.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4754984PMC
February 2016
12 Reads

Cross-Language Associations in the Development of Preschoolers' Receptive and Expressive Vocabulary.

Early Child Res Q 2016 3rd Quarter;36:49-63

Curry School of Education, University of Virginia.

The increasing population of dual language learners (DLLs) entering preschool classrooms highlights a continued need for research on the development of dual language acquisition, and specifically vocabulary skills, in this age group. This study describes young DLL children's ( = 177) vocabulary development in both English and Spanish simultaneously, and how vocabulary skills in each language relate to one another, during a contextual shift that places greater emphasis on the acquisition of academic English language skills. Findings demonstrated that DLL preschoolers made gains in vocabulary in both languages with more change evidenced in receptive, in comparison to expressive, vocabulary as well as in English in comparison to Spanish. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.11.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4721273PMC
January 2016
20 Reads

Household Chaos and Children's Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Development in Early Childhood: Does Childcare Play a Buffering Role?

Early Child Res Q 2016 1st Quarter;34:115-127. Epub 2015 Oct 31.

Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, 521 S. Greensboro Street, CB 8185, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599.

Evidence suggests that household chaos is associated with less optimal child outcomes. Yet, there is an increasing indication that children's experiences in childcare may buffer them against the detrimental effects of such environments. Our study aims were to test: (1) whether children's experiences in childcare mitigated relations between household chaos and children's cognitive and social development, and (2) whether these (conditional) chaos effects were mediated by links between chaos and executive functioning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.09.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5926246PMC
October 2015
3 Reads

The Impact of Program Structure on Cortisol Patterning in Children Attending Out-of-Home Child Care.

Early Child Res Q 2016 1st Quarter;34:92-103

Department of Psychology, University of Denver, 2155 S. Race St, Denver, CO, 80208, USA.

Full-day center-based child care has repeatedly been associated with rising levels of cortisol, a hormone that helps the body manage challenge, across the day at child care. This article presents findings from two studies examining the relationship between child care program structure (number of days per week, and hours per day) and cortisol production across the day. Study 1 presents findings comparing cortisol production in 3- to 5-year-old children enrolled in either full-day ( = 55) or half-day ( = 63) Head-Start-funded programs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.09.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4639940PMC
November 2015
16 Reads

Does Head Start differentially benefit children with risks targeted by the program's service model?

Early Child Res Q 2016 1st Quarter;34:1-12

University of California, Irvine, United States.

Data from the Head Start Impact Study ( = 3540) were used to test for differential benefits of Head Start after one program year and after kindergarten on pre-academic and behavior outcomes for children at risk in the domains targeted by the program's comprehensive services. Although random assignment to Head Start produced positive treatment main effects on children's pre-academic skills and behavior problems, residualized growth models showed that random assignment to Head Start did not differentially benefit the pre-academic skills of children with risk factors targeted by the Head Start service model. The models showed detrimental impacts of Head Start for maternal-reported behavior problems of high-risk children, but slightly more positive impacts for teacher-reported behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.08.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4563874PMC
September 2015
7 Reads

Children's Elicitation of Changes in Parenting during the Early Childhood Years.

Early Child Res Q 2015 3rd Quarter;32:139-149

University of Texas at Austin.

Using a subsample of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B; = 1,550), this study identified parents who engaged in more developmentally problematic parenting-in the form of low investment, above average television watching, and use of spanking-when their children were very young ( = 24.41 months, = 1.23) but changed their parenting in more positive directions over time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.03.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4481872PMC
July 2015
5 Reads

Neighborhood Economic Disadvantage and Children's Cognitive and Social-Emotional Development: Exploring Head Start Classroom Quality as a Mediating Mechanism.

Early Child Res Q 2015 3rd Quarter;32:150-159

New York University.

Past research has shown robust relationships between neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage and children's school achievement and social-emotional outcomes, yet the mechanisms for explaining these relationships are poorly understood. The present study uses data from 1,904 Head Start participants enrolled in the Head Start Impact Study to examine the role that classroom structural and relational quality play in explaining the association between neighborhood poverty and children's developmental gains over the preschool year. Results suggest that neighborhood poverty is directly related to lower levels of classroom quality, and lower gains in early literacy and math scores. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.04.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4413938PMC
May 2015
9 Reads

The Language and Literacy Development of Young Dual Language Learners: A Critical Review.

Early Child Res Q 2014 4th Quarter;29(4):715-733

Temple University.

The number of children living in the United States who are learning two languages is increasing greatly. However, relatively little research has been conducted on the language and literacy development of dual language learners (DLLs), particularly during the early childhood years. To summarize the extant literature and guide future research, a critical analysis of the literature was conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.05.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4394382PMC
April 2015
7 Reads

Using a narrative- and play-based activity to promote low-income preschoolers' oral language, emergent literacy, and social competence.

Early Child Res Q 2015 2nd Quarter;31:147-162

Instituto Alfa e Beto, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

This study examined whether a storytelling and story-acting practice (STSA), integrated as a regular component of the preschool curriculum, can help promote three key dimensions of young children's school readiness: narrative and other oral-language skills, emergent literacy, and social competence. A total of 149 low-income preschoolers (almost all 3- and 4-year-olds) participated, attending six experimental and seven control classrooms. The STSA was introduced in the experimental classrooms for the entire school year, and all children in both conditions were pre- and post-tested on 11 measures of narrative, vocabulary, emergent literacy, pretend abilities, peer play cooperation, and self-regulation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.01.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4391821PMC
April 2015
57 Reads

Early Exposure to Environmental Chaos and Children's Physical and Mental Health.

Early Child Res Q 2015 3rd Quarter;32:94-104

Boston College, Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology, 140 Commonwealth Ave, Chestnut Hill MA 02467.

Environmental chaos has been proposed as a central influence impeding children's health and development, with the potential for particularly pernicious effects during the earliest years when children are most susceptible to environmental insults. This study evaluated a high-risk sample, following 495 low-income children living in poor urban neighborhoods from infancy to age 6. Longitudinal multilevel models tested the main tenets of the ecobiodevelopmental theory, finding that: (1) numerous distinct domains of environmental chaos were associated with children's physical and mental health outcomes, including housing disorder, neighborhood disorder, and relationship instability, with no significant results for residential instability; (2) different patterns emerged in relation to the timing of exposure to chaos, with more proximal exposure most strongly associated with children's functioning; and (3) the intensity of chaos also was a robust predictor of child functioning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.03.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4379485PMC
April 2015
35 Reads

Effects of Parent and Child Pre-Intervention Characteristics on Child Skill Acquisition during a School Readiness Intervention.

Early Child Res Q 2015 4th Quarter;33:87-97

The Pennsylvania State University.

200 preschool children in Head Start (55% girls; 20% Hispanic, 25% African-American, 55% European American; age = 4.80 years old) participated in a randomized-controlled trial of a home visiting intervention designed to promote their emergent literacy skills (the Research-based Developmentally Informed parent [REDI-P] program). This study explored concurrent changes in levels of parent support and child literacy skills that occurred over the course of the intervention, and examined the impact of pre-intervention parent support and child literacy skills as potential moderators of parent and child outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.07.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4894752PMC
June 2016
6 Reads

Unstable and Multiple Child Care Arrangements and Young Children's Behavior.

Early Child Res Q 2014 4th Quarter;29(4):471-483

University of Chicago, School of Social Service Administration, 969 E. 60 Street, Chicago, IL 60637, United States, .

Growing evidence suggests that child care instability is associated with child behavior problems, but existing studies confound different types of instability; use small, convenience samples; and/or control insufficiently for selection into child care arrangements. This study uses survey and calendar data from the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study to estimate the associations between three different types of child care instability-long-term instability, multiplicity, and the use of back-up arrangements-and children's internalizing, externalizing, and prosocial behaviors at age 3, controlling for a large number of child and family background characteristics. Long-term instability between birth and age 3, as measured in both the survey and calendar data, is associated with higher levels of externalizing behavior problems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.05.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4307839PMC
January 2015
6 Reads

Technology-assisted Interventions for Parents of Young Children: Emerging Practices, Current Research, and Future Directions.

Early Child Res Q 2015 4th Quarter;33:21-32. Epub 2015 May 23.

The Pennsylvania State University , Child Study Center, 251 Moore Building, University Park, PA 16802,

Technology can potentially expand the reach and cut the costs of providing effective, evidence-based interventions. This paper reviews existing publications that describe the application and evaluation of technology-assisted interventions for parents of young children. A broad review of the early childhood literature revealed 48 studies describing technology-assisted parent education and interventions. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5074684PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.05.003DOI Listing
May 2015
8 Reads

Executive Functioning and School Adjustment: The Mediational Role of Pre-kindergarten Learning-related Behaviors.

Early Child Res Q 2015 1st Quarter;30(Pt A):70-79

The Pennsylvania State University.

164 four-year-old children (14% Latino American, 30% African American, 56% European American; 57% girls) in 22 Head Start classrooms were followed through third grade. Growth curve models were used to estimate the predictive associations between pre-kindergarten executive function (EF) skills and trajectories of academic skill development (math, literacy, overall academic functioning) and social-emotional adjustment at school (social competence, aggression), controlling for child sex, race, verbal IQ, and pre-kindergarten baseline scores. Direct developmental pathways were examined, along with indirect pathways, in which the association between preschool EF and elementary school adjustment was mediated by classroom learning behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.09.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4878834PMC
May 2016
8 Reads

Low-income minority mothers' and fathers' reading and children's interest: Longitudinal contributions to children's receptive vocabulary skills.

Early Child Res Q 2014 ;29(4):425-432

Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology, University of Maryland, College Park, United States.

Using data from a diverse sample of low-income African American and Latino mothers, fathers, and their young children who participated in Early Head Start (n = 61), the current study explored the association between parents' reading quality (i.e. metalingual talk) while reading with their 2-year-old children and their children's receptive vocabulary skills at pre-kindergarten. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.04.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4266160PMC
January 2014
16 Reads

Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Adoptive Parents' Experiences in Preschool Environments.

Authors:
Abbie E Goldberg

Early Child Res Q 2014 ;29(4):669-681

Department of Psychology 950 Main St Worcester MA 01610 508 793 7289.

Little research has examined the school experiences of lesbian/gay (LG) parent families or adoptive parent families. The current exploratory study examined the experiences of 79 lesbian, 75 gay male, and 112 heterosexual adoptive parents of preschool-age children with respect to their (a) level of disclosure regarding their LG parent and adoptive family status at their children's schools; (b) perceived challenges in navigating the preschool environment and advocating on behalf of their children and families; and (c) recommendations to teachers and schools about how to create affirming school environments with respect to family structure, adoption, and race/ethnicity. Findings revealed that the majority of parents were open about their LG and adoptive family status, and had not encountered challenges related to family diversity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.07.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4233412PMC
January 2014
8 Reads

The Cognitive Development of Young Dual Language Learners: A Critical Review.

Early Child Res Q 2014 ;29(4):699-714

Duke University, Duke Centre for Child and Family Policy, Erwin Square Mill Building, Bay C, Room 226, Duke Box 90539 Durham, NC 27708-0539, USA

Dual language exposure and bilingualism are relatively common experiences for children. The present review set out to synthesize the existing research on cognitive development in bilingual children and to identify the gaps and the methodological concerns present in the existing research. A search of major data bases for research conducted with typically-developing, preschool-age dual language learners between 2000-2013 yielded 102 peer-reviewed articles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.02.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4180217PMC
January 2014
8 Reads

Parental Writing Support and Preschoolers' Early Literacy, Language, and Fine Motor Skills.

Early Child Res Q 2014 ;29(4):614-624

University of Michigan, 2030 East Hall, 530 Church St, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

The current study examines the nature and variability of parents' aid to preschoolers in the context of a shared writing task, as well as the relations between this support and children's literacy, vocabulary, and fine motor skills. In total, 135 preschool children (72 girls) and their parents (primarily mothers) in an ethnically diverse, middle-income community were observed while writing a semi-structured invitation for a pretend birthday party together. Children's phonological awareness, alphabet knowledge, word decoding, vocabulary, and fine motor skills were also assessed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.07.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4183063PMC
January 2014
7 Reads

Dual Language Development of Latino Children: Effect of Instructional Program Type and the Home and School Language Environment.

Authors:
Brian A Collins

Early Child Res Q 2014 ;29(3):389-397

Department of Curriculum and Teaching, Hunter College, CUNY, 695 Park Avenue, W1032, New York, NY 10065.

Latino dual language children typically enter school with a wide range of proficiencies in Spanish and English, many with low proficiency in both languages, yet do make gains in one or both languages during their first school years. Dual language development is associated with how language is used at home and school, as well as the type of instructional program children receive at school. The present study investigates how changes in both Spanish and English proficiencies of Latino, second-generation immigrant children ( =163) from kindergarten to second grade relate to instructional program type as well as language use at home and school. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.04.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4171734PMC
January 2014
14 Reads

The Emergence of Social Capital in Low-Income Latino Elementary Schools.

Early Child Res Q 2014 ;29(4):600-613

University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Sociology, 8128 William H. Sewell Social Sciences, 1180 Observatory Drive, Madison WI 53706-1393, United States.

Scholars suggest that racial/ethnic and class disparities in school-based social capital contribute to educational inequalities. Previous studies demonstrate that social capital (relations of trust, mutual expectations, and shared values) between parents and schools supports children's development. Yet we know little about the emergence of social capital, that is, the processes through which it develops. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.07.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4169003PMC
January 2014
5 Reads

Expressive Vocabulary Development in Children from Bilingual and Monolingual Homes: A Longitudinal Study from Two to Four Years.

Early Child Res Q 2014 Oct;29(4):433-444

Florida Atlantic University.

The early course of language development among children from bilingual homes varies in ways that are not well described and as a result of influences that are not well understood. Here, we describe trajectories of relative change in expressive vocabulary from 22 to 48 months and vocabulary achievement at 48 months in two groups of children from bilingual homes (children with one and children with two native Spanish-speaking parents [s = 15 and 11]) and in an SES-equivalent group of children from monolingual English homes ( = 31). The two groups from bilingual homes differed in their mean levels of English and Spanish skills, in their developmental trajectories during this period, and in the relation between language use at home and their vocabulary development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.04.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4114737PMC
October 2014
14 Reads

The Role of Access to Head Start and Quality Ratings for Spanish-Speaking Dual Language Learners' (DLLs) Participation in Early Childhood Education.

Early Child Res Q 2014 3rd Quarter;29(3):378-388

University of California, Irvine.

Data from the Head Start Impact Study ( = 4,442) were used to test for differences between Spanish-speaking Dual Language Learners (DLLs) and monolingual English-speaking children in: (1) Head Start attendance rates when randomly assigned admission; and (2) quality ratings of other early childhood education (ECE) programs attended when not randomly assigned admission to Head Start. Logistic regressions showed that Spanish-speaking DLL children randomly assigned a spot in Head Start were more likely than monolingual-English learners to attend. Further, Spanish-speaking DLLs not randomly assigned a spot in Head Start were more likely to attend higher-quality ECE centers than non-DLL children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.04.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4088314PMC
July 2014
9 Reads

Playing with Others: Head Start Children's Peer Play and Relations with Kindergarten School Competence.

Early Child Res Q 2014 Jul;29(3):345-356

T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University.

Time-sampled observations of Head Start preschoolers' ( = 264; 51.5% boys; 76% Mexican American; = 53.11 and = 6. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.04.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4038679PMC
July 2014
7 Reads

Evidence of a Continuum in Foundational Expressive Communication Skills.

Early Child Res Q 2013 Jul;28(3):540-554

University of Kansas.

Progress monitoring measurement is increasingly needed in early childhood to inform practitioners when an intervention change is needed and as a tool for accomplishing individualization and improving results for individual children. The Early Communication Indicator (ECI) is such a measure for infants and toddlers, 6 to 42 months of age. A greater understanding of the ECI key skills (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2013.02.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4036115PMC
July 2013
6 Reads

Caregiver-Child Verbal Interactions in Child Care: A Buffer against Poor Language Outcomes when Maternal Language Input is Less.

Early Child Res Q 2013 Dec;28(4):858-873

The University of North Carolina.

Recent research has suggested that high quality child care can buffer young children against poorer cognitive and language outcomes when they are at risk for poorer language and readiness skills. Most of this research measured the quality of parenting and the quality of the child care with global observational measures or rating scales that did not specify the exact maternal or caregiver behaviors that might be causally implicated in the buffering of these children from poor outcomes. The current study examined the actual language by the mother to her child in the home and the verbal interactions between the caregiver and child in the child care setting that might be implicated in the buffering effect of high quality childcare. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2013.08.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3947639PMC
December 2013
7 Reads

Behavioral Exchanges between Teachers and Children Over the Course of a Typical Preschool Day: Testing Bidirectional Associations.

Early Child Res Q 2014 2nd Quarter;29(2):193-204. Epub 2014 Jan 24.

University of Virginia, Center for Advanced Study of Teaching and Learning, 350 Old Ivy Way, Charlottesville, VA 22903.

In the present study, 314 preschool classrooms and 606 children were observed to understand the behavioral exchanges between teachers and children. Teachers' emotionally and organizationally supportive behaviors and children's engagement were explored for longitudinal associations throughout a day. Observations were conducted in each classroom wherein emotional and organizational supports were assessed, followed by observations of two children's positive engagement with teachers, tasks, and peers as well as negative classroom engagement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.01.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4694581PMC
January 2014
7 Reads

Implications of different methods for specifying classroom composition of externalizing behavior and its relationship to social-emotional outcomes.

Early Child Res Q 2014 4th Quarter;29(4):682-691. Epub 2014 Aug 10.

New York University, United States.

In this paper, we examine common methods for using individual-level data to represent classroom composition by examining exemplary studies that thoughtfully incorporate such measures. Building on these studies, and using data from the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP), this paper examines theoretical and analytical implications of a set of different transformations of individual ratings of child externalizing behaviors in order to examine and compare the influence of these representations of classroom composition on Kindergarten internalizing behaviors, social competence, and attention/impulsivity problems. Results indicate that each Kindergarten outcome is influenced by distinct aspects of classroom composition of externalizing behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2014.07.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5339002PMC
August 2014
9 Reads

Preschool selection considerations and experiences of school mistreatment among lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adoptive parents.

Early Child Res Q 2014 Jan 21;29(1):64-75. Epub 2013 Oct 21.

Center for Research on Families, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA.

The current study is the first to investigate the school selection considerations and school-related experiences of sexual-minority parents with young children. The sample consisted of 210 parents in 105 couples, including 35 lesbian couples, 30 gay male couples, and 40 heterosexual couples, all of whom had adopted a child three years earlier. We found that parents with less income were more likely to consider cost in choosing a preschool, and parents with less education were more likely to consider location. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2013.09.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4840886PMC
January 2014
8 Reads

The Quality of Toddler Child Care and Cognitive Skills at 24 Months: Propensity Score Analysis Results from the ECLS-B.

Early Child Res Q 2014 Jan;28(1)

School of Education, University of California, Irvine; 3200 Education, Irvine, CA 92697-5500, USA.

Over half of the toddlers in the U.S. experience routine nonparental care, but much less is known about early care than about preschool care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2013.09.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3857730PMC
January 2014
7 Reads

Income and the Development of Effortful Control as Predictors of Teacher Reports of Preschool Adjustment.

Early Child Res Q 2013 Oct;28(4)

University of Washington.

This study examined the relations of income and children's effortful control to teacher reports of preschoolers' social competence and adjustment problems. This study tested whether changes in effortful control accounted for the effects of income on children's adjustment. A community sample (=306) of preschool-age children (36-40 mos. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2013.07.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3819041PMC
October 2013
13 Reads

Beyond an "Either-Or" Approach to Home- and Center-Based Child Care: Comparing Children and Families who Combine Care Types with Those Who Use Just One.

Early Child Res Q 2013 Oct;28(4)

Department of Sociology and Institute of Government and Public Affairs, University of Illinois at Chicago, 815 West Van Buren St., Suite 525, Chicago, IL 60607.

Most research focuses on preschoolers' primary non-parental child care arrangement despite evidence that multiple arrangements are relatively common. Using the nationally-representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort, we compare characteristics and outcomes of families whose 4-year olds attend both home- and center-based child care with those who attend either home- or center-based care exclusively or receive no non-parental care at all. We find that about one fifth of 4-year olds attend both home- and center-based child care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2013.05.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3810998PMC
October 2013
8 Reads

"Head Start and Children's Nutrition, Weight, and Health Care Receipt"

Early Child Res Q 2013 Oct;28(4)

Columbia University School of Social Work 1255 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10027

Using a sample of low-income children from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort ( ≈ 4,350) and propensity-score weighted regressions, we analyzed children's nutrition, weight, and health care receipt at kindergarten entry, comparing 1) Head Start participants and all non-participants, and 2) Head Start participants and children in prekindergarten, other center-based care, other non-parental care, or only parental care. Overall, we found that compared to all non-participants, Head Start participants were more likely to receive dental checkups but showed no differences in getting medical checkups; they were also more likely to have healthy eating patterns but showed no differences in Body Mass Index (BMI), overweight, or obesity. However, these results varied depending on the comparison group-Head Start participants showed lower BMI scores and lower probability of overweight compared to those in other non-parental care, and the effects on healthy eating and dental checkups differed by comparison group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2013.06.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3810984PMC
October 2013
8 Reads

Language, literacy, attentional behaviors, and instructional quality predictors of written composition for first graders.

Early Child Res Q 2013 Jul;28(3):461-469

Florida State University and Florida Center for Reading Research, United States.

We had two primary purposes in the present study: (1) to examine unique child-level predictors of written composition which included language skills, literacy skills (e.g., reading and spelling), and attentiveness and (2) to examine whether instructional quality (quality in responsiveness and individualization, and quality in spelling and writing instruction) is uniquely related to written composition for first-grade children ( = 527). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2013.01.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3778931PMC
July 2013
7 Reads